Egyptian ferry sinks

Steve
3rd February 2006, 12:39
Sky news reports that an Egyptian ferry has sunk, no more details at the moment.

Tmac1720
3rd February 2006, 13:01
Ferry is Al Salaam 98 with 1310 passengers aboard. Lost contact with radar 62 miles out from Duba. Reports of one lifeboat with 3 persons aboard spotted by Egyptian search and rescue forces. also reports of many bodies in the sea. Weather condition are reported bad in the area. Vessel is apparently ex Itallian car ferry built approx 1970.

peter lewis
3rd February 2006, 13:03
i have just read a report on aol stating that the salaam 98 left the saudi port of duba last night the report states that she was hampered by heavy weather and disapeared of the radar there were aproxamatly 1,300 on board first reports do not sound good (Cloud)

ruud
3rd February 2006, 13:06
Ahoy,

It is sunken, officially stated.

http://edition.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/02/03/egypt.ship/

http://www.faktaomfartyg.com/boccaccio_1971.htm

http://www.egyptdailynews.com/

tanker
3rd February 2006, 14:34
One of the Great disasters of ours days:She was the former BOCCACCIO of
Tirrenia di navigazone Italcantieri built 1970 Lane length 4,92 clear height 4,20.You can see in my gallery her sister LEOPARDI as she was built ,as you see very different.
Gp

lochluichart
3rd February 2006, 14:36
Could be worse than first reported.
Local sources say manifest numbers are very often understated.
Normally they sail with something in the region of 2000 pax on board.

Pat McCardle
3rd February 2006, 14:53
Looks like it ex P&O Pride of ? Looking at Yahoo news page?

ruud
3rd February 2006, 15:12
Ahoy Pat,
You should have first looked at one of my links added;
despite written in Swedish, it is readable.

http://www.faktaomfartyg.com/boccaccio_1971.htm

Pat McCardle
3rd February 2006, 15:34
Thanks Ruud. Your right again I should have!! (Thumb)

ruud
3rd February 2006, 16:29
Ahoy Pat,

OK Doki Pat,
As sunset is falling in the area, some 100 persins are survived, and some 100 dead bodies found, we have to worry about those other 1000+[No official figures about how many were on board, but some saying at least 1400, but might be up to 2000]
You can watch a CNN breaking news video by clicking on ship photo in Watch----browse/search

http://edition.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/02/03/egypt.ship/index.html

Vessel latest Safety Management Certificate was in Italy[10-2004]and expires on 10-2009, and that for a 35 years old Ro-Ro Ferry?

rstimaru
3rd February 2006, 16:35
Those upper decks looks just like a townsend thorson ferrie

Ron Stringer
3rd February 2006, 18:41
Those upper decks looks just like a townsend thorson ferrie
As originally built (before those upper decks were added above the boat deck) she was quite a good-looking ship. After that, you are right, she looked just like a T-T ferry!

Ron

fred henderson
3rd February 2006, 20:00
I think TT added one, or at most two extra decks and I hated using them on the P&O services in the Western Channel in winter. This Italian ship seems to have had three or even four decks added! The Egyptian company bought two or three of these abortions.

Fred

alan williams
3rd February 2006, 20:04
HEY LADS its abad state of affairs the Egyptian ferry must have been a target if you know what i mean.Now its dark i think its bad news,as far as more survivers are concerned, we will just have to hope.
your aye Alan (bungy) Williams

japottinger
3rd February 2006, 20:06
I actually though it was a block of flats behind the ship!

Top heavy or what?

Doxfordman
3rd February 2006, 20:11
One wonders how she complied with Solas 95 - Stockholm agreement stability requirements, my guess is she didn't. Unfortunately SMC's mean little as do DOC's with these sort's of companies, most only pay lips service to them (ISM) and local Falg States probably do not police full Solas requirements. Or maybe it was a catostrophic failure of the hull or bow door?
Eventually we will all find out I guess, until then conjecture will no doubt flow.
Such a loss for the families of the lost souls - may God (who ever and where ever he /she maybe) go with them! Be it an Ismalic or a Christian god! It matters not.

fred henderson
3rd February 2006, 20:18
From The Times on Line report: -

Hosni Mubarak, the President of Egypt, has ordered an immediate inquiry into the accident, questioning whether safety regulations had been obeyed. Suleiman Awad, President Mubarak's spokesman, said that the Egyptian government wanted guarantees that other similar ships comply with safety regulations.

"The speed at which the ship sank and the fact there were not enough life rafts on board confirm that there was a (safety) problem but we cannot anticipate the results of the investigation," said Mr Awad

Fred

Alan Hill
3rd February 2006, 20:46
A couple of the news comments are about life boat numbers and stability. Alan Hill Bridgeport, Pa. USA

wully farquhar
3rd February 2006, 21:02
All that added superstructure is crazy,does'nt look correct to me.

benjidog
3rd February 2006, 21:11
BBC now reporting 300 survivors and CNN 263. CNN quoting Egyptian Transport Minister as source of information - BBC does not quote their source.

Brian

Pat McCardle
3rd February 2006, 22:23
Was I right about Her being a former P&O Pride of whatever? She certainly looks that way to me. As for the loss of life, God moves in mysterious ways?

fred henderson
3rd February 2006, 23:39
Was I right about Her being a former P&O Pride of whatever? She certainly looks that way to me. As for the loss of life, God moves in mysterious ways?

If you read the above posts Pat, you will see that you are completely wrong about any ex Townsend, P&O connection with this tragedy. Please look at Ruud's site. The ship was an elegant Italian ferry that became grotesque in her old age.

Fred

Pompeyfan
4th February 2006, 00:41
It could be that the height with added decks plus the weather and other factors played a part in this tragedy?. Height is something I have been concerned about on modern cruise ships. Having sailed on both, modern day cruise ships some with 11 decks such as the new Arcadia, and the smaller passenger liners, the difference is quite alarming. These high rise cruise ships lean like mad when turning, and roll more in a heavy sea than the smaller ship. It was like walking uphill on one when walking from port to straboard as she was turning. That never happened on smaller ships including Canberra. Whether this would make them capsize is another matter. I am sure that Fred will have input on the latter?!. As for this ferry however, it could well be a number of things from height in a bad storm to poor safety. I am told she was as rusty as a horse shoes. But like Fred says, we cannot anticipate the results of the investigation, and neither should we. David

gdynia
4th February 2006, 09:03
Saw these ferries running by every day when in Red Sea last trip. They did not look stable even in calm waters and no doubt they were overloaded

billyboy
4th February 2006, 11:21
I took a trip on a superferry from Davao to zamboanga a couple of years ago. we were standing three decks down... on the origional teak decking looking at the marks where the one time lifeboats used to be... Above me there were three more decks plus officer accomodation and bridge. i had a quick study of the ships plan which was on the bulkhead and discovered there was a hidden stairway leadin up to the officers accomodation. this in the event of a dissaster would have been MY way out, not the advertised exit routes, as we would have had to fight our way through a mass of other people and gangways cluttered with shopping for three decks just to get at the fresh air!! sea was like a mill pond but the wash from another ship comming in the opposite direction made her wallow about a bit. think we can boast some of the ugliest ferries in world out here. most being accidents waiting to happen. we came back by plane! and we did not sleep on the voyage either.

Gulpers
4th February 2006, 12:11
Saw these ferries running by every day when in Red Sea last trip. They did not look stable even in calm waters and no doubt they were overloaded
Neville,

I wonder if the Inquiry will be as intense as the one you endured? What was it you said - 30 minutes total?
I assume, since the oil industry are not involved, the Egyptian Government will be keener to investigate this time! (?HUH)

Ray

jim barnes
4th February 2006, 13:20
the issue of life boats and life rafts regulations regarding amount of persons onboard, After the Titanic desaster where supposed to have been improved?
I suppose after the enquiry into this desaster they will say there had been a breach in the rules, shoot a couple of lowly officials then carry on regardless.$$$$involved again, no doubt the muslims will blame BUSH :@

mick Wright
4th February 2006, 13:21
According to todays Sun,only buy it for the TV suppliment "honest"
the Al-Salam Boccaccio 98 started life as as the Free Enterprise 1V built in Holland in 1969.
P&O bought TT and she the served on the Cairnryan Larne route between 1976 - 1986 ,was sold and rebuilt in 1987.
Withdrawn from service in Italy 2002 over safety fears and later moved to Egypt.

Back to Page 3

Mick Wright

lochluichart
4th February 2006, 13:23
Latest news I hear here in Egypt is there was a series of fires in engine room and the amount of water used caused vessel to list then she went down within 7 minutes. This is a present an unoffical statement made by an oiler to a navy officer who survived. Wreck apparently in 1000 mts.

ruud
4th February 2006, 14:03
According to todays Sun,only buy it for the TV suppliment "honest"
the Al-Salam Boccaccio 98 started life as as the Free Enterprise 1V built in Holland in 1969.
P&O bought TT and she the served on the Cairnryan Larne route between 1976 - 1986 ,was sold and rebuilt in 1987.
Withdrawn from service in Italy 2002 over safety fears and later moved to Egypt.

Back to Page 3

Mick WrightAhoy Mick,
That's once again bad information of one of these gossip newspapers,without doing some research on a sad tragedy, just to make headlines.:@

Frank P
4th February 2006, 14:11
Ruud you are once again correct except for one word, you said that the SUN is a gossip "newspaper", I think that the correct term should be that, the Sun is an adult comic as there is very little real news in it. I also buy it on Saturday's for the TV suppliment. (Thumb)

Frank

ruud
4th February 2006, 14:18
Ahoy Frank,

Well maybe you're right, with that conclusion about the Sun, but they pretend to being seen as the biggest selling newspaper.But anyway lots of rubbish.

The Sun Newspaper Online - UK's biggest selling newspaper (http://www.thesun.co.uk/)
The Sun is a British tabloid newspaper owned by News Corporation.

Note: Nice done!!!!! for TV suppliment's,(Thumb) but not for page 3?(*))

moaf
4th February 2006, 14:20
The Al Salam 95 was ex Free Enterprise VI. She sank last October after a collision with a Cypriot ship.

The media here is showing pictures of every other ship apart from the proper one! If it has an extra deck, then that must be it! Even the'experts' on the news are talking out of their backsides. Speculation on speculation!
The best expert view has to be that 'all ro-ro vessels are inherently unsafe' - how reassuring!!! If that's the case, how have we survived working on them all this time!!!

gdynia
4th February 2006, 14:26
Neville,

I wonder if the Inquiry will be as intense as the one you endured? What was it you said - 30 minutes total?
I assume, since the oil industry are not involved, the Egyptian Government will be keener to investigate this time! (?HUH)

Ray
I would say it would have to be as it was world news we didnt make the local paper. One thing for certain its a tradegy but we will never find out the correct number of passengers onboard.
Ray Im on the Beryl Alpha at present but end of month on my way back to Gulf Of Mexico.

sean
4th February 2006, 14:27
well Mick the Sun has got its ships mixed up but its not without an element of truth.The Free enterprise IV latterly Pride of Sandwich and Pride ofAilsa sank of Port Tarfiq egypt after collision with cargo vessel Jebal Ali on 17th Augu st last year whilst ferrying pilgrims

david smith
4th February 2006, 14:45
The press are getting more and more confused about this ship, one stating it was a sister to the Herald of Free Enterprise. Then one says it was the sister to the Pride-of Al Salam 95 - ex Pride of Sandwich/Ailsa, ex Free Enterprise VI which also sank in the Red Sea. Also not true!

ruud
4th February 2006, 14:58
Ahoy David,

They[Press] should more get their info from sources like ours [SN],sure we have "some" knowledge here around, anyway better then theirs!!!!!

Pompeyfan
4th February 2006, 15:22
All newspapers are dreadful when it comes to nautical accuracy whether reporting an accident or terminology. The Sun is also calling this vessel a boat. It is no wonder the public use wrong terminology when newspapers print incorrect information or terminology. This has always been my argument when so many people use incorrect nautical language. If they read it in a newspaper, they think it must be right. That is the problem. I buy the Sun for it's sport pages. If I want to hear the news I turn the telly or radio on!. David

Gulpers
4th February 2006, 15:28
Source BBC

"Survivors say a fire blazed for hours on a Red Sea ferry before it sank, leaving 1,000 people feared dead.

The fire broke out soon after the ship left Saudi Arabia, but it sailed on towards Egypt for two hours before finally sinking, angry survivors say." :@


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/4680752.stm

Gulpers
4th February 2006, 15:30
I would say it would have to be as it was world news we didnt make the local paper. One thing for certain its a tradegy but we will never find out the correct number of passengers onboard.
Ray Im on the Beryl Alpha at present but end of month on my way back to Gulf Of Mexico.


Cool Neville!

Take care.

Ray (Thumb)

david smith
4th February 2006, 15:50
A representative from NUMAST has now said it was an ex British ferry.
Fool

jim barnes
4th February 2006, 16:50
Source BBC

"Survivors say a fire blazed for hours on a Red Sea ferry before it sank, leaving 1,000 people feared dead.

The fire broke out soon after the ship left Saudi Arabia, but it sailed on towards Egypt for two hours before finally sinking, angry survivors say." :@


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/4680752.stm
I like the quote "Angry survivors say" would'nt expect them to be too pleased? (MAD)

gadgee
4th February 2006, 17:04
When I saw the additional superstructure on this vessel I honestly could not believe it. I thought I was seeing a distorted width -ways photo of a conventional ship. Amazing what they will add nowadays!

Chief Engineer's Daughter
4th February 2006, 17:19
The Al Salam 95 was ex Free Enterprise VI. She sank last October after a collision with a Cypriot ship.

The media here is showing pictures of every other ship apart from the proper one! If it has an extra deck, then that must be it! Even the'experts' on the news are talking out of their backsides. Speculation on speculation!
The best expert view has to be that 'all ro-ro vessels are inherently unsafe' - how reassuring!!! If that's the case, how have we survived working on them all this time!!!

The press are only interested if it involves death, blood, gore or sex and scandal. They wouldn't let a little thing like accuracy or truth get in the way of a good tragedy. I think Gulpers and Coastie will know what I am speaking about.

Coastie
4th February 2006, 17:22
Absolutely CED, I'm right with you on that!

fredkinghorn
4th February 2006, 17:43
The " Sun " newspaper is read to more people in the UK than any other.


fred.

" there's a one-eyed yellow idol "

Ron Stringer
4th February 2006, 18:53
All newspapers are dreadful when it comes to nautical accuracy whether reporting an accident or terminology. David
David,

What you say is correct but it is only part of the story. Because of your experience and training you recognise when a journalist (newspaper, TV or radio) spout absolute rubbish concerning maritime matters. What you don't immediately recognise is that they spout a similar quality of rubbish on every subject on which they write, not just maritime subjects. Where their skill lies is being able to write entertainingly without having any knowledge of the subject matter.

Ron

Coastie
4th February 2006, 19:00
If you can't blind them with science, baffle them with bulls**t!

Jeff Egan
4th February 2006, 19:13
I believe all car ferry's and Ro Ro ships with a through deck are unsafe, if they get a influx of water into the car deck, the free surface effect is hugh and the ship become unstable in minutes.

Chief Engineer's Daughter
4th February 2006, 19:18
I believe all car ferry's and Ro Ro ships with a through deck are unsafe, if they get a influx of water into the car deck, the free surface effect is hugh and the ship become unstable in minutes.

Thats correct Jeff, hence all ro-ro ferries in UK waters have a bulk head to prevent this happening. Also bow doors are either welded shut or of the "clam shell" design (our Northlink ferries are like that) and there are no passenger cabins below the water line.

Cheers
CED

Jeff Egan
4th February 2006, 19:21
I did say with a through deck, the trouble is we sold all the older unsafe ships to the third world knowing they were unsafe.

Doxfordman
4th February 2006, 19:29
CED, there is a little more too it than that but your on the right track.
Solas 95 and the Stockholm Agreement rules are those currently in place and ALL roro ferries operating from the UK have to comply. 500mm of water on the deck with the largest compartment breached. Far greater criteria than the old 2 compartment flooding. Most but not all of Europe also enforce them, especially on International routes, but when one gets down towards the Meddi and lower these regulations are not implemented.
Lets hope the investigatioin gets to the bottom of it.

Chief Engineer's Daughter
4th February 2006, 19:31
I did say with a through deck, the trouble is we sold all the older unsafe ships to the third world knowing they were unsafe.

Yeah, they went to non SOLAS countries hence the "Arab" countries got a few. The St Clair and St Sunnivia went somewhere in that region, they've now been scrapped because they were uneconomical.

Chief Engineer's Daughter
4th February 2006, 19:32
CED, there is a little more too it than that but your on the right track.
Solas 95 and the Stockholm Agreement rules are those currently in place and ALL roro ferries operating from the UK have to comply. 500mm of water on the deck with the largest compartment breached. Far greater criteria than the old 2 compartment flooding. Most but not all of Europe also enforce them, especially on International routes, but when one gets down towards the Meddi and lower these regulations are not implemented.
Lets hope the investigatioin gets to the bottom of it.

Thanks Dox. As you say hope the investigation gets to the bottom of it however, I will not be holding my breath on THAT one. I don't think they will have a Lord Donaldson!

Pompeyfan
4th February 2006, 20:50
I agree Ron, the Sun writes rubbish about everything. But I was talking about maritime matters, not other subjects. So you can't say I don't immediately recognise something when I didn't even comment on the other subjects they write about?!!.

As for this ferry, more stuff is coming out all the time as to how this disaster is being handled, let alone the mayhem that would have been happening on board. I wrote a few months ago in a post that I feared what would happen if there was a fire or some other accident on one of our ships when I went on a cruise on a British registered ship. I could see a potential disaster looming because passengers and even some new crew members did not have a clue what to do or understand language used aboard ship which would be essential in an emergency. That is why I suggested that a small list of essential terms be translated on the back of the cabin door so that passengers would know for example that port is on the left of the ship and so on. All these things would be essential in an emergency situation otherwise it would be no different than giving instructions in another language expecting people to understand. So it is no wonder their was such total mayhem on a vessel which seemed less than safe, and most likely a far inferior safety standard to ours. At the end of the day, it does not matter how good safety standards are because if people don't understand instructions when they have all the time in the world due to the difference between shore side and ship board terminology which I found when I went on that cruise, they are not going to learn when they only have seconds to to make their mind up whether it is a British ship or one with inferior safety standards. A lot of people called me an idiot when I suggested that all those who go to sea, even on a cruise should have some understanding of terminology used aboard a ship such as useful tips on the back of the cabin door such as they are standing on a deck not a floor etc etc. Something seemingly so insignificant could save their lives when speed of action is esential. You cannot act quickly if you do not understand what to do as I am sure those who lost their lives on that ferry could testify?.. David

jim barnes
4th February 2006, 21:36
Pompeyfan, regarding terminology for shore siders on a cruise ship, although i can understand your views i think it is a bit bias in away, for people who have never worked upon a ship at sea they could not be expected to learn the terminology in such a short period nor would they probably want to, a few words they could probably master for their own land lubber amusment but lets be honest? its like the majority of us who have been all over the world did we bother to master all the different languages etc no of course not maybe the odd words for our own amusment or enough to get what we wanted, also the crews and passengers could be a multiple amount of languages(BABILON) so untill we all learn ESPERANTO tradgedies are inevitable once panick sets in, not knocking your views but this is mine (Thumb)

fred henderson
4th February 2006, 23:41
As is usually the case I think the tragedy is the result of a fateful combination of circumstances. Sifting through the news reports they seem to be: -

1. A perfectly sound ferry design was produced by an Italian shipyard and introduced onto a service that only just paid its way.
2. Traffic increased but without generating the profits needed to finance new ships.
3. The owner resorted to the cut-price alternative of jumbo-ising his ships. In this case not by increasing the length of the ships, but by increasing the number of decks and adding sponsons.
4. New European safety regulations are introduced requiring ferries to be able to survive with half a metre of water on the car deck. The modified Italian ferries cannot meet this standard.
5. The new European standards are not introduced into the international SOLAS standards, so the ferries are sold to an Egyptian company.
6. As a result we have ships with poor stability characteristics being operated by a company in a country that applies the standards of care described by Gydnia recently.
7. The event that led to the loss of the ship seems to have been a fire and had nothing to do with water on the vehicle deck.
8. The fire seems to have started when the ship was still within sight of the Saudi coast, but the Captain did not think there was any reason to either stop, or return to Saudi.
9. The fumes below decks became so bad that the passengers were ordered onto the open decks, but the ship continued on her way and no emergency radio message was transmitted.
10. The ship began to list, probably as a result of the fire fighting activity and eventually a distress signal was sent, which was received in UK but not in either Egypt or Saudi.
11. She became unstable, rolled over and quickly sank.
12. The Arab nations rejected help from an RN task force that was in the area.

I may be doing everyone an injustice, but it seems to me that the ship received an unsound major modification and when the safety regulations caught up with the situation, she was the sold to operators who are unfit to run a fleet of park rowing boats.

Fred

Pompeyfan
4th February 2006, 23:49
I understand what you are saying Jim, but I am talking about basic words that WOULD be used in an emergency that some passengers would not understand. You would not expect people to learn nautical terminolgy when going on a cruise, but if they do not know the basics, then frankly they could die if the ship is sinking fast and they have no idea what to do and where to go. Before the ship leaves passengers attend boat drill and are told many things which is also on the back of the cabin door. All I ask is that a few basic ship board terms be included in this. This ferry tragedy could be prove my very point when the facts are known. I do not say anything without good reason and I tell you this, I was petrified at the lack of knowledge on cruise ships because without doubt there will be a tragedy one day that could have been avoided. I was trained in emergency at sea which is why this concerns me so much. Why oh why do it take an accident to happen before people wake up to something?. I personally have performed autopsies on boating accidents here on the island simply because they did not know the laws of the sea, or attempt to learn them. ALL these deaths were avoidable had they learned basic seamanship or been MADE to. The same needless loss of life will happen next summer and summers after that until and if something is done to prevent such avoidable accidents. Going on a cruise is different of course, but if the ship runs into problems, similar principles could apply. But as usual, it will only come to light AFTER the event, not before, much to my despair and my colleagues who have to pick up the pieces in tragic accidents telling relatives how their loved oned died and authorities how to avoid another, if of course they listen which they rarely do often siting cost as the excuse. All I am doing trying to avoid a tragedy that experience tells me WILL happen unless something is done. But nothing will be done until it is too late as per always even if it is done then. We can talk to at length about this when we are aboard Pride of Bilbao if you like over a pint?!. David

Pompeyfan
4th February 2006, 23:56
That is a good report Fred. I can see that we are going to have interesting conversations on our trip in September?!. David

jim barnes
5th February 2006, 02:56
DAVID< Should gather a crowd this conversation with me and the wife paying close attention while having a drink at the bar in our life jackets??
JIM (Hippy)

Keltic Star
5th February 2006, 08:37
I'm sure most of us had the same impression. The trouble is that naval architects don't have to go to sea in the ships they design.
Bob

Doxfordman
5th February 2006, 09:15
Fred,

I think you have hit the nail - or should that be rivit - right on the head.

One certainly wonders if Egypt will now take on SOLAS and implement proper port / flag state controls.

R651400
5th February 2006, 09:37
Danish cartoonstrip has rather overshadowed this tragedy, in this neck of the woods.
I'm interested in the Kinloss radio pickup which maybe our coastguard members can help?
My limited experience of GMDSS is that the signal would have been picked up worldwide had it been GMDSS. Does the Kinloss radio interception point to something direct like VHF, which I find an almost impossibility?
We all know how busy this sea lane was in the past and probably still is now. In the old days, had this "apology for a ferry" carried a RO and assuming a distress call was sent, the stricken ship would have been surrounded by rescuers within the hour.
"When will we ever learn."

khalid
5th February 2006, 10:16
It's a big tragedy, what happened in Alsalam 98.until now there are only 385 survives of 1400 passenger. some of bluejackets arrived to the port on trading ships and rescue boats, said that the engine burnt out, and they tried to stop the fire with 10 high pressure hoses for more than 3 hours, where the vessel started leaning on some of her sides ( a survivor told when this happened he saw the passengers falling down from the seventh floor to the sea trying to survive
now. most of them are1000 m under the sea, where no a normal diving can reach to them cause of the very high pressure in that point of depth.

may GOD accepts them in his mercy, Amen.

____________________

Best wishes,

Chief Engineer's Daughter
5th February 2006, 10:29
I'm interested in the Kinloss radio pickup which maybe our coastguard members can help?
My limited experience of GMDSS is that the signal would have been picked up worldwide had it been GMDSS. Does the Kinloss radio interception point to something direct like VHF, which I find an almost impossibility?
We all know how busy this sea lane was in the past and probably still is now. In the old days, had this "apology for a ferry" carried a RO and assuming a distress call was sent, the stricken ship would have been surrounded by rescuers within the hour.
"When will we ever learn."

GMDSS has 9 specific functions, the main one being "Transmission of ship to shore initial distress/urgency alerts by at least two seperate and independent means."
As part of this the world is divided into "areas" and depending on where you operate your vessel depends on your type of communications fit.
Eygpt is declared sea area A1.
Equipment required: VHF R/T + VHF DSC + VHF Watch reciever (Ch 70) and NAVTEX And if outside range of Navtex SATCOM EGC. Plus 406 EPIRB with SART + 9 GHz Radar and Emergency portable vhf radios.

Hope this helps
CED

Coastie
5th February 2006, 10:31
Amen indeed, Khalid.

Pompeyfan
5th February 2006, 10:50
At least we will have the bar to ourselves Jim?!!. David

Coastie
5th February 2006, 11:06
I'm interested in the Kinloss radio pickup which maybe our coastguard members can help?
My limited experience of GMDSS is that the signal would have been picked up worldwide had it been GMDSS. Does the Kinloss radio interception point to something direct like VHF, which I find an almost impossibility?
We all know how busy this sea lane was in the past and probably still is now. In the old days, had this "apology for a ferry" carried a RO and assuming a distress call was sent, the stricken ship would have been surrounded by rescuers within the hour.
"When will we ever learn."

Try looking at this site, maybe it will help you.
http://www.ukmcc.co.uk/

Rusty
5th February 2006, 12:37
Tanker, I would love to see the sister ship LEOPARDI, but how do I get into your gallery?

And if any of the powers-that-be who control this site read this, is there a way of finding a certain ship by name. The Gallery now runs to over 80 pages, so to find a certain ship takes forever. There must be an easier way.

Rusty

fred henderson
5th February 2006, 13:15
Khalid, I am sure that everyone on this site will join me in offering our deepest sympathy to the families who have suffered tragic loss in this incident.
Many of the reports we read and hear may be exagerated, but the common theme appears to be that the size of the death toll is largely because of the incompetence of the ferry's officers. It is our concern that the tragedy should be properly investigated, but there is a far greater need to establish proper professional standards on all passenger ships to prevent future tragedies.
Fire at sea is our worst nightmare. Unless it can be quickly contained there is a very high probability of the ship being lost. The weight of water used to combat the fire often causes a ship to capsize. Yet it seems that no evacuation arrangements were made and calls for assistance were only made at the last moment. One survivor interviewed on BBC World Service, said no one issued lifejackets to the passengers, he found a full deck locker and selected a lifejacket, then jumped overboard.
It must not be allowed to happen again.

Fred

Gulpers
5th February 2006, 13:33
Tanker, I would love to see the sister ship LEOPARDI, but how do I get into your gallery?

And if any of the powers-that-be who control this site read this, is there a way of finding a certain ship by name. The Gallery now runs to over 80 pages, so to find a certain ship takes forever. There must be an easier way.

Rusty
Rusty,

The photograph you want to see is here => http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/6601/password/0/sort/1/cat/all/page/1

There are different ways of finding photographs in the Gallery but the following is a straight-forward method.

1. Click on "Gallery" in the grey bar at the top of the page - left hand side under SS United States.

2. Scroll down to below the photographs which appear.

3. On right hand side click "Search"

4. Search screen comes up. Enter ship's name in "Keywords" or fill in whatever search criteria you want in the appropriate boxes.

5. Scroll down to bottom of page and click "Execute search"

et voilà!

Hope that helps. (Thumb)

gdynia
5th February 2006, 13:46
Fred,

I think you have hit the nail - or should that be rivit - right on the head.

One certainly wonders if Egypt will now take on SOLAS and implement proper port / flag state controls.
Dox
They do but their version of it is not what we know plus money changes hands on a frequent basis. That Egyptian Barge I NEARLY GOT FRIED ON LAST MONTH WAS A PRIME EXAMPLE.

Doxfordman
5th February 2006, 14:50
Reports I have heard mentioned fire hoses being used in the ER. I wonder if they had a CO2 flooding system or even the now outlawed Halon flooding system. In my experience if the fire is detected early enough and the ER shut down, CO2 or Halon will certainly do the job, especially if backed up by adequat boundary cooling if required. One would also think that "direct" bilge suctions would have been used to get the water out of the ER as well as bilge, ballast and GS pumps. Perhaps none of them worked, who knows?
I hope the enquiry findings are made public.
Interesting about the Sea Area A1, was an EPIRB signal picked up?? I wonder if they had a VDR?? perhaps that would show some light if fitted and ofcourse if it was working.

Gulpers
5th February 2006, 15:00
......... Interesting about the Sea Area A1, was an EPIRB signal picked up??

Dox,

Quote from the Times:

“RAF Kinloss, a search and rescue centre in Scotland, picked up a distant distress signal at 2358GMT which was immediately passed on to the Egyptian authorities.”


http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,251-2023480,00.html

Piero43
5th February 2006, 15:03
....I am talking about basic words that WOULD be used in an emergency that some passengers would not understand. ....David

Ahoy David, you're absolutely right in a principle way, but it should be also considered that anoard a ship the orders or indications by the crew in emergency are given in some language (say in english) and foreign passengers
who don't understand that language wouldn't understand anyway.
Much better for the safety are, in my opinion, symbolic plates indicating the escape ways, lifeboat locations, etc. and drills (carried on seriously by competent personnel) at the beginning of the voyage.
Consider also that people in panic probably wouldn't follow orders also if they understand it.
Beside all in the case of a ferry every kind of instruction is practically impossible due to the short time of the voyage (often only few hours).

As for what Keltic Star says, I, as a naval architect, wish to point out that no one designs a ship "as he likes", but the work is carried on under the strict control and survey of the Classification Societies (the one of the "Boccaccio" was the RINa) and the safety point of view is the most surveyed.
The naval architect who was in charge of the "Boccaccio" jumboizing could be blamed for the really disgusting appearance of the ship (and I often did it when she called in Genoa), but for what the stability is concerned, two huge bulges where added to compensate the effect of the added decks, and the ship and her sisters did their job for at least ten years between Genoa and the Sardinia without the lesser inconvenient.
The fact is that the ferries are ships INTRINSICALLY unsafe (through decks, hevy mobile cargo, large openings in the hull,... ) so the only way to avoid emergency is the skill and competency of the crew, and the strictest respect of all the seamanship and safety rules.
Maybe if the Captain of "Al Salaam Boccaccio" would have decided to come back to Saudi when the fire started, nothing, or at least much less, would have happened.
Piero

Doxfordman
5th February 2006, 15:17
Thanks Gulpers.

Latest from Salam Maritime - squeaky clean!????

http://www.elsalammaritime.com/ennews.html

moaf
5th February 2006, 15:44
Dox,

I was just about to post that link! They seemed to be trying to cover themselves well! I doubt any VDR was fitted, as there is no need on conventional ferries. I see this is the company that bought Incat 034 last year, given their track record, how long before this has an accident?

Doxfordman
5th February 2006, 16:05
Moaf,
A little bird did tell me that they had just completed a 30,000 hour service on one of their RK 270 engines, using their own staff - would you believe that?? I reckon that would be worth seeing. There would be smoke right across the Red Sea I reckon! You wouldn't need a EPIRB to find her.
VDR's are for all RoRo's and pax ferries as from 2004/5 I thought. Certainly are for fast craft in international routes, I have just fitted one up here.

fred henderson
5th February 2006, 16:51
The Sunday Times reports that the passengers were ordered to the high side of the ship to counteract the list, while the crew lowered the lifeboats on the low side and stood clear of the ship. There are unconfirmed reports that the Captain was in the first boat.
Those who made it into the sea and then to a lifeboat had to wait 10 hours before being rescued. At the same time RN and Israeli help was rejected.

Fred

ruud
5th February 2006, 17:14
Ahoy,
Here another report, seems a lot went wrong, but we knew that already.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2006/02/05/uferry.xml&sSheet=/portal/2006/02/05/ixportaltop.html

moaf
5th February 2006, 18:04
Dox,
I think AIS is a must for all ships as from this year, however, VDR's are only required on international fast craft.

I would like to see the results of Elenora's 30000hr overhaul, mind you, I don't think they could make the engines any worse than they were! If I remember rightly, weren't they an 'intermediate' engine between the mark I and II engines? (Two blowers on elenoras engines)

Coastie
5th February 2006, 18:11
Moaf.

I think you'll find that AIS is compulsory for ALL vessels over 500grt.

moaf
5th February 2006, 19:08
It was compulsory for vessels of 299GRT or above from 12/04. What I was saying is there is no need for Voyage Data Recorders on conventional vessels, only international high speed craft. IMO is sketchy on when they should be fitted. For RO-PAX vessels, it should be fitted 'not later than the first survey after 1st July 2002'. That's if the ship has been surveyed at all!

Doxfordman
5th February 2006, 19:57
Dox,
I think AIS is a must for all ships as from this year, however, VDR's are only required on international fast craft.

I would like to see the results of Elenora's 30000hr overhaul, mind you, I don't think they could make the engines any worse than they were! If I remember rightly, weren't they an 'intermediate' engine between the mark I and II engines? (Two blowers on elenoras engines)

Moaf,
Elenora (Condor 11) had Mark 1 16 270 engines but they were designated Mark 1 B - they did indeed have twin ABB turbochargers in an attempt - which worked to lift the power from 3.8 mW to 4.050 mW. Larger fuel injector nozzles were also fitted and the RPM was lifted to 805 or 800 ish, from 760 of the earlier engines like C10 (3.5mW). On the pre C 10 engines the RPM was 740 and the power 3.2 mW. Everything else was as the original 16 Mark 1.

I think thats about right.

Coastie
7th February 2006, 03:41
It was reported on the BBC news earlier that some of the reletives of those aboard the ferry have ransacked the office of the Ferry line and had looted it. Feelings are running VERY high there at the moment.

gdynia
7th February 2006, 12:31
It was reported on the BBC news earlier that some of the reletives of those aboard the ferry have ransacked the office of the Ferry line and had looted it. Feelings are running VERY high there at the moment.
Coastie
The so called Egyptian Fire Team we had onboard during our fire were smashing open lockers to take peoples personnel belongings out. We caught them on camera so this does not suprise me one bit. Its sad but its rife in this neck of the woods

lochluichart
7th February 2006, 13:12
This was on CNN and local comic/newspaper "Egyptian Gazette"
Bet you had many a laugh reading that one Gdynia!
Crowd piled contents of office outside building and set fire to them.
As said feelings running high.

fred henderson
7th February 2006, 13:58
The mob has probably done the ferry company a good turn. Their next statement will be, "All records concerning our comprehensive and up to date safety checks, maintenance, crew training, etc were lost on the ship and in the office fire." Perhaps they even hired the mob and have included the cost in their insurance claim.

There have also been reports of a fire on the vehicle deck of the ship. It is not clear if this was the only fire, or if it had spread from the engine room. Using fire hoses on the vehicle deck would almost guarantee the ship would roll over. The editor of Lloyds List has stated that the Italian conversion of ship met the stability standards ruling at the time of the work. These only covered intact stability. Current European standards also cover damage stability and she could not meet these requirements, so she was sold to work in an area where they are not applicable.

Fred

gdynia
7th February 2006, 13:59
This was on CNN and local comic/newspaper "Egyptian Gazette"
Bet you had many a laugh reading that one Gdynia!
Crowd piled contents of office outside building and set fire to them.
As said feelings running high.
The people know their will never be a proper conducted investigation and you can basically triple the numbers they said were onboard. They can keep the place for me. How they ever built the Pyramids if they ever did

R58484956
7th February 2006, 14:06
The Egyptian Gazette is mentioned above/below have a look at http://www.algomhuria.net.eg/gazette/2/ Home news. A fatwa has been issued.!!!

John Rogers
7th February 2006, 14:48
Reference to Pompyfans post regarding nautical terms. The lifeboat drill explains what to do in an emergency,there are posters and diagrams on every companionway, stairwell,and passage way. A picture is worth a 1,000 words in any language and it shows you the location where you are standing when looking at the diagram,and most of the passengers know how to find their room and the shops,has anyone on cruise noticed how non-speaking English passengers seem to find the food.
John.

khalid
8th February 2006, 11:31
Coastie & Fred henderson
Thank you for your honest feeling.

Pompeyfan
8th February 2006, 20:52
I agree John, and how nice to know that some people still know what a companionway is?!. Trouble is, there were no pictures or posters on the companionways of the cruise ships I have been on. There are diagrams of the ship on the bulkead along the alleways of most decks, but when she ship is sinking, the lights out, people do not have time to look at pictures. Studying information in the cabin when they board may not save lives, but could help if they familiarize themselves with basic shipboard layout and terms. I am surprised anybody finds fault when trying to improve safety when it stands out like a sore thumb. Passenger after passenger asked me which way the ship was going, and which side port and starboard was and where this or that was. It was the fact that so many people did not have a clue that concerns me so much. And if there are no problems, why have I personally performed so many autopsies on people who died because their nautical knowledge was zero?!. It may be slightly different to passengers not understand the basics on a cruise the, but the principle is the same because in an emergency you often have only seconds to survive. Even those trained may struggle, but the difference between life and death is seconds which is why so many novices who put do sea can, and often do die. Put this principle on board a ship, and in an emergency it could mean saving or losing more people. David

Hendo!
17th February 2006, 18:11
The wreck has been located.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/africa/02/16/ferry.sink.reut/index.html

captainrodaway
24th April 2006, 05:05
Lloyds List
Monday April 24 2006
The Al Salam Boccaccio 98 disaster started to unfold with the sound of an
alarm and an ominous knock on the door of the bridge at about 1909 hrs on
February 2. The following excepts are taken verbatim from the black box‚
recorder transcript, showing, exchange-by-exchange, how the crew struggled
to save the 1970-built ferry

The first engineer is saying cabin 230 is on fire‚

19:09:00 to 19:28:07

Someone knocks on the bridge door and says that there is a fire in the
garage.

Crew: „OK we tell the captain I was calling on the sailor but he is not
answering.‰

Crew:„Is this smoke in the engine?‰

Crew:„I do not know.‰

Captain: „Send for Captain Massoud quickly. What smoke what is it?„

Crew: „There is a black smoke that might be coming from the engineroom.‰

Captain: „Engine room? Where is the chief engineer? Call the engine room
quickly.‰

The first reaction of the master and the crew is to locate the fire - on
the sixth and seventh decks of the ferry and to tackle it with hoses and
sprinklers.

Crew:„The fire is in the garage captain.‰

Captain: „Can someone have a look quickly. Go quickly with fire hoses to
the garage.‰

Crew:„And also the sprinklers.‰

Captain: „And the sprinklers too. Wake up the chief engineer and the first
quickly. I need the sprinkler quickly.‰

When another vessel is heard in the background, the Al Salam Boccaccio 98
master reveals his reluctance to admit any problem and ask for assistance.

A voice of another ship on the VHF

Captain: „Turn the lights of the bridge off because of the ships around
us. I want someone to be responsible for the bridge.‰

By 19:28:07 the fire has spread to cabin 400 although the crew believes
the hoses are Œworking, working‚.

19:30:10 to 19:49:23

Less than half an hour later other cabins are affected and panic is
beginning to set in amongst the passengers as smoke pours out of the port
side of the vessel. A crewmember tries to calm down a passenger as another
ship can be heard in the background.

A voice of another ship on the VHF

Officer addressing passengers: „Get back please. It‚s over, the fire is
over, get back.‰

Early on, the captain begins to realise the danger of pumping the vehicle
decks full of seawater, heightening the risk of the free surface effect
responsible for the sinking of similar ro-ro vessels. Concern is also
building regarding the ability to drain the water out of the lower decks
and the inability to locate the exact location of the fire.

Captain: „But tell him that they must suck the water from the garage. OK,
first someone take care of the water in the garage we don‚t want it to
reach high levels and send the plumper to fix the drains.‰

Crew: „Water level is getting high.‰

Crew: „I already told the first eng. And he is sending someone to the
garage.‰

Crew: „Someone with a mask go to check the left side may be this smoke is
coming from somewhere else.‰

Crew: „Yes. First engineer, what is wrong with cabin 230?‰

First engineer: „It is on fire.‰

Crew: „The first engineer is saying cabin 230 is on fire.‰

19:49:26 to 20:10:39

By this stage a team around 10 crewmembers are fighting the fire and the
master has not ordered the waking of all the crew.

20:12:17 to 20:31:54

The fears about the build up of water on the car decks mount as cars block
the drains, the water level rises and the ferry begins to list.
Crewmembers raise the idea of calling for help but there is no answer from
the master who remains preoccupied with the fire.

Crew: „OK, OK ˜ the first engineer sent the plumber to fix the drains.‰

Crew: „First engineer, please tell Youssef to fix the drains on the right
side by any mean the listing is increasing.‰

Crew: „Yes, engine room, we need Youssef the plumber to go and fix the
drains on the right side in the garage.‰

Crew: „The drains are blocked the cars are parked over it.‰

Crew: „Tell him to fix any drains that he can reach.‰

One of the officers on the bridge:„Shall we inform the vessels around us
captain?‰

No answer from the captain

The fire begins to spread to other cabins and a decision is taken to limit
the sprinklers in the car deck, to reduce the increasing list of the
vessel.

ŒCaptain, there is smoke from everywhere‚

20:33:21 to 20:53:02

- „How many degrees is the list now?„

Crew: „Six degrees captain.‰

20:54:16 to 21:14:07

The master is asked whether to make contact with nearby ships and to ask
for assistance, but declines. In the belief that the fire is under
control, he elects instead to make contact with someone at the company.

Captain to someone on the bridge: „Yes, I know, but I do not want to
confuse the vessels around us, you understand, then they will start asking
us if there is something and I do not want anyone to ask us.‰

Crew: „Captain Sayed, what is the situation?‰

Captain: „There is only smoke and I am working on it.‰

Crew: „Ok, OK good.‰

Captain: „Is there fire or only smoke, first engineer?‰

First engineer:„Only smoke.‰

Captain:„Good, good. There is a lot of smoke coming from the chimney.‰

Somebody on the bridge: „Yes captain there is smoke from everywhere.

Captain: „I want you to call Captain Mamdouh Oraby on his mobile and tell
him that we had a fire and it spread in the garage and we are fighting it
till now and that the master is busy with the fire fighting and that we
will keep him updated and this is just for his information.‰

Two hours of a raging fire have taken its toll on the electrics, limiting
communications.

Crew: „When the pumps stopped number 24 stopped also and the telephone is
on number 24.‰

The list increases to 7 degrees and a request is made to stop the
sprinklers and contact the port captain in Egypt.

Crew: „Shall we inform Duba port captain?‰

Captain: „No, we are far.‰

Crew: „Captain Massoud, shall we stop the spray garage or you still need
it?‰

Captain: „OK, try to be sure and let us know immediately, because the
water level inside the ship is increasing a lot and will also become very
dangerous. There is no way that the telephone can work?‰

Crew: „No captain, the telephone the pump and the GPS is out of order.‰

Crew: „The trailer on the left side is still on fire.‰

As the list increases, a decision is made to shore up the vessel‚s
stability.

Crew: „The list is increasing a lot captain.‰

Captain: „Yes, that‚s why I am calling the first engineer. I want him to
take the water from the right side and through it to the left.‰

Crew: „No captain it will go right again.‰

Captain: „Ok through it to the sea.‰

With drainage showing no signs of improvement and the electrics badly
affected, the chief engineer asks for permission to send out an SOS but
again the captain does not respond.

Chief engineer:„Shall I start the caterpillar so we send SOS?‰

Crew: „There is no loads for the SOS but I can start the caterpillar.‰

Crew: „Where is engineer Abd el Rahman?‰

A voice of another vessel on the radio

Captain: „Turn off these lights.‰

The list worsens as a result of the wind and the failing drains.

Crew: „If the drains are not blocked we would have had no problems.‰

Crew: „Yes, the wind, but at the end I will turn.‰

Crew: „You know captain this list is 7 degrees because of the water inside
and at least 4 degrees because of the wind?‰

Electrical failings are also affecting the navigation of the vessel.

Crew: „We need to turn the vessel ˜ we are trying.‰

Crew: „Is it turning with you, son?‰

Crew: „Why?‰

Crew: „The batteries are not working.‰

Crew: „It is disconnected we need ??. This is the problem I was afraid of.‰

Captain: „All to the right, all to the right.‰

Crew: „Chief engineer, is there any way that we can start the batteries of
the wheel are disconnected and I want to turn the vessel because of the
wind.‰

Chief engineer: „We try but not sure.‰

After the vessel finally begins to turn and a pump begins to reduce the
water levels, the list drops marginally from 10 degrees to 9 degrees. But
it soon begins to increase again as the vessel takes a new course. The
crew begin to realise that the initiative has failed and attempt to
address the list by emptying and filling the ballast tanks on different
sides of the vessel. As the ship turns, the vehicles on the car deck shift
from one side of the deck to another, further destabilising the vessel.

Captain: „The list is 13 degree.‰

Captain: „All the wheel to the right.‰

Radio officer: „Is it fire or only smoke?‰

Crew: „Is it fire or only smoke, Captain Massoud.‰

Crew: „First, is the pump working or not?‰

Crew: „Working.‰

Crew: „Is it coming with you all to the right.‰

Crew: „Yes it is coming.‰

Captain: „Stop the spray garage now until the pump work. When we were on
the first course it was better. Is there a way to discharge water from
tank 18 right. Can we discharge the water from tank 18 right the ship is
listing 15 degrees now. Can we fill tank 25 left?‰

Radio officer to the captain:„They can open the pilot door and discharge
from it.‰

Captain:„The list is the most important now. How much is the bow.‰

Someone informing the captain: „All the trailers on the left side moved
now to the right.‰

ŒCaptain, the ship is sinking‚

Set on a new course, but with the vessel sinking, the danger of the
situation being played out begins to dawn on everyone, but there are still
no orders to begin evacuating the ship or to contact other vessels in the
vicinity. Almost three and a half hours have passed since the fire was
first reported.

22:38:14 to 22:58:32

Contact is made with another vessel as the list reaches 15 degrees.

Unclear discussion in the bridge between the captain, the radio officer
and the chief officer.

Voice of another vessel on the VHF

Radio officer: „What are you saying first, I cannot hear you?‰

Captain: „Tell him we are listing 15 degrees. Yes, first, what is the
solution now the list is very dangerous.‰

23:20:55 to 23:21:43

The urgency is all too obvious as the master orders number 2, 6, 9 and 25
ballast tanks on the port side of the vessel to be filled and to stop the
use of sprinklers.

Captain: „Do not use any water. We will lose the ship this way. The ship
is listing too much ˜ do not use the spray.‰

Crew: „Not even the pumps no any water.‰

Captain: „What is burning?‰

23:21:53 to 23:33:13

With the ballast tanks filled and the pumps working there is no
improvement.

Captain: „Can you see the right side. The list is increasing ˜ we are
listing 18 degrees now. See if there is an opening that the water is
entering from.‰

Crew: „No captain, there is no opening.‰

Captain: „So why is the list increasing although the pump is working and
the ballast is filling? We need any solution with the ballast.‰

Crew: „We are filling it captain.‰

Captain: „OK see why the water is increasing in the right side. Try to see
the ballast. We are listing 20 degrees now the vessel will turn. Please
first find any solution for the water the ship is listing 20 degrees now.
Captain Massoud, the ship is listing 20 degrees.

„OK, come right slowly. The wind is from the right ˜ maybe it is against
us. How is the wind now?‰

Crew: „Nobody knows how is the wind now.‰

Captain: „I mean left or right.‰

Crew: „Captain, tell him to change the wheel right.‰

Captain: „All wheel right.‰

Crew: „The list is 20 degrees now captain.‰

Captain: „OK be patient.‰

As the master pleads for patience, the severe listing is causing concern
among the passengers and yet, remarkably, some four hours after the fire
started, there has still been no order to prepare the life-rafts.

Captain: „Calm down the people.‰

Crew: „Shall we bring the life boats down captain?‰

Captain: „Wait, wait.‰

A telephone is ringing.

Captain: Somebody answer. The left side is all on fire. We turning the
vessel we want to decrease this list.‰

Crew: „The list is 21 degrees captain, 25 degrees captain.‰

Captain: „Half the wheel.‰

Crew: „The ship is sinking captain.‰

Captain: „Left.‰

Crew: „OK captain left but the ship is sinking.‰

Captain: „Send may day.‰

Sounds of things falling and noise.

Crew: „Captain the ship is sinking.‰

Captain: „Wait every thing is OK we sent mayday.‰

Noise

Captain: „All wheel left.‰

Crew: „The ship sank captain.‰

Captain: „Just wait.‰

Crew: „Is there any life jacket here any life jacket?‰

Captain: „Someone get us a life jacket....No life jacket?‰

Crew: „Nothing.‰

Sound of a high alarm

Crew: „Captain Sayed I am here.‰

Captain: „OK, I am with you here.‰

Crew: „I am Ahmed Atrees.

dom
24th April 2006, 08:32
frightening

non descript
24th April 2006, 15:05
Courtesy of Lloyds List today 24 April

Poignant transcript recalls crew’s battle to save Al Salam Boccaccio 98.

Monday April 24 2006


A CHILLING transcript of the conversations recorded by the black box recorder of the Al Salam Boccaccio 98point to a string of failings by the captain and crew in the last hours of the ill-fated vessel’s voyage.

Extracts of the transcript seen by Lloyd’s List reveal the full horror of the last four hours and 22 minutes of the Panama-flagged ferry’s journey between Duba in Saudi Arabia and the Egyptian port of Safaga.

More than 1,000 people died, making it one of the worst ship-ping tragedies in recent history.

The last desperate exchanges between the ship’s master, Captain Sayed Ahmed Sayed Omar, and his crew, recorded on the transcript as taking place between 2321 hrs and 2333 hrs on February 2, all too explicitly depict the confusion that contributed to the massive loss of life.

The nightmare of the crew’s valiant but ultimately ineffective effort to fight a fire that appears to have started on the car deck for four hours is vividly portrayed in the 8,800 words preceding the master’s realisation that he was about to go down with the vessel without a life jacket.

An Egyptian parliamentary committee investigating the causes of the accident blamed a “wicked collaboration” between the ship’s owners and corrupt safety inspectors for the huge loss of life.

The parliamentary committee, which issued its report last week, accused the owners of using forged documents to hide a shortage of safety equipment and political corruption for allowing the owner of El Salam Maritime Transport, Mamdouh Ismail, a politician, to escape the net of the investigation.

Panama Shipping Register, the company that issued the passenger safety certificate which covers life-saving equipment, and the ship’s insurer, Steamship Mutual, both claim that the ship’s documents were in order and that the vessel was equipped with life-saving equipment for almost double the 1,418 passengers and crew on the 11,799 gt vessel.

Regardless of the amount of life-saving equipment, the black box transcript points to a complete lack of preparedness on the part of the crew to use it in an effective evacuation of the passengers.

The voyage data recorder details how the drama unfolded from the first call to the bridge, timed at 1909 hrs on February 2, to the decision to issue a mayday signal more than four hours later, pointing to a litany of failings by the crew.

Only 24 of the crew and 300 passengers survived the ordeal. Most of the discussions during the four hours of recordings focus on firefighting activities at the expense of efforts to alert the passengers or implement any type of evacuation of the vessel.

It is only two hours after the battle with the fire on the car deck begins that the master asks: “Is everybody wearing the life jackets?” At no point does he consider returning to Saudi Arabia and continues on the tragic voyage towards the Egyptian port.

The transcript also shows a reluctance to communicate with other ships in the vicinity and with the ship’s owner.

Shortly after the fire is detected, one of the officers on the bridge asks the captain: “Shall we inform the vessels around us, captain?” but there is no answer.

Later, the master says to one of his companions: “I do not want to confuse the vessels around us, you understand. Then they will start asking us if there is something and I do not want anyone to ask us.”

There was also a lack of communication with authorities in Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

When asked, two hours into the ordeal, whether to inform the Egyptian port authorities, the master replies: “No we are too far,” as the ferry sails towards its final destination. Only in the dying minutes of February 2 a mayday call is issued.

Conversations also reveal how the master and crew used vast quantities of water delivered by fire hoses rather than powder or foam to fight the fire, contributing to the destabilisation of the ship, and how the crew later attempted to address the listing of the vessel by filling the ballast tanks, a move that eventually contributed to the sinking.

benjidog
24th April 2006, 20:53
Thanks for posting the transcripts and summary Captain Rodway and Tonga.

I don't think I have ever heard such a tale of incompetence and desperation. You feel for the captain and crew but can't help despising them for their incompetence which resulted in the loss of the lives of so many including themselves.

What more can you say - words fail me.

Brian

James_C
25th April 2006, 00:54
That tale would be funny, if it wasn't so tragic.
Will the lessons be learnt? Perhaps I'm being cynical but I wouldn't bet on it.

Douglas Young
25th April 2006, 17:51
The Numast Telegraph, April 2006, has a very interesting article on this. For those who do not get the paper try their website, www.numast.org, in the homepage, click on News, then Telegraph Back Issues, then Numast P27 April 2006.
Frightening!

fred henderson
25th April 2006, 21:20
The Numast Telegraph, April 2006, has a very interesting article on this. For those who do not get the paper try their website, www.numast.org, in the homepage, click on News, then Telegraph Back Issues, then Numast P27 April 2006.
Frightening!

Thank you for posting the link Douglas. The ship was a dissaster waiting to happen and when it did, the officers were unable to cope. Very sad.

Fred

vchiu
28th April 2006, 18:17
It is often considered that above a certain age, any ship becomes unsafe. Media often stree this fact first when an accident occur. However, I think this is a minor concern in comparison to the importance of upkeep and crew training.

the transcript suggests many pumps and drains were out of order.

Naturally, the deck heightenings did nothing but further compromised stability

A blatant lack of Seamanship combined with a questionable seaworthiness. The Recipee for Disaster is complete.

Took one ferry in China. not much better