Doulos

Bob S
11th August 2004, 15:44
DOULOS (14/6804) seen in the only shaft of sunlight on a stormy day at Southampton on the 6th April 2004.
She was built as MEDINA by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company for the Mallory Steamship Company for Atlantic service, she served with the US Coast Guard during WW2. In 1948 she was acquired by Naviera San Miguel SA of Panama and renamed ROMA and converted to a passenger ship for the Australian emigrant trade. In 1952 she was acquired by Linea Costa and renamed FRANCA C and used in the cruise industry. In 1977 she was acquired by Gute Bucher Fur Alle e.V. and renamed DOULOS and after some conversion work in Germany she sailed in her present roll.

spongebob
13th August 2008, 00:29
DOULOS (14/6804) seen in the only shaft of sunlight on a stormy day at Southampton on the 6th April 2004.
She was built as MEDINA by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company for the Mallory Steamship Company for Atlantic service, she served with the US Coast Guard during WW2. In 1948 she was acquired by Naviera San Miguel SA of Panama and renamed ROMA and converted to a passenger ship for the Australian emigrant trade. In 1952 she was acquired by Linea Costa and renamed FRANCA C and used in the cruise industry. In 1977 she was acquired by Gute Bucher Fur Alle e.V. and renamed DOULOS and after some conversion work in Germany she sailed in her present roll.

Our local paper, the Brisbane Courier Mail, announces the arrival of SS Doulos
At Brisbane's Port side passenger terminal where she is to be berthed for 6 days.

I will try to get down there for a look and perhaps go aboard,
Will report later

Bob

spongebob
14th August 2008, 08:35
Doulos

I must confess that I had never heard of this ship until reading Bob Sí post on 11th August.
Coincidentally the same morning the Brisbane Courier Mail featured the shipís arrival in Brisbane for a weekís stay and I took the opportunity to go on board this afternoon.
Google ďDoulosĒ and you will find many references to this shipís history but the most pertinent one to me was the fact that she is still in active service despite being only two years younger than the Titanic.
I wasnít that old, naive or rosy spectacled to imagine that I was about to board a pristine old liner still complete with her holy stoned teak decks, bright brass work and with triple expansion steam engines and scotch marine boilers below but I must say that I was saddened by the general state of the ship.

Obviously a shipís volunteer crew with a mission to spread Godís word around the globe and to bring literacy by way of books to many third world countries is less inclined or able than a Jack Tar, or a crowd of Merchant Marine ABís under a tough Bosun, to keep the vessel truly ship-shape and I guess that charitable work leaves little time or money for this aspect of ship husbandry
The hull paintwork, although relatively clean showed many multi layered coats beside chipped and cleaned areas that would have been at least 6 mm difference while the riveted plates showed many welded patches where corrosion or stress had made a call. The teak deck planking was black, no RN Quarter Deck whiteness here, and all in all I felt happy for the old shipís sake to note that she was on her final voyage. 94 years of age surely earns a rest.
There has got to be an element of risk in a hull that old and with a third set of propulsion, the last, a Fiat Vee 18 cylinder 42 mm bore 1000 litre 8100 horse power diesel installed in 1971 seemed at odds with the grace of the steam age hull, perhaps a bit like a 94 year old on Viagra.
A glance down below was enough as the roar of the very noisy generators took me back a year or two.

Perhaps my agnostic outlook and my negative thoughts of the vesselís state gave cause to a greater being above to arrange for me to catch my watch strap on a lashing on the gang plank handrail to snap it and in a flash consign it to the deep. I felt the knock and heard the plop and uttered the Sh*t as my ten year old Tissot took to the briny. Some lucky diver might find it in time to come, itís rated for 50 metres and the battery was new so it should keep time for a long while yet.

All in all an interesting day but the retribution angle has me worried

Bob J

Bruce Carson
14th August 2008, 15:30
Externally, about the only feature remaining unchanged from her very early years is the counter. Even the bow has been modified and now is raked.
The Mallory Line, at the time of launch, was also known as the New York & Texas Steamship Company and the 'Medina' was built for the Company's cargo service between New York and Galveston, with intermediate stops.
Later, she did make Atlantic crossings.

Bruce