Cerinthus = 1954 - 1976

Razor
26th December 2005, 21:29
In my 30 odd years at sea I only ever sailed on one tanker, apart from the coastal ones, she was the Cerinthus, Hadley Shipping Co. back in the last quarter of 1969. She was long in the tooth and not in very good shape so I doubt if she lasted much longer. She was running between Rotterdam and the north of Sweden, carrying fuel oil. We were banned from the Keil Canal because she was leaking oil, so were forced to go the long way round each trip.
Would be very much obliged if anyone could post a picture/history of her.

zelo1954
26th December 2005, 21:40
In my 30 odd years at sea I only ever sailed on one tanker, apart from the coastal ones, she was the Cerinthus, Hadley Shipping Co. back in the last quarter of 1969. She was long in the tooth and not in very good shape so I doubt if she lasted much longer. She was running between Rotterdam and the north of Sweden, carrying fuel oil. We were banned from the Keil Canal because she was leaking oil, so were forced to go the long way round each trip.
Would be very much obliged if anyone could post a picture/history of her.

Year of delivery seems to have been 1954. Those with access to proper sources will give you details without difficulty

Razor
26th December 2005, 21:50
Thanks for the picture. Brings back memories!!!!

Mac
27th December 2005, 01:47
Built in 1954 for Hadley Shipping Co. Ltd.(Houlder Brothers), by Harland and Wolff Ltd, Belfast. I believe she was of the Shell "H" class. DWT 18,027 with steam turbines.

non descript
27th December 2005, 12:42
In early 1952, with freight rates rising as a result of the Korean War, the Hadley Shipping Company took advantage of the strong market to sell their liberty ship “Cerinthus” for £580,000 to Gouldandris, securing a handy £135,000 profit on her purchase price. These funds enabled Hadleys to embark upon a venture with Anglo-Saxon Petroleum and under the “Sale & Charter-back” programme. they took over a new-building contract with Harland & Wolff where a trio of “H” Class tankers were being built, Hull: 1469 – HARPA; 1469 - HARVELLA and 1470 as then un-named but later to become CERINTHUS, entering service in 1954 with a 5 year charter to Shell Tankers, as Anglo-Saxon had by that time been restyled. It was not possible to obtain a fixed price contract at that time with the yard, but the delivered price would have been about £1,200,000 and the 5 year time-charter was at £1-5s-0d (£1.25) per ton per month. As far as I remember Cerinthus was a black oil ship, so did not load products - unlike the “A” Class tanker CLYMENE which had coated tanks and spend a great deal of her life under the control of Shell Eastern, working in the Pacific. The Cerinthus was sold for demolition in 1976, arriving at Faslane on 23 July, an elderly but much loved lady.

Hadleys were quite separate from Houlders (although Houlders did have and still do have a 5pct shareholding), the only connection being that the former took their crews from the latter, so if you were useful you generally got to work for HSC (or “Houlder’s Senior Company”).

Razor
27th December 2005, 15:54
Thank you very much Tonga. Was only onboard her for about 7 weeks and the memory is very hazy. Joined her in the Mersey then it was Rotterdam > Lulea and various other ports in Sweden. Can remember that we had to be broken out of the ice in Lulea just before it froze up solid for the winter. Was sure that we carried fuel oil, but will bow to your superior knowledge on that point.

non descript
27th December 2005, 17:32
Razor, my knowledge may be classed as many things, but superior is not one of them – I was never a tanker-man (only gas-tankers) so am in no position to comment on what was then classed as dirty and clean trades, but I’m sure you are correct, as Bunker C and maybe even IFO would probabaly be OK in Clymene’s cargo tanks and a very likely cargo if the route was Rotterdam to Lulea. Either way congratulations on sailing on a real ship, owned by a one of the best shipping companies and a vertibable icon. Hadleys are still going strong and now on the 4th generation of the family running the company, quite a feat in this day and age of British Shipping Companies.

Ron Stringer
27th December 2005, 23:05
Tonga/Razor,

The heavy fuel oil run from Shell's refinery at Pernis, Rotterdam, via the Kiel Canal to Swedish Ports in the Gulf of Bothnia was a pretty standard one. Starting at the end of September 1963, the 18,000 ton crude carrier 'San Florentino' (Eagle Oil's better version of an 'H' boat) cleaned tanks after discharging a cargo of crude and then commenced a series of voyages where we loaded heavy fuel oil at Pernis. On a succession of trips we visited Skelleftea, Lulea, Umea, Sundsvall, Gavle, Stockholm, retreating before the advancing ice. By mid-December we were still carrying fuel oil but out of the Baltic proper, to Helsingborg, Limhamn and Gothenburg, in Sweden and also to Harburg - Hamburg in Germany.

Ron

non descript
27th December 2005, 23:38
Ron, thank you for this, most useful last piece in the puzzle.

ps. Which was worse, seaksickess in the Baltic or seasickness in Chelmsford from looking at the roof of the Marconi head office? (*))

Ron Stringer
28th December 2005, 09:14
I was only seasick once and that was not while I was at sea but some years later, when fitting radio equipment on a rowing boat that was to cross the Atlantic from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean. Bobbing about in the harbour at Las Palmas whilst moored to a buoy, proved too much for my stomach.

Being ashore at Marconi's was definitely no chore - the work was interesting and rewarding. By the time I came ashore in 1966 I had already had my fill of the sea and the industry was changing rapidly. Containers were coming and the break-bulk ship was destined to go the way of the dinosaurs. One-tide turnarounds did not interest me at all and the attractions of shore life were stronger. I wouldn't have missed my time at sea (where else would a young man have been paid to travel round the world enjoying himself?) but as the changes meant more time at sea and less time in port for play I felt the time was right to swallow the anchor. From what I read on this site, the decision was a timely one as things started to go downhill for the British fleet not too long afterwards.

Ron

norsea
5th February 2006, 23:29
Joined Cerinthus as 1st trip Apprentice in Oct 1954 when she was fitting out at H&W Belfast. First 3 months running between Curacao, Trinidad, Maracaibo and European & Scandanavian ports. Next 6 months round the world via Suez,Red Sea,Persian Gulf,Borneo,Singapore,Australian and Tasmanian ports(have a pic of her approaching Sydney Harbour Bridge but no means of transmitting, sorry)Came back to U.K via Panama(have pics) Curacao, paid off on the Tyne in July 55. Sailed again as 2nd.Mate Aug to Oct 67.Still a products carrier at that time.
Hadleys also had 3 x 1475 g.r.t. sister ships Camarina, Corato and Calandria. They were Middle traders, Northern limit Archangel, S.limit Canary Islands and the Med.
Cargoes too numerous to list included timber,fish meal,oil seed rape,steel coils etc.
Hope you find some of this of interest
Best Regards
Norsea

non descript
6th February 2006, 10:57
Norsea,

Thanks for that. HSC was considered by many as the better part of Houlders and whilst commercially indendent (apart from a 5pct share-holding) their crews were drawn from the same office. i.e. they were all Houlders Sea-Staff.

I sailed on the Corato in 1972 and whilst small was indeed different, these little ships were good fun and it made a change to go to "major sea ports" like King's Lynn instead of Tubarao - mind you a bit frightening seeing 3 fathoms as the available water when one had been used to being scared of seeing less than 10 fathoms. We ended up in dry-dock together with your Cerinthus when she was coming to the end of her days.

Hadleys these days have Panamax bulk-carriers and are not into tankers, but the names remain; their present fleet is:
Cymbeline 73,060 Sumitomo, Cumbria 69,043 Imabari, Corato 64,283 Hyundai - they sold the bulker Cerinthus a year back.

Tonga

norsea
6th February 2006, 21:51
Tonga,
Many thanks for the info. Its nice to have an update from someone with his finger on the pulse. Most of my time was with Houlders except for the Hadley ships mentioned.I came ashore in 78 so things have changed a lot. My wife and I have been on a few cruises in recent years.Royal Caribbean and Celebrity,and I have never seen any of these monsters use a tug. All Azipods and bow thrusters. Just big floating hotels.Only difference you wake up somewhere different every morning, but I don`t think I would like to serve on one.
Regards
Norsea

B.Bass
7th February 2006, 04:21
Sailed on the old "Cymbeline" which was France Fenwick's "Dalewood" on the north-east coast,was Master on the "Cumbria" when sold to the Russians and ended up on the "Clymene" before she was also sold

non descript
7th February 2006, 07:58
Brain,

That is an interesting collection of Houlders ships and clearly you were a bit special to have been singled out stay with the Hadley side of the company. They must have appreciated you quite a lot, to ask Houlders to allow you to stay with them and move from the "Cumbria" to the "Clymene".

The sale of the “Cumbria” was at the very top of the market and was a brilliant piece of timing by the Owners. I remember the “Clymene” was sold and handed over in Singapore (for scrap), with a ridiculous saga by the port authorities who refused to allow the fresh provisions to be given away to a local charity. Kilos of fresh beef were thrown into the sea, whilst the orphans went hungry....

Tonga

B.Bass
8th February 2006, 04:14
Sailed on a couple of Houlders ships after being transferred over from France,Fenwick as well as a PSNC Tanker and then mainly Hadleys mini ships ,Calandria and the infamous Cotinga before the Cymbeline and Clymene.Made redundant when Clymene finished running on the NE Coast

non descript
8th February 2006, 11:17
Brian,

You are probably well aware, but for interest, the background to the France Fenwick saga and how their ships came to taken over by Houlders, owes something to the rather dubious activities of “Asset Strippers”. Without wishing to risk the wrath of the censor by adding too many names, let’s just say that the excellent shipping company that was France Fenwick came to be owned by a party more interested in selling the assets for cash, than worrying about the welfare of ships and their crews.

On a particular day, the then owner decided for “banking reasons” that the Chelwood and the Dalewood had to be sold before the day was out. The only company able to move that fast was Hadley, working together with Houlders. The former did the negotiation and bought both ships, with the intention that one would be taken by Houlders and the other by Hadley. So it came to pass that the Chelwood, with its 5 year charter to CEGB passed into Houlders fleet and became the Oswestry Grange, whilst Hadleys took over the Dalewood and she became the Cymbeline.

Tonga

B.Bass
9th February 2006, 04:35
Well aware of what happened to F.F,to quote a phrase "I was there".Also our head man was the son of Sir Errington Keville head honcho of Furness,hence another reason we ended up under Houlders management.

non descript
10th February 2006, 12:45
I was only seasick once and that was not while I was at sea but some years later, when fitting radio equipment on a rowing boat that was to cross the Atlantic from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean. Bobbing about in the harbour at Las Palmas whilst moored to a buoy, proved too much for my stomach.

Being ashore at Marconi's was definitely no chore - the work was interesting and rewarding. By the time I came ashore in 1966 I had already had my fill of the sea and the industry was changing rapidly. Containers were coming and the break-bulk ship was destined to go the way of the dinosaurs. One-tide turnarounds did not interest me at all and the attractions of shore life were stronger. I wouldn't have missed my time at sea (where else would a young man have been paid to travel round the world enjoying himself?) but as the changes meant more time at sea and less time in port for play I felt the time was right to swallow the anchor. From what I read on this site, the decision was a timely one as things started to go downhill for the British fleet not too long afterwards.

Ron
Ron,

I take your point and please forgive my oblique sense of humour; as I was only making a sly dig at the funny roof of the Marconi building that I used to pass on the train going to and from 53 Leadenhall Street.

Yes, there was a time to be at sea and a time to leave. Whilst I would was lucky enough to enjoy my sea career, I think that dry land does have its serious attractions these days. Certainly the four weeks we used to take as a normal turn-round in Buenos Aires, compares rather favorably to the 24 hours we now take to load one our 175,000tdw bulkers in Port Hedland.

Tonga

Ron Stringer
10th February 2006, 17:30
Ron,

I take your point and please forgive my oblique sense of humour; as I was only making a sly dig at the funny roof of the Marconi building that I used to pass on the train going to and from 53 Leadenhall Street. Tonga
Tonga, no offence taken I assure you. They say timing is everything; I feel very lucky to have been born when I was and getting all the health and educational benefits of the Welfare State. I started work in a time of full employment and had the opportunity to sail the world with a great bunch of people in peacetime and in an era where seafaring was an interesting and exciting prospect for a young, unmarried man. Although there might have been better employers in the marine radio business (I only sailed with Marconi Marine), none survived for a hundred years and all left the business whilst Marconi sailed on. When I tired of sea-going, they offered me a job ashore that was rewarding (although not as financially rewarding as I might have wished) and varied. That enabled me to get married, buy a house and raise a family without any traumas or tragedies. My wife and I are now enjoying retirement and four young grandchildren. Wouldn't have changed a minute of it.

By the way that funny roof covered the works canteen and kitchens and, when first built, formed the largest unsupported concrete area in the world. It is now a listed building and cannot be knocked down without Government approval.

Ron

non descript
12th February 2006, 13:05
Tonga,
Many thanks for the info. Its nice to have an update from someone with his finger on the pulse. Most of my time was with Houlders except for the Hadley ships mentioned.I came ashore in 78 so things have changed a lot. My wife and I have been on a few cruises in recent years.Royal Caribbean and Celebrity,and I have never seen any of these monsters use a tug. All Azipods and bow thrusters. Just big floating hotels.Only difference you wake up somewhere different every morning, but I don`t think I would like to serve on one.
Regards
Norsea
Tonga

Norsea, I saw you posting on the other thread, as in:

"Sailed in Corato May to Sept 1971, and August 72 to Feb 73 as Ch Off under Alan Bartholomew and Magnus Tulloch. Quite possible we may have been Shipmates at one time??
Regards Norsea"

but thought I would answer on here as a more long-term thread.

I think he was called "Black Bart" if me memory serves me well?

Did you do a trip on Corato from Cyprus to Kings' Lynn with a cargo of onions, then a dry-docking on the Tyne? I think it must have been the trip before you joined as it would be Early Summer 1972 and August 72 is maybe a bit late?

Tonga

glenn
20th April 2006, 10:03
Sailed with "Black Bart" on the Faraday 78-79 nuff said

non descript
20th April 2006, 16:02
I don’t think Health & Safety of today would really approve of the old “Corato Technique” of turning off all the ship’s power and then going up the road with the entire crew for a lock-in, with first man back having to start up the generator and put it back on the board (in the dark).

Mind you, the cargo of onions did not fare too well either, seeing as they required constant forced ventilation, which was a bit missing, with no electrics at all.

(*))
Tonga

hercules
26th April 2006, 21:06
Sailed on Hadley Sunshine Cruises Cerinthus 1973-ish mostly around the Caribean spending an excellent 2 weeks in Guatamala discharging heavy oil very slowly, before eventually ending up in Stanlow and paying off. Also sailed on the steam Clymene which as you have correctly stated carried higher quality cargoes, one instance being aviation fuel from Singapore to Anchorage Alaska! That was different!

non descript
26th April 2006, 22:21
Hercules,

Yes, very true. Two very different ships in every way, but the same decent owning company and crews. HSC were ranked as one of the best and still are in my view.

Tonga

B.Bass
27th April 2006, 04:50
Tonga,Do you know what happened to the HSC superintendents.Ican't remember their names but I know one was Clark and I forget the Senior supers name.They certainly were great guys.

leo hannan
27th April 2006, 11:25
Tonga,Do you know what happened to the HSC superintendents.Ican't remember their names but I know one was Clark and I forget the Senior supers name.They certainly were great guys.
Brian, does the name John Mcb Reid ring a bell, Hadleys chief super when I was with them. I think he got the push for nefarious practices.
Regards Leo (*))

non descript
27th April 2006, 16:59
Brian,

John Reid is the main one in my time, he was a first class engineer, but did leave the company in the end.

There were other names, but my HSC mole is away for a week or so, so I'll have to get back to you with them.

Tonga

B.Bass
28th April 2006, 05:22
Leo/Tonga,Thanks for that.I certainly shouldn't have forgotten John McB as he was responsible for me getting promotion to Master and for staying with Hadley's.Clark I remember well especially for our journey across Russia after the sale of the "Cumbria",which was an adventure in itself

leo hannan
28th April 2006, 14:14
Brian. Do you remember Capt.Hutchinson/Hutcherson with Hadleys. I used to do workbys with him on the Hardwicke when he was Mate. Any idea what happened to him? (*))
Regards Leo

non descript
2nd May 2006, 16:00
Leo - Brian,

I have some checking. Sadly no news of Hutchinson and HSC don't have any record of him - I have to admit I do have some memory of a mate of that name, but cannot place him. If/when it comes back to me I'll follow it up with a comment.

John Reid sadly passed away shortly after he left the company - his number 2 when you were there would have been Don Clark and it was he who handled the handover of Cumbria in Russia. - As you say, the trip home was a nightmare with one crew-member in particular keeping on getting lost and or wandering off. At least Japan Airlines came to your rescue with a chance sale of 30 tickes Moscow to London.... amazing what you can buy just by wandering in off the street!

The other HSC superintendent was Robson - a very decent man indeed, worked on the Cumbria as a new-building at Scott-Lithgow and did a first-class job.

Kind regards
Tonga

hercules
2nd May 2006, 18:57
Brian. Do you remember Capt.Hutchinson/Hutcherson with Hadleys. I used to do workbys with him on the Hardwicke when he was Mate. Any idea what happened to him? (*))
Regards Leo
Sailed with Hutch on the Upwey Grange, he was master on that voyage, UK to the Great Lakes if memory serves, he was from the Shetlands I believe, only sailed with him the once. The Chief Engineer on that voyage was Ellis Mason.

leo hannan
3rd May 2006, 12:49
Sailed with Hutch on the Upwey Grange, he was master on that voyage, UK to the Great Lakes if memory serves, he was from the Shetlands I believe, only sailed with him the once. The Chief Engineer on that voyage was Ellis Mason.
Tonga/Hercules
Interesting to hear about Hutch and sorry to hear of the death of John McB. I remember Supt. Robson, as you say Tonga a very decent guy. Met him on many occasions on the Cumbria, one notable time was drydock in Skaramanga when we had to employ some crew members off the International Pool as John McB. kept sacking people. Interesting times.
Regards Leo (*)
PS I forgot Hercules, sailed with Ellis Mason on the Joya McCance(Tanker)

non descript
3rd May 2006, 16:28
Leo,

Thank you; you have jogged my memory with the mention of Shetlands, and if I am correct Hutchinson was Mate on the Cumbria when I was 2/O - a really nice person, very quiet but good at his job. I'm glad he made Master.

Tonga

leo hannan
3rd May 2006, 17:57
Tonga, I wonder if we have sailed together, we seem to know lots of the same people and we both have worked in Leadenhall St. I was in Sea Personnel. I'm not sure if you said you were in Chartering. Was there someone called Van De something in that dept? It rings a bell. Trouble is, as I get older ones memory gets a bit hazy.
Regards
Leo (*))

non descript
3rd May 2006, 19:20
Leo,

I left the sea-staff in March 1976 and joined the shore-staff at 52 Leadenhall Street, and by chance the first ship I was involved with, in terms of Chartering, was the new-building Upwey Grange that you sailed on - she also delivered into service the same week that I joined the broking desk.

As for Dirk Van de Vos, yes he was on the Gas Tanker side of the ship-management and he had a model of that wonderful ship Humboldt on his desk - well it had to be "desk", we were not allowed offices in those days and furthermore there was a separate toilet for the Directors, who were given a key when they were appointed to the Board, as it was deemed most unwise to have the lesser staff urinating at the same time and same location as the Management.

I'll send you a PM with an email address.

Kind regards
Tonga

leo hannan
5th May 2006, 12:34
Hi Tonga.
Got your message thanks. Will reply more fully when I get home. Am in UK for a couple of weeks, new grandchild.Not much access to computer.
Regards
Leo (Pint)

malachy
10th July 2006, 14:38
In my 30 odd years at sea I only ever sailed on one tanker, apart from the coastal ones, she was the Cerinthus, Hadley Shipping Co. back in the last quarter of 1969. She was long in the tooth and not in very good shape so I doubt if she lasted much longer. She was running between Rotterdam and the north of Sweden, carrying fuel oil. We were banned from the Keil Canal because she was leaking oil, so were forced to go the long way round each trip.
Would be very much obliged if anyone could post a picture/history of her.
was on the cerinthus '72 taking i think a mixture of napalm and some other ingredient to rio grande in brazil and we had the same problem of cargo tank rivets leaking so bad they had to put booms around the ship when we finally docked.think we got away with fines etc when the skipper said it was the pilots fault for leaving us "high and dry" yards from the quayside as the tide receded

non descript
10th July 2006, 14:54
Malachy, ref: "taking i think a mixture of napalm and some other ingredient to rio grande in brazil"

Possibly Naptha as the cargo - but one never knows in these times (*))

non descript
1st March 2007, 16:27
It now has its own page, as in Cerinthus in Ships Nostalgia Guides

non descript
1st March 2007, 20:55
It now has its own page, as in Cerinthus in Ships Nostalgia Guides

There has been some questions (by PM) and some misunderstanding.

To avoid confusion, please allow me to explain: - What has been put in place by the Site Owners is a separate item - Ships Nostalgia Guides - which acts like Wikipedia. - A link as to how it works is here:


http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/guides/Help:Contents

For those of who who've used or seen Wikipedia, it may seem familiar as it uses the same software.

The idea is to allow Members to work together to edit factual, objective pages on ships, eras, docks, countries, companies, and anything else that comes to mind.

It is NOT designed to replace the normal threads we have all used, love and trust for our discussions, but to work in addition to those threads.

This is why I have used this one ship ( Cerinthus ) to work as an example, so some of the useful factual items we have gathered thanks to the Members, can be added to the page of Cerinthus, by putting it in as a link like this Cerinthus - as and when it is useful to show that such a page exists.

By making the link in this format Cerinthus it allow Members immediate and easy access to the interactive encyclopedia.

No one is forcing a change on the Members, it is merely an add-on that some may find useful

Good luck

aislinggear
29th March 2007, 09:02
I joined the CERINTHUS as the R/O on the 19th Dec 1972 in Bandar Mashur and sailed for Montevideo. On leaving Montevideo we heard on the bbc that there had been a military coup. we were the last ship to leave port. It explained all the navy ships we passed on the way out.We sailed to La Plata Argentina and spent the next few mts trading between Bahia Blanca and La Plata. Then on to Shellhaven via Rosario Brazil and payed off on the 24th May 1973. Hope this is of interest to you
Regards

marinero
29th March 2007, 10:36
I joined the CERINTHUS as the R/O on the 19th Dec 1972 in Bandar Mashur and sailed for Montevideo. On leaving Montevideo we heard on the bbc that there had been a military coup. we were the last ship to leave port. It explained all the navy ships we passed on the way out.We sailed to La Plate Argentina and spent the next few mts trading between Bahia Blanca and La Plata. Then on to Shellhaven via Rosario Brazil and payed off on the 24th May 1973. Hope this is of interest to you
Regards

Hi Aislinggear.
I bet you had a wonderful time Bahia Blanca/La Plata. We used to do La Plata nearly every trip on the Hardwicke Grange. I don't know if you remember the London Bar or was it the Anchor Bar (old age) in La Plata but I used to work in there on my half-days. What lovely memories. We had guided tours around the meat factory. The cattle arrived by train from the Pampas accompanied by the Gouchos on their horses and a colourful site it was too. You needed a strong stomach watching the cattle being slaughtered. Happy days.
Regards
Leo(Thumb)

K urgess
29th March 2007, 10:52
I joined the CERINTHUS as the R/O on the 19th Dec 1972 in Bandar Mashur and sailed for Montevideo. On leaving Montevideo we heard on the bbc that there had been a military coup. we were the last ship to leave port. It explained all the navy ships we passed on the way out.We sailed to La Plate Argentina and spent the next few mts trading between Bahia Blanca and La Plata. Then on to Shellhaven via Rosario Brazil and payed off on the 24th May 1973. Hope this is of interest to you
Regards

Hi Aislinggear,
We've either met or missed each other by a whisker. I joined the Cerinthus as R/O on 24th May 1975 at Shellhaven at 1530BST.
Welcome onboard.
How's that for your first post.
Cheers
Kris

aislinggear
29th March 2007, 16:29
Hi Kris. Hi Leo
Well that is some response to my very first post. I only found out about this site two days ago. Looking at the photo's has brought back many happy memories of my life at sea. I recall Leo a restaurant very near the tanker berth La Plata where we went for steak and chips every time we hit port. It was run by an Italian married to a local girl.I also remember a local bar run by a guy with one arm who was very left wing. A shout of Viva Castro was always followed by a drink on the house. In the bar down the road a shout of Viva Peron had much the same effect. There was an election campaign on at the time. Campora for President Peron for Power was one of the campaign slogans. Kris I cant recall whether I met you or not. Kind regards
Noel

non descript
29th March 2007, 18:23
Noel, a warm welcome to you. Thank you for joining the community; enjoy the site and all it has to offer and we very much look forward to your postings. Bon Voyage

aislinggear
29th March 2007, 19:40
Many thanks Tonga for the welcome.
Regards Noel

jim brindley
8th May 2007, 09:43
Discussion thread for Cerinthus (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/guides/Cerinthus). If you would like to add a comment, click the New Reply button

i joined cerinthus in liverpool as ab . was on a couple libertey ships said never again .didnt relise till i saw her in dock .we went around south ameraca in her . at that time i thought she was cunard.still the middel 40s a long time ago .jim old sinner in oz

non descript
8th May 2007, 10:47
i joined cerinthus in liverpool as ab . was on a couple libertey ships said never again .didnt relise till i saw her in dock .we went around south ameraca in her . at that time i thought she was cunard.still the middel 40s a long time ago .jim old sinner in oz

Jim

I have taken the liberty of moving your post to this thread. The thread that you added to is merely a SN Guides Thread.


Kind regards
Mark

jim brindley
9th May 2007, 01:55
thanks mark .sily old pom that i am . a hour later when i had another think about the ship memory came relised it was another ship . the trip on the cirunthus with whiskey and rum was a trip to rememeber . spelt cerinthus wrong ,sorry i get mixed up but was 60 yrs ago .old sinner jim in oz

chadders
14th May 2007, 21:47
I did my second trip on the Cerinthus, joined in Stanlow in March '69 Stan Jacobson was the Old Man a great guy and Geoff Caine was the mate. Went to Maracaibo and then did Maracaibo to the Plate for a while before coming back to the UK. A fine old lady despite the numerous leaks. I seem to remember the pumpman was Pearly Early and we also had a chinese laundryman. Also sailed on the Cymbeline on the N.E. Coast as mate in '78.
Saw a thread earlier about France Fenwick joined the Chelwood in 73 after 2nd Mates and did the Atlantic run to Port Arthur from Foynes, was also on her on the coast when she was the Oswestry Grange.

veste
15th May 2007, 09:34
I think the chinese laundry man may be Lee Sang, he was a permanent fixture on the Clymene/Cerinthus,when the ship stopped out went the fishing lines. He dried the fish on the laundry deck area then sent the fish home to the resturant in Leeds, what a character !. Like Peter Earle pumpman never to be forgotten.
Regards veste.

Bombersman
24th May 2008, 20:06
Good evening veste.

"I think the chinese laundry man may be Lee Sang, he was a permanent fixture on the Clymene/Cerinthus"

Also a permanent feature on the Brandon Priory in the early 1960s

Kind regards

Bob W

Cutsplice
24th May 2008, 23:49
In respect to Captain Hutchinson ex Houlders/ Hadleys I remembr him doing a safety survey on a vessel I was on in Aberdeen the year at a guess i would think was 1988 or thereabouts. We got into a conversation about Houlders during a tea break during the survey, he appeared to me to be a real gentleman. Whether he was full time with the DTI at the time or not I can recall, I do recall his name for some reason or other, strangely I cannot remember many names of DTI inspectors.

non descript
25th May 2008, 07:49
From my own recollections of Captain Hutchinson I would totally agree, a perfect gentleman, very good at his job and dedicated. I wonder where he is now.

paj
5th August 2008, 19:09
hi all just having a look at thread on cerinthus. i joined her in rotterdam along with several others in october 1962. from there we went to denmark, sweden, back to uk including middelsbourgh, liverpool then to lehavre, marsielle. from there we went deep sea down to cape town, i seem to remember that took about 30 days. then round to lorenco marques and biera, across to bombay. ithink we spent xmas there. then on to borneo and singapore cant remember which was first.then we headed to australia and new zealand where we spent about 3 or 4 months traveling between geelong brisban, sydney melbourne wellington auckland and then we headed home via suez canal. did not pay off with a lot but what a great trip for a 16 year old. anybody else out there who was on this trip. i would like to hear from you. paj

Les_Blues
17th August 2008, 20:54
I remember the Chinese laundryman on the Cerinthus but I don't thnk he was actually Chinese, If I remember rightly he was from Singapore. He was a mysterius guy, easily wound up but otherwise a gentleman. He came ashore with us to chinatown one night in (I think) Rotterdam and thoroughly enjoyed himself. He used to kick off with the saying "eelamakka". Thats the phonetic version, I've no idea how it's spelt, or what it means but I remember the guy using it frequently in the angry/irony mode. I did ask him once what "eelamakka" meant, and he did tell me but I can't remember so he must have given me a diplomatic reply. Bless him.

Bombersman
20th August 2008, 15:56
I wonder if anyone is around who might remember a 3/E from Glasgow called Alec Gibb (Gibbering Gibb, Gibby) .

He was with me on my first trip as Jun eng on the Brandon Priory in 1961. "What has this got to do with the Cerinthus Bob?" I hear you cry. Well, Gibby had a good few tales to tell about his time on the Cerinthus but I particularly remember (and wonder if anyone is around who can confirm this) a tale about taking on stores. In Japan, the ship was told to take on stores to get to USA, but was to call at Singapore en route. Apparently the instruction was ignored in favour of taking stores at Singapore but the run in to Singapore was cancelled. This meant that on arrival at Ana Cortez the ship was reduced to cornflakes and water.

Gibby often chanted a song, it could hardly be called singing, which went something like this although the tune was difficult to place

"There’s a tanker coming in over there
The Cerinthus coming in over there
Though her food and water's gone
she still carries on
sailing in -to Ana Cortez"

Bob W.

non descript
20th August 2008, 16:21
Bob,
I think that story is highly likely; it is the sort of thing that the ship, and its very well meaning Owners, would easily fall foul of. They (HSC) have a slightly similar tale when their CUMBRIA was due to stop at Singapore and not only take on stores, but also send some of the crew home (for Christmas) and take on new crew members. The master, who shall remains nameless, decided for reasons of his own, to abandon the plan that the Owners and the Agents had so carefully put in place and steamed past the waiting supply boat at full speed, leaving an amazed crew bobbing about in its wake – and a rather upset crew standing on the main deck with their bags packed. Arriving at Goa a week later with little to eat was a less than perfect way to celebrate Christmas. (Jester)
(Thumb)
Mark

Bombersman
20th August 2008, 17:25
Hi mark.

- and a rather upset crew standing on the main deck with their bags packed. Arriving at Goa a week later with little to eat was a less than perfect way to celebrate Christmas.

I can well believe it.

Kind regards

Bob

ALAN TYLER
21st August 2008, 19:32
I think the chinese laundry man may be Lee Sang, he was a permanent fixture on the Clymene/Cerinthus,when the ship stopped out went the fishing lines. He dried the fish on the laundry deck area then sent the fish home to the resturant in Leeds, what a character !. Like Peter Earle pumpman never to be forgotten.
Regards veste.

I sailed with lee sang on the joya macance in 1969, still got his chinese cook book, great help in that department as a newly promoted chief cook. Also sailed with peter on the stolt tudor in 72/73. he really was a great character, oh happy days.

malachy
13th December 2008, 20:24
think this is the chinese laundryman who was fishing while loading in the gulf (1972),someone threw a recently caught fish towards him and unbenown to him a barb from the fish went into his leg. By the time we got to Philidephia his leg was well infected and when the doctor came on board he just gouged the barb out, with no pain relief,and i think one of the AB's who was holding the laundryman fainted!!!sothey ended up carrying two out the Chief stewards room.

Fairfield
15th December 2008, 10:06
I took a shot of her at Brigham's Drydock at South Shields in 1972 which is in the Gallery.

Jon Vincent
29th December 2008, 03:10
Malachy. Back the original thread "Cerinthus". We must have been there at the same time. I joined in Sept 1971 at Tilbury and left at South Shields Dry-dock April 1972. I was second mate and had my wife on board through the time I was there. In that period we had Captains O"Kieffe and Charlesworth. Chief mates Tony Collop and Tony Moore, third mate Ian Mitchell and third engineer Willie Francis. The bit about going aground in Rio Grande del Sol was true, the vessel was over loaded and she always leaked, but she was carrying dirty diesel. The vessel was only fit to carry dirty oil cargo. To start with we did several trips with "WAX" from Antwerp to Stanlow. The ship was always going aground and my wife did the typing for both Captains as neither could type or spell, she got tired of typing "Dear Sirs, I regret to inform you that the vessel went aground" The "Cerinthus" rates as my all time worst voyages and ships, by todays standards it was not just in bad shape but appalling shape, well beyond her useful life. The vessel was unhappy, we had a bad "pool" crew (Liverpool) who stole the medical kits from the lifeboats amongst other things. A Captain who thought life had dealt him a duff hand after being in Royal Mail, and a Captain who was pissed at "Dennis" because he had been promised a "new Gas ship". We spent Christmas stuck in the ice alongside in "Bangor" Maine USA, with no water midship as all the pipe work on the flying bridge had burst. We had to land a cadet with "meningitis" who nearly died on us. The list goes on and on. I left the company after that and joined a major tanker company, spending years trying to forget that the "Cerinthus" ever happened. To this day I am amazed that we ever got from "A' to "B" and then even discharged a cargo which was always a tortuous process and not always successful..

K urgess
29th December 2008, 11:24
Seems things had changed by the time I joined in 1973, Jon.
I have nothing but good memories of the old girl when Tony Moor was Master.
You're the only one I've heard had a bad experience. Just goes to show what changes when a different crew sails on a ship.
Plus I joined after the drydock which must've sorted most of the problems.
Off the cuff I'd say my link to the Cerinthus was stronger because she didn't have long to live. (Sad)

non descript
29th December 2008, 12:08
I can quite appreciate that not everyone enjoyed this curious ship, and whilst she holds the sobriquet of “The World’s Favourite Tanker” in some folk’s minds, there must have been times when the trade and the Master made a pleasant experience into a nightmare. Poor old Fubar, he will be forever mentally scarred by his link with the past. Such is the value of non-ferrous metals that there is little hope for him, but his soul will, in years to come, hover over Faslane …(Jester)

malachy
29th December 2008, 20:14
jon,
joined the Cerinthus in Curacao in feb '72 when they flew me and Willie out as reliefs.This was after a KLM "world tour" London, Amsterdam,Paris,Zurich,Madrid,Caracas, Curacao.When we arrived we were expecting to go straight on watch, but were taken to the Avila Beach(man-made beach) Hotel for three days to recover from the "jet-lag"!!!!(so thoughtful)
Willie(who I think was from Barnsley????) was on free beer for a couple of days as he entertained the American tourists with his stories and banter.
After all this we were back in Swansea in two weeks and after a rough trip back, I think we lost an anchor and forward hand rails.
From there went up to Stanlow, Birkenhead,Ardrrosan, across to Cobh and then just around stanlow and that coast until going into Brigham and Cowans in S Shields.
Do you remember k.k. wong who was a motor chief who was getting his steam time at the time,he was serving as 4th eng????????????
vinny

Jon Vincent
30th December 2008, 02:05
Malachy. Willie and I are still very good friends, still go for a pint with him when in the UK, He still lives in Barnsley and my mother-in-law in Doncaster some 15minutes away. I remember Tony Moore as chief mate on the "Cerinthus" always in a fog, which was not surprising as the cargo managed to leak from tank to tank, all cargo handling operation were full of unwanted surprises. I had some of my happiest days with Houlders and best ships but the Cerinthus was not one of them, the company spirit went when there was influx of Furness people in 1971. A couple of years after this I got my master's and the first call to congratulate me was from Batch, I joked that he must be looking for bodies which he ademantly denied and told me I was better off where I was. His attitude was something I will always miss.

ALAN TYLER
30th December 2008, 13:41
Dear Jon! Oh what have you done, to talk so unkindly of the beloved (by many) Cerinthus. I sailed in her in 71/72 and did a dry/dock at Brighams and it was a happy ship then, and slightly chatty! Captain Charlesworth was a gent and John Mc Gregor ch/stwd, for me happy memories.

MARINEJOCKY
30th December 2008, 14:39
I think it was in the late sixties and I was a school boy in Northumberland when Bill Robson called in at our house to see my dad before going on to Bingham & Cowans. He asked if I wanted to go with him to see a real SHIP & of course I said yes.

My first impression of the Cerinthus was whoa!. I had never seen anything so big and glorious in my life and I believe that day changed my life. Being with the super' certainly opened numerous doors that day and I thought I was king of the yard until I sat in the duty mess and listened to stories from the engineers about this and that and their numerous runs ashore.

The hard work they talked about only seemed to be a small part of the job and the runs ashore made up for that. I could only hear Monte this and Monte that and in my young mind I had visions of sailing at sea for a few days and then arriving in Monte Carlo for a few weeks of fun. Years later I found they had been talking about Montevideo and because of the poor condition of the ship it took weeks to get there and then only a few days to discharge before more weeks at sea.

I was shown around the ship and then at lunch spent with all of the officers the engineers suggested to the deck lads that I spend time with them in the tanks to see how the workers "chucked the rivets". I was about 14 years old and eager to learn so agreed to clamber down and sit next to the worker. I have never heard anything as loud in my life as these "deaf" geordies replaced the rivets.

That still did not put me off and I signed up, I had actually hoped to go to the Cerinthus for my first trip but was sent to the Cumbria which was just over a year old and my best buddy from GCNS, Mike Fraser, went to the Cerinthus. I then joined the Brandon Priory and realised my career should be spent well away from old steam ships.

I have photographs of most of the ships I sailed on proudly displayed in my office and of course I have one of the Cerinthus that started it all and I can only say I have nothing but fond memories of her but then again does a day spent on board in dry dock count??.

malachy
30th December 2008, 18:19
Dear Jon! Oh what have you done, to talk so unkindly of the beloved (by many) Cerinthus. I sailed in her in 71/72 and did a dry/dock at Brighams and it was a happy ship then, and slightly chatty! Captain Charlesworth was a gent and John Mc Gregor ch/stwd, for me happy memories.

Alan,
what was the name of the pub just outside of the gates of Brighams.?, we used to go up there at lunch time(all the engineers were on day work) and have a couple of Double Maxims,so it must have been a Vaux's pub.would be unheard of now H & S and all that.
vinny

Jon Vincent
31st December 2008, 03:10
Alan. I served on the Brandon and Bidford Priory's, Stolt Stuart and the lowly "Avagadro" all were better ships than the "Cerinthus". When I tell any of my seafaring friends I served in Houlders they all say " did'nt they have an awful ship called the "Cer-----". So you could say she famous for all the wrong reasons.

non descript
31st December 2008, 07:53
Avogadro was such a special ship she would not mind being classed as ‘lowly’, such style, such character and of course she was a Pressure Ship….. (Jester) so she ranks as a Princess amongst the Paupers. I digress, it just goes to show (as they say in those French Controlled Pacific Islands) that one man’s Fish is another man’s Poisson. (Jester)

malachy
31st December 2008, 20:27
Alan. I served on the Brandon and Bidford Priory's, Stolt Stuart and the lowly "Avagadro" all were better ships than the "Cerinthus". When I tell any of my seafaring friends I served in Houlders they all say " did'nt they have an awful ship called the "Cer-----". So you could say she famous for all the wrong reasons.

Jon,
In '71-'72 did a total of 14 months on the Worlds Favourite Tanker and would have gone back for another 14 months if i'd been given the chance.
I know it was a hard worker and quite unpredictable(putting it mildly!!), but the camaraderie and teamwork made up for everything else that was negative.
OH HAPPY DAYS!!!!

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU AND YOUR FAMILY AND ALL AT SN(Pint) (Pint)
VINNY

Jon Vincent
1st January 2009, 03:19
Tonga. Agree one hundred percent, "Avogadro" was very special, had a great time on her and that was really hard work. Happy New Year to all.

vasco
1st January 2009, 03:25
Just did a big post and it dissapeared!!!!!

My trip as apprentice was horrible. It was a wreck. The only light moments were watching the black oil pour majestically out of holes that once held rivets and Wild Bill Lewis blowing his top. A frightening sight but at least he looked after us.

I then did a trip as x3/O around the coast. This must have been with you Jon but i can't remember you, sorry. Check my profile for the dates. I always thought the 3/O was Stuart Third, but this is unlikely as he perished on the Royston. My thoughts of the ship were only re-inforced and I must agree with your sentiments Jon.

Imagine my feelings when I was given her as first trip 2/O. From day one it was a disaster, we broke down out of dry dock and ended up in Cork Anchorage. The charts hadn't been corrected for weeks, and as the Company had only just started supplying tracings there weren't any so had a massive backlog of corrections to do long hand. When I finished I found the tracings all neatly indexed by Jerry (previous 2/O) under the Chart Room Day Bed seat!

There was a good bunch of people on board, R/O Ian & 3/O Stev (seth?) in particular. I was always late on watch, which I hated but could not understand why until I found out the watchman only whispered when he called me.

We had a boxing match, the pumpman and bosun trying to kill each other. more like Sumo wrestling, come to think of it. A fire in the pumproom (bet you never left a pumproom so quick since Seth) and everything was measured in Roddys, in honour of one of the engineers. Not to forget our very own eccentric Chippy, the Baron (?). He spent all day putting up a new clock in the saloon. Bulkhead down, clock fitted behind it so the face was flush with the bulkhead. A great job until we found out you couldn't open the clock to adjust it.

When Charlesworth left and Tony Moore joined things livened up and the latter half of my 7 months were good.

So, my last trip on her is full of good memories, but she was past her sell by date and I often wonder if she suffered a Port State Inspection to todays standards what the outcome would have been.

Happy New Year to all

Vasco,Taffy or John.

ALAN TYLER
1st January 2009, 13:46
Alan,
what was the name of the pub just outside of the gates of Brighams.?, we used to go up there at lunch time(all the engineers were on day work) and have a couple of Double Maxims,so it must have been a Vaux's pub.would be unheard of now H & S and all that.
vinny

Hi Malachy, Having a bit of memory loss about the pub. Narrowed it down to four.....The Suffolk(Norfolk),Ferry inn, the Commando and the Durham?

ALAN TYLER
1st January 2009, 13:58
Alan. I served on the Brandon and Bidford Priory's, Stolt Stuart and the lowly "Avagadro" all were better ships than the "Cerinthus". When I tell any of my seafaring friends I served in Houlders they all say " did'nt they have an awful ship called the "Cer-----". So you could say she famous for all the wrong reasons.

Hi Jon, Happy New Year to you, of all the Houlders ships I sailed in varying from the Hardwicke to the Furness Bridge, I will always have the fondest memories of the Cerinthus. Everyone has favourites and so I,ll draw a line under this one.
All the best Alan

Jon Vincent
2nd January 2009, 02:25
Vasco. Yes we did sail together in 72, you joined in Liverpool and left at dry-dock South Shields, I'm terrible with names but always remember faces, they really were memorable times, I look back at how we operated these ships and shudder, open gauging by sight until you could get it on the stick, mad panic when the cargo started to go places it was'nt supposed too, the hull leaks we just took for granted. Today I am senior mooring master/Captain in the gulf of Mexico, I watch our young officers in their automated control rooms and wonder what would happen if they were faced with the problems we took for granted.

vasco
2nd January 2009, 02:36
Vasco. Yes we did sail together in 72, you joined in Liverpool and left at dry-dock South Shields, I'm terrible with names but always remember faces, they really were memorable times, I look back at how we operated these ships and shudder, open gauging by sight until you could get it on the stick, mad panic when the cargo started to go places it was'nt supposed too, the hull leaks we just took for granted. Today I am senior mooring master/Captain in the gulf of Mexico, I watch our young officers in their automated control rooms and wonder what would happen if they were faced with the problems we took for granted.

Nice to meet up with you again!

I'm usually good with names but not faces. Those days were my dark days and sometimes I wonder how I survived.

As to control rooms. I work on the UK coast now and the amount of second mates.mates we get that are not happy turning valves is considerable. The Company has Eastern Europeans walking down the gangway after a week. The ships are not complicated, deepwell pumps, no pumproom but mainly hands on with a whessoe readout in the Office. In a way I don't blame them. They can get better else where but if the computer goes down hand them 54b and watch what happens. Bit like the old GPS/Sight situation really.

MARINEJOCKY
2nd January 2009, 14:34
Vasco, I see you were on the Joule in 1977 at the same time as me, I joined as a 5th eng and to keep me there longer they promoted me to 4th, I left in Singapore with Tom Brown, another 4th who was from Larne. Dogs'y was old man

vasco
2nd January 2009, 14:45
Vasco, I see you were on the Joule in 1977 at the same time as me, I joined as a 5th eng and to keep me there longer they promoted me to 4th, I left in Singapore with Tom Brown, another 4th who was from Larne. Dogs'y was old man

and the Cumbria! Remember those weeks in Rio? Me as 3/O and you as Cadet. Won't say anymore, keep the world guessing. Possibly met up on one other as well.

Vasco

MARINEJOCKY
2nd January 2009, 21:03
and the Cumbria! Remember those weeks in Rio? Me as 3/O and you as Cadet. Won't say anymore, keep the world guessing. Possibly met up on one other as well.

Vasco

Very Very fond memories once I spent the first hour getting over my Dear John. I will have to look up a Cumbria thread to see if anybody has posted what we all got up too down there.

I went back years later and had to threaten everybody with extra work unless they went ashore, once there they realised what they nearly missed.

clonguish
24th January 2009, 20:38
OMG The Cerinthus, joined after new year 74 as Eng. App sailed till Dry Dock in Cardiff that Summer and they kept me as a J/E till Oct, every length on Board was converted to Roddies ( so called after a Small J/E named if I remember Roderick Angus McCleod, remember he was refused a Shore Pass in the US as it turned out his uncle was I think Arthur Scargill, Yanks wouldnt let him ashore.) She leaked like a sieve and I loved her dearly, who could forget Curcao to Santa Thomas de Castillia ( Puete Barrios), TJP and Carbon Black to Stanlow, tank cleaning and trying to keep the heating coils from leaking, fixing Tubes that leaked in that old Babcock and Wilcox Boiler, 2/E Donald Bullach form Aughtrada 3/E Ian McCleod Monroe from Sutherland 4/E Bob from I think Bristol area all he did was Bronzy turned Black in the sun. After the Dry Dock in the summer meant to go to US Broke down 12 hrs out and spent a week anchored between Whitegates and Cobh in Ireland fixing the Main Steam v/v, and the getting court in a freak North Atlantic Gale, oh yes those that knew her loved the old Lady.

malachy
30th January 2009, 21:13
(Thumb) (Thumb) (Thumb) OMG The Cerinthus, joined after new year 74 as Eng. App sailed till Dry Dock in Cardiff that Summer and they kept me as a J/E till Oct, every length on Board was converted to Roddies ( so called after a Small J/E named if I remember Roderick Angus McCleod, remember he was refused a Shore Pass in the US as it turned out his uncle was I think Arthur Scargill, Yanks wouldnt let him ashore.) She leaked like a sieve and I loved her dearly, who could forget Curcao to Santa Thomas de Castillia ( Puete Barrios), TJP and Carbon Black to Stanlow, tank cleaning and trying to keep the heating coils from leaking, fixing Tubes that leaked in that old Babcock and Wilcox Boiler, 2/E Donald Bullach form Aughtrada 3/E Ian McCleod Monroe from Sutherland 4/E Bob from I think Bristol area all he did was Bronzy turned Black in the sun. After the Dry Dock in the summer meant to go to US Broke down 12 hrs out and spent a week anchored between Whitegates and Cobh in Ireland fixing the Main Steam v/v, and the getting court in a freak North Atlantic Gale, oh yes those that knew her loved the old Lady.
Clonguish,
There was another Roddy McCleod who sailed on the Cerinthus(71 or 72), he was Electrician and hailed from Skye.
vinny

vasco
31st January 2009, 03:24
[QUOTE=clonguish;285380]OMG The Cerinthus, joined after new year 74 as Eng. App sailed till Dry Dock in Cardiff that Summer and they kept me as a J/E till Oct, every length on Board was converted to Roddies ( so called after a Small J/E named if I remember Roderick Angus McCleod, remember he was refused a QUOTE]


Definitely was a Junior, see post above. He was caught with his trousers down when the pump room caught fire in Fond Mombin, Jamaica. Don't know if you were on board then. I joined as 2/O in Cardiff with that extrremely spaced out sparkie. Who was replaced by the ever charming Ian Thomas.

There are a couple of us on this site that would have sailed with you, alas my memory has faded and I can't place you, maybe Veste can

John

clonguish
3rd February 2009, 20:32
[QUOTE=clonguish;285380]OMG The Cerinthus, joined after new year 74 as Eng. App sailed till Dry Dock in Cardiff that Summer and they kept me as a J/E till Oct, every length on Board was converted to Roddies ( so called after a Small J/E named if I remember Roderick Angus McCleod, remember he was refused a QUOTE]


Definitely was a Junior, see post above. He was caught with his trousers down when the pump room caught fire in Fond Mombin, Jamaica. Don't know if you were on board then. I joined as 2/O in Cardiff with that extrremely spaced out sparkie. Who was replaced by the ever charming Ian Thomas.

There are a couple of us on this site that would have sailed with you, alas my memory has faded and I can't place you, maybe Veste can

John


Uploaded a pic taken earlier in the year before the drydock of me, in under Cerinthus, was j/e to Mick Murphy 4/e after dry Dock, and do you remember what happened to Ian Thomas's Dunhill Lighter, met Ian later on in Singapore when I was paying off the Bidford, cant remember what ship he was on but his wife was with him had a good night out. The pic was taken in Apprentice cabin Midships across from Tony Moors Capt Cabin

emphatic
3rd February 2009, 21:00
When I joined EMPHATIC (tug) in March 1959 cerithus was one of the first ships I ever docked in Barry docks Bristol channel she used to drydock in Baileys Drydock but jusy one more thing my farther who was a bosun, made his last trip to sea in this tanker, it was the only tanker he sailed in, when he arrived home he did not open his kitbag in the house he took it up the back garden tipped all his clothes out onto the garden and burnt them all along with the kitbag, the bag that took him to many places (he stitched it togother when he was in the ROYAL NAVY as a petty officer) sad day for his kitbag but not for his clothes they smelt of heavy oil stinking,, thats my memory of CERINTHUS not good DAD'S NAME BENNY DENMAN MINE FRED DENMAN

NINJA
8th March 2009, 15:07
Bought a book in the Ian Allan Bookshop in Manchester. 'Looking back at Classic Tankers'.

There is a superb colour photo of the Cerinthus arriving at Cardiff for drydocking 20MAY74. Also in the same book an equally superb colour photo of the Brandon Priory.

malachy
8th March 2009, 21:48
ninja,
where in manchester is this bookshop????
vinny

Ron Stringer
9th March 2009, 01:35
You can look from the comfort of your own home.

http://www.ianallanpublishing.com/home.php?xid=2823294e0a48d873c555e5b8cb6ddf8d

NINJA
9th March 2009, 08:54
Hello Malachy,

It is situated on the approach road up to the front of Piccadilly Station.

saunders97
10th May 2009, 11:41
Year of delivery seems to have been 1954. Those with access to proper sources will give you details without difficulty

I was on the cerinthus as deck cadet for 18 months in 1962 i think. trading around middle east australia and new zealand and baltic


Wiil try and drag up more memories

am011k5786
12th May 2009, 21:32
Joined the cerinthus tilbury 2-10-63 payed off tilbury 15-11-63 not really a tanker man but after 3weeks leave cash was tight i needed a job.However it turned out to be a pleasant voyage,nice clean ship with a swimming pool,we called into Curacoa,where the 1st.mate gave us ajob& finish painting the funnel,by 12.30 we were on the bus to the nearest bar,afew hours retuned to ship a very happy lot.up the Maricibo loaded for home.It was more like a cruise for me however i could hardly wait to get back on a cargo ship and do some work. A Macdonald.

ALAN TYLER
10th August 2009, 12:46
Whilst sailing in this grand old lady back in 71. ( March/Sept), I recall we did a trip up the River Orinoco in Venezuela,, nothing odd in that really. Though the way we " docked" was different, this was achieved by going into the river bank and letting the tide/current turn the ship. This was all very amusing to us in the galley, but not so for the crew on the focsle dodging branches etc!!! Anybody out there remember this, or possibly used the same docking method elsewhere?

vasco
10th August 2009, 13:10
Whilst sailing in this grand old lady back in 71. ( March/Sept), in Anybody out there remember this, or possibly used the same docking method elsewhere?

Quite a routine procedure.

Naming no names (or Rivers) one vessel I was on used the following procedure.

1. Head up river, if the settee in the mud bank was still visible slow down. Turn the bend as long as the top branch of the tree in the river bank was at least partly submerged. Then, heading for the sign that says 'do not anchor here' let go the anchor when the weighing scales in the scrapyard on the port side were abeam of the bridge. The bow will then nose into the bank, the ship swing with the current and then we backed up the river to the berth.

It was a small dredger, but there is nothing like using a little local knowledge.

malachy
16th August 2009, 21:33
Whilst sailing in this grand old lady back in 71. ( March/Sept), I recall we did a trip up the River Orinoco in Venezuela,, nothing odd in that really. Though the way we " docked" was different, this was achieved by going into the river bank and letting the tide/current turn the ship. This was all very amusing to us in the galley, but not so for the crew on the focsle dodging branches etc!!! Anybody out there remember this, or possibly used the same docking method elsewhere?

Alan,
spot on with the desciption. Was on that trip, can't remember the name of the place where we loaded.
malachy

ALAN TYLER
18th August 2009, 15:04
Malachy, Thought you might remember some of the crew..
April 71. September 71.
Master M Charlesworth Ditto
1st Off T Moor P Troy
2nd " G Hope Ditto
3rd " R Lamb Ditto
C/E K Ferns Ditto
2nd H Ferguson Ditto
3rd C Rooney Ditto
J/3rd J Fletcher R Pennycook
4th M Bolingbrooke K Hagues
" J Barry
5th V O,Rourke V O,Rourke
Jun/E G Shutt Ditto
" D Gavin D Hearn
Lecky R Mc Leod B Fisher
Cadet M Tautz Ditto
" A Barnes Ditto
C/Off D Mc Condichie C Evans
Bosun F Dobbs Ditto
Ch/Cook Me Ditto
ERS P Rawlinson Ditto
L/Man Lee Sang/ Sang Lee Ditto
A.B. J Houghton I Samuel

P.S. Tony Moor and P Troy wrong way round.

malachy
18th August 2009, 18:19
Malachy, Thought you might remember some of the crew..
April 71. September 71.
Master M Charlesworth Ditto
1st Off T Moor P Troy
2nd " G Hope Ditto
3rd " R Lamb Ditto
C/E K Ferns Ditto
2nd H Ferguson Ditto
3rd C Rooney Ditto
J/3rd J Fletcher R Pennycook
4th M Bolingbrooke K Hagues
" J Barry
5th V O,Rourke V O,Rourke
Jun/E G Shutt Ditto
" D Gavin D Hearn
Lecky R Mc Leod B Fisher
Cadet M Tautz Ditto
" A Barnes Ditto
C/Off D Mc Condichie C Evans
Bosun F Dobbs Ditto
Ch/Cook Me Ditto
ERS P Rawlinson Ditto
L/Man Lee Sang/ Sang Lee Ditto
A.B. J Houghton I Samuel

P.S. Tony Moor and P Troy wrong way round.

alan,
remember a lot of the names although some seem a bit vague. that's me at 5/eng vinny o'rourke. do recall the singapore lad k k wong who was getting his c/eng steam time in, who had to pay-off in philly due to an eye injury whilst changing a burner on the boiler??????
malachy

Tommo
13th October 2009, 09:59
[QUOTE=vasco;287414]


Uploaded a pic taken earlier in the year before the drydock of me, in under Cerinthus, was j/e to Mick Murphy 4/e after dry Dock, and do you remember what happened to Ian Thomas's Dunhill Lighter, met Ian later on in Singapore when I was paying off the Bidford, cant remember what ship he was on but his wife was with him had a good night out. The pic was taken in Apprentice cabin Midships across from Tony Moors Capt Cabin

The lighter in question was never lost , in fact I know exactly where it is off the berth in Haiti Fond Mombin . We must have been on the Cumbria at the time . Best Regards Ian

vasco
13th October 2009, 12:31
[QUOTE=clonguish;288637]

The lighter in question was never lost , in fact I know exactly where it is off the berth in Haiti Fond Mombin . We must have been on the Cumbria at the time . Best Regards Ian

Hello Ian,

Never realised you were on this site. That trip on the Cerinthus was a hoot. Fires in Fond Mombin, Fights on the Jetty between the rather large Bosun and Pumpman, Christmas trees up the mast off lynas not to mention the strife you and a certain 3/O used to give a green 2/O, especially the Sy CroixRadio call, will always remember that one. Can't remember the lighter story though

Regards

John

Tommo
13th October 2009, 13:45
[QUOTE=Tommo;367763]

Hello Ian,

Never realised you were on this site. That trip on the Cerinthus was a hoot. Fires in Fond Mombin, Fights on the Jetty between the rather large Bosun and Pumpman, Christmas trees up the mast off lynas not to mention the strife you and a certain 3/O used to give a green 2/O, especially the Sy CroixRadio call, will always remember that one. Can't remember the lighter story though

Regards

John

Hi John
I been a member quite a few years , never got round to typing anything yet ..hahahah
Was the 3/0 Seth ? where is he now do you or anyone know ?
The Lighter story? was aft of the funnel with Gilbert and Roddie partaking of Tennants coming into Haiti , unwrapped a packet of cigs and threw the wrapper overboard, along with a brand new gold dunhill lighter .
I read on one post about the night of the fire , and Roddies lady of the night , I watched her from the bar window legging it up the flying bridge with her jeans on back to front hugging a carton of cigs . Some things should never be forgot ha ?
Rgds
Ian

paj
13th October 2009, 20:02
I was on the cerinthus as deck cadet for 18 months in 1962 i think. trading around middle east australia and new zealand and baltic


Wiil try and drag up more memories

hi, it seems that we may have been on cerinthus at the same time. i joined her in (i think ) october 1962 in rotterdam as galley boy. going to several baltic ports back to uk and then medi ports south africa, india, singapore, australia and new zealand, great trip and i think i paid of in the following summer. paj

ALAN TYLER
18th February 2010, 12:21
Just been reading the book "Furness Withy 1891-1991" only a small paragraph about Hadleys. Much to my horror no mention of the "Worlds Greatest Tanker", how sad or is that just me!!!

non descript
18th February 2010, 18:19
Just been reading the book "Furness Withy 1891-1991" only a small paragraph about Hadleys. Much to my horror no mention of the "Worlds Greatest Tanker", how sad or is that just me!!!

Very sad, but then again, PJW will not be too upset not to see his company’s name displayed alongside TBFW… (Jester) and he does have his own book about HSC.

clonguish
16th January 2011, 15:20
Couldnt help but bump up this thread nearly a year since any posting, had an e-mail form Tony Moors daughter couldnt help but laugh thinking of a Skipper cutting a J/E hair both drunk and I think it was Port Harcourt, dont think he ever travelled without the hair cutting equipment.

Ken West
18th August 2012, 04:19
I did 2 trips on the good ship Cerinthus between 1974 and 1976 as 4th engineer and 3 rd engineer, Fred Lott was Chief and Tony Moor Captain. I have fond memories of my times there it was a hard working ship. We spent Christmas 1974 off the Isle of Aaron waiting for orders and took turns getting to the shore hotel in a launch for Christmas and new year drinks, Wadding up the beach and back as I recall to get the launch.

vasco
18th August 2012, 08:48
Hi Ken,

Think you got your years mixed up!
I was 2/O on the Cerinthus over Christmas 74 and don't recall Aaron. However we were anchored off Lynas when we had a christmas tree flying from the foremast.
Still good memories, it was a baptism of fire for me, first trip 2/O and went everywhere.
John (seem to remember the 4/E was roddie, a man of small stature. Everything was measured in Roddies! Possibly he was J/E and you were Fourth?) Have a look at my profile, all my dates are there.

Ken West
20th August 2012, 02:23
Vasco, You are correct I have my years mixed up. It was Christmas 1975 and I was 3rd Engineer

clonguish
31st August 2012, 21:30
Ken remember that time well was a 5/e at the same time we had christmas laid up in Aaron I believe we met up again on the Uncle John later that year or the following year
Duncan

Tony's Girl
3rd July 2013, 12:47
Hi all,

I'm looking for information about my father Tony Noon. he served in the Merchant Navy between 1967 - 1969 on the Cerinthus, Bidford Priory and Denby Grange. I think his rank on discharge from the MN was 5th Engineer. What did he do, what was his job role?
I have his Seamans Record Book and know when he sailed and where from, but not where to - why isn't that recorded?
I have the following dates that he sailed and if anyone knows anything, I would be forever in their debt!!
I've tried the national archives etc, but it all seems to be before WW2.....

Cerinthus:
02.08.67 - Ellesmere Port - Discharge: Ellesmere Port 21.10.67 - FGN
21.10.67 - Ellesmere Port - Discharge: Ellesmere Port 26.10.67 - HT RUN
22.11.67 - Greenock - Discharge: Greenock 03.12.67 - FGN
04.01.68 - Barry - Discharge: Ellesmere Port 07.01.68 - FGN
08.01.68 - Ellesmere Port - Discharge: South Shields 29.01.68 - FGN
30.01.68 - South Shields - Discharge: Ellesmere Port 08.04.68 - FGN
09.04.68 - Ellesmere Port - Discharge: Kingston Jamaica 02.07.68 - FGN

Denby Grange:
05.10.68 - Immingham - Discharge: Kristiansand 18.10.68

Bidford Priory:
21.11.68 - Hamburg - Discharge: London 01.05.69

Hope anyone can help!!!