A Greek lesson for Scotland

fred henderson
23rd February 2006, 21:48
Geece has been accused of failure to comply with European maritime rules by failing to open the intra-island services to other European operators. The Greek Marine Minister has agreed to comply with the EEC rules, but there will be no going back on measures that protect the safety of passengers, particulatly the stipulation that all crew on passenger ships operating out of Greek ports must be fluent in the Greek language and have a Greek education.
Great! I understand that all scots have a love/hate relationship with CalMac, but if Scotland wants to keep their services locally operated, the Greeks have provided the answer. It just needs a Scottish Minister to pass a regulation that all crew members must speak Gallic and/or a Scottish dialect, have been educated in Scotland and believe that Braveheart is a true historical record!

Fred (Thumb)

Chief Engineer's Daughter
23rd February 2006, 22:25
How will this affect our intra island services in Shetland? This isn't a Gaelic speaking community, never has been. Are the passengers going get on the ferry and say "Boy, foos di pillie?" just to prove their Shetland authenticity. (K)

bert thompson
23rd February 2006, 22:29
C E D
You have made my day. Laughed until I cried. Wonder how many understand the dialect
Bert

Chief Engineer's Daughter
23rd February 2006, 22:39
C E D
You have made my day. Laughed until I cried. Wonder how many understand the dialect
Bert

Am glad I made your day! (Thumb) (K)

Coastie
23rd February 2006, 23:19
Trust you CED!!!!

fred henderson
24th February 2006, 01:01
The passengers will continue to speak English, like all sensible folks CED. It is only the crew that will need to speak in strange way!

Fred (Thumb)

Coastie
24th February 2006, 01:07
Are the passengers going get on the ferry and say "Boy, foos di pillie?" just to prove their Shetland authenticity. (K)

It sure would be an interesting journey, but what would you say to the Lassies? (EEK) (I think that should read Lasses?!)

gdynia
24th February 2006, 06:07
How will this affect our intra island services in Shetland? This isn't a Gaelic speaking community, never has been. Are the passengers going get on the ferry and say "Boy, foos di pillie?" just to prove their Shetland authenticity. (K)

Quite right I didnt have any problems on the Mull Ferry last weekend (Applause)

vix
24th February 2006, 07:17
It just needs a Scottish Minister to pass a regulation that all crew members must speak Gallic and/or a Scottish dialect, have been educated in Scotland and believe that Braveheart is a true historical record!
Fred (Thumb)
Fred, they wouldn't have to learn the Gaelic, all they have to do is talk like the original Taggart and the rest of the world woud nae hae a clue 'fit they're talking aboot!! I had to translate for all of my family (Why does he keep on calling that young lad Jessie?) I even had to translate 'When the Boat Comes In' and that was only Geordie! Here's power to your elbow...lang may your lum reek! Vix (Applause)

J Boyde
24th February 2006, 09:10
When I joined my first ship I had big problems understanding the english as spoken by the english crew. A few months on the tyne and I could speak like a native. Bit old to learn Greek.
Jim B (Hippy)

trotterdotpom
24th February 2006, 18:53
How will this affect our intra island services in Shetland? This isn't a Gaelic speaking community, never has been. Are the passengers going get on the ferry and say "Boy, foos di pillie?" just to prove their Shetland authenticity. (K)

I've done a google voyage from Scrabster to Thorshavn and from Reykjavik to Bergen, trying to find out what "Boy, foos di pillie?' might mean in Sunny Lerwick. I know it doesn't mean "Why are there so many trees here?" I give in - help!

I did find out that "Hjalt" as in Hjaltland, the old name for Shetland means "Gold Hill" - no wonder they dug all the trees up - and all there is to know about Norn.

John T.

Chief Engineer's Daughter
24th February 2006, 19:03
I've done a google voyage from Scrabster to Thorshavn and from Reykjavik to Bergen, trying to find out what "Boy, foos di pillie?' might mean in Sunny Lerwick. I know it doesn't mean "Why are there so many trees here?" I give in - help!

I did find out that "Hjalt" as in Hjaltland, the old name for Shetland means "Gold Hill" - no wonder they dug all the trees up - and all there is to know about Norn.

John T.

It is really quite simple. This is a widely heard and sincerely dispatched greeting whereby one male inquires after the health and well being of the other gentleman's manhood!

(To which the reply is: "Nae sae ill bhoy!").

Skol
CED (K)

Tmac1720
24th February 2006, 19:23
And I thought it was just us heathens living over the shuck in Norn Iron that spoke funny. Almost nobody here understands a bloody word of it either but we spend a fortune of our (taxpayers) money translating it from the Queens English into gibberish. Rant over I'll get back in my cage now. (Cloud)

John Rogers
24th February 2006, 19:56
Simply translated to "Hows your hammer hanging old buddy"
John.

Mad Landsman
24th February 2006, 20:08
Has anyone else noticed that Gaelic speakers from the Highlands and Islands speak more clearly understandable English than Lowlanders and particularly Glaswegians?
Could it be that English is thought of as a Foreign language? Glaswegian being a language in its own right and much more than just a dialect.

lakercapt
24th February 2006, 23:27
Should try sailing with a Newfie crew to realise how the "english language' has changed to one that a native speaker wonders if thay are on the same
as I was taught at school!@!!

trotterdotpom
25th February 2006, 00:11
It is really quite simple. This is a widely heard and sincerely dispatched greeting whereby one male inquires after the health and well being of the other gentleman's manhood!

(To which the reply is: "Nae sae ill bhoy!").

Skol
CED (K)

Thanks for not leaving me dangling, CED.

John T.

Keltic Star
25th February 2006, 05:49
Should try sailing with a Newfie crew to realise how the "english language' has changed to one that a native speaker wonders if thay are on the same
as I was taught at school!@!!

I have two Newfie sons in law, both in the Canadian Navy. Can't understand a word they are saying. Explain it away as being partially deaf due to living with the noise of 8000 horsepower of diesel and constant chipping hammers in the day's when sailors went to sea, unlike them who sit on their a---s in port for ten months a year.

lochluichart
25th February 2006, 16:06
The other answer is "hinging plumb"

James MacDonald
19th April 2006, 20:18
Billy Connoly didn't do so bad in getting his jokes across to his English audience's & he ended up minted .Taggart is shown on telly in a lot of countries including the US. Robert Burns works are in demand in Russia .But I cant understand scouce, brom, geordie ,taff ,cockney or moosh. Leave auld Glesga alaine.

Matthew
19th April 2006, 22:34
Billy Connoly didn't do so bad in getting his jokes across to his English audience's & he ended up minted .Taggart is shown on telly in a lot of countries including the US. Robert Burns works are in demand in Russia .But I cant understand scouce, brom, geordie ,taff ,cockney or moosh. Leave auld Glesga alaine.

ya caaant understand scouse me 'al mate?

Its easy once you get your pronunciation right (or wrong as it is) Take it from a Liverpudlian!

dom
20th April 2006, 04:32
some of the scots shows here in aus,have sub titles,waiting for jo jo, an example

Jan Hendrik
20th April 2006, 09:38
Efcharistopouli, kalo taxidi.

Yiannis

billyboy
20th April 2006, 09:50
Duck Jan, INCOMING!!

billyboy
20th April 2006, 09:53
It is really quite simple. This is a widely heard and sincerely dispatched greeting whereby one male inquires after the health and well being of the other gentleman's manhood!

(To which the reply is: "Nae sae ill bhoy!").

Skol
CED (K)

I SAY "CHIEF"...How nicely put!...(didna think yon shetland lasies knew aboot things like that) (*)) (*))

fred henderson
20th April 2006, 17:06
Everyone has had a great deal of fun from this thread, but no one has addressed the point I raised. Under the latest EEC regulations ferry operations in any member state must be open to ships and crews from other states. The Greeks are firmly against this idea and their Maritime Minister has stated that whilst he fully supports this policy, for health and safety reasons all ferry crews operating in Greek waters must be fluent in the Greek language and have a Greek education.
My idea was that a Scottish Minister could copy this requirement and demand that all ferry crews operating in Scottish waters fluent in the Scots dialect/language appropriate to the service and have a Scottish education. This would keep the East European and Greek crews out.

Fred

agentroadrunner
24th April 2006, 12:16
MV Isle of Lewis in the old Neptune Yard at Wallsend for overhaul 3 or 4 years ago.

Geordie Yard Worker heard saying to his mate....

" Whi aye, neva seen this befoa man, British Officers an' Norwegian crew"