Female Radio Officers

Doug H
19th April 2006, 08:19
I was just reviewing some posts about the former Australian Pilot vessell WYUNA (thanks Jan Hendricks for guiding us to the right reference point) when I saw Trotterdotpom's posting from last year:
"9th June 2005, 17:32
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I can remember picking up pilots from Wyuna in the early '70s, not sure how long she lasted in that role (or should I say roll?).

After being acquired by the Australian Maritime College, Launceston, in the early '80s, she did a trip each year manned by cadets and there are many hilarious tales of their exploits. Some of the cadets escapades resulted in a drastic curtailment of the voyages. Boys will be boys!

In the mid-'80s, Amalgamated Wireless of Australia (Aussie Marconi equivalent) sponsored the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race for a couple of years and Wyuna acted as a support and communications coordination vessel. She was provided with about half a dozen AWA R/Os (they must have found some "normal" ones), including Heather, the one and only female R/O on Aussie ships. I could have gone too if I'd worn my high heels!

John T.

which, as I spent a while on Australian coastal ships (a long time ago) and hadn't heard of a lady R/O, made me wonder how many there were. We mostly know about female R/Os on Dutch ships but were there any on British ships?? Maybe John T, you can tell us more about the Oz lady. Doug H

trotterdotpom
19th April 2006, 10:31
Doug, to the best of my knowledge, Heather was the only female RO on Australian ships. I met her a few times and found her to be very competent and a pleasant lady. She was around for 3 or 4 years (I think) and eventually married a BHP Chief Officer. She did seem to get used by AWA a bit for publicity purposes. I think she disappeared under a pile of nappies, but not sure.

There were also a few female Navigating Cadets who eventually got tickets, I believe. Don't know how far up the tree they went.

John T.

PS Sadly, AWA, an iconic Australian company, for many years involved in military and civilian electronics manufacture and design as well as marine communications, seems to have disappeared altogether now.

exsailor
19th April 2006, 11:28
Mid 70's, NZ Shipping Corp had a female Sparks, who sailed on both the coastal and UK run vessels. I sailed with her brother, a Third Engineer, with Whitco Marine, London.

Peter Fielding
19th April 2006, 11:37
I believe NZS had a female sparks, named Liz Banham, and I think her husband, Richard was a Frosty in the company. Maybe some of the NZS guys could confirm this, or correct my knackered old memory.

rknibbs
19th April 2006, 12:40
When I did my R/O training in 1968/69 we had one female on our course and I think she went to work for Safmarine, well, that was her intention.

tunatownshipwreck
20th April 2006, 06:19
I would say about half of the Norwegian radio operators were female in the 1970s, I don't know what the numbers were in the 1960s, but I met a few. I remember a Russian woman who was R/O on a Soviet ship in the early 1970s, also a Filipina woman on a ship from Taiwan in 1971. Around the mid-late 1970s I read articles about American women breaking in to the trade on US ships. I met a Canadian woman who was working keys on a Japanese-owned ship with a Panamanian flag and Filipino crew around 1974. Then there was a British R/O who might have been a woman working on a Greek ship, the crew wasn't sure either.

cynter
20th April 2006, 07:07
I remember speeking (QSO'ing) with various female Scandinavian R/Os in the late 50'/60's. The only Pommie female sparkie to my knowledge was trained in Bridlington, East Yorks, as I was and I think her name was Angela... never met her.
On this subject.... I thoroughly used to enjoy speeking with the European female ops in Holland, Demark, Sweden and Norway on R/T 2182 kc/s band..... memories,eh...?????

johnmilne
20th April 2006, 07:31
Doug, to the best of my knowledge, Heather was the only female RO on Australian ships. I met her a few times and found her to be very competent and a pleasant lady. She was around for 3 or 4 years (I think) and eventually married a BHP Chief Officer. She did seem to get used by AWA a bit for publicity purposes. I think she disappeared under a pile of nappies, but not sure.

There were also a few female Navigating Cadets who eventually got tickets, I believe. Don't know how far up the tree they went.

John T.

PS Sadly, AWA, an iconic Australian company, for many years involved in military and civilian electronics manufacture and design as well as marine communications, seems to have disappeared altogether now.
I know of two female port pilots in Queensland! (Mackay Haypoint Also one at Cairns) Both doing a good Job)The one in HayPoint 'driving' the big ones
Cheers
John Milne

cynter
20th April 2006, 07:34
I remember speeking (QSO'ing) with various female Scandinavian R/Os in the late 50'/60's. The only Pommie female sparkie to my knowledge was trained in Bridlington, East Yorks, as I was and I think her name was Angela... never met her.
On this subject.... I thoroughly used to enjoy speeking with the European female ops in Holland, Demark, Sweden and Norway on R/T 2182 kc/s band..... memories,eh...?????

cynter
20th April 2006, 07:35
sorry about the "hiccup"

Jan Hendrik
20th April 2006, 08:18
Doug H.
The name is Hendrik (not Hendrick) and both are my real Christian names.
There was a Jan (pronounced Yan or Yun) on site already, hence using my second initial. Not that it matters Douglas.....

Terry,
See, as soon as a female is involved you slip up....guess we all do.... Lol

.... /._ /..._ /. // ._ //_ _ . /.. //_ . _ . // . //_ . . //. _ //_ . _ _

The "Wyuna" was for sale.
Anybody knows the current status?

trotterdotpom
20th April 2006, 10:58
It seemed like every small Norwegian port had its own radio station - most of them manned by female operators (is that a paradox or an oxymoron?). There was a well known trawler RO in Grimsby who, after several flirtatious conversations over the radio, on entering port, bought up big on tins of Quality Street chocolates from the bond and trekked up the mountain to the radio station. When he got there, huffing and puffing, the Nordic Siren turned out to be a giggling 70 year old! Wonder if she still liked the "hard centres"?

Maybe the Norwegians have there own version of yodelling "......and your old lady toooooo".

Jan, sorry, but have to say "QSD" ("Your keying is defective") - can't make much sense of your message.

John T.

cynter
20th April 2006, 11:16
"trotts".... mate, you're humour never changes. I can identify with it 100%...
I spent quite some time around Norway/Sweden/Demark and thoroughly enjoyed it.
Just wish I could go back a tad....

Chris Field
20th April 2006, 21:26
Come on, you NZ Shipping Corp lads (eg Coatal Trader...)- what was the name of our well-liked and respected female R/O- I think her father was a coastal skipper in NZ.

Charlie_Wood
20th April 2006, 21:36
Well age is really catching up now, I've been puzzling all day about a female sparks we had on the Avon Forest in 78 or 79. She must have been Marconi as she would have been relieving Sid White on one of his voyages off. All I can remember is her being turfed out of the saloon for wearing a jumpsuit, as far as Roddy MacDougall, the skipper, was concerned it was a ******* boiler suit!! She didn't create much of a stir as we were used to women working on board. At the same time we had a Canadian 3rd Mate, Janice Nicholls (sent from ship to ship just to try me I think), Elenor Sim was Chief Cook and we also had three stewardesses. All very civilised really.

Paul Christiansen
21st April 2006, 03:47
The radio officers name was Phillippa Reynolds. After languishing on the Coastal Trader for long enough to have the sauna room named after her, she was finally allowed to go deepsea. Not sure what happened in her career when sconz folded.

trotterdotpom
21st April 2006, 10:37
Well age is really catching up now, I've been puzzling all day about a female sparks we had on the Avon Forest in 78 or 79. She must have been Marconi as she would have been relieving Sid White on one of his voyages off. All I can remember is her being turfed out of the saloon for wearing a jumpsuit, as far as Roddy MacDougall, the skipper, was concerned it was a ******* boiler suit!! She didn't create much of a stir as we were used to women working on board. At the same time we had a Canadian 3rd Mate, Janice Nicholls (sent from ship to ship just to try me I think), Elenor Sim was Chief Cook and we also had three stewardesses. All very civilised really.

Wasn't Avon Forest a Denholm's managed ship? Was the 'Sparklet' Dallas Bradshaw as mentioned on David Scott's post about Scotstoun in the gallery?

John T.

david harrod
21st April 2006, 12:40
Doug H.
The name is Hendrik (not Hendrick) and both are my real Christian names.
There was a Jan (pronounced Yan or Yun) on site already, hence using my second initial. Not that it matters Douglas.....

Terry,
See, as soon as a female is involved you slip up....guess we all do.... Lol

.... /._ /..._ /. // ._ //_ _ . /.. //_ . _ . // . //_ . . //. _ //_ . _ _

The "Wyuna" was for sale.
Anybody knows the current status?
Wyuna was sold a couple of years ago; i think it is now some form of charity ship...I was the first mate/lecturer on her when the AMC bought it in 79/80...

exsailor
21st April 2006, 12:58
The radio officers name was Phillippa Reynolds. After languishing on the Coastal Trader for long enough to have the sauna room named after her, she was finally allowed to go deepsea. Not sure what happened in her career when sconz folded.
Memory failed me with her christian name - knew the surname was Reynolds, as I had sailed with her brother Terry. She went ashore as a Radio Inspector and now lives (married) near Whangarei.

Jan Hendrik
21st April 2006, 14:13
Thanks for the info David. Ch. officer at the AMC site was a certain Angus, you would know him. Forgot the captain's name.

I thought they were still trying to sell the vessel "last year", but as time goes fast, then it might have been couple of years now.....
I have good memories of the dockins in Launceston and my visits to Beauty Point.
Jan

p.s. in case you missed it -- main page -- special purpose vessels -- 2nd page AMC ships.

david harrod
21st April 2006, 14:25
Thanks for the info David. Ch. officer at the AMC site was a certain Angus, you would know him. Forgot the captain's name.

I thought they were still trying to sell the vessel "last year", but as time goes fast, then it might have been couple of years now.....
I have good memories of the dockins in Launceston and my visits to Beauty Point.
Jan

p.s. in case you missed it -- main page -- special purpose vessels -- 2nd page AMC ships.
Jan, Angus was after my time; Frad Hartnack was the original AMC master, I was Mate and later Master before Mike Wood and Bill, (blonde moment, forgot his last name, sorry)..there were a whole series of mates, Ian Moist was one , I think he is still at AMC...the ship did a great job of training cadets; Bob Frost was the original Chief Engineer, he came with the ship, in fact he had been with the ship since its delivery to the Pilots from Scotland in 1954 or thereabouts. I think his son John was Chief on her for a short whilwe after Bob retired...

Frank P
21st April 2006, 16:59
Confirming what "Tunatownshipwreck" stated about females on Norwegian ships,
I was working on Norwegian ships for about 6 years in the 1970's, and half of the ships that I was on had female radio officers onboard.
All the Norwegian ships that I worked on, had females working onboard, radio officers, stewardess's etc, to have females working onboard European/Scandinavian ships in the 60/70's was not unusual.

Frank

Tony Selman
21st April 2006, 20:03
I am virtually certain that the first female sparks on a British ship was a lady called Dallas Bradshaw. I am also virtually certain that Dallas was Canadian but trained in the UK at Colwyn Bay. I have read this somewhere and can dig it out if anyone is interested. She definitely worked for Marconi around 1970 and I think she did a couple of trips with Denholms at the same time as they were employing female cadets/apprentices.

Chris Field
21st April 2006, 22:01
Thanks Paul and ex-sailor for the info re Philippa Reynolds- another senile gap in the memory filled by this website. (And, Paul- we sailed together on SCONZ at some stage...)

R651400
23rd April 2006, 06:35
In the mid 1950's my village pub in Scotland was owned by one Bob Reid whose wife I understand had a seagoing radio ticket. Whether or not she actually went to sea, I cannot be sure.
With a fresh radio ticket myself at the timeI never gave it much thought, but recently Mrs Reid came to light in a conversation. Still alive and in her eighties, I hope to get some information.
Spending a fair bit on the Oz coast Wyuna/VKVS I remember well.
Malcolm

Douglas Young
23rd April 2006, 09:58
Unicorn Lines of Durban, South Africa had three female radio officers working the two ro-ro vessels "Border" and "Barrier" from 1989 to 1992. They were Shona Graham, (no idea where she is now): Denise Rose (now Koch), married 2nd Engineer Errol Koch, and Jane (now Rennie) but can't remember her name before she married Captain David Rennie. These girls worked 2 months on, one month off, with Shona being permanent on the Border, Jane on the Barrier, and Denise relieving them.
I also sailed with Rose King who regularly writes letters to the Telegraph. Rose also sailed with Unicorn Lines, think she then went to Safmarine, and I sailed with her on Rogers of Mauritius' ship "Belle Etoile" in 1987.

Mac
23rd April 2006, 10:22
Chris

Female radio officer Reynolds father was Captain Eric Reynolds who had been with Anchor line of Nelson and served later with the then Northland Harbour Board in Whangarei and the Bay of Islands on tugs, pilot vessels and as marine officer in the Bay.

Barmyclaresdad
24th April 2006, 10:31
In reply to the post by Cynter, the lady in question was Angela Firman who I knew quite well. Her father was a Ch. Off. and mother a stewardess on Scandinavian ships.
On one of my trips to Hamburg in 1963 I missed her by a day. The last time I saw her would be at Bridlington in 1959.
I believe she married a Norwegian guy and sailed on Norske ships for a while.
NESWT also have a web site and association.

cynter
24th April 2006, 10:45
Thankyou Barmyclaresdad..... that clears up my question. I never knew the lady in question cos I was well at sea by then. While I was at sea, I QSO'd a few Scandinavian female R/Os and was very tempted to seek employment with "Scouwegian" companies...but it never happened.
Thanks again mate...
Cheers cynter.

cynter
24th April 2006, 10:50
Hi ... Barmyclaresdad.
I forgot to ask, but I assume that you must have been a Brid bloke to know about Angela.... will keep listening.

R651400
25th April 2006, 05:17
I knew and corresponded for a time with a Norwegian female radio operator called Ragnhilde Johanssen from Trondheim when she was on a tanker called the Berglot/JWST.
Radio Officers rate each other on the quality of their operating skills particularly on the use of the morse key from redhot to zero or a "lid."
The origins of "lid" have never been fully understood and since quite a few operating words have French origins eg Mayday (m'aidez), perhaps "lid" is a dimunitive for "l'idiot."
Ragnhilde was redhot (on the morse key, lads!) and told me Berglot was her first ship, joining east coast USA with virtually no handover from her predecessor on even how to throw a mains switch. Something that would never happen on a British or even Greek flag ship.

Knut
26th April 2006, 23:39
In the 50,60 and 70-ties perhaps half of the R/Os in Norwegian ships were girls. Some as young as 18 or 19.
However the first was a Canadian, Fern Blodgett from Toronto. She was trained in Canada, but this was in the middle of WW2 and she couldn`t get a job in a Canadian or Brit ship. Then along came the MOSDALE (Mosvold Shipping, Farsund) and they badly needed a R/O and took her on. She served on that ship for several years on the North Atlantic, perhaps due to the fact that she married the Captain. The Mosdale was a 17 knots Fruit Carrier and due to the speed she was unharmed during all those years. Brave girl and she sort of set the standard.
Rgds, Knut

Barmyclaresdad
2nd May 2006, 10:40
Certainly am/was. I am a member of the NESWT Association.
Send me a PM if you would like details

bert thompson
2nd May 2006, 20:19
When I joined Panocean in 1977 there were four Lady R/Os. The one I sailed with was Carol Heaps from the I.O.M. Nice person

lagerstedt
18th May 2006, 08:48
A good web site to visit is www.warsailors.com. The site is by a woman called Siri Holm and is about her Mother and Father who were both R/O's. Her Father was at sea from 1937 until the 1970's, mainly as a R/O but he did a spell as a 2/O. Her Mother went to sea as a Galley Maid and finished as a R/O.

A well written site with photos of the ships they sailed on.

Regards

Blair Lagerstedt
NZ

lagerstedt
19th May 2006, 09:48
AWA in Australia is still going and works in the IT area only. It is now in private ownership.

Regards
Blair Lagerstedt
NZ

Derek Roger
20th May 2006, 00:28
When I was Chief on Mahsud we had a 2 RO named Ruth . Charming young lady who I think became engaged to the 2nd Mate sometime through the trip . Wonder if any of you Brock lads sailed with her ???
Derek

graham palmer
16th June 2006, 22:47
Liz Banham(nee Rait) was the first female R\O in P&O, I know because she was my junior for 2 trips (1973\74) on the Taupo between UK and NZ.
She took over from myself at Panama on the way back to NZ and she married Rick Banham (Frosty). Looking at some old crew lists from GCD they looked to have been posted to the same ship together for some time.
Still got the press cuttings from the UK papers who made a big thing about it
at the time.

Graham Palmer

KIWI
3rd July 2006, 22:28
Female crew certainly was not unusual on Scandinavian ships.On Kronviken we took on two Canadian girls in Vancouver,one as Captain's Tiger the other looked after Mates & Eng'rs.This was way back in 1949 & apparently not at all unusual. Kiwi

Tom Haywood
3rd July 2006, 23:22
For those members in Aust we have our own Patsy Adam-Smith who was the first female to be articled as a radio officer when she worked on the Australian merchant ship "Naracoopa" from 1954 to 1960.
Although the "Naracoopa" was a small coaster trading around Tasmania it was still a first in this part of the world especially in 1954.
Patsy Adam-Smith's book, "There was a Ship" is still quite a good read.

andysk
7th July 2006, 14:20
When I did my R/O training in 1968/69 we had one female on our course and I think she went to work for Safmarine, well, that was her intention.

She was on the same course timetable as me at Norwood Tech, 1968-1970, and was married (or engaged) to a Swedish Captain, but I can't for the life of me remember which company. I forget her name, I believe she was getting a ticket to be able to sail with her husband.

Cheers

Andy

Tony Breach
7th July 2006, 22:46
During my tenure as the ops man for Cool Carriers in California I often worked with 2 ladies from Leonhardt & Blumberg of Hamburg. They were Capt. Barbaro Massing & Capt. Barbara Jung of the HANSA class reefers. They were both highly effective ship's masters who ran efficient ships.

On the lighter side, Leonhardts also had a senior male master of the name Jung & when we told him that the newly promoted Barbara would be henceforth known as Young Capt Jung & he would be known as Old Capt Jung he was a bit unhappy. We fixed him by addressing the two as Ugly Capt Jung & Pretty Capt Jung - he settled for being Old!

Keep her steady Babs!

andysk
10th July 2006, 11:11
She was on the same course timetable as me at Norwood Tech, 1968-1970, and was married (or engaged) to a Swedish Captain, but I can't for the life of me remember which company. I forget her name, I believe she was getting a ticket to be able to sail with her husband.


It's come down from the shelf, she went away with her husband/partner on Gorthon's.

Cheers

Andy

K urgess
20th August 2006, 15:02
I was just about to start a new thread when a search brought up this one.
Being as how this site appears to be one of, if not THE, last bastion of male chauvenist piggery (*)) I was wondering about opinions.
I know this is strictly unPC but most of the old codgers of my, and earlier, generations I've conversed with here have been prePC and pre females at sea. Or thought we were in the latter case.
I know when Dallas first went to sea I had to take an awful lot of ribald remarks and looks of disappointment and rejection when I signed on. I knew who everyone would rather have been there.
I used to make any excuse to visit Norwegian ships when I came across them, purely to make aquaintances, of course. (*)) The fact that I could speak the language helped enormously! Unfortunately most of them were married to one of the officers or, if the "Gniste" happened to be male, that lovely dolly stewardess you fancied invariably turned out to be his wife.

Dallas Bradshaw was the first British RO for Marconi joining in August 1970, first ship Duncraig and she was Canadian. Referring to another thread about "The Merchant Navy Programme" - that was how Captain Macdonald found out that his next sparkie (sparklette?) would be a girl!
There is an interesting write up in the first book attached to this post along with details of -
Alice Mollison
Joan Wareing
Jocelyn Parker
Marylin Stockwell
and others

If the author or publisher is watching. Permission to post more details from this excellent book would be appreciated. The copy I have was a present from 'er indoors direct from the publisher and they are still available.

The 2nd book attached I've just finished reading and I couldn't put it down.
It's very evocative of the period and her descriptions of BA and Brasil brought the memories flooding back. Two chapters per throne room visit rather than one. (*))
Miss Carroll (also Canadian) spent 4 years at sea from 1947 and all on the same ship, the Siranger. Built 1944 in Beaumont, Texas, as the Cape River.
She says in her preface that the first female wireless operator to serve at sea was American. In 1910!. And that by the end of the '30s at least 13 young ladies had operated on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts as well as the Great Lakes.
Unfortunately I can't tell you where to get a copy.

Brave ladies one and all but a bit upsetting for us old salts if I remember correctly.
Any comments?

terval
19th December 2006, 10:23
Greetings one and all. I sailed with Dallas or Big D as I called her in 1979 on the Scotspark for 4 months. The best way to get any peace was to ask her if she was still 165lbs?? That gave us 48 hours peace. Seriously she was a good R/O and did her job well. I understand she was in the Guiness Book of records as the first female R/O in the British Merchant Navy. The first female at sea that I can remember hearing about was a Second Engineer during the first world war. Dallas was good at the dots but the dashes foxed her!!! Last I heard she was living in North Wales and has a gammy left leg. No more climbing up Pilot ladders.
Merry Xmas all and have a good new year.
Terry 556919.(Cloud)

Geoff_E
19th December 2006, 17:09
I sailed with a lady sparks called Sylvia Slattery on the Border Falcon about 1980. She was one one of several in BP. I believe she married a 2/E and eventually went to live in Aussie. There were also various Cadets, and 3/0's by the time I left. I seem to recall BP appointed their first female Supt. sometime recently?

Chillytoes
1st January 2007, 10:49
In 1983/84 I sailed on ANL's "Darwin Trader" with the R/O Heather (surname?), the subject of the first post on this thread. I recall her as a pleasant blonde who was competent at her job, a good shipmate and who was well aware of pitfalls and traps in the chauvinistic world around her. She used to join us in the duty mess and when bananas were on the table there was heightened interest in the prospect of watching her eat one. But she was too smart for that, she used to peel it then break it into pieces to eat, much to the disappointment of some watchers!

Graham Kellaway
2nd January 2007, 04:03
I was R/O on WYUNA in 60 or 61....nor much fun: all the crew did week on and week off but all the poor old sparky got was to go ashore with the first crew and go the the Quuenscliff pub, get tanked, and back on board with the last boat for another week of duty (dry ship too).

We had a female trainee at Plymouth & Devonport Tech 59-60 where I did my 1st Class PMG. Can't remember her name or if she went to sea.

Cheers Graham

Tad
12th January 2007, 22:51
Paid a visit to Singapore Radio/9VG 1989 or 90 or thereabouts. Had heard prior to that, mostly female voices on R/T. It turned out that the majority of operators were female, both on R/T and W/T.

Moulder
14th January 2007, 17:17
I studied for my ticket at the British School of Telegraphy (later renamed London Electronics College) at Earls Court during 1969 - 1971. There was a female student on the course before me - Barbara Keating - from Australia - she passed her ticket and went to sea under the Red Duster at the end of 1970.

Steve.

R.Philip Griffin
15th January 2007, 03:35
[QUOTE=trotterdotpom;52782]Doug, to the best of my knowledge, Heather was the only female RO on Australian ships. I met her a few times and found her to be very competent and a pleasant lady. She was around for 3 or 4 years (I think) and eventually married a BHP Chief Officer. She did seem to get used by AWA a bit for publicity purposes. I think she disappeared under a pile of nappies, but not sure.

There were also a few female Navigating Cadets who eventually got tickets, I believe. Don't know how far up the tree they went.

John T.

There were two female R/O's on the Australian Coast; one Dianne Mehonoshen was on our Oil Rig "Energy Searcher" where she spent a year, before heading to the Antartic with the AAO.
An interesting story with these two ladies. They undertook the R/O course at the AMC Launceston and passed out first and second of their course.
The R/O's Union wouldn't give them jobs until they were at the Courthouse steps.
I never met Heather, but did hear a lot about her from her friend Di, a very lovely lady and a great technician.

trotterdotpom
15th January 2007, 13:03
Thanks Grifmar, I never heard of Dianne, but I'm sure she was eminently competent, as were all the ex Launceston radio students I met.

I don't recall Heather telling me of any union problems about getting a job - apart from CSR and the Union Company, as far as I know, everyone was employed by AWA (radio company). There was no union roster employment as run by the Seamen's Union of Austalia.

When I arrived in the Lucky Country (1980), I applied for a job with AWA. I already had 13 years experience and was fully qualified, but still had to sit written technical knowledge tests about radio and radar equipment. I was offered a job and flown back to Brisbane First Class - I remember thinking: "I heard these bastards were spoiled to death."

A few days later, while waiting for appointment to a ship, I got a heavy duty phone call from Mal Pickstone of the PREIA (Professional Radio and Electronics Institute of Australia) telling me I couldn't work for AWA as there were already people in Australia qualified and waiting for a job. If this was true, I don't know why they didn't already have jobs, but, in any case, I'd already payed money and joined the PREIA so eat **** Mal, you fat bastard!

Eventually, when the writing was on the wall, the PREIA amalgamated with the mates' union, the Merchant Service Guild, sold the ROs down the river and the rest is history.

John T.

stein
15th January 2007, 17:25
Member Knut mentions Fern Blodgett of the Mosdale. On the warsailors.com site, on the end of their article on the Mosdale, there's a list of twenty other female Canadian sparks serving in the Norwegian war fleet.
Sometime ago I read a bit of the memoirs of one of them, and I believe myself to remember reading that this was arranged from above, the war ministry here or there finding this a good idea. Anyway, many married Norwegians, and many kept serving in Norwegian ships after the war. Stein.

R.Philip Griffin
15th January 2007, 21:46
Thanks Grifmar, I never heard of Dianne, but I'm sure she was eminently competent, as were all the ex Launceston radio students I met.

I don't recall Heather telling me of any union problems about getting a job - apart from CSR and the Union Company, as far as I know, everyone was employed by AWA (radio company). There was no union roster employment as run by the Seamen's Union of Austalia.

When I arrived in the Lucky Country (1980), I applied for a job with AWA. I already had 13 years experience and was fully qualified, but still had to sit written technical knowledge tests about radio and radar equipment. I was offered a job and flown back to Brisbane First Class - I remember thinking: "I heard these bastards were spoiled to death."

A few days later, while waiting for appointment to a ship, I got a heavy duty phone call from Mal Pickstone of the PREIA (Professional Radio and Electronics Institute of Australia) telling me I couldn't work for AWA as there were already people in Australia qualified and waiting for a job. If this was true, I don't know why they didn't already have jobs, but, in any case, I'd already payed money and joined the PREIA so eat **** Mal, you fat bastard!

Eventually, when the writing was on the wall, the PREIA amalgamated with the mates' union, the Merchant Service Guild, sold the ROs down the river and the rest is history.

John T.
Ahoy John
Yes that Mal sounds like the "coloured chap in the woodpile". Di only ever worked on "Energy Searcher", and then worked with the Australian Antartic Division. I think she was on "ES" about 18 months. She is now an IT whizz and lives in the Brisbane area. I well remember the amalgamation of the PREIA and the MSG. Like you say the rest is history and GMDSS.

Buoy
25th January 2007, 21:38
I did my ticket at Newport & Monmouthshire College of Technology starting in 1966 and we had a Russian lady with us for the first year, but I recall she dropped out for (I think) financial reasons. P&O Bulk Shipping Division had at least two female R/O's in the mid/late 1970's. One was called Debbie something and did at least one voyage in Ardmay. Another married a 2nd engineer and did a trip in Ardvar - I took over from her in Ras Al Kaimah in May 1976, but I'm damned if I can remember her name now!

Clive Kaine
26th April 2008, 18:03
Debbie Rex and Kit Kosarew. I also had a female junior under me (ahem!) on the Talamba in 1975/6 - Gail Courtney, though she didn't stick around for one reason or another.

Riptide
26th April 2008, 18:24
There was a female R/O sailed with Christian Salvesens,her name escapes me now & so did she.Kenny.(Jester) (POP)

G4UMW
30th April 2008, 18:18
I studied for the MRGC at Lowestoft College. On the same course was Rose King who is still at sea, and writes excellent articles in the ROA magazine.

Ray Bannerman
30th April 2008, 18:30
Hi Geoff........ I also recall a lady sparks called Barbara Padfield. I was fortunate enough to attend a survival course in Lowestoft with both Barbara and Sylvia. The pool huddle was indeed exilerating as I remember.

Regards,

Ray

trotterdotpom
30th April 2008, 18:42
Ray, "Padfield" is a famous name in RO circles. Stan Padfield was the Staff Clerk at Marconi's West Ham depot - could Barbara have been a relative?

John T.

docgk
30th April 2008, 21:14
Barbara Padfield was one of my students on the RO course at Southampton College of Higher Education ( now Southampton Solent University). This would be around 1974-1976 I think. After leaving the sea ( RO with Brocks - Radio and Electronic Services), I got a teaching job at Leith Nautical College ( now gone) and then transferred to Southampton. I remember Barbara as a truly pleasant person who was a conscientious student who did well. I also have a memory that she was originally a WREN at Pompey. Another female RO training at Southampton a year or two later was Carol Greenwood.

Ron Stringer
30th April 2008, 22:40
Ray, "Padfield" is a famous name in RO circles. Stan Padfield was the Staff Clerk at Marconi's West Ham depot - could Barbara have been a relative?

John T.

John,

It was East Ham depot (Wakefield Street, East Ham) and you may be surprised to know that Stan Padfield is still alive and well (but no longer sending R/Os on 2-year jaunts).

trotterdotpom
1st May 2008, 00:30
Thanks Ron, I get "port" and "starboard" mixed up too - Good to hear that Stan is keeping OK.

John T.

Brian Derksen
5th June 2008, 08:53
I talked with Dallas Bradshaw on vhf back in Nov '72 or Jun '73, I believe, when our ships were anchored off either Baie Comeau or Trois Rivieres in the St Lawrence. She was with a British company and I with Sanko Line.

I relieved Penny Hayworth, a fellow Canadian sparks on the Sanko car/bulker Ogden Jordan/A8IP on Jan 31 '81. She is presently employed as an MCTS officer with the Canadian Coast Guard, (Marine Comm & Traffic Services - combined radio and marine traffic regulator) a job I just retired from, after doing 3 years in a remote site (Bull Harbour CG Radio/VAG) and 19 summers in the arctic at Inuvik CG Radio/VFA.

Brian

Marilyn Egerton
5th July 2008, 06:48
Hello. I am a new member, Marilyn Egerton. I am also seeking information on Angela Firman. I have a photo in my possession of her which was published in the Leeds Newspaper sometime in the 1960's I think. If you can help with more information I would be grateful.

Marilyn Egerton

NoMoss
5th July 2008, 08:09
We had a female RO in Sealink called Barbara Ralph - she was of Australian origin and I think she had been in P&O where she married a captain.

Rose King is a member of SN.

Moulder
5th July 2008, 11:32
We had a female RO in Sealink called Barbara Ralph - she was of Australian origin and I think she had been in P&O where she married a captain.

Rose King is a member of SN.


I knew Barbara (nee Keating) at the British School of Telegraphy in Earls Court in 1969/1970.

She is still married and residing in the Bournemouth area.

Steve.
(Thumb)

R58484956
5th July 2008, 16:59
Greetings Marilyn and welcome to SN. Enjoy the site and bon voyage.

Marilyn Egerton
6th July 2008, 02:29
[Great to read your info on Angela Firman. My late grandfather I think was Angela's great uncle. I believe her father was chief Engineer James G. Firman who was killed on 23 February 1941 on the S.S. Marslew (London)
Great to find this website - it has taken me many years to finally find out about the person I have a photo of.

Marilyn Egerton

QUOTE=Barmyclaresdad;53815]In reply to the post by Cynter, the lady in question was Angela Firman who I knew quite well. Her father was a Ch. Off. and mother a stewardess on Scandinavian ships.
On one of my trips to Hamburg in 1963 I missed her by a day. The last time I saw her would be at Bridlington in 1959.
I believe she married a Norwegian guy and sailed on Norske ships for a while.
NESWT also have a web site and association.[/QUOTE]

non descript
6th July 2008, 08:05
Great to read your info on Angela Firman. My late grandfather I think was Angela's great uncle. I believe her father was chief Engineer James G. Firman who was killed on 23 February 1941 on the S.S. Marslew (London)
Great to find this website - it has taken me many years to finally find out about the person I have a photo of.

Marilyn Egerton


Marilyn,
It is good to see that you have found such a useful response to your query. A warm welcome to you. Thank you for joining the community; enjoy the site and all it has to offer, and we very much look forward to your postings in due course.
(Thumb)
Mark

IanSpiden
30th July 2008, 22:42
There is also Rowena Smith who was at GND for a long time when I was there, she then left for GCHQ in the late 80's early 90"s

K urgess
30th July 2008, 23:09
Jocelyn Parker with Texaco in 1975.
I joined the Texaco Norway in November 1975 and she'd gone from the Denmark when I QSO'd in January 1976.

mikeg
31st July 2008, 10:35
Good to read that, thanks Kris. Its heartening to know Jocelyn was so happy at sea.

I was just wondering from a equality point of view, if Jocelyn got married would there be an arguing point of allowing her to bring her husband along on a trip??

Also where are all these ex female r/o's, it would be good to hear about their sea-going expeiences on SN.

Mike

hawkey01
31st July 2008, 13:46
I have not previously been involved in this thread. It was seeing a name from the past, another of my ex colleagues - Ian Spiden, mentioning Rowena that did it. We had quite a number of female RO's in the service. I think that all were at GKA with the exception of Rowena who was at GND. A couple married other RO's. To my knowledge some are still active in GCHQ. One is in the CG stationed at Bridlington/Humber CG. A couple took to being housewives and that is not a derogative comment. There were 4 who were at GKA for a longtime. Others moved on to other things.

Hawkey01

Mimcoman
31st July 2008, 14:50
Hiya, Hawkeye:

At GKR, there was also the delectable Kathy plus one other whose name I am ashamed to say I've forgotten. I was also told of another at GNI whose name I don't remember but whose nickname was Pizza (cos her name sounded like...). I believe that she was easily startled, and the story goes that one night after the evening shift, the guys at GNI put a handheld under the seat of her mini (the car!) and watched the car set off down the road. After a few seconds, they called her on VHF and watched the headlights swerve!

IanSpiden
31st July 2008, 16:48
There is also Marie Johnson , who was out on the rigs in the North Sea originally from around Fraserborough then went to HAL as a Comms Officer , she left a few years ago and I heard sadly that she died in rather tragic circumstances in South Africa

hawkey01
31st July 2008, 16:55
Bill,Ian

This activates the grey cells. The one at GNI X GKA was Piarina Delpizzo think thats the spelling. She is now in Bedford according to the GKA members list. I had forgotten about the delightful one at GKR. Will have to have a count and see how many we actual had! In service that is - no that will be taken the wrong way as well. Working with us, thats better.

Neville - Hawkey01

hawkey01
31st July 2008, 20:57
Update - name spelling Pierina Del Pizzo. We had 7 female RO's in total at GKA. 1 was believe it or not murdered. 2 moved on to other places and 4 remained for a longtime.

Hawkey01

Mimcoman
1st August 2008, 14:47
Then there was the R/O (last heard of with GCHQ) who came to GND from GKA and told of his embarrassment after describing to his on-watch colleagues his thoughts on a certain part of a female colleague's anatomy and what he'd like to do, when the sudden silence told him that something was not right. On looking around, guess who had come on watch and was sitting behind him....

GW4ZDU
2nd August 2008, 23:18
Quote: I am virtually certain that the first female sparks on a British ship was a lady called Dallas Bradshaw.

I was at Colwyn bay Wireless college in 1968 when Dallas Bradshaw was training. There's a photo of her on the Colwyn Bay wireless college website Yes, she is Canadian but never heard a word about her since as I
joined MIMCO before she qualified and remained with MIMCO until 1989.
When the radar ticket became compulsory Mimco offered (in 1978) a self study sea going radar maintenance theory course run, I think by Plymouth Tech college.
After completing the course during a four month trip I was then sent to Eastham depot for 3 months to do the practical aspects of the training, and on the same course was a scottish lass - I think her name was Marion something - she was a lovely lass and had enjojed a few trips as R/O prior to this course.

Never heard anything further about her either. Anybody know anything about what happened to her?

Steve

Corky
10th August 2008, 16:34
Update - name spelling Pierina Del Pizzo. We had 7 female RO's in total at GKA. 1 was believe it or not murdered. 2 moved on to other places and 4 remained for a longtime.

Hawkey01

Pierina was a Houlders Radio Cadet, I think only doing a couple of trips after qualifying, before going shoreside. Seem to remember her nick-name was "Fluff!"

Piecesofeight
10th October 2008, 18:54
We had a few ladies pass through the college 1980-83 but only one got to sea to my knowledge, that was Fazilette (Bobby) Khan who remained an R/O until GMDSS prompted her to become an environmental officer for Princess Cruises where I believe she still is. She was a feisty person but probably had to be to survive being the only girl in our group of 12.

non descript
10th October 2008, 19:04
We had a few ladies pass through the college 1980-83 but only one got to sea to my knowledge, that was Fazilette (Bobby) Khan who remained an R/O until GMDSS prompted her to become an environmental officer for Princess Cruises where I believe she still is. She was a feisty person but probably had to be to survive being the only girl in our group of 12.

Piecesofeight,
On your first posting, a warm welcome to the Site - Fazilette (Bobby) Khan used to write a very good article in Tradewinds each week; I have not seen it appearing recently, maybe she has moved on. (Thumb)

john fraser
10th October 2008, 19:21
Quote: I am virtually certain that the first female sparks on a British ship was a lady called Dallas Bradshaw.

I was at Colwyn bay Wireless college in 1968 when Dallas Bradshaw was training. There's a photo of her on the Colwyn Bay wireless college website Yes, she is Canadian but never heard a word about her since as I
joined MIMCO before she qualified and remained with MIMCO until 1989.
When the radar ticket became compulsory Mimco offered (in 1978) a self study sea going radar maintenance theory course run, I think by Plymouth Tech college.
After completing the course during a four month trip I was then sent to Eastham depot for 3 months to do the practical aspects of the training, and on the same course was a scottish lass - I think her name was Marion something - she was a lovely lass and had enjojed a few trips as R/O prior to this course.

Never heard anything further about her either. Anybody know anything about what happened to her?

Steve
Steve.
Would that be Marion Curran from Greenock.I sailed with her on Bengloe in Ben Line.After that she left and went to North Foreland Radio.That is the last I heard of her. Often wonder about her

Piecesofeight
10th October 2008, 20:09
Piecesofeight,
On your first posting, a warm welcome to the Site - Fazilette (Bobby) Khan used to write a very good article in Tradewinds each week; I have not seen it appearing recently, maybe she has moved on. (Thumb)

Indeed, she finished the Tradewinds articles in 2002 here's the relevant link:-
http://www.greenhithe.org.uk/pdf/BobbyKhan.pdf

Paul
www.greenhithe.org.uk

non descript
10th October 2008, 21:29
Indeed, she finished the Tradewinds articles in 2002 here's the relevant link:-
http://www.greenhithe.org.uk/pdf/BobbyKhan.pdf

Paul
www.greenhithe.org.uk

Thanks Paul (Thumb)

FrankGil
11th February 2009, 21:40
I sailed with Dallas on the Nordic louisiana with Denholms in the 70's nice lady
frankGil

ronmac6
3rd March 2009, 01:34
I sailed with Dallas on the Nordic louisiana with Denholms in the 70's nice lady
frankGil

hi all
I never sailed with Dallas but I remember when she joined her first ship she featured on the Denholms News with her picture at the top of the gangway (Middlesboro?)
Before I collapse for the night I want to thank everyone who contributes to this site for the entertainment they provide.

regardsd ron

IAN M
13th May 2009, 23:38
Quote from The Red Duster:
"The Norwegian Merchant Navy was the only Allied merchant fleet that permitted women to serve on board as radio operators, although Russia might have done so. In spite of women holding identical licences to their male counterparts they faced a closed door during and after the war."

IAN M

NicoRos
3rd June 2009, 21:53
It was on the former Essi Gina (believed once the biggest launch at Teeside) -renamed Itel Hercules which I boarded in the mid seventies in Antwerp. Noticing the state she was in, I assumed we were heading for some Pakistani beach; nevertheless the new owner choose to risk our lives for his own profit.
After several months of breakdowns, fires and mutiny, the SSI corporation sent a superintendent onboard to find out if things were really that bad. He did not arrive alone, but brought a Japanese beauty with him, who had a RO license but never sailed as such. And that's how I met Emiko, who spent night after night in my radio room midships, far away from jealous eyes. She stayed onboard from Kitakyushu till Vancouver where we had an emotional farewell on top of Grouse mountain.
Back onboard and during the months that followed, I noticed that she had hidden numerous of tiny notes all over the place in which she expressed her love. Each note was signed with 'your little ass.' And a beautiful ass she had!

greektoon
22nd June 2009, 16:58
Hudson Steamship of Brighton had a couple of female R/O's in the 80's. Can't remember their names though.

Naytikos
24th June 2009, 04:40
The concept of women actually working at sea was, in the 60s/early 70s, regarded as a bit of a joke by non-northern-european crews. When the news of a lady-R/O on a british ship broke, the next edition of our company magazine had a cartoon of a young girl in a mini-skirt reporting to a ship's master "The office sent me as wiper!" Within five years, however attitudes changed a bit and my wife was working as cook. There were still no lady-R/Os, though!
I met one at the Flying Angel in Singapore around 1980, while we were in drydock. I was somewhat skeptical as to her willingness to crawl through the engine-room bilges to fix a log or echo-sounder transducer or climb a mast to fix a radar scanner; she didn't think those things were part of the job.............!

Mayday
31st July 2009, 00:04
I sailed with a lady sparks called Sylvia Slattery on the Border Falcon about 1980. She was one one of several in BP. I believe she married a 2/E and eventually went to live in Aussie. There were also various Cadets, and 3/0's by the time I left. I seem to recall BP appointed their first female Supt. sometime recently?

I remember Sylvia, we were at NCRS together. I always thought she went onto tankers, BP or Sell, not sure. She lived in Blackburn for a while, very nice lass.
I know we dis the Radar Cert together.

Mayday
31st July 2009, 00:10
I remember Sylvia, we were at NCRS together. I always thought she went onto tankers, BP or Sell, not sure. She lived in Blackburn for a while, very nice lass.
I know we dis the Radar Cert together.

I also remember a Norwegian lass being at NCRS early 70's, it may have been Jocelyn Parker.

ernhelenbarrett
31st July 2009, 04:56
Re joining AWA, I too had that PREIA experience. After flying out on the old Comet aircraft from London to Sydney, AWA took me straight to the OREIA office which was in Martin Place in 1960 and told me if the PREIA didnt accept me then AWA couldnt employ me but in those days they accepted my cash instantly and I was on the "Newcastle Flyer" train at 9am, joined the Lake Boga at noon and sailed at 1pm, still shattered from the 48 hour aircraft journey. Also re Female R/O's when I was on Trienza on the phosphate run to Christmas Island we drifted in company with the Norwegian ship Hoi Houw
(think that was how it was spelt) for 47 days and I chatted with her a lot, mind you I didnt know she was female as the chatting was in morse but was introduced to this gorgeous lady by Don Reid the Islands R/O when we did get ashore and found out she was from the Norwegian ship. Believe she was married to the 2nd Mate and they were on the Singapore/Christmas Island run for a couple of years.
Ern Barrett

randcmackenzie
1st August 2009, 23:04
Ha! I remember the Hoi Houw from the mid sixties and the Glenpark. we did Christmas Island 3 or 4 times and Nauru once. Lovely litlle ship she was, and the Glenpark was pretty good too.

Dutchy62
1st August 2009, 23:30
Liz Banham(nee Rait) was the first female R\O in P&O, I know because she was my junior for 2 trips (1973\74) on the Taupo between UK and NZ.
She took over from myself at Panama on the way back to NZ and she married Rick Banham (Frosty). Looking at some old crew lists from GCD they looked to have been posted to the same ship together for some time.
Still got the press cuttings from the UK papers who made a big thing about it
at the time.

Graham Palmer

Going through some old bumf recently, I came across an old press cutting of Rick and Liz getting married. I guess it was kept because I sailed with Rick back in the 60s when he was 2nd or 3rd frosty. It was NZ Shipping then, though, not P&O.

dave4e
26th August 2009, 13:03
Hi All Follow the link below for Irish Women working at Sea, note also the Chief Engineer on MV Ulysses is Female,

http://www.irishships.com/woman_at_sea.html

Dave

Graham P Powell
27th August 2009, 14:05
I went for a visit on the Norwegian tanker Polycastle and the R/O was an English girl married to the mate. We had several young women R/O's at GKA.
Lyn Burden, Odette Townsend, Kay Elliston, Cheryl Cottier plus several others.
Lyn,Kay and Cheryl married other R/O's. They had passed their tickets but at the time there were no seagoing jobs so came to GKA. One poor girl was killed by her husband when he flung her down the stairs. They were fine to work with but you had to watch the language etc. One made a comment about "finishing him off by hand " when her automatic key failed. The whole operating wing fell about laughing We also had a lot of trouble reading the terrible morse from one ship and after complaints got the R/O changed. It turned out to be young woman. To be fair we had some terrible morse from blokes as well...

IAN M
17th February 2010, 23:03
I am virtually certain that the first female sparks on a British ship was a lady called Dallas Bradshaw. I am also virtually certain that Dallas was Canadian but trained in the UK at Colwyn Bay. I have read this somewhere and can dig it out if anyone is interested. She definitely worked for Marconi around 1970 and I think she did a couple of trips with Denholms at the same time as they were employing female cadets/apprentices.

Joanna Greenlaw went to sea with the Marconi co. in 1942.

Roger Bentley
18th February 2010, 09:31
Joanna Greenlaw went to sea with the Marconi co. in 1942.

Yes, But not as Joanna Greenlaw - gender change came later. Regards Roger

Troppo
18th February 2010, 19:50
Small world, indeed....

I knew Heather well. She relieved me on the Lake Barrine/VLLB. Very competant.

I also knew Sylvia and her husband Roger (great bloke).

Ahhhh, the PREIA......run by Bob Santamaria's accolytes.

tunatownshipwreck
18th February 2010, 21:37
Yes, But not as Joanna Greenlaw - gender change came later. Regards Roger

They say the sea changes a man.

Troppo
18th February 2010, 22:27
Oh dear....

:-)

sparks69
12th December 2010, 21:13
I sailed with a lady sparks called Sylvia Slattery on the Border Falcon about 1980. She was one one of several in BP. I believe she married a 2/E and eventually went to live in Aussie. There were also various Cadets, and 3/0's by the time I left. I seem to recall BP appointed their first female Supt. sometime recently?

Sylvia, bless her, was my junior on the British Esk, came from Hull, wore contact lenses - thereby hangs a tail ! Sprained her ankle but refused to pay off.

BarnacleGrim
12th December 2010, 23:41
I'm surprised no one has mentioned Lt. Uhura yet (Thumb)

Troppo
13th December 2010, 11:44
I remember Sylvia, we were at NCRS together. I always thought she went onto tankers, BP or Sell, not sure. She lived in Blackburn for a while, very nice lass.
I know we dis the Radar Cert together.

Sylvia worked for BP. She indeed married a 2/E, Roger - a thorough gentleman.

Roger ended up working for AMSA (Aust maritime safety authority), and Sylvia worked for the Aust gov't comms authority - both in Canberra.

Ron Stringer
13th December 2010, 12:04
I'm surprised no one has mentioned Lt. Uhura yet (Thumb)

Don't believe it boys, thighs does matter.

Billieboy
14th December 2010, 05:07
Don't believe it boys, thighs does matter.

I'm a, "Legs", man too Ron, quite agree!

Troppo
14th December 2010, 08:35
Further to Heather.

She was very good technically.

She became a radio surveyor with AMSA for a while.

John David Mair
16th December 2010, 03:40
Jan, Angus was after my time; Frad Hartnack was the original AMC master, I was Mate and later Master before Mike Wood and Bill, (blonde moment, forgot his last name, sorry)..there were a whole series of mates, Ian Moist was one , I think he is still at AMC...the ship did a great job of training cadets; Bob Frost was the original Chief Engineer, he came with the ship, in fact he had been with the ship since its delivery to the Pilots from Scotland in 1954 or thereabouts. I think his son John was Chief on her for a short whilwe after Bob retired...

Wyuna is alongside the wharf in Launceston and still for sale.
Angus was back here at the AMC last week, Bill Woods was one of the skippers. Ian Moist was here at AMC now relieving pilot Christmas Island.

John David Mair
16th December 2010, 03:54
Wyuna:
As I mentioned before she is still for sale after serving the Australian Maritime College as a training vessel, for a while.
As for lady radio officers, Heather was the first on the Australian coast, and is an ex AMC student. She and I swapped ships once so she could stay with her husband Peter, who was indeed a Mate with BHP.
Plenty of lady deck officers have passed through AMC, already Masters and at least one Harbour Master, Helen.

Graham P Powell
16th December 2010, 09:10
The only female R/O I met while at sea was a British girl who was R/O on the Norwegian tanker Polycastle. She was married to the 2nd mate. We had quite a few at GKA over the years including two married couples. One of my former colleagues was on a ship where the female R/O was told off by the old man for knitting on watch!.
rgds
Graham Powell

Troppo
16th December 2010, 21:30
One of my former colleagues was on a ship where the female R/O was told off by the old man for knitting on watch!.
rgds
Graham Powell

Ha ha!

What a goose (the old man, that is...).

Graham P Powell
17th December 2010, 08:51
One of the girls at GKA had , how shall I put it, a bit of a reputation. Sometimes on nights the supervisor would allow a draw to take place and somebody would get sent home. On this particular night, a chap won the draw at around 2am and thought like you would do, "I'll go and see Miss X". He went round there, rang the door bell and it was opened by one of the other male R/O's.
rgds Graham Powell

trotterdotpom
17th December 2010, 09:34
One of the girls at GKA had , how shall I put it, a bit of a reputation. Sometimes on nights the supervisor would allow a draw to take place and somebody would get sent home. On this particular night, a chap won the draw at around 2am and thought like you would do, "I'll go and see Miss X". He went round there, rang the door bell and it was opened by one of the other male R/O's.
rgds Graham Powell

Wonder if her dada new she did it?

John T.

JoK
17th December 2010, 09:38
all the good woman officers and the worst examples are always drug out for a vicarious thrill

5TT
17th December 2010, 17:26
One of the girls at GKA had , how shall I put it, a bit of a reputation.

Perhaps she had great dits?

Dick S
27th December 2010, 18:08
Hi All,
When I was 3/mate with Denholms I sailed with Dallas Bradshaw, mid 70s on the Eden BridgeI think, she was agood shipmate as I have posted else where. I know there is a picture of her somewhere on SN site as I searched for her name in the galley. Wonder where she is now?
Richard

J. Davies
2nd January 2011, 10:11
Sailed as chief R/O on the Hong Kong Registered "Coral Princess", a legendary cruise liner of the far east belonging to the Swire group. This was 1987/88. Junior R/O was a lovely Chinese girl, Petty Leung, a meticulous worker. She ended up marrying the Cruise Director, one Richard Haver, and later she left the sea and worked for Radio Holland in Hong Kong as sales manager. Great girl!

John

Rose King
2nd January 2011, 17:39
Angela Firman (trained in Bridlington) was my cousin: she is dead now. I am still an R/O - they call me ETO but you can't change your spots.

Rose King

hawkey01
3rd January 2011, 11:29
Rose,

welcome. Interesting I did not know that companies were still carrying ETO's. Are you UK flag or foreign? Look forward to your input.
Also good to see Bridlington - my old radio college - mentioned. I did not know your cousin - what year was she there?

Hawkey01