Did anyone sail with 'Victoria Drummond'?

rainbow
17th February 2006, 17:00
Having had success with the sad incident of the apprentice. I have been asked to submit a new topic for research amongst the membership.

This time, it is about Victoria Drummond, the only serving female 2nd engineer in the whole of the British Merchant fleet. Born in Errol, Dundee, Scotland. She was the god-daughter of Queen Victoria.
There is no doubt that she was an interesting woman, she preferred oily overalls to satin dresses and in 1927 was the first woman to gain 2nd class Engineerís cert. Won the MBE for exceptional gallantry at sea in time of war
(now you get one for bowling a maiden over or writing a song) and the Lloyd's Medal for bravery at sea

Her niece Jean Cherry Drummond (Baroness Strange; a champion of war widows) wrote her biography; The Remarkable Life Of Victoria Drummond - Marine Engineer.
I don't know how true it is but I was told that her engineering skills became apparent when she fixed a car belonging to Sir Alfred Holt (Founder of Blue Funnel Line). He was staying over at her family's estate at the time and his car wouldn't start. He was so impressed with her skills, that he made a statement akin to "We could do with engineers like you aboard my ships" never realizing that she would one day call upon him to make good his word. Her journey from apprentice in 1922 to Chief Engineer in 1959 must have been one of hardship and discrimination. But her tenacity got her there.

What I have written can be found quite easily on the net. But that is not what we are after. It is the experiences of real seamen who sailed with her and shared a joke or a beer with her.
What was she like?
Did she have a sense of humour? I suppose she'd have to, being the only woman aboard a ship.
Did she cast off her royal personage, (A baroness in the Dog House Bar, Cristobal!!! Wot?) when she was ashore with the boys?
We definitely aren't after sordid tales. Funny and dramatic incidents are what we remember best.
She retired in 1962, so it's within memory of many. So please contribute if you can.

Tony

KIWI
18th February 2006, 00:38
Boy what a fascinating subject & am really looking forward to comments from those who sailed with her.Read a few chapters of the book on her when in Sydney at the Maritime Museum library.The book is available on Amazon but quite expensive. KIWI

KIWI
22nd February 2006, 20:07
Victoria Drummond.Well I am surprised, with all the far reaching maritime knowledge that is regularly exposed on this site no one has come forward with further comments on this remarkable woman.Surely those who sailed in Blue Flue after she had gone would have heard anecdotes well worth repeating.Today we take equality of the sexes as a given but the mind boggles just thinking of how she handled so many aspects of just being a sea going engineer & then in charge as well. KIWI

KIWI
23rd February 2006, 07:52
Looking up Abebooks website notice a signed copy is available of her book.It was done on her 100th birthday 1999. KIWI

R58484956
23rd February 2006, 12:01
Victoria served apprenticeship at Caledon ship works, first trip 1922 as 10th EO on the Anchises, after sea time went for 2nd's ticket passed on 3rd attempt. she sailed as a fiver in 1927 with BI, after sea time went for chiefs ticket and failed 37 times (it is written because she was a female)
eventually got a Panamanian chiefs ticket. During ww2 she sailed on many convoys including the Russian ones. On one occasion during the war her ship was attacked and she kept the engines running by herself despite damage to a vital pipe for which Victoria was awarded the MBE and Lloyds War medal for bravery, on arrival in Virginia she was applauded as a hero. After the war she at one time supervised the building of new ships. 1952/57 sailed as 2nd 1959 -1962 she sailed as a chief on various types of cargo and tankers.
First female member of the Institute of Marine Engineers
Victoria died in 1978 and is buried in Megginch Castle, Scotland.
A book on her life by a relative Cherry Drummond (Baroness Strange) is on ISBN 1-902536-25-8. £12

trotterdotpom
23rd February 2006, 17:50
Wasn't there a film made of her exploits including fixing an engine by using her bra for a fan belt or something? She didn't think to ask the 2nd for his stockings!

John T.

Doxfordman
23rd February 2006, 18:53
Bloody remarkable women!

pierhead jumper
23rd February 2006, 18:55
I sent a cheque last week to abebooks for this book which was listed on their website.two days later I received a letter and cheque return to say they could not trace the book.However I have today received confirmation from Imarest that they have this in stock.Price £19.95.Am ordering tomorrow.Pierhead jumper.

pierhead jumper
23rd February 2006, 18:58
Me again.I recall being moored alongside the Panamanian "Bonita" in balboa 1942,but never met the lady.P.J.

pierhead jumper
23rd February 2006, 19:00
Sorry.The price is£11.95.P.J.

John Rogers
23rd February 2006, 19:09
Hell as brave as she was and the guts of that woman she should of used her Jock strap because she had more of them than some men.

backsplice
24th February 2006, 08:48
hello everybody ......this was the first time I,d heard about theis remarkable engineer !!!!.....so to see if I could glean any information about her I posted a thread on a Dundee web site (where I come from ) and am waiting a reply but by all accounts her story can be found on Google ....what" WE " should be calling a legend not like some of these nancy boy "sporting 5 minute wonders" (POP) .....sorry got carried away !!!....backsplice

R58484956
24th February 2006, 15:48
Plenty of information on Victoria on the google search engine.

rainbow
24th February 2006, 17:47
Well it looks like Kiwi has given the thread a kick start after it stalling. My thanks to Kiwi!
The purpose of trying to find authentic information about Victoria Drummond from a seamanís perspective is to celebrate her achievements as a woman who done her job, as well as, if not better than other marine engineers, in a period when women were regarded solely as household drudges, barmaids or similar.
The info that's been posted in this thread by members can be found on several sites throughout the web and I thank them for keeping it going, but there arenít any personal accounts of the woman or lady (in the true meaning of the word) that got stuck in with her comrades, anywhere.
Judging by the number of members who were engineers, I would have thought that some stories about her would have survived from their sea-going days. She was awarded the Lloyds Medal for Gallantry because she single handedly manned the engine room during a WW2 drama.
She must have swapped a yarn with other shipmates or had her photo taken with them. Isnít there a saying or example concerning her workmanship or character thatís still around.
A simple factual tale will suffice. But if not, hearsay, as long as it relates to the truth and doesnít demean her, is fair.
Some people might not share the sentiments of the last sentence. But for what itís worth, I believe if it enhances their image, thereís no harm done.
All heroes and heroines are given reputations that wouldnít stand intense scrutiny.
So please fella's. Letís keep her memory alive.
A pint of watered Wrexham Lager in the pig for the best tale.
Well thatís what we got on the Carinthia and Sylvania. How else can a barman afford a Bentley in the sixties? (*))
Thanks to all members for contributing,
Tony

Tony D
24th February 2006, 21:13
As I mentioned on another thread she was 2nd Engineer on the MV British Monarch (Harrisons of Clyde) I assume it was the same person, but she had moved on when I joined the vessel in Feb 62,it was the kind of thing your told when you join a new ship "she had a female second at one time you know" I have no idea of whether it was the previous trip or a few years before my time.
Tony D

KIWI
25th February 2006, 03:49
It was 1957 according to the list of her ships on Google.Photos are included & I must say her appearance is not quite what I expected KIWI

vic pitcher
4th March 2006, 13:32
When Victoria Drummond was 2nd in "British Monarch" the 2nd Mate was one Douglas Wardrop who distinguished himself by falling overboard when reading the log after his graveyard watch and was not missed until 0800 or 0900.
The old man turned the ship round and the unhappy Douglas was miraculously found after steaming back 50-60 miles.
This is briefly mentioned in the IME book about Victoria.
The story also appeared in a paper-back of the "gripping yarns of the sea" variety called "Against the Sea."
Douglas packed it in some years later and ended up in the Medway area as a local Prudential Assurance Branch manager. He unhappily succumbed to cancer some 20 years ago.
I think he also sailed in Smiths of Cardiff, I seem to remember his name being mentioned.

"Manners makyth man"
Vic Pitcher

KIWI
16th January 2007, 19:07
I have just returned from Australia & while in Sydney managed to get into the National Maritime Museum library for several hours to read the book.It was extremely interesting but unfortunately did not come out with some of the detail that would have made it truly memorable.For instance Unisex toilets are taken for granted these days but how was a woman in their midst handled by all the other engineers.No such thing as own facilities or two cabins sharing.During her voyages she was invited out to some highly social functions by family friends so after donning appropriate female gear what did she do about her hands?We can all remember that we males were not so splendiforous in crisply laundered whites when one looked at the hands.Particularly after cleaning a generator or clearing a bilge suction.The book is a must read but leaves a lot of personal info unanswered as has this thread.It is amazing that stories about her have not become maritime history. Kiwil

JoK
16th January 2007, 19:28
She probably carried a big wrench.
As for the hands, white gloves and no rings.

Tony Breach
17th January 2007, 12:54
Never sailed with Victoria but her brother, Lord Strange, was a fairly regular passenger with Geest. He was an author who wrote under his ordinary name of John Drummond & I beleive he was also a hotelier on the Isle of Man. He told me that he had all the material to write Victoria's biography but she had made him promise not to publish it before her death. I imagine that this material was passed to Baroness Strange who I suppose is his daughter & she was the one who wrote the book. I must get a copy.

ranger66
3rd March 2007, 08:15
I was deck apprentice on British Monarch when Victoria Drummond was 2nd. Engineer. Story at that time was that her application was submitted to Raeburn & Verel under V.Drummond and her gender only became known when she signed on. As I recall she was a good age when I sailed with her - probably just in her late 50's though - everyone seems old when you are 18!
As you might expect, she kept pretty much to herself during the trip although friendly enough. That was a tough ship for engineers though as the B&W engine was constantly blowing exhaust valves, and I remember many times being stopped and wallowing around in a big swell in the tropics while the engineers worked at replacing one. Victoria stuck it out though and attracted the attention of the press in many of our ports as did Doug Wardrop the 2nd. Mate. who went overboard in the Pacific 5 days out of Panama and was recovered 9hrs later. ( See posts under Man Overboard thread ). She was certainly a unique and courageous lady. I imagine after serving her time in the Caledon shipyard, going to sea was a walk in the park!
Didn't know there was a book written about her - must try and get a copy.

Chillytoes
3rd March 2007, 09:34
I did not know Victoria Drummond, but I have a book of hers "Swingle's Catechism of Steam, Gas and Electrical Engineering". Since there is no date of publication (typical of US publishers) I don't know when she bought it, but it is signed "V A Drummond" on the flyleaf. I bought it from a UK dealer for about 18 pounds.
As well as the book that Kiwi looked read at the Australian National Maritime Museum, they also hold another of her books, a list of union rules, both of which I purchased for the Museum when I was employed there. As a former engineer I can only endorse the comments made earlier - what a brave woman to go into such an unforgiving, testosterone charged enviroment, especially with her background!

GALTRA
3rd March 2007, 13:19
Thought this might be of interest,Charley

Aldinga
4th March 2007, 00:17
This one was taken at the time she received her MBE. I am not sure how I acquired.
Ron

Ray Ferrie
4th March 2007, 16:04
When Victoria Drummond was 2nd in "British Monarch" the 2nd Mate was one Douglas Wardrop who distinguished himself by falling overboard when reading the log after his graveyard watch and was not missed until 0800 or 0900.
The old man turned the ship round and the unhappy Douglas was miraculously found after steaming back 50-60 miles.
This is briefly mentioned in the IME book about Victoria.
The story also appeared in a paper-back of the "gripping yarns of the sea" variety called "Against the Sea."
Douglas packed it in some years later and ended up in the Medway area as a local Prudential Assurance Branch manager. He unhappily succumbed to cancer some 20 years ago.
I think he also sailed in Smiths of Cardiff, I seem to remember his name being mentioned.

"Manners makyth man"
Vic Pitcher

Hi Vic are there still sources from which you can get "Gripping Yarns from the Sea" Amazon.com don't seem to be able to source them. I wouldn't mind giving them a read. Have you any info
Regards
Ray

jazz606
10th March 2007, 10:44
I've just read the book "Victoria Drummond Marine Engineer". Shakespeare it isn't - but an honest account and the more interesting for that. I finished the book feeling really sad. It's pretty obvious that she had a raw deal at the hands of the "marine establishment". I find it difficult to believe that someone could sit for Chief's 31 times and fail - particularly since she passed 2nd's and subsequently Motor 2nd with just a couple of re sits.

There is an excellent description of a liberty ship coming apart in bad weather with a cargo of iron ore.

JoK
10th March 2007, 12:44
I find it difficult to believe that someone could sit for Chief's 31 times and fail
I can believe it.
I think that single fact shows what kind of person she was. She was going to have that Certificate and no one, no matter how biased, was going to stand in her way. She was tough.

Davey
11th March 2007, 13:58
I can believe it.
I think that single fact shows what kind of person she was. She was going to have that Certificate and no one, no matter how biased, was going to stand in her way. She was tough.

I second that. And as jazz606 said "It's pretty obvious that she had a raw deal at the hands of the "marine establishment"."

Hugh Ferguson
26th August 2007, 13:10
Having had success with the sad incident of the apprentice. I have been asked to submit a new topic for research amongst the membership.

This time, it is about Victoria Drummond, the only serving female 2nd engineer in the whole of the British Merchant fleet. Born in Errol, Dundee, Scotland. She was the god-daughter of Queen Victoria.
There is no doubt that she was an interesting woman, she preferred oily overalls to satin dresses and in 1927 was the first woman to gain 2nd class Engineer’s cert. Won the MBE for exceptional gallantry at sea in time of war
(now you get one for bowling a maiden over or writing a song) and the Lloyd's Medal for bravery at sea

Her niece Jean Cherry Drummond (Baroness Strange; a champion of war widows) wrote her biography; The Remarkable Life Of Victoria Drummond - Marine Engineer.


I don't know how true it is but I was told that her engineering skills became apparent when she fixed a car belonging to Sir Alfred Holt (Founder of Blue Funnel Line). He was staying over at her family's estate at the time and his car wouldn't start. He was so impressed with her skills, that he made a statement akin to "We could do with engineers like you aboard my ships" never realizing that she would one day call upon him to make good his word. Her journey from apprentice in 1922 to Chief Engineer in 1959 must have been one of hardship and discrimination. But her tenacity got her there.

What I have written can be found quite easily on the net. But that is not what we are after. It is the experiences of real seamen who sailed with her and shared a joke or a beer with her.
What was she like?
Did she have a sense of humour? I suppose she'd have to, being the only woman aboard a ship.
Did she cast off her royal personage, (A baroness in the Dog House Bar, Cristobal!!! Wot?) when she was ashore with the boys?
We definitely aren't after sordid tales. Funny and dramatic incidents are what we remember best.
She retired in 1962, so it's within memory of many. So please contribute if you can.

Tony

One of the ships Victoria Drummond sailed in was the Blue Funnel, PERSEUS.
It is said that in 1943, when she was an Assistant Engineer in that ship, the Chinese firemen took exception to it, and were replaced with "white" firemen, who themselves agitated for the open fo,cstle accommodation to be replaced with two berth cabins.
During the conversion in New York the firemen lived up to their reputation and there were a number of desertions and replacements of similar ilk.
There followed a round trip to Australia in which the ship only averaged 10 knots instead of her usual 13. And for the next voyage the Chinese firemen were back!
Miss Drummond made only one voyage in the PERSEUS-just as well, for the ship was torpedoed and sunk in January,1944.

Chouan
3rd September 2007, 20:15
One of my father's colleagues as a superintendant went up for his chief's at the same time as her. Once he, and the others, found out, they all cancelled their examination applications. They all knew that they would all fail, because the examiners would fail them all in order to show that they weren't failing her because she was a woman.

sparkie2182
3rd September 2007, 22:23
just cant win.....can ya?

JoK
3rd September 2007, 22:45
One of my father's colleagues as a superintendant went up for his chief's at the same time as her. Once he, and the others, found out, they all cancelled their examination applications. They all knew that they would all fail, because the examiners would fail them all in order to show that they weren't failing her because she was a woman.

Amazing.
Things certainly have changed since.

Riptide
4th March 2008, 00:47
I once watched a documentry on tv about a lady who sailed on sailing ships & then became a 2nd eng. onsteam ships.does not sound like miss Drumound.So I ask myself who could it be.?No disrespect this lady came from the higher sections of society or should I say eschlons,Who were quete well in bucking the system.Where members of the lower classes where not only kept in their place,but stayed in their place.My mother born in England,but educated in Scotland (Kelso Highschool)Ended up tying fishing flies for those that could afford a permitt.Her brother,educated Kelso Grammer School went on to be a pilot.For most of my youg life,I remember her saying "I wish I had been born a man.She had Dreams and asperations,but she was not allowed to fulfill them.Kenny.

Ross Campbell
26th March 2008, 07:01
I just logged in, apparently successfully. I was able to see the first of the Victoria Drummond thumbnails, but every time I click on the second one, I get fired back to the login page. Any ideas?
My colleague, Ron Baxter, joined Clan Line in 1966 and sailed with several people who had encountered Victoria Drummond. We are trying to find out a bit more than there is in the book. Any material welcomed.

Ross

non descript
26th March 2008, 08:34
I just logged in, apparently successfully. I was able to see the first of the Victoria Drummond thumbnails, but every time I click on the second one, I get fired back to the login page. Any ideas?
My colleague, Ron Baxter, joined Clan Line in 1966 and sailed with several people who had encountered Victoria Drummond. We are trying to find out a bit more than there is in the book. Any material welcomed.

Ross

Ross, I am sorry about that and even more sorry that I cannot supply a quick cure. - I have looked at #23 and #24 and both thumbnails open safely for me with no problems. - If one of my colleagues has any additional comment on this one, I am sure they will say, but in the short term, maybe shutting down and then re-booting your PC might clear any minor glitch in your system?
(Thumb)
Mark

MM≤
26th March 2008, 09:45
"We are trying to find out a bit more than there is in the book. Any material welcomed."

There is a book ' The Remarkable Life of Victoria Drummond Marine Engineer'

Published by the Institute of Marine Engineers ISBN 1-902536-25-8

George Elder
28th March 2008, 03:04
Here is a Big Worm for the can
I remember my father telling me that he sailed with a woman Chief Eng. during the war. According to his telling at the time she was was good really good.
I can't remember her name.
The only shipping line that I'm aware of that he sailed with was T&J Harrisons out of Liverpool. He suffered three sinkings and didn't speak much about it.
Any one got any ideas

Stan McNally
31st March 2008, 17:02
Hi There,

I sailed with Victoris Drummond when she was 2nd Engineer on our ship "British Monarch" - I was the Radio Officer. She was a very remarkable Lady.
When she came aboard , I think it was in Cardiff or Avonmouth , in Uniform , I thought she was the District Nurse.

She got on very well with every one - especially one of the AB's who had been a "Lt Commander" on MTB's during the War and use to have the "Times" airmailed to him on the ship. He and She came from very well known families. I beleive her Uncle was Governor General of Canada. She must have had quite high ranking people behind her to overcome the prejudice against Woman going to Sea - especially to be an "Engineer" .
I beleive she had to take the examination for Chief several times, ever though she knew it, before finally being allowed to pass.

She use to be invited ashore quite a lot in the different countries we called at because of her back ground.

She was aboard, as was the Capt Coutts's wife and son when we lost our 2nd Mate over the side but picked him up "Safe and Well" 9 hours later.

Stan McNally
Radio Officer
M/V. British Monarch

gingerbeer73
1st April 2008, 10:36
Wow, quite a story and how great that someone on here sailed with her. She did well in spite of her "priviledged" background. Quite an appropiate name of the ship considering her background.

Goodness the 2nd mate was lucky! It must have been calm seas or he would not have been found.

I note you say that the Captain had his wife and son on board. I was under the impression that "wives" started going to sea in the 70s. I would be interrested to know when this did start then ?

Cheers
Colin

Hi There,

I sailed with Victoris Drummond when she was 2nd Engineer on our ship "British Monarch" - I was the Radio Officer. She was a very remarkable Lady.
When she came aboard , I think it was in Cardiff or Avonmouth , in Uniform , I thought she was the District Nurse.

She got on very well with every one - especially one of the AB's who had been a "Lt Commander" on MTB's during the War and use to have the "Times" airmailed to him on the ship. He and She came from very well known families. I beleive her Uncle was Governor General of Canada. She must have had quite high ranking people behind her to overcome the prejudice against Woman going to Sea - especially to be an "Engineer" .
I beleive she had to take the examination for Chief several times, ever though she knew it, before finally being allowed to pass.

She use to be invited ashore quite a lot in the different countries we called at because of her back ground.

She was aboard, as was the Capt Coutts's wife and son when we lost our 2nd Mate over the side but picked him up "Safe and Well" 9 hours later.

Stan McNally
Radio Officer
M/V. British Monarch

MM≤
1st April 2008, 11:27
Has a few copies of her biography. Actually one less now I've bought one.

Basil
30th August 2008, 17:04
Just finished reading her book which, since it was put together from her diary by her niece, I guess counts as a sort of autobiography.
She certainly sailed in some rough ships. The British Monarch was the scruffiest ship on which I sailed but hardly rated a mention from Miss Drummond.
In addition to her seagoing tales it gives an insight into the ups and downs of the lives of the aristocracy a century ago.
In view of the social period covered it's interesting to read between the lines and form one's own opinions - wonder what cousin Henry was up to in Ceylon:rolleyes:

Glenford
20th March 2013, 01:13
Miss Drummond was an excellent Chief Engineer and a delightful lady. Her biography was disappointing in as much as it used "I" all the time and Miss Drummond was not like this. She was very capable and when a cargo of iron ore moved in rough seas she slid down with me to examine the damage in the old Liberty ship. We both agreed to head for home port.
My wife thoroughly enjoyed her company and she was interested in everything from sending samples to Kew Gardens to having tea with the Governor in Hong Kong.

Sister Eleff
20th March 2013, 01:24
Welcome to the site Glenford. Miss Drummond is mentioned in various threads and I am sure some one will point you to the most appropriate one. Indeed she sounds as if she was a capable person and pleasant company according to all reports.

billyboy
20th March 2013, 06:45
A warm welcome aboard from the Philippines. Please enjoy all this great site has to offer.

Pompeyfan
20th March 2013, 08:38
On behalf of the 'SN Moderating Team', welcome aboard Glenford.

NoR
20th March 2013, 10:08
I read her autobiography. It was sad that she couldn't 'pass' her British Chief Engineers's ticket, but you get the distict impression that the examiners were never going to pass her however well she did.

R58484956
20th March 2013, 11:03
Greetings Glenford and welcome to SN as already mentioned here plenty of info on this site of Chief Drummond. Bon voyage.

Sister Eleff
20th March 2013, 12:39
Just click on this link Glenford and it should take you to another thread called; 'Did anyone sail with Victoria Drmmond'

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=4774&highlight=Drummond

ninabaker
21st March 2013, 01:06
Hi Glenford,
How wonderful to hear from someone who actually knew her. She was my role model when I was trying to find a company to take me on.

Philthechill
20th May 2013, 09:54
I read her autobiography. It was sad that she couldn't 'pass' her British Chief Engineers's ticket, but you get the distict impression that the examiners were never going to pass her however well she did.-----her story on "Wiki" and it states she DID sail as "Chief" from 1959 to 1962,

What an extraordinary woman she was and how far-ahead-of-her-time.

I am a great believer in women being as capable as men in many parts of life and there are VERY few jobs they can't do just as well as men.

Admittedly women would find jobs involving brute strength a bit beyond them. However, in this day-and-age, even men aren't allowed to handle, for example, the 16 stone, (2 cwt.), bags of corn I, and many other wagon-drivers loaded/unloaded day-in, day-out. So the "brute-strength, jobs are few and far between now.

Women now fly fast jets, passenger a/c, crew ships, both Merchant and "Men-of-fight", (with the exception of submarines but I believe the US Navy is looking toward doing that), drive 46 ton "artics" etc. etc.------and why shouldn't they?

Victoria Drummond was an incredible woman and, who knows, she may have been one of the "leading-lights" in women being given the true recognition they deserve. Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

Jonty_L
25th May 2013, 22:11
Found out by chance recently that I live in the Lambeth house she shared with her two sisters from the early 1930s until it was bombed in the early part of WW2.

Hugh Ferguson
26th May 2013, 08:56
Must be about 25 years ago I met an old Blue Funnel hand-probably an R.O.-who had sailed with her. He wrote to me later: I'll see if I can find the letter.

ben27
1st June 2013, 01:29
good morning rainbow.sm.18 feb.2006.03:00.re:did anyone sail with "Victoria"drummond.i have read this old thread with great interest,i did not know Victoria drummond but she was a lady ahead of her time,she must have set an exsample to many women to follow a career in eng,a most interesting thread,thank you for posting,regards.ben27

Hugh Ferguson
1st June 2013, 11:35
A David Burrell was commissioned by Furness Withy to write a centenary history of the company. Twenty years ago I exchanged some correspondence with him re. Victoria Drummond who sailed in ships of that company.
Try looking up the name of the author and details of the book.

It's only a week or so ago that I stumbled across some letters I exchanged with the ex. Blue Funnel guy who sailed with her-he has died but I met his son as well-I'll see if I can come up with more on this subject.

(I have Burrell's address-in Ayrshire-and a 'phone number. I may give it a try later but it was 20 years ago!)

Hugh Ferguson
1st June 2013, 12:46
Title of book on Furness Withy by David Burrell "Furness Withy 1891 to 1991"
Plenty for sale on Abe Books starting at about £18.

Hugh Ferguson
1st June 2013, 16:37
Herewith a couple of thumbnails from from the fly leaf and photo plates contained in the book written by her niece, Cherry Drummond.
Victoria was a God Daughter of Queen Victoria, not a daughter.

Her first appointment was as 10th engineer in the Blue Funnel s.s. Anchises. She left Blue Funnel at the outbreak of the war as it was their policy not to have women in the engine room in war-time.
The Anchises was sunk early in the war by a bomb which exploded in the sea and started the engine room shell plating. The ship had to be abandoned with loss of two, the master and a quartermaster.

(The 2nd engineer was a Mr Quayle: they had pet names for each other; he was Hedgehog-on account of his prickly nature, she was Kate to him because she had a shrewish temper!! Work that one out.)

Hugh Ferguson
2nd June 2013, 13:05
Must be about 25 years ago I met an old Blue Funnel hand-probably an R.O.-who had sailed with her. He wrote to me later: I'll see if I can find the letter.

I've found the letter referred to; lo and behold it was enclosed in the book!
'Twas written by a Tom Kennerley after I met him. His letter was dated 18th Ap.1985 and it was not very flattering about the lady.
He said, I don't think I should believe everything you read about Victoria Drummond, my first wife knew her...................
There is more and then, Please do not quote me

He also writes, I was also in the Tyndareus with a Chief engineer named Jones, son of Holy Jones and he used to tell of her going ashore in Batavia in her engine-room boiler suit and being hauled back and given a telling off by the old man!

Hugh Ferguson
2nd June 2013, 16:55
One of the many ships in which Victoria sailed; this one as 2nd engineer at age 58.

Hugh Ferguson
2nd June 2013, 17:51
She went only one voyage in this ship which was sunk soon after.

pramsec
27th October 2013, 11:07
Today I corrected an optically scanned excerpt from the "Barrier Miner" , a newspaper from the city of Broken Hill, New South Wales about Victoria Drummond. Most of it was about her career but the following sentence stood out:- " A tall, dark girl with engaging personality, before going to sea Miss Drummond served an apprenticeship of five years at a shipbuilding yard at Dundee."

I had sailed with BI but never met anybody who had sailed with her.