Aureol

Ian
8th April 2004, 18:41
AUREOL berthing at Liverpool Landing Stage shortly after delivery from Alexander Stephen & Sons Ltd in 1951.

Fairfield
8th September 2004, 11:31
Taken in Southampton in 1973 moving round to the Ocean Terminal following the departure of FRANCE for New York.

odette
3rd December 2004, 11:03
HI - GREAT PHOTO - WOULD YOU LET ME USE IT ON MY WEB SITE|? i RUN A FEW PAGES DEDICATED TO THE ELDER DEMPSTER LINE AT WWW.LIND.ORG.ZW

Fairfield
3rd December 2004, 11:16
No problem-glad to be of help.Sorry it/s not a better one. Have had a very quick look at your site.Looks excellent.Will go back when I have a little more time and see it properly.

Rhiw.com
24th March 2005, 18:17
I made eleven trips on the Aureol, three as J.O.S. between February 1970 and June 1970, and eight as E.D.H. between September 1971 and June 1972. We sailed from Liverpool on March 14th 1972 and docked in Southampton on the 17th of April, this was the first time at that port, and she never went back to Liverpool again. She was a fine ship, with a great crew, and I have many fond memories of her. I have two photos of her on my website, which you can use as you like. Regards Tony Jones. www.rhiw.com.

Rhiw.com
25th March 2005, 09:04
They called her the white swan, when she sailed out of Liverpool. And in this photo you can see why, Regards, Tony.

trotterdotpom
3rd June 2005, 17:34
I remember the "Big White Bird" berthed at Apapa, I think. A young couple from the ship, he in a white tuxedo, she in an evening dress, straight out of a Somerset Maugham story, were in the middle of riotous happenings in Maxim's Nightclub, on top of a large building in Lagos. They looked so embarrassed, but I'm sure they laugh about it now. Good job they didn't see the sink in the back room!

John T.

FLYERS
7th November 2006, 20:26
Great photo's of another Liverpool old girl.
My father was an engineer on this vessel in the 50's and had many tales about her.

Roger Turner
13th November 2006, 21:47
Yes She was a beautiful vessel, I think they used to say modeled (?) on the "Coronia"
Anybody any idea where the name came from, it certainly didn`t seem to go along with the general run of ED`s names

eldersuk
13th November 2006, 23:25
Roger
The name of the ship comes from Mt. Aureol which rises behind Freetown.
I doubt if she was modelled on the Caronia or any other ship, although there was a slight resemblance. She was an in-house design by Elder Dempster naval architects.

Flyers, what was your father's name, it's possible that I knew him.

Regards,
Derek

Angecahill
29th August 2013, 09:28
Hi, my Dad James Finnegan was an engineer on the Aureol. He absolutely loved the ship and his time spent aboard her. Does anyone remember him? It would probably have been late 60s or early 70s.
Thanks
Angela

woodend
29th August 2013, 09:41
I was lucky enough to spend time as Apprentice, Extra Third Mate and Extra Second Mate on her. Not only was she good looking but she was always a 'happy'
ship!

John Gillespie
29th August 2013, 09:52
I was 3/0 on her in 1967. Capt Sullivan was the Master and Charlie Woodward was the Mate

WilliamH
29th August 2013, 10:08
In my six years in EDs I never sailed on any of the three passenger vessels, I was told by Mr Heslop, engineers personel manager, "That I was not mail boat material", snobby bar stewards.

Angecahill
29th August 2013, 10:24
I seem to remember my Dad mentioning someone called Heslop must be the same person William

Rogerfrench
30th August 2013, 17:28
I was 3/0 on her in 1967. Capt Sullivan was the Master and Charlie Woodward was the Mate

That would have been Captain C.S.H. O'Sullivan, whom I knew well from his time as master of the Ebani.
Clifford Stanley Harbottle were his names, he was known as "Timmo", an abbreviation of Timoshenko, the Russian Army commander. A well-known figure down the coast, with an eye for the ladies.

I did 3 trips on the Aureol as Apprentice in 1962, not long before I came ashore to do my 2nd Mates ticket.

alan ward
30th August 2013, 17:37
Harbottle was the master of the my first ship the Accra, a very urbane character with a grey goatee.I only lasted one trip Don Cadman said I spent too much time being lead astray by the Junior Engineers but I was a good human being,probably why my next boat was the Kohima!

Alan Rawlinson
30th August 2013, 21:02
They called her the white swan, when she sailed out of Liverpool. And in this photo you can see why, Regards, Tony.

Remember her fondly from days in the Bank Line when we 'crossed tracks' on the West African Coast in the 1950's. One of the pics of her I like is attached. - stern view.

Peter Martin
31st August 2013, 21:24
The Aureol was possibly my favourite ship. I did three trips on her in the early 70's as a cadet. First to we're with Captain RG Williams who was a super chap and well fitted to be master of a passenger ship. My third trip was a year later under Captain Duncan 'Drunken ' Campbell. She was an exceptionally happy ship.
I transcribed my 'Log Book' for one of those voyages and have posted it on my website; www.sudarg.wordpress.com/2009/09/19/aureol/

Jeff Taylor
31st August 2013, 23:24
I've seen speculation that one of the reasons for her relatively early retirement was the brittle nature of some of the earlier post-war steel with which she was constructed. Does that ring a bell with anyone? Obviously she lasted for over 50 years with Latsis, but much of that was in a static role.

Rogerfrench
2nd September 2013, 06:02
I've seen speculation that one of the reasons for her relatively early retirement was the brittle nature of some of the earlier post-war steel with which she was constructed. Does that ring a bell with anyone? Obviously she lasted for over 50 years with Latsis, but much of that was in a static role.

I suspect the decline in passenger traffic to West Africa rendered her route obsolete, and as a relatively slow and small liner, built for the west coast run, she wasn't much use elsewhere.

Not too many years earlier, there had been 3 three mail boats from Liverpool (Aureol, Accra, Apapa), Calabar and Winneba from London, and the smaller Port Harcourt service by the Tamele and Tarkwa.

By the time the Aureol was sold, Jumbo Jets were flying, though not yet to West Africa. Her time was done, even if she wasn't. Sad, really.

Alan Rawlinson
2nd September 2013, 08:38
I suspect the decline in passenger traffic to West Africa rendered her route obsolete, and as a relatively slow and small liner, built for the west coast run, she wasn't much use elsewhere.

Not too many years earlier, there had been 3 three mail boats from Liverpool (Aureol, Accra, Apapa), Calabar and Winneba from London, and the smaller Port Harcourt service by the Tamele and Tarkwa.

By the time the Aureol was sold, Jumbo Jets were flying, though not yet to West Africa. Her time was done, even if she wasn't. Sad, really.

There was a DC10 service to Lagos via Kano in the mid 70's but the connection was via Paris. I 'enjoyed' travelling up and down this way about the time of the huge port congestion in Lagos with hundreds of ships waiting outside.

crisden78
27th September 2013, 03:56
I spent 6 trips as 4/E on the Aureol in 1967. The Chief Engineer was Alex McCarrick, a real gentleman. Norman George and Andy Anderton were 2 of the seconds. Peter Mills was one of the juniors, and Willie was the ships plumber and bookies runner. I am attaching a photo of the Aureol taken in Langton Dock the same year. The Chief leckie was the ship's photographer. Happy Days. Ernie Sabiston

franciscojosewaring
23rd October 2013, 21:53
I managed three trips as Chief Officer on Aureol, I transferred from the Kaduna as C/0 Charlie wanted trip off, I did one learn the ropes, then trip on my own and a further one as charlies family had mumps, then back to the cargo ships again, a good ship well run, Timmo as master MC Carrick Chief Engineer, we had a strike of catering staff in Lagos and left them all behind managing a full complement of passengers till we arrived in Freetown and picked up new staff there, none of whom had been on a mail boat before but they managed and a fine time was had by all, all in a days work Frank Waring

Donald McGhee
24th October 2013, 06:34
i was a passenger on her many times, between the ages of 6 weeks and five. My folks were based in Nigeria and they used to come home on leave on her and the Apapa.
I remember the kids stalag /holding pen/kindergarten aboard and the beef tea and ice cream, also the bacon and eggs. strange what memories you have as a child. Mind you my current shape indicates that food always played an important part in my life!

alan ward
25th October 2013, 12:26
Is it true that after the protesting catering staff were left in Lagos some of the deck crowd were Shanghaied into waiting on?I heard some tales embroidered no doubt,but who cares,about scouse ABs with white jackets straining at the seams asking passengers`Hands up for soup`or`I haven`t got any fish,here have an apple pie to be getting on with`after all these years it still makes me laugh.

Despite not enjoying the west coast the humour of the men on the Owerri will stay with me for ever,Keith Ritch,Alan Wardle, George Paton and Dave Atkin had me in stitches.They could be pretty scathing at times with us younger lads but we learned to think on our feet and learned pretty quickly.