Climping

Fairfield
10th September 2004, 13:25
She was one of a series built to bring coal to the upriver London power stations under the low bridges,and nicknamed Flatirons.
I can/t remember if CLIMPING was her original name as they were managed by Stephenson Clarke and received their names as coal traffic declined.
She is seen here in 1974 discharging a grain cargo in Glasgow.

Bob S
10th September 2004, 17:44
Built in 1958 and 1877 tons gross, she was originally the CAMBERWELL operated by the South Eastern Gas Board. Renamed by Stephenson Clarke Shipping in 1969.

Fairfield
13th September 2004, 08:47
Built in 1958 and 1877 tons gross, she was originally the CAMBERWELL operated by the South Eastern Gas Board. Renamed by Stephenson Clarke Shipping in 1969.
Thanks Bob.Couldn/t remember if she had a Gas Board name beforehand or not.

trotterdotpom
5th May 2005, 11:55
Stephenson Clarke named all their ships after West Sussex villages. Apparently they are now the oldest British shipping company still using the same name!

In the late '60s I spent a short time on "Harry Richardson", another flatiron collier. We traded between the Tyne and London, generally Battersea and Fulham power stations. The so-called "Northeast Coast Agreement" stated that if the ship was away from the Tyne for (I think) 72 hours, she was guaranteed a night alongside on her return up north. Needless to say that usually meant a few hours stooging around off Flamborough Head, ensuring that the time limit was exceeded.

My favourite memory is one trip sailing towards Tower Bridge en route to Fulham (bye the way, the funnel folded down to allow passage under the bridge). The pilot was on the monkey island and as the ship glided under the bridge, a gang of urchins spat on him. He was still screaming blue murder when the ship emerged from the other side of the bridge and the kids, having ran across the road, got him again!

John.

R798780
5th May 2005, 14:25
The urchins on the bridges over the Manchester ship canal would try to pee down the funnels of ships passing beneath. Perhaps they still do.

Fairfield
5th May 2005, 15:55
The urchins on the Clyde (and that/s giving them their Sunday name) throw anything to hand at WAVERLEY on her passages up and down the river getting especially dangerous when the river narrows.Police have attended several times but I don/t think as yet there have been any injuries.

Pat McCardle
14th June 2005, 17:43
Stephenson Clarke named all their ships after West Sussex villages. Apparently they are now the oldest British shipping company still using the same name!

In the late '60s I spent a short time on "Harry Richardson", another flatiron collier. We traded between the Tyne and London, generally Battersea and Fulham power stations. The so-called "Northeast Coast Agreement" stated that if the ship was away from the Tyne for (I think) 72 hours, she was guaranteed a night alongside on her return up north. Needless to say that usually meant a few hours stooging around off Flamborough Head, ensuring that the time limit was exceeded.

My favourite memory is one trip sailing towards Tower Bridge en route to Fulham (bye the way, the funnel folded down to allow passage under the bridge). The pilot was on the monkey island and as the ship glided under the bridge, a gang of urchins spat on him. He was still screaming blue murder when the ship emerged from the other side of the bridge and the kids, having ran across the road, got him again!

John.

Flamborough Head to colliermen was known as 'Geordies Cape Horn'

Marcus Cardew
14th June 2005, 20:20
Flamborough Head to colliermen was known as 'Geordies Cape Horn'

Like Mull of Kintyre was Caledonian McBranes 'Cape Horn'!

Hamish Mackintosh
25th January 2006, 02:45
Flamborough Head to colliermen was known as 'Geordies Cape Horn'
spent a few happy years on the"Beeding" the "Petworth" the "Seaford" sailing coal into Shoreham from the north east coast. we also worked to the north east coast agreement,watch ashore watch aboard

ruud
27th August 2006, 08:09
Thanks Bob.Couldn/t remember if she had a Gas Board name beforehand or not.
Ahoy Paul,

Here seen as CAMBERWELL 1958 for the S.E.G.B.
Courtesy/ by A.Duncan, whish I had more photos made by him, but already being lucky to got some [+/- 100].(Applause)

ruud
27th August 2006, 08:18
Stephenson Clarke named all their ships after West Sussex villages. Apparently they are now the oldest British shipping company still using the same name!

In the late '60s I spent a short time on "Harry Richardson", another flatiron collier. We traded between the Tyne and London, generally Battersea and Fulham power stations. The so-called "Northeast Coast Agreement" stated that if the ship was away from the Tyne for (I think) 72 hours, she was guaranteed a night alongside on her return up north. Needless to say that usually meant a few hours stooging around off Flamborough Head, ensuring that the time limit was exceeded.

My favourite memory is one trip sailing towards Tower Bridge en route to Fulham (bye the way, the funnel folded down to allow passage under the bridge). The pilot was on the monkey island and as the ship glided under the bridge, a gang of urchins spat on him. He was still screaming blue murder when the ship emerged from the other side of the bridge and the kids, having ran across the road, got him again!

John.Ahoy John,

As well for you this one, hope this will back some good old memories.
The HARRY RICHARDSON 1950 courtesy/ by A.Duncan.

trotterdotpom
27th August 2006, 14:02
Ahoy John,

As well for you this one, hope this will back some good old memories.
The HARRY RICHARDSON 1950 courtesy/ by A.Duncan.

Thankyou, Ruud. Not the best looking ship but lots of laughs at both ends of the trip. I especially remember the pub at Seaham Harbour - never mind the licencing hours, what time's the tide? And great boozers in the Fulham area (much more productive than nearby trendy Chelsea).

John T.

notnila
30th September 2006, 21:49
"The Marquis of Londonderry" or the other was "Noah's Ark" I think.

ian fears
3rd October 2006, 11:24
Stephenson Clarke named all their ships after West Sussex villages. Apparently they are now the oldest British shipping company still using the same name!



John.

Small point they also named them after East Sussex villages ie Wilmington which Im still trying to get a photo of

john shaw
3rd October 2006, 14:44
here's a b&w of Climping

trotterdotpom
3rd October 2006, 15:16
Small point they also named them after East Sussex villages ie Wilmington which Im still trying to get a photo of

Thanks Ian, you live and learn. I remember Wilmington being the newest ship in the fleet and running over the pond - did she even go to Wilmington, NC?

Check out www.ship-photos.com - there is a photo in the catelogue under Great Britain Coastal ships. The owner is in NZ and I have purchased a swag of photos from him before - highly recommended to anyone (huge inventory). Mention my name and you won't get it any cheaper, but, hey, what price can you put on a memory?

Good luck, John T.

ruud
21st December 2006, 12:58
Small point they also named them after East Sussex villages ie Wilmington which Im still trying to get a photo of

Ahoy Ian,
This must be your "Lucky Day",buy yourself a lottery ticket, here your WILMIMGTON 1969.
Merry Xmas (Thumb)

awateah2
21st December 2006, 13:43
In 1893, Colonel Stephenson Robert Clarke purchased 'Borde Hill' in West Sussex and named all his ships after Sussex towns and villagesl In 1965 it became a registered charity although still owned by the family and is open to the public at certain times of the year.
There were some exceptions 'Totland', 'Portsmouth'. Gosport,'Flathouse' etc

Coastie
21st December 2006, 16:08
I remember when I was a teenager in the 70's sometime, hearing the maroons going off. I turned my Marine band radio on listening for the Coastguard and hearing them call the name Climping over the marine band. Now, I don't know to this day if this vessel was in any way connected to whatever it was that the maroons were fired for, but it was certainly being called over the MF at the time of the incident.