Backing up your digital photos

benjidog
18th February 2006, 00:31
I make no excuse for stating what may seem obvious to many SN members; if this message helps just one person it will have been worth it.

A computer hard disk will fail sooner or later - it is not a matter of whether - just of when. If you are relying on it for long-term storage of digital images you need to make backup copies or you risk losing your pictures for ever.

The simplest way of doing this is to make regular copies of your image files onto a CD or DVD - I recommend that you take at least two CD/DVD copies of everything. Alternatively you may consider getting a second hard disk installed on your computer and doing a disk to disk copy. Hard disks are not expensive nowadays and the cost is negligible compared with the loss of your treasured pictures.

If you use Windows XP, it has built-in software to copy files onto CD and DVD. If you have an earlier version of Windows (e.g. Windows 2000 or Windows 98SE) you may need additional software like Nero. There are also a number of freeware programs if you are feeling adventurous.

Personally I keep 3 copies on hard disks in addition to DVD copies - of which I get a relative to hold one copy. In my job I have to think about the disasters that can befall computer systems and make sure that data can be recovered if one strikes.

Don't wait for your hard disk to let you down. Make regular copies!

Brian

KPC
18th February 2006, 00:41
Very sage advice..it is not until the Disaster happens that most folk take the necessary precautions...and they are "gone forever"..

ruud
18th February 2006, 00:50
Ahoy Brian,

I just have all my piccies[approx.350.000] in my External HD[WesternDigital 250Gb],and weekly an automatic dual update from my main HD 2x500 Gb to the External.

http://www.backoffice.be/shop/information.asp?partid=WDXUL2500BBNE

RCHARLTON
18th February 2006, 01:30
I use an Iomega 120GB External Hard Drive which comes with automatic backup on the fly. Any files or folders you designate are immediately backed up whenever you make a change to them. It works great and you don't have to worry about scheduling backups.

airds
18th February 2006, 02:09
Here's a handy wee program that will assisting it copying file and folders, Karen's Replicator (http://www.karenware.com/powertools/ptreplicator.asp)

Just make up job(s) for to copy your favorite folders on any schedules on to another hard drive - and it'll do the rest. Note it doesn't work with DVD's or CD's, but I find it extremely handy.

rdgs

Hugh MacLean
18th February 2006, 10:16
Very sound advice indeed, Brian.

I can relate to this. Just yesterday I had to inform my brother that he needs to reinstall windows after his computer crashed and corupted his ntfs file system.

All his digital photo's were lost, he had no back up.

Back up! Back up! and Back up! guys.

Rgds

Charlie_Wood
18th February 2006, 10:29
Great work with your site Hugh, what a resource the internet is for keeping memories alive. I'm sure your father would be very proud of you.

Hugh MacLean
18th February 2006, 13:06
Charlie,

Thank you! Your comments are very much appreciated.

Rgds

allanc
19th February 2006, 10:06
The other alternative is to get a Mac! But still the advice is valid, back up!
More seriously, an iPod, which works just as well with Windows, has a vast capacity for photos. As a Mac user I use iPhoto, and as well as using the iPod I back up on CD every few months or whenever I've added anything special.

airds
19th February 2006, 13:22
The other alternative is to get a Mac!

* Malicious worm aims to bite Apple *

A malicious program that targets Apple's operating system has been discovered online. Full story:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/-/1/hi/technology/4723390.stm

Phill
5th March 2006, 19:28
a good note to take???????? when your computer does crash, donít think that the big computer shop in the High Street will help you, as with mine I took it in for a service and to delete a couple of spy ware , on return all I get is a restored system, luckily I saved most of my pics to a disc, and only lost a few recent ones, ASK SOMEONE WHO HAS AN IDEA OF PCs, before you even think about taking your PC to the politically correct world and there so called fitters

Phill

allanc
7th March 2006, 04:03
* Malicious worm aims to bite Apple *

A malicious program that targets Apple's operating system has been discovered online. Full story:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/-/1/hi/technology/4723390.stm

Thanks for the info. This was mentioned in the Melbourne Age newspaper, and if it's the same one it doesn't seem to be too big a threat, as the OS apparently requires a password for the worm to get to any files. Or so I hope!

benjidog
23rd October 2006, 02:35
Dear All,

I make no excuses for re-awakening this thread for the benefit of those who have not seen it.

If you don't back up your computer hard drive and it is the only place you store your digital photos THEY ARE AT RISK!

A colleague of mine (who should have known better) had a hard disk crash on a machine that stored several months of work from a project and the idiot had not backed it up. It cost several thousand pounds to get a specialist company to recover the data - he was lucky in that most of it was recovered.

Unless you have a lot of money to waste or don't care about your photos, please find out how to make backups on your machine and do it regularly. Read the thread above for ideas but I would be surprised if there are many machines around now that cannot copy to CDs or DVDs.

Regards,

Brian

Jeffers
23rd October 2006, 15:29
An additional bit of security I used when building my latest PC was to use a pair of "mirrored" hard drives. Many motherboards now have this facility, and with the price of hard drives dropping all the time, it's a relativley inexpensive way of protecting your data. What you have is two copies of your data on two different hard drives at all times. If one fails, it can be replaced and the data copied back from the remaining good one. Unless you have the extreme misfortune to have both drives fail at once, you're fairly safe. I would always go for an external backup as well, in case something catastrophic happens to the PC that corrupts your data. Again, external disk drives are getting to be relatively cheap now, so it makes sense to add this extra level of security. After all, many of these photos are probably priceless to the people who took them, and with digital photography you haven't got a set of negatives to go back too. Progress, eh?

treeve
23rd October 2006, 15:41
Spot on advice -
I always upload from my camera to PC, Laptop and External Drive.
Then I make CD copies of each directory. Neurotic or what?
Be Safe, Be sure ....

non descript
23rd October 2006, 17:31
Spot on advice -
I always upload from my camera to PC, Laptop and External Drive.
Then I make CD copies of each directory. Neurotic or what?
Be Safe, Be sure ....

No Sir, very far from neurotic - just very wise.

(Thumb)

hilifta
23rd October 2006, 23:56
Along the same lines. When I bought my first digital, a D70, the saleman told me not to get a memory card bigger than 512mb. He explained that with a 1gb card you are tempted to leave all your photos on there until it is full, and if it corupts you then loose a lot of photos.

Well, they may not corrupt often but they do and usually at the worst time.
During a recent trip to Bathurst one of mine did corrupt with 184 images on it. I was about to put a new one in as there was only space for about another 10/15 images, and bingo, up flashed an error message followed by a re-format sign and indication that the file was mty and the images gone.
I was devastated and hot footed it down to a local camera shop, where they tried but failed to retreive them. They advised me to try at home at a place with more sophisticated gear.
I did this and was very lucky to retreive all my images.
However the technican told me that I was VERY lucky, as usually you lose the lot.
So, as far as memory cards go, I follow the original advice and stick to 512gb cards.

Rgds/Mike Cornwall.

R58484956
24th October 2006, 07:57
Mike 512 gb WOW that is some card, must have cost a fortune, or just maybe it is a 512 mb. LOL

wakaman
25th October 2006, 09:09
After reading this thread I tried to put some images on a brand new 256 mb
''flash memory drive'' unfortunately my pc wouldnt,or couldnt recognise the
device,I have XP..sp 2(MAD)

airds
25th October 2006, 12:31
. They advised me to try at home at a place with more sophisticated gear. I did this and was very lucky to retreive all my images.
However the technican told me that I was VERY lucky, as usually you lose the lot.
So, as far as memory cards go, I follow the original advice and stick to 512Mb cards.

The best recovery utility I've found is smart recovery (http://www.pcinspector.de/file_recovery/uk/welcome.htm) (Best used with a card reader)

Don't think the Pro's would agree with only using 512MB cards - when it REALLY counts:-( What are they up to, 8GB cards?

Andy
25th October 2006, 14:21
The best recovery utility I've found is smart recovery (http://www.pcinspector.de/file_recovery/uk/welcome.htm) (Best used with a card reader)

Don't think the Pro's would agree with only using 512MB cards - when it REALLY counts:-( What are they up to, 8GB cards?

I use 2gb cards now, and that's becasue I can dump a full card onto a laptop when away. The recommendation to not keep all you eggs in one basket is still top of my mind, which is why I use 2gb instead of larger ones... then again, in over 7 years of using CF cards, I've never had a corrupted card (I only use Lexar)

Over the years, I've accumulated loads of cards, varying from 8mb (supplied with the earliest digital cameras) to 512mb... I gave away all these surplus cards in the Summer... I'd hate to think how much these cards cost me when I bought them, seem to remember paying £100 for a 64mb card in the early days of digital, certainly remember £ a Mb days

cheers,
Andy

treeve
26th October 2006, 00:22
I have two digital cameras ( 9.5Mpixel and 6Mpixel ) and I have two 1Gb cards for each.
- before I settled on the size, I searched around for info on stability.
One of the main reasons for corruption is the removal or insertion of the card when the camera is functioning in any way, or that the card is only formatted to the camera in which it is to be used.
Do not disconnect the camera from pc until the software exit is used and that it displays the "safe to remove" message.
It is not a good idea to keep removing ( deleting ) and taking more pictures when space is limited. This can corrupt very easily.
Leave a little space, say out of 456 frames, leave 40 to 50. The card needs space to work, when uploading to the pc.
Keep your batteries up to capacity, when taking pictures.
Best Wishes, Raymond

benjidog
21st November 2007, 23:03
Just seen another member with disk problems and thought it time to bring this thread back to life.

There is some good advice in here folks - take heed or you could lose your precious photos forever. Likewise any other important letters or whatever.

Christmas is coming - you could do worse than buy one of those large disks that plug into a USB port and use it to back up your files.

Regards,

Brian

kwg
8th December 2007, 12:58
For one of my interests I have several Gb's of pics....as an additional level of backup, prompted by the collapse of an external mass storage device, I started some 18mths ago using 'DIINO', simply Google Diino and take it from there...You get 2Gb free and can pay for additional storage if you wish....me, I set-up several Diino accounts each with 2Gb free....you can also have a separate P/word to allow others to access the data read only....Up-to-now, although it can be a little slow, never had any problems with it.

Supern
17th December 2007, 23:38
Having lost a lot of photos on one of our laptops it is a real problem and it was Apple too.

We have external hard drive but now I have an online account at Kodak and you can have it private and keep all the photos off premises and if the crash comes, the house burns down, get the photos back anytime you like. Lots of web sites have this facility now.

treeve
18th December 2007, 00:39
Doesn't it take forever uploading the files?
And what if the website disappears as so many do?
I have CDs, two external drives and a laptop, 5 copies of each should do it!!
Now up to 150Gb of images, I am not sure I would trust that to the vagaries
of a website and of possible hits by hackers and virus etc ...
Are the pictures that you store in their original format and compression zero?

airds
18th December 2007, 03:23
Doesn't it take forever uploading the files?
And what if the website disappears as so many do?
I have CDs, two external drives and a laptop, 5 copies of each should do it!!
Now up to 150Gb of images, I am not sure I would trust that to the vagaries
of a website and of possible hits by hackers and virus etc ...
Are the pictures that you store in their original format and compression zero?

- Initially - yes. After that, it is just incremental backups (changed or new files)
- It's not a 'website' as such - more like data storage 'space'
- 150Gb - that's nothing ....
- the data is usually password protected and/or encrypted. Sometimes, if your ISP is a professional outfit, they will offer the service - with an additional monthly payment of course .... and there are very reliable third party outfits too. (U.S. companies are a good idea with the present exchange rate. Real 'remote' backups :-)
- format/compression? depends on your use, more compression quicker uploading, etc
- also investigate accounts with flickr, smugmug, and other online photo sharing sites.

treeve
18th December 2007, 10:09
I see, learn something new every day. Thanks for that David.
All Best, Raymond

airds
23rd December 2007, 12:40
-. Sometimes, if your ISP is a professional outfit, they will offer the service - with an additional monthly payment of course .... and there are very reliable third party outfits too.

In fact just recieved an email from BT offering 'Digital Vault' services - £4.99/month for 50Gb. Believe if you are a BT Internet customer, a lite version is free.

Don't know how all this uploading effects your specific ISP download/upload monthly limits though - so that's another factor worth investigating.