Nestor Class

Jim S
12th February 2006, 23:26
The Nestor, Neleus, Theseus trio of the early 1950's were designed to try to improve the fuel efficiency of the steam turbine and probably to give a comparison with the similar sized "A" class motor ships.
I have read reports that the so called advanced steam plant proved difficult to operate in practice, requiring according to one observer, the need for "specialised engineers" - Does anyone have info on this matter

As a G & J Weir apprentice I worked on the H and P classes but I recall only one visit to Theseus as I believe there was only one of our pumps on board.
The closed feed system and associated pumps and equipment was supplied by Worthington Simpson

Jim S

Succour
23rd April 2006, 04:45
Yes Jim,

they were a bit tricky and hot.

Manouvering platform right above the boiler front. Parsons Marine turbines. Foster wheeler external superheater boilers.15lb exhaust steam from the turbo alternator. Good Engineers on these ships. Willie Sutherland, Harry Robertson, Alan(dangerman) Kirkham fom Liverpool.

Will never forget these fine lads.

Best Regards.

Dino.

Jim S
23rd April 2006, 20:30
Yes Jim,

they were a bit tricky and hot.

Manouvering platform right above the boiler front. Parsons Marine turbines. Foster wheeler external superheater boilers.15lb exhaust steam from the turbo alternator. Good Engineers on these ships. Willie Sutherland, Harry Robertson, Alan(dangerman) Kirkham fom Liverpool.

Will never forget these fine lads.

Best Regards.

Dino.
Thanks for above observations on Nestor Class. I had heard that any upset in steaming conditions could lead to a sort of domino effect where things progressively got more and more out of kilter

Jim S

Jim S
24th April 2006, 22:12
Thanks for above observations on Nestor Class. I had heard that any upset in steaming conditions could lead to a sort of domino effect where things progressively got more and more out of kilter

Jim S

You say that the Nestor Class had Parsons Turbines - could they not have been Metropolitan -Vickers (A company that later became AEI - a supplier of turbines to Tribal Class and Rothesay Class frigates.

Jim S

R651400
25th April 2006, 06:43
Good Engineers on these ships. Willie Sutherland, Harry Robertson, Alan(dangerman) Kirkham fom Liverpool.

Will never forget these fine lads.

Best Regards.

Dino.
I could have possibly sailed with each one of them. Robertson from Glasgow, chief on Glenbeg (SR) and Orestes (M). Alan Kirkham may have been 2nd on the old Melampus (ST) and Sutherland chief on Adrastus (M).

Succour
6th May 2006, 03:46
Jim, you are correct, Sorry mate,

Good to hear from you senior member Those are definately the lads I was reffering to God bless them for their humour and wit on what were otherwise very hot and noisy ships, which strangely enough were a great experince for any young lad. I hope you are in good health Cheers!

Dino

R651400
6th May 2006, 08:34
Thanks Succour and same to you.
In the Duncan Hawes Merchant Fleets first issue Blue Funnel Line he commends the book to Ch Engr J Soulsby who was 4th on Glenbeg when Robertson was Chief.

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/6734/password/0/sort/1/cat/all/page/1

Soulsby on left, just a bit bigger than his dimutive Japanese partner. Big chap in front was 3rd Engr from Galashiels.

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/6732/password/0/sort/1/cat/all/page/1

Robertson in front. 2nd Engr with beard could this possibly be Alan Kirkham?

japottinger
15th July 2006, 23:03
Definitely HP and LP M.V. (later AEI) turbines. Were still supplying spares when I was in their drawing office 1959-61

settling tank
10th October 2006, 23:55
Sailed Neleus on her last 2 deep seas..& handover to the cypriots, practically the only ships where the engineers went ashore together......sailed back from mid indian ocean to L'pool natural draft due to ID fans burning out........everything happenned that trip.....perhaps a book should have been written. kieth Rowlands Chief Engineer. life revolved around the 15lb line. But they were years ahead of their time. First V fridge compressors at sea (J & E Hall?). i still have the engineroom Brassplate and Bell.

Keith L Branton
14th October 2006, 21:40
I was on the Neleus from 11/11/54 to 1/8/56. We had some problems with the closed feed system in the early days but once that was corrected I was very fond of her.If anyone out there remembers Kevin Barker, from Tasmania, who was 2nd on the Nestor while I was 2nd on the Neleus, I am trying to locate him. Best Regards to all
Keith Branton

Jim S
15th October 2006, 20:40
Gents,
I have been very interested to read the comments that have began to drift in about the Nestor Class machinery. My impression had been that the trio had very advanced steam turbine plant but needed great care in the operation of same as the system was not that inherently stable.
During my time as a G & J Weir apprentice on the Outside Works Squad I worked on most of the P and H Class ships - IXION was my favourite - the engine room was immaculate. The Nestor Class were considered by us as Worthington - Simpson ships although I think there must have been some Weir pumps on board. First year apprentices at the works training department were often used as messengers to hand-carry small parts or company publications to ships berthed on the Clyde. I remember taking a part for a Weir direct-acting pump to THESEUS berthed at KGV and handing it over to the 2nd Engineer. A week or so later I read that a 2nd Eng from THESEUS had been killed in a plane crash. I believe it a BEA Viscount flight from Amsterdam to Manchester. It concerned me greatly at the time that this could have been the same man. This was around March 1957.

settling tank
22nd October 2006, 20:42
Further thoughts on the Nestors ....their engineering design/conception was based on naval vessels the Blueey Engineering Supt being Mr. L Baker D.S.C.
Not only were the double reduction gear box much quieter than the P & H classes but the boilers were of a more higher pressure and were the first of the ESD's. The Hick hargreaves feed system and the fact that no steam from the turbines was bled off for feed water heating......instead an allens back-pressure turbine generator was used constantly the exhaust of which (the infamous 15lb. line) fed into a direct-contact feed heater.
Also due to the high boiler pressure and temperatures there was a special pneumatic controlled valve system to engage the turning gear from the control platform. Talking with those who sailed on the Nestors on the Aussie run there were no problems, lengthy time in port and on the coast PLUS most engineers were happy to stay with the Aussie run.. but once on the far east run that all disappeared and schedules had to be maintained???
On hand over to the cypriots (Neleus) they took 2 days to flash up then once in the Mersey sat for another 2 days trying to leave. Last heard they ran them at 8½ knots instead of 14, and no problems with controlling the feed systems. probably only used 2 burners or even only 1 boiler.
The engine room was very small for size of vessel and for those who sailed on them , remember passing in front of the boilers or helping the fireman change burners for the first time. probably4ft between boiler and feed tank casings..or less.

Jim S
22nd October 2006, 21:33
Again thanks for the latest on the class by "Settling Tank" - I have been comparing in my mind the Nestor Class with Brocklebank's Mangla and Mathura of 1959 and 1960 respectively. They also had Foster Wheeler ESD boilers 610 psi or about 550 at superheater header with a temperature of 800 deg F. I cannot remember if there was any bled steam from the turbines but they had a Peter Brotherhood turbo alternator, capable of supplying all electrical power at sea that exhausted into a low pressure main supplying steam to boiler air heaters and the Weir evaporator. AC power was used throughout the ship except for deck machinery where AC was converted to DC for the Clark Chapman deck machinery - either by static or rotary invertors, the latter when working cargo as the rotary invertor coped better with the fluctuating load. The pair were not fitted with automatic combustion control but utilised a hydraulic actuated vane system on the Forced and Induced Draught fans controlled from the main engine control console.
The FD and ID fans were driven by constant speed ac motors although they did have a "High" and "Low" speed setting.
The creme de la creme of the Brocklebank fleet at the time and very advanced engineering for that rather conservative company.
Unfortunately both ships were victims of engine room fires after their Brocklebank careers. Advancing years or poor engineering staff, who knows.

Any further info on the Nestor Class or the P and H classes would be greatly appreciated.

Jim S

Succour
16th December 2009, 08:20
Boy were those Allen turbine Generators noisy. If I remember correctly they revved at around 14,000 RPM through an epicyclic reduction gearbox. The whole thing whining like a banshee. The Infamous 15lb exhaust line had the most tweaked valve wheel in the whole engine room and as one of the members states the 2nd Engineer would stare at the pressure gauge with glazed eyes during standby. Yes the machinery spaces on the N Boats were very small and very hot.
Succour.

Geoff Brant
17th December 2009, 18:58
Hi Jim, realise that this reply is somewhat dated given the date of your first posting but I have not been a member very long and have only just seen the various postings
I did 3 trips on Theseus starting Dec.68, also was on the Neleus when it was handed over to the Cypriots
By the end you could say I had a fair knowledge of these ships which were complicated, hard work and a constant challenge
If anyone out there has a question or remembers sailing with me I would love to hear from them
Seasons Greetings to all

BillH
17th December 2009, 19:50
Extracted from my "Blue Funnel Odyssey" book on CD

NESTOR (4) (1952 - 1968) “Nestor” class steel steamship.
O.N. 185443. 7,802g. 4,368n. 464.9 x 64.3 x 31.1 feet.
Three steam turbines made by Metropolitan Vickers Electric Company Ltd., Manchester, reduction geared to single propeller shaft. 8,250 SHP. 16 kts.
26.3.1952: Launched by the Caledon Shipbuilding & Engineering Company Ltd., Dundee (Yard No. 485), for the Ocean Steamship Company Ltd.
10.1952: Completed.
12.1968: Transferred to Glen Line Ltd., London, and renamed GLENAFFRIC.
7.1970: Reverted to the Ocean Steamship Company Ltd., and renamed ORESTES.
6.1971: Transferred to Glen Line Ltd., London. 1971: Sold to N. D. Papalios, Greece, and renamed AEGIS DIGNITY.
1971: Sold to Kimon Companhia Naviera S. A., Panama, retaining Greek registry.
1972: Sold to Adelais Maritime Company, Cyprus.
21.11.1973: Sailed from Singapore Roads.
6.12.1973: Delivered to the China National Metal and Mineral Import & Export Corporation, for demolition at Whampoa.

NELEUS (2) (1953 - 1971) “Nestor” class steel steamship.
O.N. 185457. 7,802g. 4,366n. 464.9 x 64.3 x 31.1 feet.
Three steam turbines made by Metropolitan Vickers Electric Company Ltd., Manchester, reduction geared to a single propeller shaft. 8,250 SHP. 16 kts.
8.7.1952: Launched by the Caledon Shipbuilding & Engineering Company Ltd., Dundee (Yard No. 486), for the China Mutual Steam Navigation Company Ltd.
2.1953: Completed. 6.1971: Transferred to Glen Line Ltd.
14.9.1972: Sold, for 12,500, to Akamas Shipping Company Ltd., Cyprus, and renamed AEGIS FABLE.
1973: Sold to Alicacnossos Shipping Company Ltd., Cyprus, and renamed AEGIS TRUST.
17.3.1974: Departed from Nigata, Japan.
29.3.1974: Delivered to the China National Metal and Mineral Import & Export Corporation, for demolition at Shanghai.

THESEUS (2) (1955 - 1971) “Nestor” class steel steamship.
O.N. 185513. 7,804g. 4,242n. 490' 0" x 64' 4" x 28' 6 " oa
Three steam turbines made by Metropolitan Vickers Electric Company Ltd., Manchester, reduction geared to a single propeller shaft. 8,250 SHP. 16 kts.
10.11.1954: Launched by the Caledon Shipbuilding & Engineering Company Ltd., Dundee (Yard No. 498), for the Ocean Steamship Company Ltd.
3.1955: Completed.
6.1971: Sold to Alkiriades Shipping Enterprises S. A., Greece, and renamed AEGIS MYTH.
1972: Transferred to Alkividis Shipping S. A., Panama, then to Avacon Shipping Company Ltd., Cyprus, and finally Syracousae Maritime Company Ltd., Cyprus, and renamed AEGIS CARE.
1973: Sold to the China National Metal and Mineral Import & Export Corporation, for demolition.
4.11.1973: Departed from Singapore Roads bound to Shanghai.
7.12.1973: Work commenced.