The Iron Ore Carriers

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calvin
15th February 2006, 19:51
hi what ever happen to all the orecarriers of the sixties and early seventies
was with w a souter on the
longstone
dunstanburgh castle
lindisfarne
but remember others like welsh herald la colina silversand and shore cape franklin cape howe and ports like narvik murmansk sept isles nouadhibou monrovia mossamedes pepel victoria lulea and the dust good beer though.

cboots
16th February 2006, 03:49
I would imagine the demise of the UK steel industry did for them as well.
CBoots

vix
16th February 2006, 03:58
Yes, probably relegated to history...like walking the plank! Did Oremina, Craigallian, Pennyworth, Ravensworth...some good ships and SOME good ports! Vix

trotterdotpom
16th February 2006, 09:41
Lots of mentions of these ships on the site Calvin - see Denholms, Houlders and many more.

With the rationalisation of the steel industry in the UK, all the iron ore was taken to Port Talbot, Teesport and Glasgow (I think) and all carried in the big bulkies.
4 days in Vitoria turned into 18 hours in Tubarao - spoilsports!

John T.

calvin
17th February 2006, 19:52
Yep like us old seadog left to demise and linger in the memories some bloody good ones some rubbish.there was nothing like going to sept isles or murmansk in the middle of winter or heading south to nouadhibou and getting the weather forecast on the shipping programme of finistere and hearing that the weather was gentle to moderate breezes and yet you were in a flaming force 10 to 12 no the wonder we called the station gentl jesus never did get his weather right

trotterdotpom
17th February 2006, 22:18
Yep like us old seadog left to demise and linger in the memories some bloody good ones some rubbish.there was nothing like going to sept isles or murmansk in the middle of winter or heading south to nouadhibou and getting the weather forecast on the shipping programme of finistere and hearing that the weather was gentle to moderate breezes and yet you were in a flaming force 10 to 12 no the wonder we called the station gentl jesus never did get his weather right

Yes, I recall battling sandstorms off Nouadhibou, crossing the hatches of mv Dunkyle to get to the bar down aft - a dark and lonly job but it had to be done!

The station known as "Gentle Jesus" was actually Monsanto Radio (CTV?), a Portuaguese naval station - the quality of their forecasts indicated that there were no windows in the building.

They were supposed to accept meteorological reports but were almost impossible to raise. I received an infringement notice once because they reported me for transmitting 5 seconds inside a "silence period" on the distress frequency. You had to say why you did whatever you did wrong and send it back to Geneva or somewhere, so I just wrote that it was unlikely that Monsanto heard me transmitting at that time as they never listen, and never heard anymore about it.

John T.


John T.

John Cassels
19th February 2006, 11:40
John,
Why didn't you take the tunnel. I thought all the Denholm Orey boats all
had tunnels through the starboard wing tanks.

JC

trotterdotpom
19th February 2006, 14:54
John,
Why didn't you take the tunnel. I thought all the Denholm Orey boats all
had tunnels through the starboard wing tanks.

JC

Don't recall a tunnel, John, but in any case, time was of the essence!

John T.

beedeesea
1st March 2006, 21:26
My own first trip to sea was as junior R/O on Dunkyle, in '62, I think.
Falmouth to Seven Islands. As far as I can remember, there was a tunnel, but I thought it was on the port side?
Regards,
Brian

Argyll
2nd March 2006, 17:22
Brian,
I think I may have sailed with you on the Dunkyle in '62, I joined her in Falmouth ,in drydock as I remember. I was senior apprentice anmd the junior ,doing his first trip was Les Mc Naughton from Dundee. Master D.R.Kidd a perfect gentleman the mate was Gerry Elwick. I think the senior R/O was from Manchester area but can't remember his name. the2/o was Vince Wallace who was later releived by Sandy Ferguson as far as I remember, The Bosun was from Liverpool who nick named me Slim on account of my name being Alistair, the Cook was Andy Lang .
Regards
Argyll

beedeesea
2nd March 2006, 21:31
Argyll,
Well,well,well.....still crazy after all these years! Boy, what a memory you have! You brought it all flooding back. My Chief's name was Tim Wall from Cheadle Hulme; he was a big motor-cycling fan. I still bear a scar from our crossing of the line ceremony on the trip to Vitoria......a jagged-edged can almost severed my little finger. King Neptune was a big bearded Cornish chippie named Derek Something. Also recall Vince Wallace switching on the radar while I was painting the scanner.......Elwick insisted I get down on my hands and knees and clean up the whole mess myself. Can't remember your name, but definitely do remember one of the Apps being from Tarbert; it's the only time I've come across the place in my life! Great to hear from you! It's a brilliant website, isn't it?
Regards
Brian

Tom Morton
2nd March 2006, 21:43
I remember the tunnel on the Denholm ore carriers, down the starboard side. Once in Bone (Algeria) I was sent down the tunnel to look for stowaways, had done this before and it was just a walk in a poorly lit area. However , this time I was walking along and saw a pair of eyes. Did not switch the flashlight on, did not look further---just go the hell out of there and reported my findings. They picked a couple of hands and sent them down---sure enough they came back with a stowaway---felt really sorry for him as he was turned over to whatever authorities. I was about 17 and did not weigh probably more than 140 lbs!

Argyll
3rd March 2006, 09:15
Brian,
My memory is good sometimes not all the time, until I read your thread i had no more mind , the tunnel was on the starboard side, was dispatched to suji on more than one occasion.I remember your chief as I bought a tape recorder from him. also the chippy now that you mentioned him. he used to sing a wee ditti about a ship called "La Estancia" one of Buries Markies. I agree it is a good site , at times I wonder about all the guys I worked with and what became of them , memories ,yes some bad , but the good ones outweigh them,
Argyll( Alistair Kernachan)

stephano
3rd March 2006, 13:04
seem to remember all tunnels where on the star/b side dont know why.
alan

beedeesea
3rd March 2006, 21:31
Alistair,
I was obviously wrong about the tunnel......the old Senior Moments are on the increase I'm afraid. If I remember rightly I think it was you who told me about an up-and-coming young singer/comedian who was doing the rounds in Glasgow at the time. His name was Billy Connolly; didn't 'e do well!
Did you ever hear what became of Dunkyle in the end?
Regards
Brian

Argyll
4th March 2006, 11:51
Brian,
on this occasion re- Billy Connely I don't remember talking to you about,but put that down to age. I do remember your chief was a guitar player who was a Shadows fan . as for Dunkyle I saw her many years later at the General terminas in Glasgow under the Greek flag I think it was ,discharging ore, what are you doing with youself now and where are you now living.
Alistair

beedeesea
4th March 2006, 20:20
Alistair,
I've been working my way steadily downwards since last we met! When I went ashore I worked for L.M.ERICSSON on exchange installation, then for the Irish Post Office Engineering Branch. Got married in '70; went to Oz for 5 years in '71. Returned home in '76, had 2 kids, a boy and girl, now both grown up. Worked for Irish Fertilizer Industries for the next 26 years. When they folded I decided to cut my losses and take time to smell the roses before it was too late. Since '76 have been living in Arklow, Co. Wicklow.
There wouldn't be too many people around who could match your sea-time, these days. Are you going to stick it out to the bitter end?
Regards
Brian (Duane)

Argyll
7th March 2006, 16:19
Brian,
I'Ve had qiute a chequered life, after Dunkyle I went to Naess Cavalier, Naess Clipper, Crinan, then I chucked it for a couple of years and worked ashore at Leyland motors in Lancashire, I then went back to sea on deck, as I did not sit my ticket, I ended up working for a private owned ferry company, sailing locally to Islay , I got a second bite of the cherry and sat and gained my mate hometrade the company chucked the run and I left and went to Robertsons of Glasgow then Gardeners, for the last 27 years I've been with Caledonian MacBrayne sailind as mate and 2nd mate which I' doing at the moment. I could have retired in December ,but I'm on the local run ( terminal being 5 miles from my house) I work 2 weeks on 2 weeks off plus 6 weeks leave per annum not bad for a failed Denholm app. I go back tomorrow will talk to you in 2
Regards
Alistair.
Ps I'm also married with 2 grown up sons.

Sparks
29th March 2006, 10:25
Well you all made my day after reading through 'ore carrier memmories'.
Sept isles in and out in two hours, but the cod were out of this world. Black-out in Murmansk, steel coils across the Bay to Spain, finding a grocer outside the Dock Gates in Savona with wall to wall spirits, all under a fiver and emptying same before sailing, saily sked on R/T.......
Well I'm going to tell you all something about this tunnel after joining the Clarkeden (first of 4 ore boats) in Port Talbot. First night on board had a dream about a tunnel, lottsa green water, lights going out etc.etc. Kept quiet about it, as you do at that age and being in the local half the night before said dream, until we were half way down the bay, with gentle breezes and calm seas (Monsanto again,come a time I was getting reluctant to pass this onto the bridge, as all I got was will you look out of the windows Sparks and what do you see!!!!) shipping the green stuff and I though well there go today's meals until 2nd. enquired about my lack of presence down aft. Well this is where the tunnel was mentioned, went down and that's as far as I got.
You guys can laugh yor socks off, but it was down to the last cable tray bulkhead light etc. etc. No way Jose, till it flattened out.
There you go, good old days. Took a sentimental trip up the MSC on one of Liverpool's ferries last summer and even the steelworks at Irlam have gone.
Kind regards and continuing good health to all.

Sparks
29th March 2006, 10:33
Hello Alistair, wouldn't be Blair by chance? Met on said c/Mcbride ferry way back in early seventies. If so was Sparks with you on Clarkeden in 1965. Kind regards, Jan Gray

athinai
28th June 2006, 20:05
Anyone remember Ivanovich vessel "ORECREST" We Had many good visits to Port Talbot when on the Ore Charters in the Sixties, Fondest Memories of the Hotel on the Waterfront.,
Regards/

Fairfield
28th June 2006, 20:27
A lot of the old ore carriers went to Greeks and their charters were renegotiated with British Steel when Hunterston was delayed and they all came back to Glasgow with DAPO names!!!
Remember DUNKYLE became SUSIE and another old Denholm became ADY, GOTHLAND became DAPO SKY and caught fre when outbound from Glasgow and was scrapped at Faslane.
DAGHESTAN of Common Bros had about 2 or 3 renamings and came back under all of them!! Will need to look out some of these old stagers.

Les Gibson
28th June 2006, 22:42
My first 2 ships were ore carriers; Afghanistan, and Iron Crown both Commons managed. I was electrician on them from Feb. 1962 until June (Afghanistan) and July 1962 until Feb.1963. (Iron Crown) Yes, did Vittoria, Sept. Isle, Monrovia, Bone, Even a doubleheader Newport - Monrovia - Piombino (Italy) Algiers- Cardiff . (They were too big at 15,000 DWT for Port Talbot) Fond memories of it all. I think I lost the plot a little after that, joined Bank line- 18 months later came home!. Strange to say my Mates were still holding the bar up in Hebburn Progressive club just as they were when I left. I think some of them had been there all the time. Ray Evans said " Didn't even know you'd been away Les, get them in" So I got them in!

john shaw
29th June 2006, 20:47
Hi Calvin-- maybe we even sailed together?
I was a Deck cadet with W.A Souter from 1972, then (quickly) 3rd Mate from 1973. I was in the Dunstanburgh Castle several times-- I truly loved the old "DBC". I was also on "Longstone", "Bamburgh Castle", "Irish Wasa" (formerly "Sheaf Wear"),and my first ever ship was "Scottish Wasa" which I remember was formerly "Iron something", possibly "iron Crown" as mentioned by Les above. I stayed with Souters thru their various incarnations as Souter Hamlet etc, spending most of the late 70s in the "Solvent" Essberger parcels tankers, before my last few trips in the M.O.C. bulkers Equinox/Esplanade.I left the sea in 1985.

Good, and bad, memories of the old ore-carriers. I must sort all my old photos!

kepowee
5th November 2006, 11:47
hi all has anybody got a photo of the tv morar ive been on lots of gallerys but cant seem to find one would be most gratefull ken powell

john shaw
5th November 2006, 13:59
The Scottish OreCarriers "Morar" can be found at:

http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/viewship.asp?id=18437

regards.

wa002f0328
5th November 2006, 15:45
(Thumb) I was on "LINDISFARNE" Tyne to Peru, payed off in the Tyne, bad ship in all respects

albatross1923
16th November 2006, 19:03
i remember the scottish ore carriers well. charted by bisco. its rather odd that i worked the last 20 years ashore for british steel was 2nd engr on the following ships, mv arisaig, built 1957, lithgows port glasgow, broken up faslane 1972, gtv morar built lithgows, scrapped 1980, mv naess trader, have no information.

took iron ore port talbot middlesborough from spain norway russia sweden west africa

doxfords did their stuff gas turbine least said better

albatross 1923

ARRANMAN35
16th November 2006, 20:04
Hi Albatross 1923,

Naess Trader was broken up in Singapore in 1987,
she was:

1973 Zapata Trader
1980 Cora
1983 Zapata Trader,

Was 4/E on the Arisaig in 1958 and did one trip on the
Morar as supernumery in late 1960.

Cheers
Archie

Keith Adams
17th November 2006, 03:20
I posted a photo to the Gallery of the "UFFINGTON COURT" which ran between
UK W. Coast Ports to Narvik in the 40s and 50s... before deep sea specialty
vessels were built, Snowy.

aj hawker
21st November 2006, 17:32
Hi All
For all you Denholm iron ore wagon buffs have just posted photos of the DUNKYLE, CLARKAVON, CLARKEDEN, CRINAN AND DEALMOUTH. Will post cargo ships later.
Cheers for now
AJ

aj hawker
22nd November 2006, 15:04
Hi Denholm Buffs
Have posted Sir Andrew Duncan (iron ore ) cargo vessels Clunepark, Glenpark
& Clarkspey.
Cheers AJ

jim barnes
23rd November 2006, 13:16
was on the DUKESGARTH tunnel stbd side of course? creepy place to be in the early hours in bad weather heading midships for the 4 to 8 watch all alone? any pictures of the DUKE?

john shaw
23rd November 2006, 13:40
Jim-- pics at:

http://www.wellandcanal.ca/salties/d/dukesgarth/garth.htm

http://www.merchant-navy.net/Pictures/dukesgarth.html

aj hawker
23rd November 2006, 16:20
was on the DUKESGARTH tunnel stbd side of course? creepy place to be in the early hours in bad weather heading midships for the 4 to 8 watch all alone? any pictures of the DUKE?

Hi Jim
Will post picture of Dukesgarth to this site later was in her in 1963, was fed up of the Sept-iles after six months.
Regards AJ

ernhelenbarrett
26th November 2006, 05:00
Been reading about the ore carriers I did my first 6 months as trainee R/O on the Avistone/GBSV mostly on the La Goulette Bone Algiers Tunis and once to Conakry runs and usually ended up in Middlesbro, Avistone was an ex Fort or
Empire boat if I remember correctly Owned by Aviation & Shipping Co, Jock Purvis was the owner and he had three ex WW2 ships Avisbank Avismere and Avistone. Havent heard what became of the ships or Company but expect
they went the way of all the ore carriers. After Marconi I joined AWA in Australia and now retired in Adelaide. Regards Ern Barrett

thall
14th March 2007, 20:15
I am new to the site and have been interested in the comments about the iron ore ships many of you sailed on.

Unfortunately I never did get to sea(always my amibition as a kid) but in the late 60's did work for Carlbom Shipping Agents at Immingham Dock who acted as agents for the ore being imported by BISCO destined forthe steelworks at Scunthorpe.

I remember well the Denholm boats in particular Sir Andrew Duncan, Houlders, Lyle , Cory and many others and was always welcomed on board by the captains with beer etc!!(Frogger)

thall

Hague
14th March 2007, 20:26
I am new to the site and have been interested in the comments about the iron ore ships many of you sailed on.

Unfortunately I never did get to sea(always my amibition as a kid) but in the late 60's did work for Carlbom Shipping Agents at Immingham Dock who acted as agents for the ore being imported by BISCO destined forthe steelworks at Scunthorpe.

I remember well the Denholm boats in particular Sir Andrew Duncan, Houlders, Lyle , Cory and many others and was always welcomed on board by the captains with beer etc!!(Frogger)

thall

Thall,
Not forgetting the ships of John I. Jacobs - Beechwood, Cherrywood etc,etc and those of Silver Line, SilverSand, SilverCrag etc,.
These type of ships were replaced in the early 70s by ships of the Kaiser Fleet (Frisco). Trentwood, Gene Trefethen (130k) and various Panamax (69k).
Elwood Mead did not quite make the delivery due an accident 26.12.72 in English Channel.
Brgds
Hague

non descript
14th March 2007, 21:54
I am new to the site and have been interested in the comments about the iron ore ships many of you sailed on.

Unfortunately I never did get to sea(always my amibition as a kid) but in the late 60's did work for Carlbom Shipping Agents at Immingham Dock who acted as agents for the ore being imported by BISCO destined forthe steelworks at Scunthorpe.

I remember well the Denholm boats in particular Sir Andrew Duncan, Houlders, Lyle , Cory and many others and was always welcomed on board by the captains with beer etc!!(Frogger)

thall

Carlbom Shipping, were and still are one of the nicest companies around. Years ago I took my young son up to Immingham to visit the China Pride and Carlbom (the company and the man) could not have taken more care and interest.

Mick quinn
15th March 2007, 21:52
Calvin

Served on the La Colina Official Number 187793 registered London GRT 7212.48, NRT 3383.70 bhp 4000 from 2 Oct 1973 to 30 November 1973 running between Murmansk and BISCO Workington. Really interesting run, escorted trip ashore in Murmansk to duty free shop only courtesy of AK 47 clad Russian soldiers! Shoreside in Workington was not much better! Was only too glad to get back to Houlder Bros and real ships.

Kind regards

Mick Quinn (ex AB)

calvin
22nd March 2007, 22:40
souter ore carriers were longstone lindisfarne bamburgh castle cheviot dunstanburgh castle alnwick castle then tere was sheaf boats crest,field royal and chartered baltic wasa irish wasa if memoriy serves well souter went on managing ben line ships for a time

john shaw
23rd March 2007, 01:05
Calvin

almost correct with the above mate.

The "Bamburgh" ore carriers are correct-- though the DBC and the Alnwick Castle were actually 105,000dwt bulkers rather than the traditional "ore-carrier"

The "Sheaf" ore-carriers were the Sheaf Wear (later Irish Wasa as mentioned by you, so two bites at the same cherry!) and Sheaf Field.

The other managed ore carrier (Whitwill Cole/Salen) was "Scottish Wasa" (ex Iron Crown)

As to your Ben Line reference, it was the other way round I,m afraid-- Ben Line took over the remaining Souter-owned ships on acquiring the controlling interest of the Sheaf Steam and Bamburgh Shipping companies in 1976

Seemore
23rd March 2007, 01:26
Hi all
Just like to add a few ore carriers I sailed on 1957 River Afton - Bamburgh Castle 1960 - Dalhanna 1960 and Lindisfarne1961, photo of the River Afton would be appreciated
seemore

jd0459
20th June 2007, 20:36
Hi To All The Denholm Lads Do You Recall Unloading In Workington And Going Ashore To The Watering Hols Ie The Coastgard,honky Tonk Ect. Iremember On Lad I Sailed With He Told Me Workington Was The Best, His Name Was Angus Galbraith I Thik He Was From The Isle Of Baara
Jd

Raz Jones
26th November 2007, 18:29
John,
Why didn't you take the tunnel. I thought all the Denholm Orey boats all
had tunnels through the starboard wing tanks.

JC

I don't remember the Gleddoch or Arisaig having a tunnel through the starboard wing tanks but Clarkeden and Clarkavon certainly had them
Regards to All
Ray

Burned Toast
26th November 2007, 20:04
Souter Bros now OSG Still going strong.

Couple of Iron ore Wagons I was on Pennyworth and Knob Lake Dagliesh and CTB Knob Lake unoffical seamans strike 1961 Baltimore. both vessels had tunnels from midships.

ray

muldonaich
27th November 2007, 08:02
I don't remember the Gleddoch or Arisaig having a tunnel through the starboard wing tanks but Clarkeden and Clarkavon certainly had them
Regards to All
Raythere was no tunnels on gleddoch or ormsary kev.

John Cassels
27th November 2007, 08:14
Ray , was never on Gleddoch but the Arisaig was my first ship as 3rd.mate
in 1966 and she did have a tunnel. "Jogi " Blair was master.

Raz Jones
28th November 2007, 02:55
John, I sailed as AB on Arisaig Jan/60 until until June/60, Master was E D Macgregor I am a little confused about tunnel now so I shall take your good word for it, I remember being on Clarkeden and we stole a keg of beer whilst taking stores aboard in Port Talbot and we hid it in tunnel until we sailed, glad to say we got away with it too Ha Ha
Regards Ray

John Cassels
28th November 2007, 08:22
Yes Ray , SantaPortablo brings back many memories . Spent a good part of
the '66 strike there,
Bye the way , E.D. still alive and well. Was operated for cancer not so long
ago but has recovered well. Clarkeden was also my first ship as 2nd.mate in
'68 or '69.
brgds - john

Raz Jones
28th November 2007, 18:23
John, I sailed in Clarkeden on three seperate occasions between 1960 and 65, The Masters were Cormack, Dunnet and Furneaux. I'm glad to hear that ED is still alive and well seemed to be a nice chap as I remember. I myself had surgery for throat cancer five years ago and now have a Trachyostomy, the result I suppose of smoking all those duty free cigarettes and tobacco so many years ago.
Regards-Ray

daytona600
13th April 2008, 18:20
I have only found this one reference to Orecrest. My Father was the Radio Officer on MV Orecrest in the early sixties, and he always referred to her as his favorite ship. Anyone remember her?

Anyone remember Ivanovich vessel "ORECREST" We Had many good visits to Port Talbot when on the Ore Charters in the Sixties, Fondest Memories of the Hotel on the Waterfront.,
Regards/

eddy260
19th May 2008, 21:21
irish wassa theres a ship i havent heard of almost forgot i done a run to murmask on her thanks for jogging the old memory

ron fletcher
19th May 2008, 21:50
Very fond of the Cape Howe asit was my first ship.Did one trip on the Beechwood was't that keen on her.

Pat Kennedy
20th May 2008, 07:17
I sailed in the Pennyworth and the Monksgarth. Both good ships, good crowds and decent grub, but boring as hell because there was nothing to do but chipping, scraping, painting and bloody sugi. I couldnt wait to get back to general cargo ships.
Pat

duffield
26th May 2008, 00:57
Hi all. Mention of the River Afton and Dalhanna brought back memories. Were'nt they managed by Huntings of Newcastle?I sailed on the Duffield after she had been converted from a tanker to a bulk carrier. Only carried one cargo of iron ore before she went on California to Japan run carrying timber. Long trips but great ports at either end.

rokerman
9th July 2008, 21:04
Hi,
I was with Souters from 71 to 75 as deck apprentice, then last 6 months uncertified 3rd Mate. Sailed on Scottish Wasa twice, Longstone, Sheaf Field and Stolt Sheaf. Long time ago but happy memories.
Scottish Wasa and Longstone were iron ore carriers, Sheaf Field general cargo and Stolt Sheaf chemical tanker.
Joined my first ship Scottish Wasa at drydock South Shields. First foreign port Murmansk in January !!!!!!!!



Colin Coates

rokerman
10th July 2008, 18:33
Unless my mind is playing tricks on me the Sheaf Field was a general cargo ship and not an an iron ore carrier. I sailed on the Sheaf Field in the early seventies. I am now doubting my sanity !!!!!!

rokerman
10th July 2008, 20:48
I am now doubting my own name. !!!!!!! I was on a general cargo ship for sure. But it may have been the Sheaf Crest not the Sheaf Field!!!! Being out of the navy for 33 years I have been racking my brain as to the correct name

captsunlight
29th August 2008, 12:20
I was on the Sheaf Field as 2nd Mate in the late 60's it was definately Ore carrier as was the Sheaf Wear.

Cheers
Mike Allan

Peter Cheseldine
5th September 2008, 15:32
Hi all. Mention of the River Afton and Dalhanna brought back memories. Were'nt they managed by Huntings of Newcastle?I sailed on the Duffield after she had been converted from a tanker to a bulk carrier. Only carried one cargo of iron ore before she went on California to Japan run carrying timber. Long trips but great ports at either end.
Dalhanna--managed by Huntings.Sailed on her as Jnr. Eng 1969/70. Only one trip before being transferred to Thamesfield (tanker) in Singapore.If I remember correctly Dalhanna used to roll heavily in drydock!!!
Peter

TonyAllen
8th September 2008, 15:07
Been reading about the ore carriers I did my first 6 months as trainee R/O on the Avistone/GBSV mostly on the La Goulette Bone Algiers Tunis and once to Conakry runs and usually ended up in Middlesbro, Avistone was an ex Fort or
Empire boat if I remember correctly Owned by Aviation & Shipping Co, Jock Purvis was the owner and he had three ex WW2 ships Avisbank Avismere and Avistone. Havent heard what became of the ships or Company but expect
they went the way of all the ore carriers. After Marconi I joined AWA in Australia and now retired in Adelaide. Regards Ern Barrett

Hi sailed on Avistone feb55/April see my reply to the thread under what have you seen that lubbers never will cheers Tony Allen

styne
2nd March 2009, 22:14
Anyone remember Davey Hill chippie..from jarrow?

David Williams
2nd March 2009, 22:41
Hi Calvin.
Did a couple of trips on the Orelia.Port Talbot,Bone(North Africa),
Narvik,Irlam on the Manchester Ship Canal.Nice little ship,but did
roll a bit,but soon get used to it.

Dave Williams(R583900)

alex clark
12th March 2009, 15:30
Anyone remember Davey Hill chippie..from jarrow?

Yes.Davie lived in the next street to me,also did my first trip to sea with him in 1964.MV.Edenmore. We were in collision in the English Channel.Unfortunatley Davie died about 4 years ago. Reg a. clark.

Nick Balls
18th April 2009, 20:55
Saw the Houlders boats but sailed with the opposition (Mavrolean)
I haven't really been following to closely but I sailed on both the Victore and the Finnamore Meadow and remember a few names such as Captain Newson and John Blamires (2/0)
Always the same. Good times on bad ships! Tins of Tennents in Glasgow and Champagne in Murmansk! . I know I was once on the Bridge in dense fog going down the Kola inlet waiting for us to be blow out of the water by the soviet fleet..........They never did ! but fished the 2/E out of the water a couple of nights after we arrived and saved his life!! (Drunk again)
Then it was back to Betty's

Ian J. Huckin
23rd April 2009, 21:38
was on the DUKESGARTH tunnel stbd side of course? creepy place to be in the early hours in bad weather heading midships for the 4 to 8 watch all alone? any pictures of the DUKE?

Rievaulx, Ribblehead, Redcar and Ripon had Stbd tunnels and winter NA was wierd when leaving the engine room going for'd you could see the ship bending quite clearly as the o/h lights disappeared and re-appeared.....(Thumb)

Steven Lamb
25th April 2009, 13:55
Ahoy there ! anybody still around from my 1st trip to sea as Junior Sparks in March 1974 on that mighty fine vessel ? Still picture the faces but some of the names have escaped my "grey matter"
At the time mainly all the Officers onboard were from the Strathclyde region and I believe I was the only English bloke onboard. Nonetheless they made me feel at home and I had a bloody memorable trip ! Think the lecky's name was Dave Sillet ? with his piercing blue eyes he reckoned he was better looking than Paul Newman the actor and could pull any women on two legs !!
My soul mate & senior apprentice was Eddie Morning from Dumbarton his old man worked at the Ballantines whiskey factory down the road and was a local councillor. I'm not ashamed to say that my 1st foreign port was the spoil heaps of Noadibou ! At least the fishing was good !
A couple of runs to Murmansk on the bounce made up for the disappointment of the Sahara as both me & the 2nd mate fell in love with a couple of fine looking Olga's up the road. No chance of getting them back onboard for a ship visit though !!
Southbank Labour Club was a slightly different kettle of fish - as we discharged at Redcar. Being young and innocent at the time me and some of my comrades piled in there for more than a memorable night !
Stayed onboard for approx 3 months during which time I nurtured the taste for Tennants Wee-Goldies (complete with spanner) and 4-Bells dark rum !
The food onboard was wholesome and conjured up under the watchful eye of the Ch Steward Davie who was the minder / keeper of the ships pidgeon "Hector".
The mass majority of us all paid-off under scutiny of HM Customs at Greenock and I for one paid-off in the RED ! Those days it was the silly Marconi 12, 24 or 36 per month thing. Needless to say Bob Porter in the Liverpool office (remember him ?) gave me a good bol...king !! and I reassured him that I'd squared my slopchest / subs by cheque ok. In the same breath I gave Bob a wry smile and declared that i'd had a most memorable 1st trip to sea ! If any of you guys from the Gothland are still with us please e-mail back.

Baltic Wal
25th April 2009, 17:56
Rievaulx, Ribblehead, Redcar and Ripon had Stbd tunnels and winter NA was wierd when leaving the engine room going for'd you could see the ship bending quite clearly as the o/h lights disappeared and re-appeared.....(Thumb)

Rievaulx also had a port tunnel, not sure if it went forward of midships though.

Ian J. Huckin
26th April 2009, 08:11
Rievaulx also had a port tunnel, not sure if it went forward of midships though.

Wal, 100% right about the Port tunnel, did it come out by Chippies shop? that seems to ring a bell.

Meantime, here is what I remember running like a liitle girl aft down the stbd tunnel....creaking, dripping wet, rusty and spookier than crap. Entered the engine room by the central ballast eductor which was fwd of leckies workshop. Down a level (on Rievaulx) to the two DC main air compressors where the 2/E slept. Have I got it right?

Oh happy days....well, there were happier ones....(Thumb)

johnandhelen
6th July 2009, 21:19
Hi to you all,
Just a quick message to daytona 600, I was Apprentice Officer on the
Orecrest in 1960 and the Sparks was nicknamed splash, cant remember his real
name but think it was something Like Waterfall anyway if this is any help
please let me Know, I can add that before I joined The Orecrest My Brother
was 3rd mate on it and that was Derek Simmons, and in fact I had his cabin
when I Joined and yes it was a very good ship, not over keen on the ports of
call but thats another story.

Regards Johnandhelen

stan mayes
8th July 2009, 10:18
Hi John,
Was Captain Jamieson in Orecrest during your time?
Regards
Stan

calvin
1st September 2009, 20:05
hi rokerman the sheaf cargo ships were tyne and crest the wear and field were ore carriers then a sdi4/15 launched as the new sheaf field round 1073

chadburn
4th September 2009, 13:47
Rokerman, Souters had a very close relationship with my old Company Maritime Overseas and at a later date took over the mangement of two of my old ships Har Addir became Yamato and the Har Saggi became the Chihaya. Another vessel of the same class was also managed by Souter's she was the Mount Katherina which became the Mikasa, any knowledge of them?. When I went for my interview for Maritime it was at the Merchant Navy Hotel in Middlesbrough where the Chief was staying and there was also a Souters Super present at the time,(1967).

tsell
4th September 2009, 23:42
My first trip was with Souters, on the 'Sheaf Arrow' 1950. Loaded iron ore at what was then called Factori Franco Belza, up river from Bilbao.

Taff

Thenavigator4
5th September 2009, 00:46
I certainly remember the ore carriers, my first ship was the La Colina a Buries Markes Vessel, Pepel, Narvik, St Johns into Port Talbot and workington. The thing I remeber most was the hosing down and sujiing after sailing! Loading never took more than 18-24 hours!(Ouch) Still I sailed on other bulkers with the company mostly grain (the pain). The 2 new ships had tunnels on both sides, along with government paid for de-gaussing gear in them. Never did work out the logic of the degaussing gear in the middle sixties.
Ernest

heathenscot
16th September 2009, 15:35
Hi All.
My first trip to sea was on the "Joya McCance" as deck-boy ( I was nicknamed "SPIDER" ) from April/62 till June/62 first foreign port was Conakry and I couldn't believe how hot it was. Also went to Murmansk and I couldn't believe how cold it was.
One time we had a dart tournament (crew v Officers) and a party afterwards, a few beers later some carrots and tomatoes were thrown around, and I threw an egg at the Chief mate, I got charged with "Attacking an Officer on the high seas with a blunt instrument" namely one hard boiled egg! Only after I was paying-off was the charge dropped. It sure kept me in check the rest of the trip.
I also sailed on the MONKSGARTH from Aug/69 till Oct/69 as AB, joined her in Bremerhaven, when a whole new crew were flown out. Anyone sail on those ships during the dates I mentioned? if so let me know.
Cheers
Stan Greening (JOCK)

Shipbuilder
19th September 2009, 14:45
Hello again Stan (after 47 years).
I was junior R/O aboard JOYA MCCANCE at the same time you were there. I remember talking to you on the poop the day you joined, but the only name I ever knew you by was Spider.
I remember that everone got on well together from Captain Neale downwards.
I was there at the darts tournament, and remember the egg throwing incident, but I am pretty sure that it landed on the neck of the chief engineer, Len Parr. I can tell you after all these years that the charge of "Attacking an officer with a blunt instrument, namely one hard-boiled egg" was a joke on the part of the Bosun with the chief participating in it. The chief took it for what it was - bit of fun! I remember toward the end of the voyage, the Bosun was on the bridge talking to the mate (Mr. Hedger) when the chief came in. I remember the chief saying, "look, its gone on long enough, look how miserable the poor little sod is, tell him, it was a joke!" The bosun said "Leave it until after payoff, first bit of peace we've had down below!"
To me the JOYA MCCANCE was a wonderful ship, I had had an awful time on my first voyage in Blue Star and it was great to be with such a grand lot as the officers and crew of JOYA MCCANCE. On my three voyages, we did Conakry twice and Seven Islands once, ending in layup at Barry (Docked in Newport). Nearly everyone else transferred to MABEL WARWICK, coming out of layup. My radio company wouldn't let me go, so I was sent to FREDERICK T. EVERARD instead!
Here is a picture I took on the forecastle head on the last morning at sea before layup. I do believe that is you, 2nd from right with just head showing.

Best wishes
Bob Wilson

PS
I met Len Parr again years later and he still remembered the egg incident!

maeken
19th September 2009, 19:56
hi ian, first ship was mv reivaulx. joined her in 1966 as 5th. engineer.
c/eng was ken cole
cheers
frank carroll

THE CAPE CRUSADER
19th September 2009, 20:37
Spent my first trip on the Cape Nelson, joined her June 75 at the General terminus in Glasgow. Sailed a couple of days later to Kirkenes, Norway and after discharging in Glasgow we headed south to Nouhadibou West Africa.
A year later joined the Cape Howe in Belfast dry dock and sailed for Septiba bay Brazil...Great times for a young guy...still not bettered.

trotterdotpom
19th September 2009, 21:32
Shipbuilder and Heathenscot - wow, all that guilt for all those years, finally laid to rest on SN! You can sleep soundly now, Stan - you threw the egg but the yolk was on you!

Great story.

John T.

ernhelenbarrett
20th September 2009, 04:42
My first ship as Trainee Makee-learnie Sparks was the Avistone/GBSV ex
Empire Martaban in 1954 on the Iron Ore run Middlesbro to Tunis, Bone, La Goulette.Algiers,Conakry to name a few, not quite built for the ore trade we did a fair bit of rolling around the ocean, an impressive Shipping Company name of "The Aviation and Shipping Company" commonly known as one of Jock Purves's he had 4 ex wartime built ships, AvisBank,Avismoat,Avismere and Avistone, but dont think the Company lasted too long.
Ern Barrett

TonyAllen
21st September 2009, 13:06
My first ship as Trainee Makee-learnie Sparks was the Avistone/GBSV ex
Empire Martaban in 1954 on the Iron Ore run Middlesbro to Tunis, Bone, La Goulette.Algiers,Conakry to name a few, not quite built for the ore trade we did a fair bit of rolling around the ocean, an impressive Shipping Company name of "The Aviation and Shipping Company" commonly known as one of Jock Purves's he had 4 ex wartime built ships, AvisBank,Avismoat,Avismere and Avistone, but dont think the Company lasted too long.
Ern Barrett

Hi Ern I joined the Avistone at Birkenhead on 12 feb 1955 paid off in middlesbrough 30 April I was a first trip catering boy and I was sea sick for 2 days, and was scubbing the bathroom in my own spew till one of the officers sent me back to my bunk and finished the job for me I grew up on that ship and I have a great affection for her.When I was on blue funnel my dad sent me a newspaper cutting saying she had been in a collision in the med,I dont knowwhat the outcome was I was going to rejoin her in middlesbrough but the pool sent me to blue funnel and I stayed there for quite a while


Kind regards Tony Allen

Shipbuilder
21st September 2009, 19:07
Tony,
AVISTONE became TURKIYE and was finally broken up at Istanbul in 1972.
Bob

patchas
21st September 2009, 21:38
I sailed as a deck apprentice on MV Sagamore ( Furness Withy ) joined in Rotterdam in 1960. Visited Sept Isles, Conakry, Bone Vittoria and many other out of the way places

TonyAllen
21st September 2009, 22:37
Tony,
AVISTONE became TURKIYE and was finally broken up at Istanbul in 1972.
Bob

Bob.thank you, any other news about the collision? Regards Tony

tondav3137
29th September 2009, 14:46
Hi I was on the "Redcar" in 1960 we did Seven Islands, and Vitoria, got out, being chippy I could never get ashore what with ballasting and taking on fresh water. In Vitoria we anchored out for three weeks and then only eight hours along side, by the way the Redcar had a tunnel full length on the starboard side, when ballesting you would leg it down the tunnel open a valve and then leg it back on deck to open the opposite valve on the port side in the hope if you moved fast enough you would keep the ship in trim.

heathenscot
7th November 2009, 15:07
Hi again Shipbuilder/Trotterdotpom.
Your right Bob, that's me on the poop of the "Joya McCance" imagine 47 years ago, I'm now retired and living in Hope. BC Canada.
I sailed again with the Chief Mate ( Mr Hedger) think it was on the CLARKEDEN (could be wrong) 9th/Jan/1965 till 20th/Mar/1965 although on that trip there was another Chief mate so I'm not sure what Mr Hedger's position was.
On the Joya McCance I remember talking to Len Parr ( Chief Engineer ) while he was sun-bathing on deck, and said to him "you get good money for doing next to nothing", he told me "I get paid for what I know, not for what I do". I told him "same with me", he says "Your way over-paid".
I left the navy in 1970, jumped ship (MV ARANDA) in Sydney Australia, got married, left Aus for Toronto Canada, obtained a diploma in Electronics after which I worked in the cable-tv business for 10years, then from 1981 till I retired in 2005, I tested "Inertial Navigation Systems" with Lytton Systems.
A friend and I fish on the Fraser river, and we caught 500lb. of salmon between us last year, and about 300lb. this year, my biggest was 29lb.
I golf 6 days a week, have an electric cart that I drive from my house to the golf course (takes 3 minutes) the weather in Hope is quite mild and we may lose 2-4 weeks golfing in the winter.
So, from deck boy on the Joya McCance 47 years ago till my retirement I'm more fortunate than most. Who else do you know that has seen as much of the world as we have.
Thanks for the memories Bob I wouldn't change a thing, wish I could be back there now, just the one trip. lol.
Regards
Stan (spider)

KenM
11th December 2009, 21:43
Ahoy there ! anybody still around from my 1st trip to sea as Junior Sparks in March 1974 on that mighty fine vessel ? Still picture the faces but some of the names have escaped my "grey matter"
At the time mainly all the Officers onboard were from the Strathclyde region and I believe I was the only English bloke onboard. Nonetheless they made me feel at home and I had a bloody memorable trip ! Think the lecky's name was Dave Sillet ? with his piercing blue eyes he reckoned he was better looking than Paul Newman the actor and could pull any women on two legs !!
My soul mate & senior apprentice was Eddie Morning from Dumbarton his old man worked at the Ballantines whiskey factory down the road and was a local councillor. I'm not ashamed to say that my 1st foreign port was the spoil heaps of Noadibou ! At least the fishing was good !
A couple of runs to Murmansk on the bounce made up for the disappointment of the Sahara as both me & the 2nd mate fell in love with a couple of fine looking Olga's up the road. No chance of getting them back onboard for a ship visit though !!
Southbank Labour Club was a slightly different kettle of fish - as we discharged at Redcar. Being young and innocent at the time me and some of my comrades piled in there for more than a memorable night !
Stayed onboard for approx 3 months during which time I nurtured the taste for Tennants Wee-Goldies (complete with spanner) and 4-Bells dark rum !
The food onboard was wholesome and conjured up under the watchful eye of the Ch Steward Davie who was the minder / keeper of the ships pidgeon "Hector".
The mass majority of us all paid-off under scutiny of HM Customs at Greenock and I for one paid-off in the RED ! Those days it was the silly Marconi 12, 24 or 36 per month thing. Needless to say Bob Porter in the Liverpool office (remember him ?) gave me a good bol...king !! and I reassured him that I'd squared my slopchest / subs by cheque ok. In the same breath I gave Bob a wry smile and declared that i'd had a most memorable 1st trip to sea ! If any of you guys from the Gothland are still with us please e-mail back.

That brought back memories of the Marconi pay system. Was trying to remember Bob Porters name. Ta

calvin
27th February 2010, 14:18
remember souters ore carriers were bamburgh castle lindisfarne longstone cheviot dunstanburgh castle sheaf wear and field also baltic wasa and irish wasa on charter and management the cargo ones were sheaf tyne crest and royal also think they had alnwick castle

chadburn
28th February 2010, 11:37
Souters were very much involved with my old Company Maritime Overseas and went on to manage all of the the last Furness Company built OBO's, four in all.
Har Addir becoming Yamato
Mount Katherina becoming Mikasa
Har Saggi becoming Chihaya
Mount Eden kept her name.
Souters managed the above in the early 1980's.
I served on both the Har Addir (four trips) and one trip on the Har Saggi for Maritime O., before I went on to Reefers. When I was interviewed for the Har Addir ( whilst she was in build) a Souter's Engineering Super was present and that was in 1967 my first Contracting job as it was known in those days.

Ernieab
28th February 2010, 17:28
Hi To All The Denholm Lads Do You Recall Unloading In Workington And Going Ashore To The Watering Hols Ie The Coastgard,honky Tonk Ect. Iremember On Lad I Sailed With He Told Me Workington Was The Best, His Name Was Angus Galbraith I Thik He Was From The Isle Of Baara
Jd

Hi Jd, was just trawling thru the pages for names i might know and noticed Angus Galbraith,I saild with him on the MV Northern Enterprise,owned by ALCAN and managed by Denholms,that was in 1987, I'm sure he was a Barra man.
regards,
Ernie Lindsay

BBBSTEEL
16th April 2010, 07:33
remember souters ore carriers were bamburgh castle lindisfarne longstone cheviot dunstanburgh castle sheaf wear and field also baltic wasa and irish wasa on charter and management the cargo ones were sheaf tyne crest and royal also think they had alnwick castle

I sailed on Sheaf Field (iron ore) Sheaf Field (General Cargo - not an SD14 but a Doxford Engined liberty replacement and a sister to the Sheaf Crest) Did my time on the ore carriers Lindisfarne, Cheviot, Scottish Vasa but being allergic to North Atlantic and appreciative of J A Pan's charms I volunteered for Sheaf Tyne and the others to go world wide. The married men tended to stay around the UK, being tossed around in Neptune's tennis court. My brother preceded me and was still with Souters, on the Dunstanbugh Castle, when I did a ship delivery to Canada and decided to take their dollars for a living.

doc2009
27th September 2010, 00:28
Can anyone what became of the Neas Pioneer Joined her in Hamberg loaded ore in Sweden the over to Philly. I remember she had a tunnel up the starboard side. Myself and another A.B nearly missed her had a good night in Boyles bar, We were made to sweep the hole for keeping her back soon sweated of our hangovers.

John Cassels
27th September 2010, 08:43
Pioneer must be long gone by now.

I was on her in '69 and she had a Spanish crowd . When were you there ?.

David Campbell
28th September 2010, 02:09
Was 2nd Engineer on the Naess Pioneer in 1962 running from Hamburg to Newport News. I would like to hear more, too the Master then was J.B. Whyly and the C/E was D. Smith. Regards.

ARRANMAN35
28th September 2010, 17:48
Pioneer must be long gone by now.

I was on her in '69 and she had a Spanish crowd . When were you there ?.

Hi,
Sold to Greek owners in 1973, broken up, after a severe fire,
at Santander in 1979.

Archie.

doc2009
3rd October 2010, 01:23
Pioneer must be long gone by now.

I was on her in '69 and she had a Spanish crowd . When were you there ?.

Hi John was on her 1971. If remember she had mostlly a scotish crew from the island spoke mainly in gaelic to each other. The rest of use were from of the dock street pool at Algate east.

m.davies343
25th October 2010, 10:12
Hi All
This thread has brought back a lot of memories for me.I was born and raised in Port Talbot.My first ore waggon( and first ship), was the Orecrest, twice!!A total of 9 months1966/7.Also the Clarkavon 1969 and La Colina 1970.After Margam Wharf closed I had the Orotava Bridge 1970/71,Lackenby 1981,and Appleby 1982.The big ships werent the same though.

John Cassels
25th October 2010, 13:46
Hi All
This thread has brought back a lot of memories for me.I was born and raised in Port Talbot.My first ore waggon( and first ship), was the Orecrest, twice!!A total of 9 months1966/7.Also the Clarkavon 1969 and La Colina 1970.After Margam Wharf closed I had the Orotava Bridge 1970/71,Lackenby 1981,and Appleby 1982.The big ships werent the same though.

Ah , Santa Portablo , what memories !.

Is the Grand , the Willow Tree , Lamb and Flag etc . still going strong ?.

wagonmound
3rd December 2010, 21:38
My time in this type of ship was relatively short and uninteresting. I would say the attraction was there for the married man who could expect to be home fairly frequently.

ALAN TYLER
6th December 2010, 15:56
My time in this type of ship was relatively short and uninteresting. I would say the attraction was there for the married man who could expect to be home fairly frequently.

Admittedly the "cargo,s" weren,t too much to talk about, though the places you sailed to were varied and sometimes exciting especially on the smaller ships. Granted the short trips were handy coming back to great ports such as Port Talbot, Birkenhead, Newport, Avonmouth,Hartlepool (of monkey fame) and North Shields.

Ian J. Huckin
6th December 2010, 16:47
I thoroughly enjoyed three years on the Rievaulx and Ribblehead. All the regular NA ports plus the Narvik and Murmansk runs. But also Brasil and Spain...W. Africa was not so good. Ore carrier home ports were all brilliant provided you got the time ashore. I enjoyed being an apprentice/Ore Carrier man....still proud of it.

Warder54
17th September 2011, 10:19
Hi, been fun reading all the Ore carrier posts!
My first trip after NSTS Gravesend was the MV La Estancia bulk carrier in June 1969. Joined with a pal from Thanet Tech catering college Colin French. It was also my first time flying, as I was flown from London to Rotterdam to join the ship - all very exciting! The crew was full of "characters" Peter Crees the chief cook - openly Gay, great cook and a laugh a minute, Shelty an AB always drunk and trying to jump ship - anywhere! he was stopped at the gangway in Monrovia wearing about 6 layers of clothing staggering about hoping his ploy would not be noticed - I'm sure all his fines courtesy of the skipper must have matched his wages on most trips!! Skipper was a Mr Shiells if I remember correctly. I paid off just before Christmas with the princely sum of 106 after bond and deductions - still have the pay slip (*))

Happy days!

calum maciver
17th September 2011, 11:51
Good to read all the stories about the ore carriers,sailed on a few of Denholms in the 60s, Clarkeden,Duncraig twice,Naess Trader in 1972,that was her last trip for Denholms,I believe she was scrapped after that.What a great site keep it up.
Calum Maciver.

shieldrow
8th October 2011, 22:16
Came across an interesting Iron Company ledger when carrying out research for my latest book "The Conside Trilogy".

The ledger contains an entry for every ore carrier that docked at the old Tyne ore terminal from 1953 to 1964 when the terminal closed.
The ledger by either the TIC or Consett Iron Company. Each vessell is named in chronological order from first to last, cargo carried (ore type) not port although if you knew that Kiruna "B" ore was shipped from Narvik and say Carol Lake was Sept Isle then you can work out loading port. The ledger also contains tonnage discharged and when the ship arrived and sailed.
The figures are quite interesting in that 28,828,000 tons were dischaged from a total of 1,347 vessels. The first vessel being the Twickenham (abt 9,000T) although the first official cargo was 15,000 tons of ore from Bone carried by the River Afton. the last ship was Commons Daghestan with a load from Narvik.

The list of ships is interesting in that from what I can see all the larger UK flag ore carriers had at least one trip to the Tyne this includes:-
Huntings- Afton,Dalhanna & Inverfield
Common- All seven, 5 x Iron and two 'stans
Souter - All six. Iron Ore Transport-Ruth Lake, Knob Lake & Sept Isles
Denholms- All five large carriers plus Gleddoch,Crinan, Craigallian & Clarkeden.
Mabel Warwick & Joya Mc Cance plus Oregis, Orelia & Oredian.
Bolton- All four. Pennyworth and Warkworth. Sagamore Edenmore.
Cory- All fourth 'garths. Silverline- 2 Silver, 2 'gates.
Lyle- Cape Franklyn, Nelson, Howe and Baron Inchape.

Others include Trinculo,Finnamore Meadow, Welsh Herald, Victore, Gothland, Foreland, Glyntawe, Rosewood & Oakwood?, Zinnia & Ixia.

Two smaller ones included La Collina and Phillipe LD.

Uglands was also well represented with all their 'ita ships such as Carmencita, Livanita etc as were the old Swedish stalwarts Rautus, Raunala, Porjus and Pajala.

The largest cargo unloaded was 39,583 tons of Cerro Bolivar ore carried by the Liberian Ore Prince owned by National Bulk Carriers in June 1962.

A further interesting trend shown in the ledger was the gradual changeover from traditional cargo ships of circa 9,000T dwt to the specialist ore carriers starting with the River Afton and the Rautus and Raunala.
Unfortunately I have to give the ledger back to its owner but I have gleaned some of the info.

Regards

muldonaich
8th October 2011, 23:10
Came across an interesting Iron Company ledger when carrying out research for my latest book "The Conside Trilogy".

The ledger contains an entry for every ore carrier that docked at the old Tyne ore terminal from 1953 to 1964 when the terminal closed.
The ledger by either the TIC or Consett Iron Company. Each vessell is named in chronological order from first to last, cargo carried (ore type) not port although if you knew that Kiruna "B" ore was shipped from Narvik and say Carol Lake was Sept Isle then you can work out loading port. The ledger also contains tonnage discharged and when the ship arrived and sailed.
The figures are quite interesting in that 28,828,000 tons were dischaged from a total of 1,347 vessels. The first vessel being the Twickenham (abt 9,000T) although the first official cargo was 15,000 tons of ore from Bone carried by the River Afton. the last ship was Commons Daghestan with a load from Narvik.

The list of ships is interesting in that from what I can see all the larger UK flag ore carriers had at least one trip to the Tyne this includes:-
Huntings- Afton,Dalhanna & Inverfield
Common- All seven, 5 x Iron and two 'stans
Souter - All six. Iron Ore Transport-Ruth Lake, Knob Lake & Sept Isles
Denholms- All five large carriers plus Gleddoch,Crinan, Craigallian & Clarkeden.
Mabel Warwick & Joya Mc Cance plus Oregis, Orelia & Oredian.
Bolton- All four. Pennyworth and Warkworth. Sagamore Edenmore.
Cory- All fourth 'garths. Silverline- 2 Silver, 2 'gates.
Lyle- Cape Franklyn, Nelson, Howe and Baron Inchape.

Others include Trinculo,Finnamore Meadow, Welsh Herald, Victore, Gothland, Foreland, Glyntawe, Rosewood & Oakwood?, Zinnia & Ixia.

Two smaller ones included La Collina and Phillipe LD.

Uglands was also well represented with all their 'ita ships such as Carmencita, Livanita etc as were the old Swedish stalwarts Rautus, Raunala, Porjus and Pajala.

The largest cargo unloaded was 39,583 tons of Cerro Bolivar ore carried by the Liberian Ore Prince owned by National Bulk Carriers in June 1962.

A further interesting trend shown in the ledger was the gradual changeover from traditional cargo ships of circa 9,000T dwt to the specialist ore carriers starting with the River Afton and the Rautus and Raunala.
Unfortunately I have to give the ledger back to its owner but I have gleaned some of the info.

Regardsif i remeber right we used to discharge into railway wagons first pub was i think the comercial hotel great place went with a girl from garwood street kev jesus thats along time ago .

TonyAllen
9th October 2011, 00:25
berthed there in1955 on the Avistone my first trip too young for the pub so had to go to the pictures instead I remember that the unloading took so long
the captain made the customs open the bond and the chief steward managed to get 200 woodbines and made them into a parcel to send back home to my dad with a letter in to tell them where I was.he was a lovely man and I wish I could remember his name after all these years,he was from the tees I think
was on her for three trips to north africa Bone Bizerta bone Tony

shieldrow
9th October 2011, 14:04
Avistone did indeed dock at Tyne Dock in 1955, she docked on March 8 and starting discharging her load of 9,450 tons of Quenza or Ouenza ore from Bone straight away and left on March 11th.

Delays could be expected at Tyne Dock if you went to the old North West quay where you discharged direct into rail wagons as did Avisbrook in February 8th 1957 which took seven days to unload a load of 9,513 tons ore Liberian ore from Monrovia.
Normaly Tyne Dock was pretty quick with discharge times between 2 and 4 days depending on ship size and trains to Consett steelworks.
Most of the Purvis ships visited Tyne dock including Avisbrook,stone, vale, glen, ect. These were general cargo ships of circa 9,500 tons and no visits were recorded after 1959 by which time the newer special ore carriers were entering service.

An interesting set of ships that visited the Tyne were Stanhopes Stanbell and Stanfield both of about 13,000 ton dwt, Stanfield was Huntings Tynefield which had been converted from a tanker into a bulk carrier in 1955.

TonyAllen
9th October 2011, 16:33
Sheildrow.I don't dispute what you said but as I recall we where there for a lot longer than 3 days I know we went for bunkers before we left.But it was 56 years ago and my dad was very grateful for the giggies, its good that someone has kept the records but weather future generations would be intrested I'm not to sure, I remember her with fondness being my first ship Regards Tony

CPBLAKE
13th October 2011, 11:20
I sailed on the Welsh Herald out of Newport 7 trips to Seven Islands on the trot in the winter, then the booby prize Mauretania moored to a jetty a mile offshore for 3 days in a sandstorm, then the jackpot Vittoria in Brazil, no compaints about the ship loved it especially the gotaverken diesel main engine,

TOM ALEXANDER
19th October 2011, 06:55
I sailed as a deck apprentice on MV Sagamore ( Furness Withy ) joined in Rotterdam in 1960. Visited Sept Isles, Conakry, Bone Vittoria and many other out of the way places

I too sailed as deck apprentice on the Sagamore, but in 1959. Most interesting port, other than Oxelosund was Bone. When there we were not allowed to have any lines hanging outboard incase a French Foreign Leigionaire should try to stowaway. Curfew of 10 p.m. severely restricted night life in town. Had to search the ship for escaped legionaires just prior to getting under way. Often trhought when descending the chain locker ladder with a flashlight in my mouth that if there really was a legionaire down there, I probably wouldn't get to report it --- ever! Stayed on the ship until about a week after she was laid up in the Blackwater due to a lack of cargoes.

Tony Crompton
19th October 2011, 11:50
Avistone did indeed dock at Tyne Dock in 1955, she docked on March 8 and starting discharging her load of 9,450 tons of Quenza or Ouenza ore from Bone straight away and left on March 11th.

Delays could be expected at Tyne Dock if you went to the old North West quay where you discharged direct into rail wagons as did Avisbrook in February 8th 1957 which took seven days to unload a load of 9,513 tons ore Liberian ore from Monrovia.
Normaly Tyne Dock was pretty quick with discharge times between 2 and 4 days depending on ship size and trains to Consett steelworks.
Most of the Purvis ships visited Tyne dock including Avisbrook,stone, vale, glen, ect. These were general cargo ships of circa 9,500 tons and no visits were recorded after 1959 by which time the newer special ore carriers were entering service.

An interesting set of ships that visited the Tyne were Stanhopes Stanbell and Stanfield both of about 13,000 ton dwt, Stanfield was Huntings Tynefield which had been converted from a tanker into a bulk carrier in 1955.

One of my "Boyhood heroes" as a Kid in Robin Hoods Bay dying to go to sea was Captain "Kaff" Roche who was Master in these ships. He took me one day to see the "Avismere" in the Tees.

Tony

TonyAllen
19th October 2011, 14:57
One of my "Boyhood heroes" as a Kid in Robin Hoods Bay dying to go to sea was Captain "Kaff" Roche who was Master in these ships. He took me one day to see the "Avismere" in the Tees.

Tony

Well would you believe it, Cap roache was the first master I sailed with on the avistone,I was the galley boy and did 3 trips with him,A real gent,and on the third trip my shoes were well worn out (only had one pair )and he gave me a pair of canadian winter shoes that had a lineing inside.he said that I was the first boy to do 3 trips and said he would have me back after the payoff becouse the chief steward had mentioned it to him, but after leave at the pool in liverpool I asked to rejoin they the said she had already sailed so sent me the china boats I'll never forget him and the chief steward,but the cook was an ars'''' so I always ignored him,Turned me from a boy into a youg man Tony Allen

wavedweller
24th October 2011, 14:55
Hello Sparks,
I joined the Clarkeden on the Manchester Ship Canal late December '61. First trip up to Narvik, (froze my bxxxx off). Good job she had the stbd, side tunnel as we would never got to the bridge. 2nd. trip to Almeria, warmer, but very dusty cargo. 3rd. trip. to Poti in Russia. Interesting scenery through the Bosporous especially passing Istanbul. Black Sea ,chilly! Not for me--back to Esso and the Gulf. Take care, regards,
Colin

shieldrow
24th October 2011, 21:15
Ore carrier memories
Sailed on Huntings Dalhanna and River Afton and Souters Lindisfarne.
Typical loading ports were Bone, Oxelsund, Pepel, Seven Islands, Buchanan (Liberia), Conakry and Port Etienne. Port Etienne has reputedly the worlds longest beach something like 2,000.miles long,all the way to Egypt!
Discharge ports were Hartlepool (7 to 10 days on a rapid discharge) never saw such an antiquated ore port, Bidson dock (pretty quick), Rothesay dock as General Terminus Quay was occupied, Tees both Cargo Fleet and South Bank (Dorman Long's), Newport and Ijmuiden in Holland 5 trips Pepel to Ijmuiden on the Afton in succesion.
Also loaded steel coils on the Lindisfarne at Birkenhead after discharging ore at Bidston bound for Genoa in Italy.
Funny never got to my home port of the Tyne although all three ships were there on numerous occasions.
Spent the remainder of my sea time on tankers Thamesfield and Teesfield and the T2 Coral Venture.

Out of intersest I visited Pepel many years after the ore mine at Marampa had been put onto care and maintenance whilst working at a Rutile mine. The whole place was a mess no care and absolutely no maintenance. If members can remember the new ore quay built by Taylor Woodrow with the all glass control room. No a pane was left, not broken but removed and sold to would be house improvers, at the mine( Marampa) most of the mining gear was in pieces, all usefull bits been sold to pay the watchmens wages.

daytona600
27th November 2011, 08:02
Hi John

Doesn't sound like him then. My dad's name was Derek Blackburn and he didn't mention a nickname other than Sparks.
Thanks for the response though.


Hi to you all,
Just a quick message to daytona 600, I was Apprentice Officer on the
Orecrest in 1960 and the Sparks was nicknamed splash, cant remember his real
name but think it was something Like Waterfall anyway if this is any help
please let me Know, I can add that before I joined The Orecrest My Brother
was 3rd mate on it and that was Derek Simmons, and in fact I had his cabin
when I Joined and yes it was a very good ship, not over keen on the ports of
call but thats another story.

Regards Johnandhelen

daytona600
27th November 2011, 08:07
My dad regularly mentioned Captain Jameson when he talked about Orecrest. I can't remember if he was the captain who was sea sick at the beginning of every voyage??

Hi John,
Was Captain Jamieson in Orecrest during your time?
Regards
Stan

Frank P
27th November 2011, 09:15
My time in this type of ship was relatively short and uninteresting. I would say the attraction was there for the married man who could expect to be home fairly frequently.

I agree with you, there was nothing wrong with the one ore ship that I was on (M/S Arabella), the problem was the length of time spent in the loading ports was to short.

Cheers Frank

WEST
27th November 2011, 20:58
Hello Daytona 600 and John. I joined the Orecrest as a cabin boy in Port Talbot on 11th Feb 1960 and left her as Asst Steward in August 61 rejoined her in Feb 62 and left again in June 62 to join the newly built Skycrest as Second Steward where i stayed for 2 years. I can only recall ever having one Sparky and that was indeed Derek Blackburn, we did have an engineer from Stockton called "Splash" Trevor Waterfall was his name and yes John i can recall sailing with your brother Derek although at the time i think he was still a Deck Cadet we were good pals and had more than a few laughs when we got ashore. If I am not mistaken you lived in Thanet, Kent and i can recall you coming into Port Talbot on another vessel once when we were there, would it have been the Carmancita or something similar. We had several Captains during my "stay" I think Captain Quirk a Manxman was the first then Capt Anderson from Broughty Ferry followed by Capt Williamson, and then Anderson again when i finally left. Chief Steward was Billy Hardy from my home town South Shields.Chief Cook Billy Bage from Birkenhead a real character. I can't recall many of the officers but i do remember the 3rd Mate was an obnoxious fat sod who always came to second sitting for meals so that he could "clean out the pantry" i've got a few tales to tell on that as well. I am sure i will remember some more names in due course but for now cheers it was nice to hear the Orecrest mentioned again

WEST
27th November 2011, 21:06
Reference the Orecrest Sorry i just had a rush of blood to the old grey matter and i have got things back to front and i am sure it was you John who i sailed with and your elder brother was Derek

done it
28th November 2011, 18:47
I agree with you, there was nothing wrong with the one ore ship that I was on (M/S Arabella), the problem was the length of time spent in the loading ports was to short.

Cheers Frank
hi frank when were you on arabella, i had a few Norwegian friends on her round about 1959/60, sad to say forgotten there names now long time ago,I sailed on the Norwegian ship essex, 3 months old when I joined her in port talbot still smelled new, then i was on oremina, my first wife came from there, her dad was the lock keeper, had some great times there

Frank P
28th November 2011, 20:04
Hello done it,
I was onboard the Arabella in 1971 for about 5 months, a few of the Norwegian crew lived in the UK and some of them had been onboard for years, the ship was coming to the end of a 10 year charter to British Steel so every trip was unloading in the UK. I have posted a few photos of my time onboard.

Cheers Frank

stores
28th November 2011, 21:01
HI, WOULD THAT FIRST SHIP BE THE TWICKENHAM OF WATTS WATTS AND CO, ? (Scribe)

shieldrow
29th November 2011, 09:27
Yes Stores that was the Watts, Watts Twickenham.
She arrived in the Tyne as was due to discharge at the old Tyne Dock North Quay with a load of 8,256 tons of ore from Pepel with both Marampa concentrates and rounds (lumps) on November 4th 1953, but was sent to the new quay to pre-commision it.
The ship that was destined to "officially" open the quay was Mungo Campbells River Afton at 16500 ton dwt one of the largest if not the largest ore carrier under the Red Ensign at that time. She had been completed by Lithgows a few weeks earlier and her maiden voyage was Bone Algeria to the Tyne with 15,271 tons of Ouenza ore.
She duly arrived in the Tyne on November 24th and officially opened the new facility.
I believe that the TIC thought they should try out all the gear including cranes etc on ore first before the Afton arrived with a cargo of almost twice the size.

The Twickenham took 12 days to unload where'as the Afton only took 5days.
Obviously there were a few "gremlins"!

The book that covers the event and other info is called the "Conside Trilogy"and covers the history of Tyne Dock, Consett Iron Co, railways and Spanish iron ore ports etc.

done it
30th November 2011, 22:23
Hello done it,
I was onboard the Arabella in 1971 for about 5 months, a few of the Norwegian crew lived in the UK and some of them had been onboard for years, the ship was coming to the end of a 10 year charter to British Steel so every trip was unloading in the UK. I have posted a few photos of my time onboard.

Cheers Frank hi frank by 1971 she was a few years old by then , i was at sea for about seven years took up truck driving for 42 years, retired nearly seven years ago, moved to southern spain ive dropped anchor here ,

TOM ALEXANDER
1st December 2011, 08:08
I remember the tunnel on the Denholm ore carriers, down the starboard side. Once in Bone (Algeria) I was sent down the tunnel to look for stowaways, had done this before and it was just a walk in a poorly lit area. However , this time I was walking along and saw a pair of eyes. Did not switch the flashlight on, did not look further---just go the hell out of there and reported my findings. They picked a couple of hands and sent them down---sure enough they came back with a stowaway---felt really sorry for him as he was turned over to whatever authorities. I was about 17 and did not weigh probably more than 140 lbs!

On the Sagamore the tunnel on the port side had all the ballast tank valves (I think) but vaguely remember there also being a tunnel on the starboard side. How come you got the easy job in Bone???? I had to go down the ladder into the forepeak and the anchor locker - needed both hands for the ladder so had to keep the flashlight in my mouth. Damn glad I never found anyone - figured a young deck apprentice would stand little chance against a focused French Foreign Legionaire who wanted out. Anyone remember the little one eyed Arab there (he also turned up in La Goulette) who would chase off the urchins wanting "baksheesh" and then offer to be your guide?

bill mc guire
1st December 2011, 13:45
i done 3four trips to murmansk in s.s.m cape nelson and can,t think of a more miserable place on the face of the earth raining all the timeremember the border gaurds doing a contraband check i the bilgesone steptinto yhe oily bilge and went under over his head he wasn,t a happy chappie when his mates pulled him out and found 2appies and 2 junioners rolling about on the engineroom plates

bill mc guire
1st December 2011, 14:00
done the run up to murmansk3times with scottish ship management on the cape nelson what a miserable dump rained all the time i remember the red army border guards doing a contraband check in the engine room and having to lift the plates for them to check in yhe bilges one stepped into the oily bilge over his head he was not a happy camper when his mates pulled himm out to find us rolling about laughing but a packet of wrigleys calmed him down and we parted as thebest of friends

slats
1st December 2011, 17:05
Hi all. what interesting reading this is, it takes me right back.

I sailed with Denholm's in late sixties - early seventies, on ore carriers of which the Clarkavon, Sir Andrew Duncan, Naess Trader (Fort St Catherine - possibly a tanker) were where my memories come from.
Hearing about Murmansk,Narvic,Sept Isles, Vitoria and of course Nouardibou - With the red cloud visible from about 3 days sailing away!! Terrific.

Dave Slater from South Shields

Ian J. Huckin
2nd December 2011, 22:09
Came across an interesting Iron Company ledger when carrying out research for my latest book "The Conside Trilogy".

The ledger contains an entry for every ore carrier that docked at the old Tyne ore terminal from 1953 to 1964 when the terminal closed.....

Bolton- All four. Pennyworth and Warkworth. Sagamore Edenmore.

Regards

Bolton's Ore Carriers were actually owned by the North Yorkshire Shipping Co. and were Reivaulx, Ribblehead, Ripon and Redcar. All, except Reivaulx, had 2 x 25 ton Scotch boilers with steam auxiliaries and ME driven pumps. Reivaulx had electric aux. All had Doxford LBs

Regards, Ian

chadburn
3rd December 2011, 18:32
Ian, remind's me of walking along the Jetty in 1968 for a night ashore after being landed by the Ferry at Narvik past one of the vessel's you mention, a Motorship style of vessel but with the distinct sound of the Weir's pump droning noise filling the air.

shieldrow
4th December 2011, 14:57
For all who sailed on the ore carriers of the sixties and seventies give a thought to an earlier time when some ore loading ports looked like this.

Can any one guess where it is?

chadburn
4th December 2011, 15:45
Bone.

John Cassels
4th December 2011, 18:47
Narvik ?.

Angus Murray
5th December 2011, 15:52
Google Port Talbot Swansea docks,which should give access to some nostalgic pics of the old PT docks and Margam wharf. Shows Morar,Gleddoch and Orelia discharging. Also various other vessels at lay-bys. Try Home page in site, thence Slide Show - Margam wharf (PDF file).
Maybe someone has already posted this one, if so-apologies!

Angus

Ian J. Huckin
5th December 2011, 18:53
Ian, remind's me of walking along the Jetty in 1968 for a night ashore after being landed by the Ferry at Narvik past one of the vessel's you mention, a Motorship style of vessel but with the distinct sound of the Weir's pump droning noise filling the air.

I was trying to remember just how many electric auxiliaries there were on the "steamer" Doxfords...I came up with FVC pumps, Purifiers/Clarifiers, domestic FW and DW pumps (Megator), TG, vap feed and cond p/ps, radar and the galley dough mixer!!! I'm sure there was more. Interestingly the SG was compound steam recips driving a Heli-Shaw......cheers all...(Pint)

ps...for all you hunters out there I had a supreme Whitetail deer season with four does and two bucks, one of which was a 19 point non-typical....pics available...

duquesa
5th December 2011, 21:08
"Margam wharf"

Great site and super old pics and prints. That Houlder "Orelia" in one of the shots was my first as apprentice. Joined her in Irlam.

DCMARINE
6th December 2011, 12:09
History of the Ore Carriers (The Iron Ladies) by John Harrison in Ships in Focus Records 23, 24, and 25 in 2003. Some had very interesting changes following the completion of their BISCO Charters.
Contact John Clarkson on 01772612855, or sales@shipsinfocus.co.uk, to see if still available anywhere.
Donald Campbell

ebbwjunc
10th December 2011, 12:28
I sailed on the Welsh Herald out of Newport 7 trips to Seven Islands on the trot in the winter, then the booby prize Mauretania moored to a jetty a mile offshore for 3 days in a sandstorm, then the jackpot Vittoria in Brazil, no compaints about the ship loved it especially the gotaverken diesel main engine,

my first trip was on the Welsh Herald in Feb 71 out of Cardiff to Mocamedes. I know that it was about 1.00am freezing cold with snow on the ground when I boarded to work on a compressor and the first person I met was Ken Thurston 3/engr I believe who lived near me and after some arm bending I was persuaded to join them as they would have had to sail short handed. I gave my notice to Bristol Channel Ship Repairers and organized my papers all within three days and signed on as 4/engr. 72 I flew out to Japan to join the Welsh Minstrel met my wife in Australia and when the company stopped sailing out of "OZ" I stayed. My time on the Herald took me to Narvik Vitoria Sept Iles Port Cartier most places several times. I agree that the Gotaverken main unit was good if noisy and I believe reasonably economic.(Pint) loved the Tenants.

shieldrow
16th December 2011, 14:56
For those who tried to guess where the old vessel was loading iron ore the answer is Piquillo on the Cantabrian coast between Santander and Bilbao in Northern Spain.
This was one of about six "cargaderos" or ore loading cantilevers situated on this coast.
These were constructed in the abscence of suitable ports and the close proximity to the mines. This one was built circa late 1860s and loaded until the mid 1960s. Ships would pick a pilot off Casrtro Urdiales or Santander who would navigate the empty vessel to a point below the cargadero and loading would start. As the cargaderos cantilever was fixed, ships would be required to move to fill hatches beyond the reach of the spout.
Although none are in use now and most have been destroyed, one has been preserved at Dicido about 10kms East of Castro. This one was still being used upto about 1980 to load iron ore from Setares mines for shipment to AVHs blastfurnaces on the Rio Navion near Bilbao.
One of the most famous cargaderos was at Saltacaballo, this was where the British freighter Blackhill loaded its last cargo of iron ore bound for the Tyne or Tees before being sunk in the Thames estuary in late 1939.
It was also the point where the German freighter Baldur was sunk whilst loading by the submarine HMS Sceptre.
If any of the viewers loaded from these or similar ports I would be interested to know?
I have further info/photos if anyone is interested!

Runrig
21st December 2011, 22:50
History of the Ore Carriers (The Iron Ladies) by John Harrison in Ships in Focus Records 23, 24, and 25 in 2003. Some had very interesting changes following the completion of their BISCO Charters.
Contact John Clarkson on 01772612855, or sales@shipsinfocus.co.uk, to see if still available anywhere.
Donald Campbell

See also : http://www.coastalshipping.co.uk/ships-in-focus-record/457-ships-in-focus-record-23-1901703207.html

Peter Trodden
12th January 2012, 12:29
Hi all,
I sailed on a few of the Ore Boats mentioned on this thread.
DUNADD. 15.2.57. 2 trips Birkenhead-Bone,Algeria. B/head
RIPON. 26.3.63. B/head-- Vitoria,Brazil. -B/head.
DALHANNA.20.2.65. B/head--Nouardibou--Hartlepool.
KNIGHTSGARTH.12.10.65. B/head--Lulia,Sweden.--South Shields.
I enjoyed my various trips on Ore Boats. Firstly,they were handy on joining day just down the road from where I lived. After discharging at Bidston Ore Dock they would lay at Reas Wharf or Cavendish Quay taking on stores,bunkers and some make-ups to the crew. I was mostly a cargo boatman but now and then a trip in an Ore Boat was a break from Derricks,Jumbo's ect, But as Pat Kennedy said earlier the deck work was mostly chipping and soojee jobs that got a bit monotonous day after day. One exception for me was the RIPON.
During her discharge at Bidston Dock she sustained quite a bit of damage from the Grabs to the heavy timber cladding that lined her cargo holds,so before we sailed we loaded a stack of heavy timber for repairs. All the way down to Brazil we worked with the Chippie removing and replacing the damaged timber(weather permiting)
We went to Anchor outside Vitoria for 8 days. We were told that the Japs had a large contract for X amount of Ore and thier ships had priority to the berths(Ouch)ttfn Peter.

trotterdotpom
12th January 2012, 12:45
I was on Mabel Warwick, Iron Crown, Dunkyle, Cape Franklin (for a day) and Victore. Seven Islands, Monrovia, Lower Buchanan, Vitoria, Tubarao (just outside Vitoria), Nouhadibou, Murmansk, maybe more, I forget. Pretty easy going ships.

I thought I'd seen the last of iron ore until I came to Australia and discovered ... Port Hedland. Oh no!

John T

Peter Trodden
12th January 2012, 19:34
John T,
Yes I believe there are many ore boats trading out of Oz. Just before xmas I was in touch with my cousin who lives in Brisbane and he is Ch/Cook on the Iron Yandi. Gordon Cavanagh is his name,and has been on Her for 3yrs on the triangle trade(??) ttfn
Peter.

trotterdotpom
12th January 2012, 22:05
Thanks Peter, good to know that there are still a few Aussies employed at sea.

The"triangle" used to refer to ships taking coal from eastern Australia to Japan, Korea, etc, then returning via northwest Australia and loading Iron ore for Port Kembla and Newcastle in NSW. The ships were huge bulkies though, not the 15000 ton BISCO boats.

Not sure what the "triangle" refers to now as the steel industry shut down years ago in NEwcastle and is winding down to nothing in Port Kembla. It may even be finished already, not sure.

John T

John Cassels
13th January 2012, 08:39
I was on Mabel Warwick, Iron Crown, Dunkyle, Cape Franklin (for a day) and Victore. Seven Islands, Monrovia, Lower Buchanan, Vitoria, Tubarao (just outside Vitoria), Nouhadibou, Murmansk, maybe more, I forget. Pretty easy going ships.

I thought I'd seen the last of iron ore until I came to Australia and discovered ... Port Hedland. Oh no!

John T

When were you on the Dunkyle John ?.

Was on her twice ,'64 as apprentice and '72 as 2nd.mate.

trotterdotpom
13th January 2012, 09:44
Think it was about '71 John. I remember being stuck at anchor for about 3 weeks in TeesBay because of a dock strike in Hartlepool - could see my sister's house at New Marske.

John T

beedeesea
13th January 2012, 19:07
When were you on the Dunkyle John ?.

Was on her twice ,'64 as apprentice and '72 as 2nd.mate.

Did my stint as Junior R/O on Dunkyle in '62, along with another SN member, "Argyll", who was Senior Apprentice at the time.

Brian

michael charters
13th January 2012, 19:21
On the Sagamore the tunnel on the port side had all the ballast tank valves (I think) but vaguely remember there also being a tunnel on the starboard side. How come you got the easy job in Bone???? I had to go down the ladder into the forepeak and the anchor locker - needed both hands for the ladder so had to keep the flashlight in my mouth. Damn glad I never found anyone - figured a young deck apprentice would stand little chance against a focused French Foreign Legionaire who wanted out. Anyone remember the little one eyed Arab there (he also turned up in La Goulette) who would chase off the urchins wanting "baksheesh" and then offer to be your guide?

Tunnel on port side only on Sagamore ,lecky

Blackal
14th January 2012, 15:15
Google Port Talbot Swansea docks,which should give access to some nostalgic pics of the old PT docks and Margam wharf. Shows Morar,Gleddoch and Orelia discharging. Also various other vessels at lay-bys. Try Home page in site, thence Slide Show - Margam wharf (PDF file).
Maybe someone has already posted this one, if so-apologies!

Angus

I still remember, when sailing with my father on the Gleddoch - transferring from launch to the ship in Narvik - via a rigid wooden ladder, held away from the hull at the bottom - by an empty 45gal oil-drum lashed to the ladder.
I didn't climb the ladder (I was 8 yrs old and had the build of a porridge-spirtle) - the bosun gave me a piggy-back!

I can still remember the vision of the Lofoten Islands from then (1965)

Happy days!

Al :)

shieldrow
25th January 2012, 14:06
Pepel, The phoenix rises from the ashes.

For many of us that visited Pepel Sierra Leonne in the fifties, sixties and earlier might be interested in this post!

After visiting Pepel on numerous occasions on Huntings River Afton and Dalhanna, plus one trip on the Lindisfarne I was interested to find out the old port has re-opened for business.

A little history first. The Iron ore deposits at Marampa in Sierra Leone were first mined in 1933 with shipments starting in September of that year by a company called Delco, this company was later to be controlled by William Baird Mining and others.
To ship the product the company built a port on the Rokel River (upstream from Freetown) at Pepel.
The first loading point at Pepel was a jetty with a fixed conveyor (old jetty) later in the early sixties a new loading jetty was constructed by Taylor Woodrow consisting of two loading conveyors with luffing and slewing capabilities. To connect the port to the mine a 74km 3ft 6in railway was constructed.
However by early 1975 Delco was in trouble, leading to the mine closing.
A brief attempt to restart was tried in 1983 but failed.
When I visited Marampa in 1980 while working in SL I found the mine a mess with most of the plant vandalised and never thought I would see the day it was re-opened.
Now however a company called African Minerals has developed a new orebody at Tonkolili about a further 126km east of Marampa. This new company has reinstated the old 74km Pepel-Marampa railway and constructed a further 126km of new track.
At Pepel the shiploader has been refurbished and the first shipment of ore (about 40kt) has been shipped to China.
The phase one plan is to load transhipment vessels/barges at Pepel and transload into Capesize vessels in Freetown Harbour.
The company on their website have a video showing the operation and the loading of the first vessel at Pepel.

Erimus
20th February 2012, 22:32
I still remember, when sailing with my father on the Gleddoch - transferring from launch to the ship in Narvik - via a rigid wooden ladder, held away from the hull at the bottom - by an empty 45gal oil-drum lashed to the ladder.
I didn't climb the ladder (I was 8 yrs old and had the build of a porridge-spirtle) - the bosun gave me a piggy-back!

I can still remember the vision of the Lofoten Islands from then (1965)

Happy days!

Al :)


Well this thread brings back memories.......Narvik.

As the then Ship Scheduling Controller for British Steel I spent my first wedding anniversary(1972) on the Livanita ( JJ Ugland) from Tyne to Narvik, in the owners suite, force 5 to start then up to 9 until the Lofoten Islands.... we were both somewhat unwell at time and arranged to go ashore on the Sunday morning in Narvik.....My wife went down the ladder first and neither of us realised that there was about 12ft between the bottom and a very small smelly boat...anyway we jumped and the smell was awful...landing in Narvik we went for a wander and all the shops,bus stations etc were closed.

As Livanita wasn't berthing till afternoon I went on the scrounge and called onboard another of 'my' ships, the Dalhanna (was Mungo Campbell by then Huntings)...spying a scruffy man on deck I asked for the Captains cabin.....'who wants him?'...so I told him...... Ah he said I have been waiting to meet the man that only sends us to Seven Islands or Murmansk and never down the African Coast!!

That was the Captain and on a promise of a warm trip next time we were given a Roast Chicken dinner..

geoff

chadburn
21st February 2012, 13:47
You missed a treat at Narvik namely their War Museum (in aid of the Red Cross), the equipment on show in those days was not "nailed down" or behind glass and you were not banned from touching it (with or without gloves) as long as you put it back!!
Market tomorrow, Barkers for tea and fancies.

Erimus
21st February 2012, 14:02
You missed a treat at Narvik namely their War Museum (in aid of the Red Cross), the equipment on show in those days was not "nailed down" or behind glass and you were not banned from touching it (with or without gloves) as long as you put it back!!
Market tomorrow, Barkers for tea and fancies.


...and I mean nowhere was open..not even the churches! We did get to admire lots of window boxes with begonias in...How did they get so large we asked 'Midnight Sun' was the reply...

Barkers for tea & fancies..not my scene.....Garthway Sandwich Bar for bacon butties.

geoff

Erimus
21st February 2012, 17:05
Pepel, The phoenix rises from the ashes.

For many of us that visited Pepel Sierra Leonne in the fifties, sixties and earlier might be interested in this post!

After visiting Pepel on numerous occasions on Huntings River Afton and Dalhanna, plus one trip on the Lindisfarne I was interested to find out the old port has re-opened for business.

A little history first. The Iron ore deposits at Marampa in Sierra Leone were first mined in 1933 with shipments starting in September of that year by a company called Delco, this company was later to be controlled by William Baird Mining and others.
To ship the product the company built a port on the Rokel River (upstream from Freetown) at Pepel.
The first loading point at Pepel was a jetty with a fixed conveyor (old jetty) later in the early sixties a new loading jetty was constructed by Taylor Woodrow consisting of two loading conveyors with luffing and slewing capabilities. To connect the port to the mine a 74km 3ft 6in railway was constructed.
However by early 1975 Delco was in trouble, leading to the mine closing.
A brief attempt to restart was tried in 1983 but failed.
When I visited Marampa in 1980 while working in SL I found the mine a mess with most of the plant vandalised and never thought I would see the day it was re-opened.
Now however a company called African Minerals has developed a new orebody at Tonkolili about a further 126km east of Marampa. This new company has reinstated the old 74km Pepel-Marampa railway and constructed a further 126km of new track.
At Pepel the shiploader has been refurbished and the first shipment of ore (about 40kt) has been shipped to China.
The phase one plan is to load transhipment vessels/barges at Pepel and transload into Capesize vessels in Freetown Harbour.
The company on their website have a video showing the operation and the loading of the first vessel at Pepel.

Thanks for this...always wondered what happened to Pepel as in my early days we loaded there for Gjers Mills Ayresome Wharf in Middlesbrough and almost nowhere else later for mainly South Wales. The London Agents for Wm Baird were Fergusson Wild in St.Helens Place, off Bishopsgate, which was a couple of doors from our BISC(ore)Ltd offices...

Although the port was in warmer climes it was not popular with the ships as there was generally a 'no shore leave' ban......we did have some Chinese crew who did 'go ashore' and who had to repatriated on arrival in the Tees....and the only photos I ever saw of the place were of huge trenches to take away the rainfall.....

geoff

p.s. Can you remember who the Master was on Lindisfarne please?.

John Cassels
21st February 2012, 18:53
Loaded at Pepel end '63 on the Crinan for Middlesborough , but thought it
was Cargo fleet ? . or has the memory finally gone >

Erimus
21st February 2012, 20:19
Loaded at Pepel end '63 on the Crinan for Middlesborough , but thought it
was Cargo fleet ? . or has the memory finally gone >

In 1963 you were possibly correct as they could make more money out of sl&g at that time than steel.....Gjers Mills closed in 1966....

geoff

chadburn
21st February 2012, 20:28
Your cargo would be for Cargo Fleet Iron and Steelwork's, the Jetty was just up river from Smith's on the same side, they also exported sl&g usually in smaller vessel's like the Gertrude and Otrude Mueller. Lackenby Wharf which most will remember was just downriver from Smiths.

Erimus
21st February 2012, 21:19
Your cargo would be for Cargo Fleet Iron and Steelwork's, the Jetty was just up river from Smith's on the same side, they also exported sl&g usually in smaller vessel's like the Gertrude and Otrude Mueller. Lackenby Wharf which most will remember was just downriver from Smiths.

Yes the Ottomueller vessels kept the Tees almost as their home port for years.....when I was with Constantines we had them running potash from Wismar & Antwerp all the time ( we handled 700 ships a year through that office).......Lackenby Wharf eventually turned into Lackenby Dock where the first vessels to use it were Silvercrag and, I think, Sheaf Field where we had them in partial lay-up during the depression about 1962/63 ...Lackenby Dock became,as you will know, Tees Dock...
geoff

chadburn
22nd February 2012, 14:09
The Mueller's, the Tholstrups and the Breore's were very popular with one particular Tug, it's Skipper and his Mate who was a sly old Fox. Do you remember the incident? it was around 1958.

shieldrow
22nd February 2012, 14:35
Erimus

Regarding the Lindisfarne the Master was Dodson or possible Robson and the Chief Engineer was Bill Collins, we brought a couple of cargoes into the Tees, one from Port Etienne for Cargo Fleet, then in ballast to the Tyne for drydock (middle dock) and later in early August 1968 Seven Islands to Eston jetty on the Tees where I payed off prior to shore leave with intent to join the Sheaf Mount for trading between Australia and Japan. But personal problems changed these plans and went to Africa instead.

Erimus
22nd February 2012, 18:26
The Mueller's, the Tholstrups and the Breore's were very popular with one particular Tug, it's Skipper and his Mate who was a sly old Fox. Do you remember the incident? it was around 1958.

No, remind me please........? I did start on the Tees in 1958 but we saw plenty of the Ortrud & Gretchen Mueller but we didn't handle Gbr.Breore vessels.....Tholstrups I remember well but didn't do much with them till a lot later...

geoff

Erimus
22nd February 2012, 18:27
Erimus

Regarding the Lindisfarne the Master was Dodson or possible Robson and the Chief Engineer was Bill Collins, we brought a couple of cargoes into the Tees, one from Port Etienne for Cargo Fleet, then in ballast to the Tyne for drydock (middle dock) and later in early August 1968 Seven Islands to Eston jetty on the Tees where I payed off prior to shore leave with intent to join the Sheaf Mount for trading between Australia and Japan. But personal problems changed these plans and went to Africa instead.

There was a Captain Robson at one time...George I think....


geoff

chadburn
23rd February 2012, 12:46
No, remind me please........? I did start on the Tees in 1958 but we saw plenty of the Ortrud & Gretchen Mueller but we didn't handle Gbr.Breore vessels.....Tholstrups I remember well but didn't do much with them till a lot later...

geoff

As the subject is off Piste a little and "to protect the innocent" (where have I heard that before) I will pm you. Regard's

Erimus
23rd February 2012, 21:13
As the subject is off Piste a little and "to protect the innocent" (where have I heard that before) I will pm you. Regard's

NO PM recewived yet???

geoff

chadburn
24th February 2012, 17:37
NO PM recewived yet???

geoff

It is now(Thumb)

Spurling Pipe
26th February 2012, 11:16
Nouhadibou (Port Etienne) ring any bells. Charming place.

Shipbuilder
26th February 2012, 11:30
Yes - Port Etienne - I had my 21st birthday there aboard Sagamore Ship next to us was Silversand and R/O there was having his 21st as well!
Bob

Erimus
26th February 2012, 11:39
I was in the,then, Port Etienne in 1968 in a sandstorm as part of a steel industry party visiting what was then the Miferma Mines...later called Tazadit & F'derik...I thought the town itself quite fascinating but then I had not been to any Arab towns at the time....

En route we were told to buy a couple of bottles of Scotch ( JW Black Label) as gifts for the European Mining engineers..mainly French & Russian....when customs checked our bags at Fort Gourard they carefully removed one bottle each!

geoff

Spurling Pipe
26th February 2012, 11:40
Interesting! I was in Silversand. What date Bob?

Tazadit.....memories

trotterdotpom
26th February 2012, 11:52
Geoff, that sand storm was still going in 1970 when I was on Dunkyle. I suspect it still is.

John T

Erimus
26th February 2012, 12:06
Geoff, that sand storm was still going in 1970 when I was on Dunkyle. I suspect it still is.

John T

We were there a week and apart from the day we landed it apparently was clear...we were flown over the coast and shown the moving sand dunes which could jump about 50yds a night....

geoff

John Cassels
26th February 2012, 18:47
Geoff, that sand storm was still going in 1970 when I was on Dunkyle. I suspect it still is.

John T

Ah John , the Dunkyle , tears fill my eyes , thankfully was never
at NoddieDoddy on her.

Erimus
26th February 2012, 19:40
Ah John , the Dunkyle , tears fill my eyes , thankfully was never
at NoddieDoddy on her.

One of the first full pay-offs I did was on the Dunkyle at Ichaboe Buoys on the Tees....started well as the ferry boat broke down and we went past the buoys for half a mile...not unusual with that boat..

Because of the timing of the pay-off we missed lunch but were told that we would have a special Scottish Afternoon Tea.......Smoked Haddock...great we all ordered it..Just as the man from The Federation was taking a bite another ship was anchored alongside, thump,causing the haddock to hit deck.....did it flake No. did it collapse again No...did it get eaten...No again...it was still in one piece as all of ours were....So the man from the Union went to the Galley and 15minutes later a splendid curry appeared...we didn't get anything to wash it down with...not until we called at the Baltic on the way home!

geoff

Spurling Pipe
26th February 2012, 20:04
Geoff,

I have memories of a taxi firm used by BISCO agency department in Middlesborough. Owner was a tall ginger man named George???

Dave

Erimus
26th February 2012, 21:49
Geoff,

I have memories of a taxi firm used by BISCO agency department in Middlesborough. Owner was a tall ginger man named George???

Dave

Can't place a George Dave......they mainly used Boro Taxis in my days (1960-64 before London) and the owner was called Walter. I'm sure I would have remembered a ginger one.....there was a redheaded girl though...worked for her Dad who had a red Humber Hawk.

geoff

calvin
27th February 2012, 12:07
remeber it was boro taxis and used lots ford zeyhers zodiacs and hawks the ginger one u on about could be the taxis from south bank next to queens and junction pubs think owner called reed or chesworth

Spurling Pipe
27th February 2012, 12:49
Your probably right!

Erimus
27th February 2012, 12:50
Your probably right!

New one on me...learn something everyday! The ones in Station Road were either Nelsons or Station Taxis.......

geoff

Spurling Pipe
27th February 2012, 16:49
There was a Margaret working in the dock office in Redcar. Or is my memory playing tricks again?

Erimus
27th February 2012, 17:02
There was a Margaret working in the dock office in Redcar. Or is my memory playing tricks again?

Again spot on.......I worked with her briefly when she first joined BSC but she only retired fairly recently. She is married to Capt.John Black one of the Tees Port Superintendents now also retired. ..she lives about 10 miles from me...but I rarely see her.

geoff

Spurling Pipe
27th February 2012, 18:20
She was very efficient and pleasant with it.

Dave

Erimus
27th February 2012, 21:11
She was very efficient and pleasant with it.

Dave

Indeed she was and I'll mention this exchange next time we do meet..

geoff

para handy clyde
9th April 2012, 22:18
Hello All.Great to read all the posts about the ore wagons.I sailed on the.Oremina of Houlders.catering boy first trip.Joined her in rothsay dock in Glasgow.Full Peanut uniform(Mothers Orders)you can imagine the reception when i stepped on board.I also sailed on Cape Franklin of scottish ship management.I remember an incident off hartlepool with the Franklin when The Ravensworth scraped along side of us and we needed a tug to pull us apart.
happy days

done it
16th April 2012, 08:24
hi para handy . when did you sail on the oremina i sailed on her about 1959 out of port talbot

para handy clyde
16th April 2012, 17:50
Hello Done it.I sailed on the Oremina 9thfeb1967 to24th June1967.Just checked discharge book.How strange is this.I paid off in Port Talbot.I loved the town.All the people were very friendly to us seaman.Cheers for replying to my post.

1234balerman
29th October 2012, 10:45
anyone sailed on the dalhana? ore carrier earley seventies

Erimus
29th October 2012, 14:39
anyone sailed on the dalhana? ore carrier earley seventies

Another one of 'my ships' Had lunch on her in Narvik September 3rd 1972...roast chicken dinner..Captain was, I think, called Smith and from Sedgefield.........had to swap a couple of voyages to Nouadhibou for that lunch for wife and myself....we were on Livanita at the time.

geoff

1234balerman
29th October 2012, 14:45
I was on her off and on for a few trips started as cabin boy finnishing as 2nd cook 1970 to about 1975

A.D.FROST
29th October 2012, 14:49
anyone sailed on the dalhana? ore carrier earley seventies

Front cover of "Looking Back At BulkCarriers" by Andrew Wiltshire

oldseamerchant
30th October 2012, 13:57
Can't decide which weakened the structure of Iron Ore carriers more. The carriage of the Ore itself and the associated BMs & SFs or the appalling discharge regime in places like Redcar in particular. No Tankside Brkt was safe!!!! Not uncommon after discharging +100K to remain alongside for several days rebuilding the ship (well, would you believe the holds??)

A.D.FROST
30th October 2012, 15:38
Can't decide which weakened the structure of Iron Ore carriers more. The carriage of the Ore itself and the associated BMs & SFs or the appalling discharge regime in places like Redcar in particular. No Tankside Brkt was safe!!!! Not uncommon after discharging +100K to remain alongside for several days rebuilding the ship (well, would you believe the holds??)

Including Bidston(Birkenhead)Left the Hopper side wing tanks like a cauldron.(?HUH)

Erimus
30th October 2012, 16:25
Including Bidston(Birkenhead)Left the Hopper side wing tanks like a cauldron.(?HUH)

You can add Newport and Immingham to that!

geoff

John Cassels
30th October 2012, 19:41
Can't decide which weakened the structure of Iron Ore carriers more. The carriage of the Ore itself and the associated BMs & SFs or the appalling discharge regime in places like Redcar in particular. No Tankside Brkt was safe!!!! Not uncommon after discharging +100K to remain alongside for several days rebuilding the ship (well, would you believe the holds??)

Apart from the well documented grab damage , the loading/
discharging regime didn't help.
Remember once loading in under an hour at Seven Islands and
discharging at Margam in 12 hours.
Just imagine what this would do to SF's and Bending M's.

Denholm ore boats were wood sheathed up the sides ?. More than
40 years ago now so can be forgiven for asking !.

Malky Glaister
30th October 2012, 19:52
Dead slow ahead past the Seven Islands jetty !! loaded!!!

five weeks discharge in Barry!!!

regards

Malky

oldseamerchant
30th October 2012, 20:09
There was a story circulating about a ship 'Cerro Bolivar'???? which having discharged at Bidston and crossing the Bay en-route Vittoria the Mate heard a persistent 'thud' in one of the holds. On inspection....yes you guessed it.....one of the bulldozers had been left onboard.

Any truth in that Erimus?

Erimus
30th October 2012, 20:36
There was a story circulating about a ship 'Cerro Bolivar'???? which having discharged at Bidston and crossing the Bay en-route Vittoria the Mate heard a persistent 'thud' in one of the holds. On inspection....yes you guessed it.....one of the bulldozers had been left onboard.

Any truth in that Erimus?

Personally I don't remember that one but it did happen.....one Christmas Eve a ship desperate to get out before the dockers went to the pub left port and when she returned there was a skid loader perched on top of the ore...another had cactus grabs impaled in her tanktops,between Christmas & New Year, and had to drydock to get them removed safely...both these incidents were in the early 60's before the majority of the 'new' fleet was operational...so they were probably ships like the Globe Trader or the Sirefjell rather than Denholms/Boltons vessels...

rgds
geoff

oldseamerchant
30th October 2012, 20:40
Spent a little time 'Googling' since post re ships name.She was a Navios owned or chartered vessel can't be sure which.

Erimus
30th October 2012, 21:04
Spent a little time 'Googling' since post re ships name.She was a Navios owned or chartered vessel can't be sure which.

Yes she was one of the older Navios Corporation vessels registered in Nassau but in effect part of United States Steel Corporation who used them exclusively from Puerto Ordaz on a worldwide basis.....ships like this and the old Pantokrater were eventually replaced by the River Class...i.e Rhine Ore, Weser Ore etc......which were 19100 SDWT ( therefore could only do 17000 into Bidston).....or the Rio class which were about 23000 sdwt....i.e Rio Orinocco was a regular into Newport.

geoff

Malky Glaister
30th October 2012, 21:31
Some well remembered names there Geoff !!

regards

Malky

Erimus
30th October 2012, 21:41
Some well remembered names there Geoff !!
regards

Malky


I'm finding that this Forum is good mental exercise in my dotage!!
When I first joined I sat down and for the first time for years wrote down the names of the old BISCO fleet...some were obvious but others needed head scratching.....thats what so go about SN!

geoff

oldseamerchant
31st October 2012, 18:23
Any experiences running to Port Kamsar for Bauxite?

garry Norton
1st November 2012, 02:21
From memory the Fernie and Aurora were both ore carriers and were also used for other cargoes

Erimus
1st November 2012, 10:03
From memory the Fernie and Aurora were both ore carriers and were also used for other cargoes

To my knowledge we didn't use either of the above on voyage charter in my days..

geoff

done it
5th November 2012, 19:40
done it;555864]hi frank by 1971 she was a few years old by then , i was at sea for about seven years took up truck driving for 42 years, retired nearly seven years ago, moved to southern spain ive dropped anchor here just to add, she was 3 months old when i signed on in port talbot

oldman 80
6th November 2012, 21:21
Can't decide which weakened the structure of Iron Ore carriers more. The carriage of the Ore itself and the associated BMs & SFs or the appalling discharge regime in places like Redcar in particular. No Tankside Brkt was safe!!!! Not uncommon after discharging +100K to remain alongside for several days rebuilding the ship (well, would you believe the holds??)


(Applause)
Now we are talking !!!!
Consider now the OBO.
I never carried a dry bulk cargo into the Tyne/Tees area.
However I did many into Dunkirk from US east coast (Norfolk, Newport area).
It seemed to me that the stevedores there had but one objective, namely to do as much damage as they possibly could.
I saw transverse side frames ripped clean out of the ship, not a hold ladder left in place, punctures in hoppers and tank tops - the list goes on and on.
Complete discharge and sail - next port Hound Point (for example) to load crude oil for US east coast.
Laytime / cancellation - 24hours after departure Dunkirk.
Just a bloody nightmare - all hands and the cook out there welding welding and welding.
Then of course came the pollution, the prosecutions, and the start of the criminalisation of masters, which inevitabley, sooner or later would lead to the criminalisation of all who manned such vessels.
Shame Shame Shame - No more and no less than Shame.
Back in H.O. though - it was regarded as a joke.
Shame on them too , over and over again.
But that's management - I don't think the owners regarded it as so amusing.
(coal of course isn't high density but the damages inflicted on the vessel and subsequent "repairs" - well there effect was - shall we say "latent" - next charter iron ore, that is if you got there.)

NINJA
7th November 2012, 08:36
A colour portfolio book has been published, LOOKING BACK AT BULK CARRIERS with a lot of excellent colour photos of ore carriers in. Some of the old ones include, Wellpark, Cydonia and Queensgarth.

John Cassels
7th November 2012, 09:03
OM'80 , you forgot to mention the inherent problems in the carraige and
cleaning from coal .
Like you in Dunkirk , used to have constant battles with the stevedores re
discharge. On one occasion ( with Richards Bay coal ) had given them a letter
prior discharge and still they left vast amounts up behind tripping brackets
etc. We called down a surveyor from the nautical court who ordered the
stevedores to properly complete the discharge.

Apart from that , sticky coal played havoc with the operating systems -
fixed ullage systems, permajets , portable heating coils etc , etc.

PS ; Sorry folks , this post is on wrong thread and nothing to do
with the ore carriers.

oldseamerchant
7th November 2012, 09:26
Agree!

John Cassels
7th November 2012, 09:32
Agree!

To what ? , sticky coal problems or wrong thread ?.

Erimus
7th November 2012, 09:42
A colour portfolio book has been published, LOOKING BACK AT BULK CARRIERS with a lot of excellent colour photos of ore carriers in. Some of the old ones include, Wellpark, Cydonia and Queensgarth.

Thanks Ninja..........I'll look out for that one............memories!

geoff

NINJA
7th November 2012, 10:37
Geoff,

ISBN number, 978-1-902953-58-8

Bought it at the Ian Allan bookshop Manchester.

Regards

Tom.

oldseamerchant
7th November 2012, 10:53
Both!

Erimus
7th November 2012, 11:34
Cheers..daughter can buy it for me for Christmas!

geoff

Malky Glaister
7th November 2012, 12:07
Geoff,

Ian Allan bookshop is just outside Piccadilly Station. There is another outside New Street station Birmingham.

Might get a copy myself.

regards

Malky

Erimus
7th November 2012, 12:11
Geoff,

Ian Allan bookshop is just outside Piccadilly Station. There is another outside New Street station Birmingham.

Might get a copy myself.

regards

Malky

Long walk from this part of NOrth Yorkshire though amigo!

My ISBN checker tells me it doesn't exist though..........


cheers

geoff

p.s.looks like a postal purchase to me.

Malky Glaister
7th November 2012, 12:19
I live in North Yorks too!

have a day out Geoff, You could also take a look at Irlam s waste land.

regards

Malky

NINJA
7th November 2012, 13:00
Here it is,

http://www.coastalshipping.co.uk/memories/960-looking-back-at-bulk-carriers-due-late-oct-2012-9781902953588.html

ccurtis1
7th November 2012, 15:08
First trip to sea, the "Silversand", joining at the General Terminus quay in Glasgow. Second ship, the "Silvercrag". Really exotic ports, Middlesbrough, Bidston, Barry, Newport, the Tyne and Cardiff. Abroad, Kirkenes, Buchanan,
Almeria, Pepel, Murmansk, Seven Islands and Vittoria. I could not wait to leave these awful vessels and joined Bank Line and saw the world. A different world altogether from the ore wagons.

A.D.FROST
7th November 2012, 15:37
My first ship SILVERCRAG Dec'69 .one trip Newport to Port Etienne,stop by some guy rowing the Atlantic asking for directions,The skipper nearly sunk him with the wash from the prop.(double ring astern in the middle of nowhere).A reporter from the "Telegraph" wrote the Tanker SILVERCRAG had found the rower.

oldseamerchant
7th November 2012, 17:18
First trip to sea, the "Silversand", joining at the General Terminus quay in Glasgow. Second ship, the "Silvercrag". Really exotic ports, Middlesbrough, Bidston, Barry, Newport, the Tyne and Cardiff. Abroad, Kirkenes, Buchanan,
Almeria, Pepel, Murmansk, Seven Islands and Vittoria. I could not wait to leave these awful vessels and joined Bank Line and saw the world. A different world altogether from the ore wagons.

Might not have suited you but, ideal for the family man.

Erimus
7th November 2012, 17:55
The two Silver Line ships plus Bishopsgate & Aldersgate (Bishopsgate Shipping Co. a Joint BISCOre/Silver Line Company) were actually some of our most reliable of vessels...when they were not chasing rowers in the Atlantic......nice Ship Management people to deal with and handy for our offices in St.Helen's Place..

geoff

ccurtis1
7th November 2012, 19:23
Might not have suited you but, ideal for the family man.
Very true, but not for a 20 year old ready to sample all the world had to offer

Peter Trodden
14th November 2012, 11:05
anyone sailed on the dalhana? ore carrier earley seventies

I joined Her as AB, Jan,1965 in Birkenhead. Big Ritchie from Middlesbrough was Bosun. We had an ex-pat Polish Chippy that had been in Her for a while. This Chippy was a Jehovah's Witness and he would way-lay any crew member if found alone,and go into a long religious sermon (anyone sail with this Guy ?) He also left religious books, pamphlets on our bunks. We did Etienne and back to Hartlepool.
ttfn.Peter.

oldseamerchant
17th November 2012, 09:39
Any tales of Seven Islands or Port Cartier?

John Cassels
17th November 2012, 10:20
Seven Islands , once loaded there in 53 minutes .

oldseamerchant
17th November 2012, 11:27
Did they adhere to the loading plan?

John Cassels
17th November 2012, 11:40
Loading plan ??.

Nick Balls
17th November 2012, 12:10
Got into Seven Islands on Christmas Eve 1974 on board the Finnamore Meadow, after a vary stormy atlantic crossing from Glasgow, Could we possibly have a night in? No! they loaded us in a very swift couple of hours and chucked us back out into the weather. We just had time to grab a saw and chop down our very own Christmas tree from the surrounding landscape.

oldseamerchant
17th November 2012, 12:11
Loading plan ??.

Exactly!!

TIM HUDSON
17th November 2012, 12:17
Arrived Seven Islands on 'Iron Horse' to find two other Common Brothers BISCO chartered iron ore ships at anchor. We all loaded and sailed within 24 hours !

beedeesea
17th November 2012, 14:13
Likewise, Seven Islands my first foreign port. Turned in after my last watch; woke in the morning to find we'd been in, loaded, and put to sea again. This after a 10-day struggle thro' bad weather. Oh, the romance of it all!

Brian

John Cassels
17th November 2012, 14:15
Exactly!!

Same as all the other Denholm ore carriers then stop for trimming.

Erimus
17th November 2012, 18:01
Yes ...and we sat in London and blessed those Canadians for their promptness in London...........sorry!

geoff

Malky Glaister
17th November 2012, 18:52
I have said before. Dead slow ahead past the jetty then full away. Horrible place.

Regards

Malky

John Cassels
17th November 2012, 19:32
Yes ...and we sat in London and blessed those Canadians for their promptness in London...........sorry!

geoff

With not even a passing thought for us idiots on board ?.

Erimus
17th November 2012, 20:35
With not even a passing thought for us idiots on board ?.

They were rare but the best slow loads were Conakry( to Tyne) where up to three weeks loading..depending on if the Soviets were unloading tanks ( sori printing machines)..or Poti in the Black Sea where a week was the norm...neither was a brilliant place to be with machine guns on the gangway.......

geoff

kypros
17th November 2012, 21:06
Just come across this thread I spent 4/5 months on a ore carrier the Sagamore fine crew and no complaints but it was the only vessel in my 10 year MN service that I felt uncomfortable when in bad weather at sea and that seemed frequent in the western ocean.Just felt on lost Mcgregor lid from a one way trip to the bottom.What do you lads think.reguards Kypros

graymay
18th November 2012, 08:30
Any tales of Seven Islands or Port Cartier?

Cast Petrel 79, crew got a hiding in Port Cartier, Willie Grant (third mate from Elgin) got involved and ended up with a black eye.

Duncan McNiven from Broadford was there, anyone remember him?

graymay
18th November 2012, 09:31
Also remember an old AB called Nat Petrie, bosun was John Cannon and Percy Pike was a lovely old Guy from Truro.

John Cassels
18th November 2012, 09:33
They were rare but the best slow loads were Conakry( to Tyne) where up to three weeks loading..depending on if the Soviets were unloading tanks ( sori printing machines)..or Poti in the Black Sea where a week was the norm...neither was a brilliant place to be with machine guns on the gangway.......

geoff

Was in Almeria once for 10 days due to a strike. Spent over a week
tied up near centre of town. Must have been around 1967 - on the
Arisaig.

Erimus
18th November 2012, 09:57
Was in Almeria once for 10 days due to a strike. Spent over a week
tied up near centre of town. Must have been around 1967 - on the
Arisaig.

By you were lucky then John.....we had one of the other small ones,perhaps Naess Trader?,stuck in Sagunto for a week and they asked if they could go back again.........

geoff

Frank P
18th November 2012, 11:20
In 1971, I was once lucky/unlucky enough to be alongside in Seven Islands for 2 or 3 days due to the warf workers going on strike just after we tied up, the strike was because the owners of the conveyor/loading structure had hired students (non union) to paint the structure and the workers didn't like it.
The first evening we went ashore and believe me you people who never got to go ashore didn't miss any thing. The ship I was on was the Norwegian M/S Arabella and I went ashore with 3 Norwegians, in the Taxi one of the Norwegians tried to have a conversation with the taxi driver in English and the driver answered him in English, when I tried to talk to driver in English he recognised my English accent and answered me with "parly Francaise" and would not speak English to me, the Norwegians thought that this was very funny.
At the time there was a large British ship in front of us, I think that she was the Dunstanborough Castle, one of the biggest ore carriers at that time.

Cheers Frank

graymay
18th November 2012, 11:27
Was in Almeria once for 10 days due to a strike. Spent over a week
tied up near centre of town. Must have been around 1967 - on the
Arisaig.

Just spent the last year working in Conakry, it is 'unique' now, can't possibly imagine what it was like years ago?

TIM HUDSON
18th November 2012, 11:51
Seem to remember the inside loading berth at Vitoria, Brazil was a long stay (and noisy) affair.
Being on a Newcastle registered ship, Tyne visits were most welcome and I believe a case of beer to crane operators helped in prolonging the stay ? Or so I was told.

Erimus
18th November 2012, 11:53
Seem to remember the inside loading berth at Vitoria, Brazil was a long stay (and noisy) affair.
Being on a Newcastle registered ship, Tyne visits were most welcome and I believe a case of beer to crane operators helped in prolonging the stay ? Or so I was told.

By thats a long time back!..........it was something between 3 and 7 days for a 15000 ton cargo in the early days....I understand that toilet paper,soap and toothpaste worked well with those ashore too.....

Frank P......Ah the Arabella, first on the list alphabetically on the BISC(Ore) Fleet and one of the most reliable ships we had then...

Graymay..How 'unique' was it??.....Conakry in the 60's/70's had all sorts of 'problems', rather like Freetown and Pepel..however, the Soviet and later Chinese 'influence' had a great effect on what ships could do and when...they were desperate for currency,from anywhere, and the fact that Consett had to take what was a poor ore was balanced by an order for steel which was balanced by a barter deal for Handley Page aircraft in Brazil ..which I believe was cross- bartered for shoe making machinery in Italy!

geoff

oldseamerchant
18th November 2012, 12:03
Geoff,

Ref above. Which were your favourite/most reliable ships of the 70s

Erimus
18th November 2012, 15:04
Geoff,

Ref above. Which were your favourite/most reliable ships of the 70s

Of the British ones...The Souter fleet (Sheaf Wear/Field and Lindisfarne,Longstone,Bamburgh Castle...) and the Common Bros fleet, Iron Age/Iron Ore/Iron Horse/Iron Crown/Iron Barque/ Daghestan & Afghanistan....i.e all Geordies.......

Other favourites were the two locally built larger Houlder Bros...Joya McCance and Mabel Warwick.

Of the non-UK fleet..the Ugland Fleet.....headed by Livanita on which I spent my first wedding anniversary in Narvik.......so Favorita, Evita,Camencita of the modern fleet...............also a one off Norwegian. the Nordland...never any problem there....

Off the small fleet...I had personal favourites,usually because I knew the Master from years back....Like Alfie Cromarty of Denholms.... Walter Backhouse & N.Oddy of Houlders etc...but reliable ones..Arabella & Phillipe LD were good 'uns.

geoff

WilliamH
18th November 2012, 19:56
Erimus, No mention of Corys 4 ore carriers, I sailed on Knightsgarth, Monksgarth and Dukesgarth, all very well built ships, and very easy to maintain. I also said on Sheafield and Iron Crown.