Booker Venture

Billy Brown
8th March 2006, 15:47
Hi All
I'm trying to find out whatever happened to the Booker Venture. A friend of mine was on her and would like to know. Also If anyone has a photo.....

Thanks in advance
(Frogger)

ruud
8th March 2006, 16:30
Ahoy Billy,

Not sure if this is the one you're looking for;if so, at least some details, I haven't a clue where she ended up.

Gulpers
8th March 2006, 17:35
Booker Venture (04.1961)
Caribbean Memories (1978)
Thanic (1980)
Trader (1985)

Broken Up (1986)

gdynia
8th March 2006, 18:34
Hi All
I'm trying to find out whatever happened to the Booker Venture. A friend of mine was on her and would like to know. Also If anyone has a photo.....

Thanks in advance
(Frogger)

Billy
In the early 70,s I saw both the Venture and Vanguard up the Great Lakes. The 2nd Mate who was ship daft explained to us they normally traded sugar fro central america but due to politics were on the grain run from the Lakes to continent

chaspat
10th March 2006, 09:45
Does anyone know what happened to Booker Line?

R58484956
10th March 2006, 13:59
No doubt took the same course as the rest of British companies.

Billy Brown
10th March 2006, 17:04
Thanks you all very much for the photo and the info. (Applause)

sparksliverpool
14th March 2006, 12:44
Does anyone know what happened to Booker Line?

Moved into the pharmacutical sector also Booker cash and carry also the Booker Prize (For Books ) I also live near Booker Av a well known road in Liverpool Also sailed on Booker Viking

sparksliverpool
14th March 2006, 13:11
Hi All
I'm trying to find out whatever happened to the Booker Venture. A friend of mine was on her and would like to know. Also If anyone has a photo.....

Thanks in advance
(Frogger)

The business firm, Booker Brothers, McConnell & Company, popularly known as Bookers, played a leading role in the economic history of Guyana, particularly from the beginning of the twentieth century. By the middle of the century, the company, headquartered in London, owned large holdings in Britain, Trinidad, Barbados, Jamaica, Nigeria, Canada, India, Belgium, East Africa as well as Guyana.

The Booker family owned sugar plantations in Guyana since the early nineteenth century. The firm gradually expanded its holdings by purchasing other plantations that ran into economic problems late in the century. Thus, by the end of the nineteenth century, Bookers owned most of the sugar plantations in Guyana.

The firm had also by this time branched out, both in Guyana and in its other international locations, to form separate companies involved in shipping, the import and export trade, and wholesale and retail sale of consumer goods, among other businesses. Bookers' impact on the economy of the country was so great, that Guyana, then known as the colony of British Guiana, was often humourously referred to as "Bookers Guiana".

Through the wealth Bookers generated in Guyana, and its role as the largest employer, it was able to wield much political influence during successive periods in the country's history.

By 1950, the Booker companies were involved in all sectors of the Guyanese economy. Bookers Agricultural Holdings owned 15 of the existing 18 sugar estates and a large cattle ranch located at Kabawer on the upper Abary River. Another offshoot company known as the Campbell Booker group owned a large number of wholesale and retail stores selling groceries, furniture, household appliances, clothing, hardware, building supplies, sports goods, farm machinery and equipment, and motor vehicles. It also owned the largest taxi service in the country.

Another branch of the group was the Bookers Engineering and Industrial Holdings which manufactured and sold pharmaceuticals. It also manufactured boxes and was involved in printing and publishing.

Bookers Merchants, in addition to conducting a lucrative advertising business, performed the role of producers and distributors of rum, stockfeed, balata, lumber, and petroleum products.

The international shipping business was provided by Bookers Brothers (Liverpool) which also controlled the sugar terminals in Georgetown. This company was also involved in various types of insurance. Two other branches of the Bookers business cartel, the Guiana Industrial and Commercial Investments and Bookers Central Properties, carried out investments in real estate and other property.

The management sector of the Bookers group of companies in Guyana comprised mostly expatriate Englishmen who served for a few years before returning to Britain. They included the managers of the sugar estates which employed thousands of persons of Indian and African ancestry as cane cutters and factory workers. Urban middle class Guyanese made up a lower tier in Bookers' management team.

sparksliverpool
14th March 2006, 13:13
No doubt took the same course as the rest of British companies.
The business firm, Booker Brothers, McConnell & Company, popularly known as Bookers, played a leading role in the economic history of Guyana, particularly from the beginning of the twentieth century. By the middle of the century, the company, headquartered in London, owned large holdings in Britain, Trinidad, Barbados, Jamaica, Nigeria, Canada, India, Belgium, East Africa as well as Guyana.

The Booker family owned sugar plantations in Guyana since the early nineteenth century. The firm gradually expanded its holdings by purchasing other plantations that ran into economic problems late in the century. Thus, by the end of the nineteenth century, Bookers owned most of the sugar plantations in Guyana.

The firm had also by this time branched out, both in Guyana and in its other international locations, to form separate companies involved in shipping, the import and export trade, and wholesale and retail sale of consumer goods, among other businesses. Bookers' impact on the economy of the country was so great, that Guyana, then known as the colony of British Guiana, was often humourously referred to as "Bookers Guiana".

Through the wealth Bookers generated in Guyana, and its role as the largest employer, it was able to wield much political influence during successive periods in the country's history.

By 1950, the Booker companies were involved in all sectors of the Guyanese economy. Bookers Agricultural Holdings owned 15 of the existing 18 sugar estates and a large cattle ranch located at Kabawer on the upper Abary River. Another offshoot company known as the Campbell Booker group owned a large number of wholesale and retail stores selling groceries, furniture, household appliances, clothing, hardware, building supplies, sports goods, farm machinery and equipment, and motor vehicles. It also owned the largest taxi service in the country.

Another branch of the group was the Bookers Engineering and Industrial Holdings which manufactured and sold pharmaceuticals. It also manufactured boxes and was involved in printing and publishing.

Bookers Merchants, in addition to conducting a lucrative advertising business, performed the role of producers and distributors of rum, stockfeed, balata, lumber, and petroleum products.

The international shipping business was provided by Bookers Brothers (Liverpool) which also controlled the sugar terminals in Georgetown. This company was also involved in various types of insurance. Two other branches of the Bookers business cartel, the Guiana Industrial and Commercial Investments and Bookers Central Properties, carried out investments in real estate and other property.

The management sector of the Bookers group of companies in Guyana comprised mostly expatriate Englishmen who served for a few years before returning to Britain. They included the managers of the sugar estates which employed thousands of persons of Indian and African ancestry as cane cutters and factory workers. Urban middle class Guyanese made up a lower tier in Bookers' management team.

tom nicholson
15th March 2006, 11:58
i remember both ships BOOKER VENTU RE & VANGUARD both lengthening jobs in smiths docks those were the days.
cheers tom (*))

Aldinga
22nd May 2006, 06:32
This is a different view of the ‘Booker Venture”

Ron

Ships Agent
5th June 2006, 23:04
I used to Board the Booker ships when they came into greenock to discharge sugar I am sure one had a foreign crew. I think the old man was a yugoslavian

jonog
3rd November 2006, 12:17
Hi,
I'm ex Bookers as well, and have started researching what happened to all of their ships. I can point your friend in the direction of a fantastic publication called 'Ships in Focus Record 34'. Its a magazine available from J. & M.Clarkson, 18 Franklands, Longton, Preston, telephone orders to 01772 612855, or e-mail: shipsinfocus@btinternet.com. Record 34 concentrates on all of the Booker ships with loads of photos including of the Venture, and cost me about £10 delivered!! Bargain!
However, just to let you know, according to the mag., Bookers sold her in 1980 to the Greeks who renamed her THANIC. She was sold on again in 1985 to the Maltese and renamed TRADER, and she was broken up in India starting on 10.1.1986. I have no idea where these guys get all their info and photos from, but it's the best £10 I've spent since I don't know when!!!
Kind regards,
Jon Gregory

john shaw
3rd November 2006, 16:58
Here's another of Booker Venture.
Also Booker Viking and Booker Vanguard.

niggle
11th November 2006, 18:17
I spent my second voyage on the Booker Vanguard as junior sparky with Alan Moss as senior R/O. There used to be a saying in Booker Line that because Alan had spent so many years on the Vanguard that " In the beginning God created Mossy then he built the Booker Vanguard. Good memories of that voyage, including the fact that she was 240dc power but radio station ran on AC so in the funnel space was a DC to AC convertor which required the brushes to be cleaned with a glass fibre stick each voyage. Easier said than done as it could only be done in harbour as you had to lean over the main engine exhaust flue. Happy times......... met Alan in the nineties working in the Triad building in Bootle for those familiar with Liverpool. Anyone remember another Booker vessel the Booker Crusade which I also sailed on and almost sank on her when on charter from St. Lawrence to Venezuala with newsprint which got very damp after No1 hold started to fill with seawater in very heavy weather. Thats another story for another day if anyone interested.

Clive123
22nd May 2012, 05:44
I see this thread is not what you'd call active but I'll direct you to the link http://www.bookerline.com which has a lot of information about the company, crew and ships.
I sailed as 2nd r/o on the Venture (GHPB) in the late 60's. There are some nice pictures of the radio room in the site's gallery posted by Don McRae R/O. I remember having a few QSOs with Al on the Vanguard, mainly ship's gossip.

capkelly
22nd May 2012, 18:45
Niggle, good evening, I was surveyor for the cargo insurers at Bermuda for the Booker Crusade, the vessel had a lucky escape. The water in the holds caused the paper to expand - what a mess to discharge. But a pleasant stay in Bermuda - worked day shift only if my memory is right.

tugtere
24th May 2012, 02:30
Hi folks,
I spent too much time in "Eigigu" ex "Booker Challenge" when owned by Nauru Pacific Line running out of Melbourne and Nauru Island
. When the Island went broke I think all of the ships went to the breakers.
She had Halberstadt-Man main engine and SKL gensets. Had some good runs but mostly bad ones. regards ray

niggle
3rd June 2012, 09:28
Niggle, good evening, I was surveyor for the cargo insurers at Bermuda for the Booker Crusade, the vessel had a lucky escape. The water in the holds caused the paper to expand - what a mess to discharge. But a pleasant stay in Bermuda - worked day shift only if my memory is right.

Hi Capkelly,

I well remember our 6 weeks in Bermuda, I took lots of photos of the cargo which were for Insurance purposes, even took some of the dumped cargo on the landfill tip behind Island Island. It was dangerous on deck at times with the hydraulic oil from the winches plus the big steel rod put down the core of paper rolls to break them out when connected via a block welded to hatch side then to derrick winch. Remember several snapped wires, blocks etc also the steel rod being "launched" like a missile into middle of dock just prior to arrival of a warship that docked ahead of us.