Can any one help??

Gerrysea
31st March 2006, 20:25
Hi there,

Got my cousin over from the States. She sailed out of Liverpool 1952 on the Newfoundland sailing into Boston.

Looking for any info on the Newfoundland, Links for pictures would be great? what shipping line was she from? Anyone here sail on her?

Any snippets we can work with will do.

Thanks in anticipation.

Ron Stringer
31st March 2006, 20:44
Nice shot on http://www.merchant-navy.net/Pictures/newfoundland.html.
She and her sister ship the ss Nova Scotia were the most usual carriers from the UK to Newfoundland. They were both owned by the Furness Withy line.

Sailed with a sparks who did his first 6 months on the ss Newfoundland and all he could talk about was how rough the weather was during his time on her and how he suffered from the seasickness. However after leaving Avonmouth he went green and rushed out of the radio room just as we passed Barry Island on our first trip together, so I am not sure that he was a good judge of the seakeeping qualities of the Newfoundland.

Ron

Gerrysea
31st March 2006, 20:53
Nice shot on http://www.merchant-navy.net/Pictures/newfoundland.html.
She and her sister ship the ss Nova Scotia were the most usual carriers from the UK to Newfoundland. They were both owned by the Furness Withy line.

Sailed with a sparks who did his first 6 months on the ss Newfoundland and all he could talk about was how rough the weather was during his time on her and how he suffered from the seasickness. However after leaving Avonmouth he went green and rushed out of the radio room just as we passed Barry Island on our first trip together, so I am not sure that he was a good judge of the seakeeping qualities of the Newfoundland.

Ron

Hi Ron,

Our Mary was only telling us the tail of her crossing this morning, about how rough it was and that vitually every one on board , Including the crew, were sea-sick. So could be that Sparks was telling the truth.

Thanks for your prompt response.

Ron Stringer
31st March 2006, 21:05
Gerry,

Here is a bit copied from the Shipslist site

NEWFOUNDLAND / GEORGE ANSON 1947
7,437 gross tons, length 423.5ft x beam 61.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 75-1st and 80-tourist class passengers. Crew 80. Launched 22nd May 1947 by Vickers-Armstrong, Newcastle as the NEWFOUNDLAND for Furness Withy & Co. and operated by Furness-Warren Lines Ltd, Liverpool on their Liverpool - St. John's NF - Halifax - Boston service. 11th Nov.1961 last voyage as a passenger ship. Jan.1962 passenger accommodation reduced to 12 due to declining numbers carried, and sold to Dominion Navigation Co, Melbourne (H. C. Sleigh Ltd). Refitted at the builder's Elderslie Yard, her bridge deck was extended to the foremast and aft to the stern house. Renamed GEORGE ANSON, she was then used on the Australia - Hong Kong - China - Japan service. For a while she wore the red and black topped funnel of the Indo-China S.N.Co. with a green hull and was registered in the Bahamas. Feb.1971 arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping [Merchant Fleets, vol.37 by Duncan Haws]

Ron

Gerrysea
31st March 2006, 22:30
Thanks for that Ron.

m spurrell
21st November 2011, 20:04
hi,
just stumbled on this thread, i know it's a bit late but thought you might like to hear my expeiriences of the 'newfoundland' and 'novascotia'
in 1959 when i was ten, i sailed from liverpool to st. johns, on to halifax, and finished up in boston mas. with my mother, two sisters and a cousin, to visit my fathers family some of whom lived in newfoundland but most of them lived in new york. we crossed in either the newfoundland or the novascotia i can't remember which and we came back four months later in the other. what i do remember was the trip out probably about june, was relatively smooth though i was awfully sick for the entire journey. however the return journey in september was a nightmare, we all thought we were going to die. the decks outside were out of bounds and criss- crossed with rope to allow esential crew members to have something to grab. each time the prop came out of the water the ship shook violently, all the tables in the dining room were chained down and covered with wet blankets to allow plates etc to stick to the surface, not that many passengers were eating. a vew from any porthole was, light grey, sky, as she rolled, grey green, sea, rolling further dark green then black. at that point anything not screwed down would shoot across the room and the ship would start to roll back to complete the cycle. from memory this didn't come gradually but late one night like a train crash with peoples suit cases and property flying about and passengers falling out of bed. i distinctly remember a man's voice yelling "ye gods" loudly. from that moment on i abandoned my plans of following in my fathers and his fathers footsteps in the merchant navy and stayed on solid ground for the next fifty years my next expierience being a pleasure cruise on the med. quite different altogether.
i still have the menu cards from the novascotia and newfoundland somewhere autographed by passengers and crew, i could dig them out and copy them if anyone is interested
best wishes martin

Pat Kennedy
21st November 2011, 20:17
Newfoundland and Nova scotia had a terrible reputation amongst Liverpool seafarers . It was said of these two ships that they would roll in drydock!
I remember passing the Nova Scotia at Liverpool Bar on a Blue Funnel ship. The weather was mild, the sea had a slight chop, and we were as steady as a rock. The Nova Scotia on the other hand was acting like a drunken sailor.
Pat

Lou2325
19th May 2012, 03:27
hi,
just stumbled on this thread, i know it's a bit late but thought you might like to hear my expeiriences of the 'newfoundland' and 'novascotia'
in 1959 when i was ten, i sailed from liverpool to st. johns, on to halifax, and finished up in boston mas. with my mother, two sisters and a cousin, to visit my fathers family some of whom lived in newfoundland but most of them lived in new york. we crossed in either the newfoundland or the novascotia i can't remember which and we came back four months later in the other. what i do remember was the trip out probably about june, was relatively smooth though i was awfully sick for the entire journey. however the return journey in september was a nightmare, we all thought we were going to die. the decks outside were out of bounds and criss- crossed with rope to allow esential crew members to have something to grab. each time the prop came out of the water the ship shook violently, all the tables in the dining room were chained down and covered with wet blankets to allow plates etc to stick to the surface, not that many passengers were eating. a vew from any porthole was, light grey, sky, as she rolled, grey green, sea, rolling further dark green then black. at that point anything not screwed down would shoot across the room and the ship would start to roll back to complete the cycle. from memory this didn't come gradually but late one night like a train crash with peoples suit cases and property flying about and passengers falling out of bed. i distinctly remember a man's voice yelling "ye gods" loudly. from that moment on i abandoned my plans of following in my fathers and his fathers footsteps in the merchant navy and stayed on solid ground for the next fifty years my next expierience being a pleasure cruise on the med. quite different altogether.
i still have the menu cards from the novascotia and newfoundland somewhere autographed by passengers and crew, i could dig them out and copy them if anyone is interested
best wishes martin
Hi
I'm the great niece of the SS Nova Scotia's Cook - Tommy Riley
I would to hear from you if you remember him
Thanks

TOM ALEXANDER
19th May 2012, 07:48
I didn't see either ship, but was sailing with Furness Withy on a few ships from 1956 - 1959. Word around all the company was that the Newfoundland and the Nova Scotia were the best submarines in the North Atlantic, although having sailed on the ore carrier, the Sagamore, I doubt that very much.

Leratty
7th July 2012, 04:26
Does anyone know where a picture of the Canadian Pacific Beaver Ash might be there is one of her I believe when she was sold on to a Greek Co but not too sure it that is in fact her. I served on deck on her in the mid 60's out of London. She was a great ship, crew food we had terrific times up the Gt Lakes.
Richard

A.D.FROST
7th July 2012, 09:11
Does anyone know where a picture of the Canadian Pacific Beaver Ash might be there is one of her I believe when she was sold on to a Greek Co but not too sure it that is in fact her. I served on deck on her in the mid 60's out of London. She was a great ship, crew food we had terrific times up the Gt Lakes.
Richard

BEAVERASH;1969 r/nZANET,1980 r/n AGIOS NIKOLAOS;1984 r/n NISSAKI; b/u Gadani Beach 17.4.84 (Thumb) http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old%20Ships%20B/slides/Beaverash-03.html