Grimsby Fishing Vessels

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Clem
28th May 2006, 16:28
Hi everyone, I've started this thread to discuss Grimsby fishing vessels. I'm in the process of compiling a database of the above and, would welcome any contributions on this theme. ie. photo's, stories of life on board, histories of the vessels etc.

Hopefully as this thread develops, it can become a reference point for people with similar interests.

Regards

Clem

brixhamrfc
29th May 2006, 04:22
Clem, I have photos of Apollo and Silver Stream if they are any good to you, regards, Trev

Clem
29th May 2006, 12:55
That would be great Raymond, you do have my email?

Apollo being GY139, ex. GY227, ex. GY605. I have no record of Silver Stream.

Cheers

Clem

glenn
29th May 2006, 15:56
Silver Stream GY 386 Burnt out during refit towed to New Holland for scrap see my gallery for pics

glenn
29th May 2006, 16:05
Try these two sites Clem loads of good stuff on them
http://web.ukonline.co.uk/rayricho/index.htm
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/grimsby.trawlers/
The first one is the home page for Consols & second is the home page for sindwinders good hunting

brixhamrfc
29th May 2006, 17:29
Clem, Silver Stream and Apollo are/were similar longliners. Apollo GY 36, and Silver Stream GY 386. I'll post a couple of photos onto the gallery for you, regards, Trev.........Glenn, you are quite right of course, Silver Stream was burnt out (well, the wheelhouse was) during a refit. Trev

brixhamrfc
29th May 2006, 17:47
Hi again, I posted photos of these 2 some time ago, they are amongst the first loaded on the fishing vessel bit, page 106 approx.

Clem
29th May 2006, 18:08
Thanks Trev, Glenn. I've checked out your galleries, nice pictures. The Consol's website is a favourite of mine. The Sidewinder site is new to me, so thanks again.

Clem

Clem
31st May 2006, 15:09
Hi everyone, here is a list of vessels I'm currently researching. So if anyone reading this has any information of any kind relating to these vessels (including pics), please let me know by posting here or by PM.

Regards

Clem

GY6 Ross Kelly
GY19 Stockham
GY22 Northern Eagle
GY65 Lancer
GY68 Tagalie
GY110 Northern Princess
GY121 Northern Prince
GY142 Northern Sea
GY148 Spurs
GY190 Northern Spray
GY204 Northern Gem
GY245 Euryalus
GY249 British
GY263 Cradock
GY280 Mildenhall
GY289 Northern Dawn
GY333 Boston Valetta
GY354 Peken
GY389 Taipo
GY395 Lifeguard
GY427 Northern Sky
GY440 Northern Sun
GY453 Kyoto
GY457 Clixby
GY467 Digby
GY484 Port Vale
GY507 Recordo
GY511 Varanis
GY596 Boston Coronet
GY600 Osako
GY625 Recono
GY661 Tokio
GY664 Lemberg
GY679 Garola
GY689 Okino
GY810 Strephon
GY1037 War Duke
GY1306 Xylopia
GY1367 Kirmington
GY Katie Louise
GY Efficient

Clem
1st June 2006, 13:05
Starting with GY280 Mildenhall, I have not yet discovered how she was lost and, I don't have an image of her. If anyone knows, please post.

Official Number: 162893
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY280
Name: Mildenhall
Callsign: GYDX
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 1/35
By: Cochrane & Sons Ltd; Selby
Gross Tonnage: 434
Net Tonnage: 237
Length: 156ft.
Beam: 25.9 ft.
Draught: 14.1 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: T. 3Cy. 110 NHP
By: Amos & Smith Ltd; Hull
Owner: H. Croft Baker; Grimsby
Comments: 1/35 built as GY126 Drangey; Admiralty service purchased 8/39 or 1/40 as A/S trawler FY195 sold 46; 6/46 registered GY280 Drangey; 3/47 renamed GY280 Mildenhall; other owners 1/35 Rinovia Steam Fishing Co. Ltd (manager J.G.Little); 7/37 Drangey SF; Admiralty; 6/46 Hull Ice Co; 11/46 H. Croft Baker
Fate: Ran aground, Murmansk coast, 1/11/48

wully farquhar
1st June 2006, 17:29
Hi Clem,Great you started this thread,hopefully there will be more broken down fishermen!!! will put things on.
Cheers,-------Wully (Thumb) (Applause)

Clem
1st June 2006, 19:58
In her guise as the A/S trawler Drangey FY195, the Mildenhall was involved in the rescue of survivors from the liner Empress of Britain when she was bombed and torpedoed in the 39/45 conflict.

Ref: The Role of the CPR (Canadian Pacific Railway) Ships in World War II

"In late October 1940 the best-known of the CPR's liners and flagship of the company's Atlantic Fleet, the magnificent Empress of Britain, was the next victim of enemy action. She was travelling alone to Glasgow from Suez via South Africa, when she was bombed off the northwest coast of Ireland by a Focke Wulf Condor plane. The "Condors" were long-range aircraft used by the Luftwaffe to bomb merchant ships and to spot convoys for the U-boats. When the Condor attacked Empress of Britain the ship's crew put up a determined defense, but they were unable to shoot down the plane and its hits caused terrible fires to break out. Soon the fires were so out of control that the vessel's master, Captain C.H. Sapsworth, was forced to give the order to abandon ship. Forty-five lives were lost as a result of the attacks. The survivors, which included women and children, were rescued later that afternoon by the Polish destroyer Burza, the British destroyer HMS Echo and three British naval trawlers Cape Agona, Drangey, and Paynter. The still burning Empress remained afloat and the next day two Royal Navy tugs, Marauder and Thames took her in tow with the intention of bringing her in safely to port. She was surrounded by escort ships, but in spite of the escorts' vigilance, two days later on October 28th, the German U-boat, U-32, managed to sneak by the escorts and torpedo the crippled Empress. She sank within ten minutes. At 42,348-tons, Empress of Britain was the largest Allied passenger liner to be sunk and the biggest merchant ship loss of the war."

Clem
1st June 2006, 20:04
Hi Clem,Great you started this thread,hopefully there will be more broken down fishermen!!! will put things on.
Cheers,-------Wully (Thumb) (Applause)

:) I never got the chance to be a broken down fisherman Wully. (*))

trawlercook
1st June 2006, 20:23
HI CLEM I SAILED ON SEVERAL OF THE BOATS YOU MENTIONED ROSS KELLY BOSTON CORONET WHEN OUT OF LOWESTOFT AND THE KIRMINGTON AND ALL THE OTHER SLIEGHTS BOATS WADDINGTON ,FISKERTON,SYESTON AND SCAMPTON WAS MY FAVORIT NEARLY A YEAR.I LIVE IN HULL AND IF YOUR NEAR I COULD SHOW YOU AS MANY PICTURES OF TRAWLERS AS YOU WANT.I BUILD MODELS OF TRAWLERS ALL THE TIME AND YOUR WELCOME TO COME AND SEE SOME.OTHER WISE I HAVE MY OWN WEB SIGHT TRAWLERCOOK@TRAWLERCOOK.KAROO.CO.UK THERE ARE A FEW ON THERE,IF I CAN BE OF ANY HELP IN ANY WAY PLEASE DROP ME A LINE AS I,M AN OLD FISHERMAN WASHED ASHORE IN MY YOUTH (SOB SOB)

Clem
1st June 2006, 20:42
Hi Colin, thanks for your interest, I'll email you later. The ships I'm checking out were ones a relative of mine worked on. He retired from fishing in the 70's and, now he's keen to have his memoirs put down for posterity. This ties in with my interest with the industry.

Regards

Clem

trawlercook
1st June 2006, 21:09
Clem Whats His Name I Fished From 1965 To The End Thats When I Ended Up In Lowestoft But I Did Quite A Long Time In G.y.in Many Firms We May Have Come Across One And Other In Cotties White Knight Albion Many Other Watering Holes I Often Missed The Last Ferry Home
Regards Colin

Clem
1st June 2006, 23:25
Email on it's way Colin.

Cheers

Clem

ruud
3rd June 2006, 04:30
Ahoy,

Just found me this "old" piccie of the Northern Crown GY-284;
Northern Crown,
An example of a new steam trawler with triple expansion engine, the Northern Crown, of 804 tons gross, is one of the largest trawlers built in 1953.She was constructed at Selby by Cochrane & Sons,Ltd., for Northern Trawlers, Ltd., of Grimsby, and is a sister of Northern Sceptre, under construction by the same builders.

Clem
3rd June 2006, 13:12
Hi everyone, here's some detail of Northern Sceptre of the same class as the Northern Crown & Northern Jewel.

Rudd, I just found out one of my uncles was on the Northern Crown, the trip before she ran aground and sank, in 1956. I'll chase up some more info. on the her and post it on here.

Regards

Clem


GY297 Northern Sceptre

Official Number: 184919
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY297
Name: Northern Sceptre
Callsign: MQTQ
Type: Steam Trawler (oil burner)
Built: 2/54
By: Cochrane & Sons Ltd. Selby
Gross Tonnage: 804
Net Tonnage: 291
Length: 183 ft. 4 in.
Beam: 32 ft.
Draught: 16 ft. 5 in?
Engines: Triple expansion 3 Cy.
By: Amos & Smith Ltd. Hull
Owner: Northern Trawlers Ltd.
Manager: John Bennett
Comments: Same class of ships (Northern Crown, Northern Sceptre and, Northern Jewel) built in the same yard
Fate: Scrapped 10/78

glenn
3rd June 2006, 20:46
Call Sign Northern Sceptre was MQTQ

Clem
3rd June 2006, 20:49
Call Sign Northern Sceptre was MQTQ
Thanks Glenn, I'll update the post.

martin johns
6th June 2006, 23:44
Hi Clem,
Do you need any info on Grimsby boats that operated from Devon or Cornwall in the last thirty odd years? I'm not too good on the oldies i'm afraid.
Regards, Martin.

Clem
7th June 2006, 00:07
Please do, Martin, any contribution you care to make would be most welcome. What kind of fishing were/are these GY boats involved in? I think some went round in the late 70's for Mackerel.

Cheers

Clem

Clem
7th June 2006, 09:28
GY453 Kyoto

Official Number: 139319
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY453
Name: Kyoto
Callsign: GWDJ
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 1917
By: Cochrane & Sons; Selby
Gross Tonnage: 262
Net Tonnage: 104
Length: 121.8ft.
Beam: 22.6 ft.
Draught: 12.2 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: Triple Expansion; 3 Cylinder; 76 RHP
By: C.D.Holmes & Co. Ltd. Hull
Owner: Japan Steam Fishing Co. (H.L.Taylor)
Manager: C.Taylor
Comments: Built as H575 Cornelian (Kingston Steam Trawling Co.) till 1928; sold to Stewart Trawling Co. Hull; 7/30 to Grimsby as GY262 (Overseas Steam Fishing Co.); to Aberdeen (W.F. McIrvine) as A443 3/37; sold to J. Craig in 1940; Admiralty Service Hired 1/40 as A/P (Auxiliary Patrol) Trawler (Renamed Forfeit 1940) returned 6/46; 1/47 to Grimsby as GY453 Kyoto (Japan Steam Fishing Co.)
Fate: Sold to Holland for scrapping 5/62

treeve
11th June 2006, 22:14
Found this photo

Best Wishes
Raymond

treeve
12th June 2006, 13:49
And another,
All Best, Raymond

Clem
12th June 2006, 15:48
Raymond, I've got info. on both these trawlers (Malaga & Imperia). I'll get round to posting soon.

Thanks

Clem

Clem
12th June 2006, 19:48
GY758 Imperia

Official Number: 134749
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY758
Name: Imperia
Callsign: MKGM
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 1912
By: Cook Welton Gemmell Ltd; Beverly
Gross Tonnage: 213
Net Tonnage: 88
Length: 117.2 ft.
Beam: 21.5 ft.
Draught: 12.1 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: Triple Expansion; 3 cylinder; 58 RHP
By: Amos & Smith Ltd; Hull
Owner: Trawlers (White Sea & Grimsby) Ltd (1937)
Manager: J. N. Bacon
Comments: Owners; 10/12 Pelham Steam Fishing; 7/13 North Western Steam Fishing; 3/14 Grimsby & North Sea Steam Fishing; 8/21 Trawlers White Sea & Grimsby Ltd; 1/46 T.C. & F. Moss; Admiralty Service; 1-6pdr; Hired 1914-19; Nov 1939 Boom gate vessel; returned Nov 1945
Fate: Scrapped 3/57

WLH
2nd July 2006, 22:03
Starting with GY280 Mildenhall, I have not yet discovered how she was lost and, I don't have an image of her. If anyone knows, please post.

Official Number: 162893
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY280
Name: Mildenhall
Callsign: GYDX
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 1/35
By: Cochrane & Sons Ltd; Selby
Gross Tonnage: 434
Net Tonnage: 237
Length: 156ft.
Beam: 25ft. 9in.
Draught: 14ft. 1in.
Engines: T. 3Cy. 110 NHP
By: Amos & Smith Ltd; Hull
Owner: H. Croft Baker; Grimsby
Comments: 1/35 built as GY126 Drangey; Admiralty service purchased 8/39 or 1/40 as A/S trawler FY195 sold 46; 6/46 registered GY280 Drangey; 3/47 renamed GY280 Mildenhall; other owners 1/35 Rinovia Steam Fishing Co. Ltd (manager J.G.Little); 7/37 Drangey SF; Admiralty; 6/46 Hull Ice Co; 11/46 H. Croft Baker
Fate: Ran aground, Murmansk coast, 1/11/48ex Drangey GY126/46. A/S 39/46. Wrecked 1/11/48 Cape Nyemetski, Finland. WLH

Clem
3rd July 2006, 16:50
Thanks WLH, a nice piece of information. I'm wondering if the crew survived. My uncle had left her in May of '47 but, he has no recall of her loss.

Clem

Brumlebass
23rd August 2006, 21:50
Hello!
I have a photo of the old smack named "Esther". She was built in Grimsby in 1888, and was sold to the Faroe Islands in the 1930's I think. Then someone told me that she was sold back to Grimsby in 1996 (?). I took a picture of her back in the 80's. Maybe not a pretty sight, but are you interested? If you are, I'll have to scan the photo first. Then I'll guess I should load it up on shipsnostalgia?

Clem
23rd August 2006, 22:51
Please do, any image of a vessel of that age would be interesting to see. Do you know what she got up to in Faeroe?

Regards

Clem

Brumlebass
24th August 2006, 21:14
Hello again!
I have just loaded up two images of Esther and Johanna under "Fishing wessels". One of them is not of good quality, the other one is from a book. Anyway: they are nice old ships. Is "smack" actually the right word for that kind of wessels? My english is not very good as you can see... In the Faroes they call them "slupp". Do you know if Esther really is located in Grimsby now?

john shaw
24th August 2006, 22:27
Clem

re trawlers you are currently researching:

my wife (she of the pic of the Lacerta) has a limited edition print by an artist, Adrian Thompson, called "The Call of the Sea". This shows the fish dock 1950s with the hydraulic tower to left distance.The featured boats are
GY80 Rapallo
GY252 Remindo (G F Sleight)
GY357 Athenia (Sir Thos. Robinson&Son)
GY453 Kyoto (H.L. Taylor & Co)

the latter is shown from stbd quarter view,as if moving away from the first 2 trawlers shown in the foreground,side by side alongside-- but neither the name nor number of Kyoto are shown on the hull.

The print is framed and glazed, and too large to scan-- I don't know how it would photograph, but I would be prepared to try?

The print was obtained from the Gy Telegraph in a readers' offer approx 1999/2000, if you are able to contact anyone / have any contacts at the Telegraph. Presumably, the artist (if you could trace him) has a photo from which he made the painting-- and may well have others?

Clem
25th August 2006, 00:47
Hello again!
I have just loaded up two images of Esther and Johanna under "Fishing wessels". One of them is not of good quality, the other one is from a book. Anyway: they are nice old ships. Is "smack" actually the right word for that kind of wessels? My english is not very good as you can see... In the Faroes they call them "slupp". Do you know if Esther really is located in Grimsby now?

Hi there, they're great images you've posted of the Esther & Johanna. How nice to see a vessel built in the 19th century still, recently, working. A friend of mine has a register of Grimsby sailing smacks (the Johanna is certainly a smack), next time I see him I'll check out the details of the Esther and post the info. here. I'm not aware if she is now back in Grimsby.

Thanks Brumblebass

Clem

Clem
25th August 2006, 01:05
Clem

re trawlers you are currently researching:

my wife (she of the pic of the Lacerta) has a limited edition print by an artist, Adrian Thompson, called "The Call of the Sea". This shows the fish dock 1950s with the hydraulic tower to left distance.The featured boats are
GY80 Rapallo
GY252 Remindo (G F Sleight)
GY357 Athenia (Sir Thos. Robinson&Son)
GY453 Kyoto (H.L. Taylor & Co)

the latter is shown from stbd quarter view,as if moving away from the first 2 trawlers shown in the foreground,side by side alongside-- but neither the name nor number of Kyoto are shown on the hull.

The print is framed and glazed, and too large to scan-- I don't know how it would photograph, but I would be prepared to try?

The print was obtained from the Gy Telegraph in a readers' offer approx 1999/2000, if you are able to contact anyone / have any contacts at the Telegraph. Presumably, the artist (if you could trace him) has a photo from which he made the painting-- and may well have others?

Thanks for that John. I'll check out the artist, Adrian Thompson, I've never seen any of his paintings. The Telegraph, I'm aware, has a large collection of maritime photos but they are on the pricey side. I would expect the same would go for any prints they may have to sell.

Thanks for your offer to photograph the print yourself, if you could? The print taken out of doors in natural light and photographed could possibly avoid problems with flash glare.

I've already got one photo of the Kyoto, anchored in the Humber, waiting for the tide before landing. Also have you seen Jenny Morgan's, oil on canvas painting, in this thread?

Re: the first U.K. trawler to fish off Greenland, I'm still looking around (maybe someone else is aware), if I find anything I'll post here.

Best wishes

Clem

K urgess
25th August 2006, 01:09
Clem

If your mate's list contains owners names I'd be grateful for some info.

My gear grandfather's apprenticeship papers were registered in Grimsby in 1862 and I'm trying to find out which fishing smack it was. I have the owner/skipper's and possibly the mate's names.

By 1870/71 he was in Hull on the smack "Sovereign" Official number 16748. She was 38 tons built in Plymouth in 1851 and registered in Hull in 1863. She was broken up in 1878 and struck off the registry in 1883. She ended up in Yarmouth after being sold in 1871. I have more details of crew etc if anyone else is doing research.

Cheers

Clem
25th August 2006, 01:21
Clem

If your mate's list contains owners names I'd be grateful for some info.

My gear grandfather's apprenticeship papers were registered in Grimsby in 1862 and I'm trying to find out which fishing smack it was. I have the owner/skipper's and possibly the mate's names.

By 1870/71 he was in Hull on the smack "Sovereign" Official number 16748. She was 38 tons built in Plymouth in 1851 and registered in Hull in 1863. She was broken up in 1878 and struck off the registry in 1883. She ended up in Yarmouth after being sold in 1871. I have more details of crew etc if anyone else is doing research.

Cheers

No problem, I'll have a look next time I visit him. Can you let me have the owners/skippers name, it could narrow things down a little?

I've got a copy of the Seagoing Apprentices of Grimsby Index, but I'm afraid it only covers 1879-1937. I know Grimsby's (modern) apprentice system started in 1850, I'm afraid I don't have records for those first 28 years.

Cheers

Clem

K urgess
25th August 2006, 15:53
Clem

Many thanks for the kind offer. I had visions of not getting much further with my search. Because of what I'm about to tell you I probably won't anyway but thanks in advance for trying.

I really need the official number if possible so that I can spend more megabucks at the Canadian maritime heritage site.

My great grandfather's indenture (which is kept at the Dock Office Museum in Hull) is dated 19th July 1862 and registered at Grimsby on the 23rd. His name was John Donovan, which he later changed to Thomas Donovan, is translated as Thomas Douman in the 1871 census, Thomas Donmon on his marriage certificate and Thomas Dunham from 1881 census onwards. He lived in Hull from sometime in the 1860s to his death in 1925 and always listed himself as a fisherman. He was a foundling so I can find no record of his origins and I'm beginning to doubt some family legends. (*))

The master's name is given as Robert Gouldsbrough of Grimsby. He is traceable as a sailmaker in Sculcoates, Hull in 1851, a smack owner in Yarmouth in 1861 and back to a sailmaker in Hull, Hornsea and Owthorne in the following years. This may mean that his smack was registered in Yarmouth unfortunately but I'm sure he was still the owner. The name spelling also varies quite a bit. A lot of "southern" boats were coming up to nick our fish at this time because of the Brixham trawl and the discovery of the big cod pits in the North Sea but I'm sure you know all that.

The witness to the indenture is Thos. Bailey as close as I can get. He was probably the mate 'cos he was indentured to an Avison Terry, ship owner, in Hull in 1835.

Gouldsbrough was apprenticed to a sailmaker in Hull in 1832 so he was getting on a bit.

My GGFs names don't appear on the crew lists at Hull archives except for a J.Dunham in 1906 and on the Don and the Knot in 1906 and 1910 respectively as J. Donovan but they may not have been him. I know he must have signed on between 1871 and 1914 but I haven't found him for certain yet.

I hope I haven't overloaded you with useless information and look forward to your reply even if it's negative. (Thumb)

Cheers

Clem
26th August 2006, 03:06
That is an interesting history you have there, lets hope Robert Gouldsbrough crops up as an owner of a Grimsby fishing smack around that time. Then perhaps this would help confirm the vessel your relative worked on.

Regards

Clem

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 15:03
I'm happy to see this thread as this is an interest of mine.

I've collected quite a bit of information about Grimsby fishing vessels and it's mostly unsorted "somewhere on my computer". I'll try to dig anything relevant out as this thread develops and see if I can contribute something useful sometime.

Hilary

Clem
26th August 2006, 15:11
Hi Hilary, welcome to SN and this thread in particular. If you have any info/pictures regarding the particular ships in post #9 of this thread, I'd be grateful.

How did your interest in GY trawlers develop, do you have any connections with the industry?

Regards

Clem

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 15:41
[QUOTE=Clem]Hi everyone, here is a list of vessels I'm currently researching.

GY65 Lancer

I assume this is the trawler that was supposedly spying on the Soviets between 1949 and 1954. If so, there is a 'log' here:

http://www.offmsg.connectfree.co.uk/mainpage.htm

I've used the quotation marks because I don't know whether it is genuine or not, not because I have a view either way. I don't know enough to be anything but open minded.

Hilary

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 15:47
[QUOTE=Clem]Hi everyone, here is a list of vessels I'm currently researching. So if anyone reading this has any information of any kind relating to these vessels (including pics), please let me know by posting here or by PM.

Regards

Clem

GY110 Northern Princess

The following is from The Times of Friday, Nov 18, 1960, page 10 under the heading TELEGRAMS IN BRIEF:

OSLO - The Grimsby trawler Northern Princess, grounded near Tromso since Monday, was refloated by the Norwegian salvage vessel Uller.


Is this sort of information of interest? I love to read about everything that happened - strange catches, groundings etc etc, but it may not interest everyone!

Hilary

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 15:50
How did your interest in GY trawlers develop, do you have any connections with the industry?


Hi Clem
Absolutely none. Although my mother came from Grimsby, I live in London and the nearest I've ever got to the industry is the fish and chip shop. I think that's why I find it so interesting. I have a very unadventurous life doing a mundane office job.

I love research though and I'm an avid collector of useless information. Maybe some of it might actually be useful to someone at last.

Hilary

Clem
26th August 2006, 16:12
Is this sort of information of interest?

Any, and all Hilary. I'm aware of the diary kept by the Radio Officer (Al Bowles) on the Lancer. A relative of mine was deckhand on her from October 1950. He was unaware of any covert activity going on but, remembers they received lots of 'attention' from Soviet gunboats by their presence in those waters.

The same relative also worked on the Northern Princess, albeit sometime before her grounding which I was unaware of. Thanks for bringing this to my attention.

Clem

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 16:17
Spurs GY148

I'm not sure if this is the right Spurs. GY148 was in Olsens of 1953 but there was another Spurs GY697 in Olsens of 1974 and this relates to 1961 but I'm sure someone on here will know. Anyway, another grounding from the Times.

Times, Friday March 17, page 11

REYKJAVIK - The Grimsby trawler Spurs (399 tons) grounded in Dyrafjordur Bay, north-west Iceland, was pulled afloat by the Icelandic freighter Tungufoss (1,176 tons) and another Grimsby trawler, the Viviana (455 tons).


Phew! Icelandic spelling tests must be a lot harder than English ones.

Clem
26th August 2006, 16:24
This would have been GY148 Spurs (Consols), she was scrapped in April 1962. GY697, of the same name (Wendover Steam Fishing), was built in July of 1962.

That's great, thanks.

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 16:38
GY190 Northern Spray

I have a few items on the Nothern Spray from the Times (I do have other info than Times info, but everything I have found so far that is on your list is Times info):

Times, Thursday Jan 21, 1937 Pg 9
RESCUES FROM DROWNING
ROYAL HUMANE SOCIETY AWARDS

The silver medal of the Royal Humane Society was awarded at a recent meeting of the society to Ernest Hill, 28, a dock hand, of Radcliffe Road, Fleetwood, who, on November 8, 1936, saved Harold Daniels, 18, a dockhand, of Victoria Street, Fleetwood, when he caught his foot in a rope on board the steam trawler Northern Spray and fell into the sea off Patrixfjord, Iceland. Hill dived in in full fishing kit, and supported Daniels, who was collapsed, until both men were hauled to safety after considerable difficulty.
_______________________________________________

It does say 'dockhands' but from the context I would think they were more likely to be deckhands.

More to follow later.

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 16:53
GY190 Northern Spray

Times, Saturday Oct 21, 1961, pg 4

TRAWLERMEN REFUSE TO SAIL
GRIMSBY, OCT 20
Dissatisfaction among members of the United Fishermen's Union at Grimsby confined trawlers to the port today. Some of the crews refused to sail because they said the vessels were understaffed or had non-union men on board.
The main dispute is concerned with the trawler Northern Spray, from which eight men have been suspended by the owners, Northern Trawlers Ltd. This vessel, together with three others, has been tied up in dock and union officials say they will remain idle until the suspended men are reinstated.

Times, Monday Oct 23, 1961 pg 6
TRAWLER DISPUTE ENDS
GRIMSBY, Oct 22
Eight Grimsby fishermen, who were suspended by Northern Trawlers Ltd, after refusing to sail in the firm's trawler Northern Spray, because their union was not recognized, have been reinstated. The crews of three other vessels who struck in sympathy have agreed to go back to sea. A settlement was reached yesterday after a meeting between the Grimsby Trawler Owners' Associaton and Mr John Butt, manager of Northern Trawlers Ltd, which was followed by discussions between Mr Butt and Skipper C.W.A. Chapple and Mr Peter Ireland, president and secretary respectively of the United Fishermen's Union, to which the eight suspended men belong.


I think I've got one more, but have to go and have my hair cut now!

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 19:25
[QUOTE=john shaw]Clem

re trawlers you are currently researching:

my wife (she of the pic of the Lacerta) has a limited edition print by an artist, Adrian Thompson, called "The Call of the Sea".

Your wife has excellent taste!

I also have this lovely print and mine is not in a frame, but it is too big for my scanner. If you (or your wife) don't fancy taking it out into the garden, I could have a go at photographing it.

There is actually a picture of The Call of the Sea, though not a brilliant one, on this website:

http://www.visitgrimsby.co.uk/origins.htm

Hilary

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 19:50
[QUOTE=Clem]Starting with GY280 Mildenhall, I have not yet discovered how she was lost and, I don't have an image of her. If anyone knows, please post.

Clem
I have a report on the loss of the Mildenhall. It is an Acrobat file. But I don't know the house rules here. Can I post an attachment and if so, how?

I also have a picture, though a poor one. Not sure how to upload that either.

Sorry to be pathetic. Must be the haircut.

Hilary

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 20:00
[QUOTE=Clem]

GY190 Northern Spray

BRITISH SKIPPER FINED IN ICELAND
REYKJAVIK, Oct 27
Dennis Pougher, skipper of the Hull trawler Peter Cheyney, was today fined 300.000 kronur (about £2,500) for fishing inside Icelandic waters. Pougher, who admitted the charge, told the court at Isafjordur, north-west Iceland, that his radar had broken down.
The Peter Cheyney was arrested yesterday by the Icelandic gunboat Odinn after she had sailed from Isafjordur, where she had put ashore 20 shipwrecked seamen from the Grimsby trawler Northern Spray.

Clem
26th August 2006, 20:15
Great articles you're posting here Hilary. I know very little of the circumstances surrounding the loss of the Spray.

Thanks for posting.

Clem

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 20:20
[QUOTE=Clem]

GY280 Mildenhall

Clem
I figured out how to attach, but my file is too big. I will gladly email it to you if you wish.

I have uploaded the picture, wish I had a better one.

Hilary

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 20:59
[QUOTE=Clem]


GY280 Mildenhall

I found this picture advertised as Mildenhall Crew 1930s on my computer.

Hilary

Clem
26th August 2006, 21:16
I think the photo of the Mildenhall and her crew from the 1930's is of GY124, built in April 1936 before being taken over by the Admiralty at the start of the war.

GY280 was ex. Drangey (built January 1935) till her name change to Mildenhall in March 1947.

This threw me for quite awhile (a few months ago) until I found that the owners H Croft Baker had two Mildenhalls!

Clem
26th August 2006, 21:20
Thanks for the report Hilary, I'll enjoy reading it over a malt!

Also the photo of the crew of 'the other' Mildenhall (GY124) is very interesting. It might just be I had another relative on her as well! (*)) One of the crew certainly looks familar. Any chance you can email the full size photo to scrutinise?

Cheers

Clem

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 22:16
[QUOTE=Clem]

GY280 Mildenhall

My last post of the evening. Two more references to Mildenhall.

Mildenhall

A stray mention in 1939 in connection with the loss of the Hull trawler St Sebastian:

The Times, Thursday, Mar 23, 1939; pg. 4

INQUIRY INTO LOSS OF TRAWLER
VAIN ATTEMPTS AT RESCUE
HULL, March 22

A Board of Trade inquiry was opened at Hull Law Courts yesterday into the stranding and total loss, with a crew of 16 men, of the Hull steam trawler St Sebastian on September 29 last on the coast of Bear Island in the Arctic Circle. The Wreck Commissioner, Mr J. G. Trapnell, K.C., was assisted by three nautical assessors.
Mr E.M. P****y, for the Board of Trade, said that the vessel was homeward bound from the Bear Island fishing grounds when the accident occurred. He read out a series of wireless messages sent out by the St Sebastian when she struck the rocks, which were picked up by a number of vessels. The last of the messages was received in the early hours of the morning from the wireless operator of the St Sebastian in which he said that the chart-room was filling with water.
Evidence was given by Skipper James Myers, of the steam trawler Cape Duner, who said that he and five other trawlers attempted to get near the wreck, but the seas were so heavy that he found it impossible. The witness with five of his crew attempted to land on the island from the leeward in the hope of rescuing any men who had got ashore, but they failed to reach the shore and the trawler Kingston Cairngorm picked up their boat and saved them. Eventually a party of 10 from his vessel and the trawler Davy landed at another point. They found the wrecked trawler being pounded by heavy seas, but could see no sign of life.
Skipper R. H. Broomhead, of the Grimsby trawler Mildenhall, gave evidence that he reached the scene the following day and while watching the ship for any signs of life saw her break in two.

---------------------------------------------

The Times, Wednesday, Nov 03, 1948; pg. 3

BRITISH TRAWLER LOST IN ARCTIC
Lloyd's agent at Tromso reported yesterday: A wireless message from H.M.S. Romola reports that the British steam trawler Mildenhall has gone aground south-west of Cape Nyemetsky. The vessel is a total loss, but the entire crew of 21 have been saved and will be landed at Tromso.

john shaw
26th August 2006, 22:17
[QUOTE=john shaw]Clem

re trawlers you are currently researching:

my wife (she of the pic of the Lacerta) has a limited edition print by an artist, Adrian Thompson, called "The Call of the Sea".

Your wife has excellent taste!

I also have this lovely print and mine is not in a frame, but it is too big for my scanner. If you (or your wife) don't fancy taking it out into the garden, I could have a go at photographing it.

There is actually a picture of The Call of the Sea, though not a brilliant one, on this website:

http://www.visitgrimsby.co.uk/origins.htm

Hilary

Hilary-- yes,that is indeed the same picture-- I will try to photograph tomorrow for Clem,but if it does not succeed perhaps you would also do it- I'll report back! Thanks

mattarosa
26th August 2006, 22:18
[QUOTE=

Mr E.M. P****y, for the Board of Trade

Oh dear, if the BoT man's name is important to anyone, they'll have to figure it out or email me.

Clem
27th August 2006, 00:41
Thanks John, look forward to seeing the print.

Hilary, great job with your contributions today, hope you carry on finding these little gems.

Good Night.

Clem

mattarosa
27th August 2006, 09:10
[QUOTE=Clem]

GY204 Northern Gem

I'm pretty sure you must be aware of the book Coxswain in the Northern Convoys by Sid Kerslake. For anyone that isn't, it is online at Naval-History.net:

http://www.naval-history.net/WW2Memoir-RussianConvoyCoxswain.htm

There are quite some references to Northern Spray in it, as well.

Here's a little item from the Times on the Gem:

The Times, Wednesday, May 13, 1953; pg. 8

GRIMSBY CATCH LANDED IN HOLLAND
The Grimsby trawler Northern Gem, which landed 33,000 stones of fish at Ijmuiden, Holland, on Monday, was making an experiment, the owners said yesterday. "Rather than let our ships lay up I would prefer that they land their catches on the Continent," said a spokesman of the firm. "It does seem fatuous that German ships should discharge at Grimsby while we send vessels to Holland, but it is preferable to laying up ships."

By the way, someone mentioned in a post about the Grimsby Telegraph having pictures. Their archives are online so it is easy to check whether they hold a picture of a particular trawler or not. I am guessing everyone with an interest in Grimsby trawlers already knows this, but I can post the URL if anyone needs it.

Hilary

mattarosa
27th August 2006, 09:29
Northern Dawn GY289

There is a really good picture of Northern Dawn here:

http://www.photos.is/gallery2/search.php?searchstring=northern+dawn

A small item from the Times:

The Times, Wednesday, Oct 29, 1958; pg. 9

HAMMERFEST, NORWAY - Firemen here worked through the night to put out a fire in the bunkers of the 620-ton Grimsby trawler Northern Dawn. Damage was not extensive.

mattarosa
27th August 2006, 09:35
Here is a pic of Boston Valetta GY333

mattarosa
27th August 2006, 09:55
Taipo GY389

The Times, Saturday, Mar 15, 1947; pg. 2

STEAMER DESTROYED BY FIRE
The steamer Empire Jonquil, 369 tons, was destroyed by fire in the North Sea, 40 miles off the Humber, early on Thursday morning. Four of the crew were lost, and four others were landed yesterday by the trawler Taipo.
The Empire Jonquil was bound from Jarrow to Chatham with coke when she caught fire. The four members of the crew who lost their lives were Skipper S.C. Whisker (Middlesbrough), Chief Engineer Hugh Murphy (Ellesmere Port), A.B. Charlie Stott (Stonehaven) and John Hall, aged 16 (Middlesbrough).

mattarosa
27th August 2006, 09:57
Lifeguard GY395

The Times, Thursday, Jul 07, 1960; pg. 12

ROYAL NAVY FOILS ICELAND GUNBOAT
REYKJAVIK, July 6 - The British destroyer Palliser intervened to prevent the Icelandic gunboat Thor from arresting the Grimsby trawler Lifeguard off Iceland during the night, it was reported here today.
The three ships waited all night pending orders to the destroyer from the British Admiralty. Late today the Palliser informed the Thor that she would not allow the arrest as the trawler had been fishing on the high seas, and not inside the four-mile limit and 12-mile limit as the Thor had alleged. The Lifeguard then sailed for home, and the Thor abandoned the chase.

(news of the Northern Spray as well as the Lifeguard in the following item):

The Times, Friday, Oct 25, 1963; pg. 10

£2,150 ICELAND FINE ON TRAWLER
REYKJAVIK, ICELAND, Oct 24 - Mr Oleson, skipper of the Grimsby trawler Lifeguard (668 tons), was fined 160,000 kronur (about £2,150) today on a charge of fishing inside Iceland's 12-mile limit. The Lifeguard was escorted into port by a fishery inspection vessel on Monday after the escort vessel fired a shot across her bows.
Isafjordur police court ordered confiscation of the trawler's catch and equipment. Mr Oleson told the court he lost his trawl while outside the limit and was trying to get it back.
Meanwhile, the Icelandic coastguard vessel Odinn today attempted to salve the Grimsby trawler Northern Spray (620 tons) whose crew of 20 men were rescused yesterday when the vessel ran aground in Isafjordur Bay in a storm.
Another British trawler, the James Barrie (666 tons) shot a rescue line across to the stranded vessel, hauling to safety eight crew members in a lifeboat. The Odinn rescued the rest of the crew.

Picture of Lifeguard attached.

That's all for now. Got a ceiling to paint.

Hilary

Clem
28th August 2006, 21:43
Great posts Hilary. They add up to a very interesting read, thanks for kick starting this thread and if you have any more nuggets, please carry on posting. I'd rather be reading these than painting any ceiling!

Clem

mattarosa
28th August 2006, 22:39
Great posts Hilary. They add up to a very interesting read, thanks for kick starting this thread and if you have any more nuggets, please carry on posting. I'd rather be reading these than painting any ceiling!

Clem

Me too, but it had to be done.

I'll keep on trawling (!) through my files to see what I have, but I thought I would post a list of the trawlers I'm particularly interested in, just in case anyone has any info.

GY328 Edwardian
GY696 Sheldon
GY369 Curtana
GY365 Etrurian
GY284 Hammond
??? Sindonis
GY375 Equerry
GY1017 Kastoria
GY350 Staunton
GY924 Unitia
GY630 Nairana
GY759 Lord Northcliffe
GY440 Northern Sun
GY466 Vendora
GY1037 War Duke

Thanks
Hilary

mattarosa
28th August 2006, 22:41
Northern Sun GY440

The Times, Wednesday, Feb 14, 1962; pg. 9

FATAL ACCIDENT IN GRIMSBY TRAWLER
OSLO, Feb 13

The first officer of the Grimsby trawler Northern Sun, Mr Roy Ferrand, was killed and the skipper, Mr George Lively, was badly injured in an accident off the coast of Norway last Sunday. The trawler sailed to Harstad and the skipper was taken to hospital, where he had an arm amputated.
The ship is on her way back to Grimsby with the body of the first officer. Both the captain and the first officer come from Grimsby.

mattarosa
28th August 2006, 22:42
Port Vale

I think there may have been more than one Port Vale, but here goes on what I have:

The Times, Monday, Oct 28, 1974; pg. 1

BRITISH TRAWLER'S CREW RESCUE
Reykjavic, Oct 27 - All 18 men on board the Grimsby trawler Port Vale were rescued after their vessel ran aground off the east coast of Iceland in a gale last night.
The rescue was made by an Icelandic rescue team. Its leader said the weather had been terrible, with a dangerous surf.

The Times, Wednesday, Dec 03, 1975; pg. 6

ICELANDERS FORCE LONE SKIPPER BACK TO FLEET
From MIchael Horsnell
On board the support ship Miranda off south-east Iceland, Dec 2
The Grimsby trawler Port Vale was escorted from the North Cape of Iceland by the Icelandic coastguard vessel Ardvakur today after her trawl had been cut.
The Ardvakur, a small armed tender, stole up in darkness on the Port Vale while she was within the 50-mile limit; the coastguard ship pretended to be a trawler by carrying a trawl light on her mast.
The trawl cutting ws the price paid by her skipper, Mr John Rimmer, for refusing to join the main British trawler fleet off south-east Iceland.
For several days the Port Vale had fished alone and unprotected off the north-west coast more than 200 miles from the safety box designated by Mr Taff Davis, the commander of the British Goverment's defence ship Star Aquarius.
Tonight the Port Vale was heading for the main fleet where 49 trawleres had been fishing safely.
Before the trawl-cutting incident she had been constantly harassed by angry Icelandic fishermen. It was the first trawl-cutting incident since early last week when the trawler William Wilberforce suffiered a similar fate.
The British operations off the south-east coast have been deterring the Icelandic gunboats, though one Icelandic trawler, with Nordic bravado, sailed across the bows of the ocean-going defence tug Lloydsman and the Government support ship Miranda just before midday.
Frigate withdrawn: HMS Leopard, the first of three Royal Navy frigates sent to protect British trawlers fishing off Iceland, has been withdrawn and is to pay a courtesy visit to Grimsby on Thursday before returning to her home base of Portsmouth.

mattarosa
28th August 2006, 22:44
GY664 Lemberg

The Times, Tuesday, Sep 14, 1937; pg. 11

A storm during the week-end damaged enough apples to fill 150,000 barrells, about one-tenth of the Nova Scotian crop, and wrecked the trawler Lemberg on Sable Island. Her crew were rescued. Communications have been much disruped by the gale.

Not sure if this is the right Lemberg. I've seen a picture of a Lemberg on Redcar rocks. How many times could one trawler get wrecked?

mattarosa
28th August 2006, 22:45
Northern Sky GY427

The Times, Wednesday, Aug 13, 1958

BRITISH SKIPPER FINED £2,200
REYKJAVIC, Aug 12 - Alf Kissack, skipper of the Grimsby trawler Northern Sky (620 tons), was today fined 100,000 Icelandic kronor (about £2,200) in a magistrate's court at Seydisfjord, East Iceland on fishery charges. He was also ordered to pay the equivalent of about £700 costs. Fishing gear valued at £1800 and a catch of fish valued at £240 were confiscated.
Kissack was charged with fishing inside Icelandic territorial waters. There was also a charge relating to the size of the msh of the trawler's nets. The court said the fine was larger than usual because of the skipper's behaviour towards the officers of an Icelandic gunboat.
It was stated that the trawler would be allowed to sail from Seydisfjord later tonight. She was intercepted by the gunboat Odin [sic] on Sunday.

trotterdotpom
30th August 2006, 14:22
[QUOTE=mattarosa]Port Vale

I think there may have been more than one Port Vale, but here goes on what I have:

The Times, Monday, Oct 28, 1974; pg. 1

BRITISH TRAWLER'S CREW RESCUE
Reykjavic, Oct 27 - All 18 men on board the Grimsby trawler Port Vale were rescued after their vessel ran aground off the east coast of Iceland in a gale last night.
The rescue was made by an Icelandic rescue team. Its leader said the weather had been terrible, with a dangerous surf....QUOTE]

Here's a picture of "Port Vale" aground in Iceland. She is the same "Port Vale" I sailed on in 1968. Photo by courtesy of www.arcticcorsair.f9.co.uk

John T.

Clem
31st August 2006, 12:18
Here's a picture of "Port Vale" aground in Iceland. She is the same "Port Vale" I sailed on in 1968. Photo by courtesy of www.arcticcorsair.f9.co.uk

John T.

Hi John, nice to hear from someone who worked on her. GY484 Port Vale is, to my knowledge, the only Grimsby ship of this name. You probably already know she was built in October 1957 by the Goole Ship Building & Repair Co. Ltd. in Goole for Consols subsidiary Wendover Steam Fishing Co.

Colne Shipping Co. (Lowestoft) purchased her in June 1978. She became LT309, and went on to standby duties in 1981 before being sold for scrap on 07/01/87.

Can you tell us a little about your time on the Port Vale? My uncle, was Mate on her in 1962 fishing off the Faeroe's.

Regards

Clem

daveb
31st August 2006, 13:05
hi not sure how this works, i am trying to gather info on my grandfather John Monger of 33 Carr lane CleEthorps. He was the captain of various fishing trawlers sailing out of Grimsby. he received and M.B.E and an D.S.C and was at both Dunkirk and Normandy. i cannot find his trawlers name which was converted to a mine sweeper and went up as far as ark-angle and Murmansk (please excuse the spelling). i would also like to find out what were the reasons if any for the awards or did everyone get them. Many thanks i hope i find some answer here.

treeve
31st August 2006, 14:01
Have you had a look through the Dunkirk "little ships" website?
http://www.adls.org.uk/

trotterdotpom
31st August 2006, 14:12
Dave,

On the Grimsby trawler website "Sidewinder", currently being rebuilt after some technical problems, there is a section on Grimsby Skippers. John C. Monger is mentioned as Skipper of "Ernest Holt", but no other information. See http://www.embark.to/sidewinder. The site belongs to Ray Richardson and he may be able to help you further.

Another site that may be of interest is "Harry Tates Navy" (Google will find it) - lots of information about requisitioned trawlers in WW2 and fishermen who ended up in the RN.

Good luck.

John T.

Clem
31st August 2006, 14:13
Hi Dave, you can also try this link. It may help also it has a forum where you may pick up some info.

Regards

Clem

Records of Service in Royal Navy - For Service 3rd September 1939 to Present Day


Pay, Pensions and Personnel Administration
AFPAA (Centurion)
RN Records and DPA
Room 086
Centurion Building
Grange Road
Gosport
Hants PO13 9XA

Tel. 023 9270 2174 Fax.023 9270 2211

http://www.harry-tates.org.uk/

trotterdotpom
1st September 2006, 13:03
Dave,

I asked my old boss and trawler guru, Barney Warman about "Ernest Holt" and here's what he said:

"Oh yes the Ernest Holt was a nice looking trawler, something like the St Amante class but she was just for the White Fish Authority, didnt land catches and that sort of thing, just went around the various grounds checking the water temps and that sort of thing, probably the odd haul to see if there was fish at certain places. You never saw her in the fish dock alwayus in the Royal dock"

She must have been a research ship - wonder if there are any photos about?

John T.

Clem
1st September 2006, 14:11
Here's a couple photos of GY591 Ernest Holt. She was built for M.A.F.F. in December 1948 by Cochrane's of Selby. She worked out of Grimsby and Leith in her capacity as a Fisheries Research Vessel. I have record of her going to Lowestoft in March 1971.

Clem

trotterdotpom
1st September 2006, 14:32
Thanks, Clem - fast as a farting snake as they say down here. It's true she was a handsome vessel.

John T.

daveb
1st September 2006, 16:46
There we go December 1948 captain on her maden voiage E.R.Ingham from Burnley and her fishing skipper was J.C.Monger my Grandfather, have a puplication and photo from Grimsby telegraph Jan 16 2006. She was a research ship and was alway moored at the Royal dock. what i am realy interested in are the war years when fishing vessels were converted to mine sweepers. etc etc which ship did he captain both to Dunkurk and Normandy.

cheers

Dave

Clem
1st September 2006, 17:33
what i am realy interested in are the war years when fishing vessels were converted to mine sweepers. etc etc which ship did he captain both to Dunkurk and Normandy.

cheers

Dave

That could be difficult without accessing your grandfathers service records. When did he receive his DSC and MBE? You could search The London Gazette for these awards, maybe mention is made of his ship/ships.

Clem

daveb
2nd September 2006, 07:28
Thanks for the help am will try the other sites and let you know how i get on!!!

Nelson
2nd September 2006, 12:28
Hi Clem,
Very interesting to see this new thread. In late `60s I worked for a while for Ross Trawlers in Grimsby, as R/O, sailing on the Ross Kandahar, and the Ross Jupiter. The Kandahar was Icelandic fishing, and the Jupiter middle water, i.e. Faeroes. I`d been deep sea since going to sea, and life on these vessels was a real eye-opener. At the time, I was living in N.Wales, so you can imagine the struggle to get home, have a couple of nights at home, and then back to GY for sailing after 3 days ashore. It was all too much in the end, so I got a job in Fleetwood, firstly with Hewett trawlers, and then with Wyres. Getting too and from Fleetwood only took about 4 hours, which was much easier.

Clem
2nd September 2006, 15:58
Hi Clem,
Very interesting to see this new thread. In late `60s I worked for a while for Ross Trawlers in Grimsby, as R/O, sailing on the Ross Kandahar, and the Ross Jupiter. The Kandahar was Icelandic fishing, and the Jupiter middle water, i.e. Faeroes. I`d been deep sea since going to sea, and life on these vessels was a real eye-opener. At the time, I was living in N.Wales, so you can imagine the struggle to get home, have a couple of nights at home, and then back to GY for sailing after 3 days ashore. It was all too much in the end, so I got a job in Fleetwood, firstly with Hewett trawlers, and then with Wyres. Getting too and from Fleetwood only took about 4 hours, which was much easier.

Hi Nelson, did you ever work with skipper Barry Jacklin on the Kandahar? He had her for three trips from the beginning of '69 (all Icelandic trips), before having the Kashmir for over a dozen trips. He also skippered the Kelly, Kelvin, Khartoum and Ross's Archer.

You must have spent most of your time ashore travelling between GY and your home! I can understand how Fleetwood suited you better. How did fishing in Fleetwood compare to Grimsby?

Regards

Clem

fishdockroad
4th September 2006, 21:19
Hi everyone,

anyone have any info on what I believe was a Grimsby vessel??? The John Burlingham. Her Ships bell is at auction tommorow morning and I'm struggling to confirm either way her origin. I have numerous reference books regarding Grimsby but would love a definitive list of all the trawlers that sailed out of much loved port. Is there such a list??? he bell is engraved John Burlingham 1917. No mention of Grimsby is this the norm? I always understood that the ships bell was engraved with the name and its port. Any info would be greatly appreciated either on the afore mentioned ship or as to were I can find more info on the numerous companies etc.

Clem
4th September 2006, 22:35
Hi F.D.R. Here's some info. regarding GY829 John Burlingham/Rehearo

Official Number: 143801
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY829
Name: John Burlingham
Callsign: n/k
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 07/1917
By: Cook Welton & Gemmell Ltd. Beverly
Gross Tonnage: 266
Net Tonnage: 105
Length: 125.2 ft.
Beam: 22 ft.
Draught: 12.2 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: T. 3 cy. 62 RHP
By: Amos & Smith Ltd. Hull
Owner: G.F. Sleight
Comments: Built for the Admiralty as ‘Non Standard’ (hull) Castle Class minesweeper; Armament 1-12pdr 1-Bomb Thrower; Owners 1/1920 Sir G.F. Sleight (4/20 Renamed Rehearo); 11/33 G.F. Sleight & R.L. Humphreys; Admiralty Service 9/40 Minesweeper Returned 12/45 or 1/46; 5/49 G.F. Sleight & Sons
Fate: Scrapped 1961


For a pretty complete list Grimsby side trawlers try to find a copy of this:

'The Steam Trawlers and Liners of Grimsby' by Charles B. Cox ISBN 0 9513927 4 3

The author also published a catalogue of Grimsby fishing smacks.

Will you be at the auction, if so, would it be possible to get a photo of the ships bell?

Cheers

Clem

birgir
4th September 2006, 23:45
Hello.

I have not figured out yet, how to operate on such message boards, so this is the first attempt.

The Esther, (smack to the english, "kutter" to the Icelandic, and "Slup" to the Faroese.) was first registered in Iceland under the strange name "Grimsby Ice Company", or G.I.C. It belonged to a company in Seydisfjordur, called "Gardar" which was controlled by the British Hewett or Hewitt family.

Second enquiry. From about 1910 the Grimsby shipowner Alec Black had a number of trawlers registered in Thorshavn, the Faroe Islands as property of a certain Christian Evensen. Does anybody have any information about this.

Clem
5th September 2006, 00:10
Hi Birgir, I'll have a look in some books to see if I can come up with some info. for you.

Could this, GY157 GIC, be the Esther?

Clem

<Edit: This photograph appears to be GY152 Sea King or Frolic>

fishdockroad
5th September 2006, 10:14
Thanks Clem,

i think thats the book they always use out when I go to the reference library i'll try to get hold of a copy. I'm going to the auction now so will try to get a photo of the bell, if i can keep up with the bidding and am lucky enough to buy the bell i'll definatly send you a photo. Fingers crossed.

Fishdockroad

Clem
5th September 2006, 10:56
FDR, if you live in or near Grimsby, I think the Library used to sell them but they could be out of print now.

fishdockroad
5th September 2006, 18:42
Hi Clem,

I got the Bell. I'm absolutly delighted I'll post some photos asap. I checked with the library at Gy but they dont have any copies left.

Thanks for all your help.

FDR

Clem
5th September 2006, 20:56
Congratulations, look forward to seeing the photos.

Clem

mattarosa
5th September 2006, 21:08
Silver Stream GY 386 Burnt out during refit towed to New Holland for scrap see my gallery for pics

What sort of trawler is Silver Stream, please? It's an odd looking thing!

mattarosa
5th September 2006, 21:12
Hilary-- yes,that is indeed the same picture-- I will try to photograph tomorrow for Clem,but if it does not succeed perhaps you would also do it- I'll report back! Thanks

Remember John drawing attention to the print called The Call of the Sea last week? The artist is selling prints of it on ebay £5.99 post free. I'm not on commission or anything, just thought you might be interested.

There is another called Northern's Pride, which is of Northern Pride and Northern Duke.

Hilary

mattarosa
5th September 2006, 21:15
Hi Clem,

I got the Bell. I'm absolutly delighted I'll post some photos asap. I checked with the library at Gy but they dont have any copies left.

Thanks for all your help.

FDR

I just wanted to say congratulations on your purchase, I think it's brilliant how things get "rescued" by enthusiasts. If not for that, everything would be gone.

Clem - was the Rehearo actually originally registered at Grimsby under the name John Burlingham? I haven't got that one on my list, so perhaps I should add it.

birgir
5th September 2006, 21:17
Hi Birgir, I'll have a look in some books to see if I can come up with some info. for you.

Could this, GY152 GIC, be the Esther?

Clem

HI Clem.

Unfortunately, the general characteristics of the smacks/kutters is such that it is very difficult to say whether two pictures are of the same ship, or different ones.

Esther is best known in Iceland for the rescue of the crews of 4 open fishing boats, 38 men, on march 24. 1916. She was sold to the Faroese in 1924.

Birgir

Clem
5th September 2006, 21:51
Clem - was the Rehearo actually originally registered at Grimsby under the name John Burlingham? I haven't got that one on my list, so perhaps I should add it.

Hi Hilary, it does seem that way. She was registered at Grimsby in January 1920 but, not renamed until April of that year.

Clem
5th September 2006, 21:57
HI Clem.

Unfortunately, the general characteristics of the smacks/kutters is such that it is very difficult to say whether two pictures are of the same ship, or different ones.

Esther is best known in Iceland for the rescue of the crews of 4 open fishing boats, 38 men, on march 24. 1916. She was sold to the Faroese in 1924.

Birgir

Thanks for that. When I visit a friend I'll check his books to see if there was more than one G.I.C. The year 1916 helps.

Were the crews of these four boats line fishing?

Clem

fishdockroad
6th September 2006, 18:21
I just wanted to say congratulations on your purchase, I think it's brilliant how things get "rescued" by enthusiasts. If not for that, everything would be gone.

Clem - was the Rehearo actually originally registered at Grimsby under the name John Burlingham? I haven't got that one on my list, so perhaps I should add it.
Thanks for that, have now posted a photo.

fishdockroad
6th September 2006, 18:40
Hi all,

hopefully I've managed to post a photo of the bell. I'm new to this forum and just have to say that I think its great. Obviously a lot of knowledgable people out there. The posts have raised a few questions mind. If the John Burlingham was'nt registered in Grimsby until 1920 where was it registered up until that date?

Did the number GY829 stay with the ship when she was renamed? And why did they rename them?

And finally the biggest question of all for myself at the moment is who was John Burlingham??

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Fishdockroad

mattarosa
6th September 2006, 20:28
[QUOTE=fishdockroad]Hi all,

>hopefully I've managed to post a photo of the bell.

>And finally the biggest question of all for myself at the moment is who was >John Burlingham??

The bell is brilliant, I am envious. Where are you going to put it?

Over 500 trawlers were built for the Admiralty during the First World War as part of a programme to replace fishing trawlers that had been requisitioned for minesweeping, and lost. The vessels under this programme were named after the crew of the HMS Victory and the HMS Royal Sovereign at the time of the Battle of Trafalgar.

I don't know whether the John Burlingham was one of these, but it was built in 1917, so I think it is quite possible it was.

Hilary

mattarosa
6th September 2006, 22:19
There is a picture for sale on ebay, the description of which says it is
GY15 Stockholm.

Is there such a trawler? Does anyone have any details?

This is another (of many!) not on my list.

Thanks
Hilary

Clem
6th September 2006, 23:37
Hi all,

hopefully I've managed to post a photo of the bell. I'm new to this forum and just have to say that I think its great. Obviously a lot of knowledgable people out there. The posts have raised a few questions mind. If the John Burlingham was'nt registered in Grimsby until 1920 where was it registered up until that date?

Did the number GY829 stay with the ship when she was renamed? And why did they rename them?

And finally the biggest question of all for myself at the moment is who was John Burlingham??

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Fishdockroad

Hi FDR, Great photo of a piece of Grimsby's maritime past. Where do you plan to keep it?

In answer to your question, it looks like she was GY829 all her time in GY till being scrapped.

From what I can see. She was launched in 1917, it looks like she was 'Admiralty' until her sale to Grimsby in 1920. However, in a book I have, it says, 'The above trawlers at the date of purchase [by the Admiralty?] were completing for their normal task of fishing.' I don't know what this implies.

Could the Admiralty's requirement for minesweepers have changed?

Cheers

Clem

Clem
6th September 2006, 23:54
There is a picture for sale on ebay, the description of which says it is
GY15 Stockholm.

Is there such a trawler? Does anyone have any details?

This is another (of many!) not on my list.

Thanks
Hilary

Hi Hilary, two Stockhams I'm aware of. GY89 Stockham, ex. Kingston Peridot, built in 1929.

GY19 Stockham built 1949. Sister ship to GY85 Laforey, which was lost with all hands in 1954. Skipper Bill Mogg of the Laforey was one of my relative's first deep sea skipper in the 1940's, he thought very highly of skipper Mogg. The same relative also worked on the Stockham prior to her sister ships loss. He never thought much of the Stockham, not a good sea boat.

Maybe GY15 Stockholm should read GY19 Stockham? Do you have a thumbnail of the photo on offer?

Cheers

Clem

trotterdotpom
7th September 2006, 02:39
Hi John, nice to hear from someone who worked on her. GY484 Port Vale is, to my knowledge, the only Grimsby ship of this name. You probably already know she was built in October 1957 by the Goole Ship Building & Repair Co. Ltd. in Goole for Consols subsidiary Wendover Steam Fishing Co.

Colne Shipping Co. (Lowestoft) purchased her in June 1978. She became LT309, and went on to standby duties in 1981 before being sold for scrap on 07/01/87.

Can you tell us a little about your time on the Port Vale? My uncle, was Mate on her in 1962 fishing off the Faeroe's.

Regards

Clem

I did three trips to Iceland in Port Vale in 1969. Pretty sure the Skipper was Bill Hardie Jr ( known as "Wiggy") - a whizz kid in his early 20s at the time.

The main thing that stands out in my mind is that she was one of, if not the, last distant water trawler in Grimsby without automatic steering. The deckies refused to sail without it and the company hastily installed a mickey mouse system which operated from the magnetic compass - details very hazy now.

I have a great picture of the ship, painted by Steve Farrow, which, along with others in his collection, was available at the Fishing Museum, Grimsby.

John T.

mattarosa
7th September 2006, 06:44
[QUOTE=Clem]

Maybe GY15 Stockholm should read GY19 Stockham? Do you have a thumbnail of the photo on offer?

Clem
Now why didn't I think of that?

Now attached.

Hilary

daveb
7th September 2006, 07:57
Hi again, still struggling to get info but having looked at web sites suggested here i can only find him as skipper of Ernest Holt he was on it from its maiden voyage till he retired. I Have two other ship names so maybe you guys can help. i am not sure if these were there operational names during the war? they were the Recono and Red sky. can you help?

Clem
7th September 2006, 10:01
I did three trips to Iceland in Port Vale in 1969. Pretty sure the Skipper was Bill Hardie Jr ( known as "Wiggy") - a whizz kid in his early 20s at the time.

The main thing that stands out in my mind is that she was one of, if not the, last distant water trawler in Grimsby without automatic steering. The deckies refused to sail without it and the company hastily installed a mickey mouse system which operated from the magnetic compass - details very hazy now.

I have a great picture of the ship, painted by Steve Farrow, which, along with others in his collection, was available at the Fishing Museum, Grimsby.

John T.

Automatic Pilot, beats a rope beckett on the wheel.

Can you post a photo of the painting? It'd be nice to see.

Cheers

Clem

trotterdotpom
7th September 2006, 14:39
Automatic Pilot, beats a rope beckett on the wheel.

Can you post a photo of the painting? It'd be nice to see.

Cheers

Clem

I'll see if I can get a scan done of it somewhere (is that legal?).

By the way, in those days Port Vale were in the 4th Division - did you ever play against them, Malcolm?

John T.

fishdockroad
7th September 2006, 16:50
Hi FDR, Great photo of a piece of Grimsby's maritime past. Where do you plan to keep it?

In answer to your question, it looks like she was GY829 all her time in GY till being scrapped.

From what I can see. She was launched in 1917, it looks like she was 'Admiralty' until her sale to Grimsby in 1920. However, in a book I have, it says, 'The above trawlers at the date of purchase [by the Admiralty?] were completing for their normal task of fishing.' I don't know what this implies.

Could the Admiralty's requirement for minesweepers have changed?

Cheers

Clem
Thanks Clem,

the bells going to go in my kitchen i think. I've got a couple of other items with a direct grimsby link so i'll post some photos for all to view. One further question Clem if you dont mind 'do you know if the bell would have stayed with the ship when it was renamed?

Fishdockroad

fishdockroad
7th September 2006, 16:54
[QUOTE=fishdockroad]Hi all,

>hopefully I've managed to post a photo of the bell.

>And finally the biggest question of all for myself at the moment is who was >John Burlingham??

The bell is brilliant, I am envious. Where are you going to put it?

Over 500 trawlers were built for the Admiralty during the First World War as part of a programme to replace fishing trawlers that had been requisitioned for minesweeping, and lost. The vessels under this programme were named after the crew of the HMS Victory and the HMS Royal Sovereign at the time of the Battle of Trafalgar.

I don't know whether the John Burlingham was one of these, but it was built in 1917, so I think it is quite possible it was.

Hilary
Hi Hilary,

thanks for the info. HMS victory's crew did indeed have a Burlingham though his first name is listed as being Jho ??? Possibly a misprint so i'll deve a little further.

The bell by the way is going in my kitchen, though I've been warned not to ring it again as I scared the cat and dog half to death.

Fishdockroad

Clem
7th September 2006, 21:13
Hi again, still struggling to get info but having looked at web sites suggested here i can only find him as skipper of Ernest Holt he was on it from its maiden voyage till he retired. I Have two other ship names so maybe you guys can help. i am not sure if these were there operational names during the war? they were the Recono and Red sky. can you help?

Hi Dave, GY625 Recono was built 9/15. Owned by Sleights until she was scrapped in 3/62, built by Cook Welton & Gemmell of Beverly. She served in both wars. A relative of mine also worked on her in 1953. When was your grandfather on her? I'm trying to find out if she was a 'bridge aft sider' (maybe built a bit late for that), any clues? I'll post some more detail of her later.

I can't find Red Sky in GY, but have 'Red Sky, Admiralty Wood Drifter, built 1918. She also served in WWII.

I’ve found another couple of photos of GY591 Ernest Holt. Can you see your grandfather?

Cheers Clem

Clem
7th September 2006, 21:26
There is a picture for sale on ebay, the description of which says it is
GY15 Stockholm.

Is there such a trawler? Does anyone have any details?

This is another (of many!) not on my list.

Thanks
Hilary

Hi Hilary. If you compare your picture of 'GY15 Stockholm' with this one of GY19 Stockham, would you agree they probably the same ship? It seems to me the ebay source has mistaken the text.

Cheers

Clem

mattarosa
7th September 2006, 22:11
[QUOTE=Clem]Hi Hilary. If you compare your picture of 'GY15 Stockholm' with this one of GY19 Stockham, would you agree they probably the same ship? It seems to me the ebay source has mistaken the text.

Clem
I think you are right. Thanks for looking.
Hilary

mattarosa
7th September 2006, 22:36
[QUOTE=fishdockroad]
HMS victory's crew did indeed have a Burlingham though his first name is listed as being Jho ??? Possibly a misprint so i'll deve a little further.

Could it be Jno? that's quite common in historical documents as an abbreviation for John - though it's not much shorter than the original name!

mattarosa
7th September 2006, 22:41
According to the Official HMS Victory website

http://www.hms-victory.com/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=64&Itemid=67

it is Jno Burlingham who was English, age 20 and a Landsman (whatever that was).

mattarosa
8th September 2006, 00:07
A Landsman is a person who has not been to sea before and has no experience of the Royal Navy. The Landsman was the lowest rank in the Royal Navy at that time.

(courtesy of Google)

daveb
8th September 2006, 08:55
Hi Dave, GY625 Recono was built 9/15. Owned by Sleights until she was scrapped in 3/62, built by Cook Welton & Gemmell of Beverly. She served in both wars. A relative of mine also worked on her in 1953. When was your grandfather on her? I'm trying to find out if she was a 'bridge aft sider' (maybe built a bit late for that), any clues? I'll post some more detail of her later.

I can't find Red Sky in GY, but have 'Red Sky, Admiralty Wood Drifter, built 1918. She also served in WWII.

I’ve found another couple of photos of GY591 Ernest Holt. Can you see your grandfather?

Cheers Clem

Cool thanks he is picture 4th male from right just his head showing his wife is in fron to him in black dress i have sent to my mom to try and find out who the other people are. John Monger Retired from the Ernest Holt and was on her from her maden voyage in 1948 so i assume he was not on GY 625 at the same time but what do i know. My Grandfather passed away in 1987 at age 86. this is amazing i will try and find out more from my mom's sister who still lives in Clethorps in there family home.

many many thanks i am so excited i cant tell you

john shaw
8th September 2006, 09:55
Trotterdotpom:did three trips to Iceland in Port Vale in 1969. Pretty sure the Skipper was Bill Hardie Jr ( known as "Wiggy") - a whizz kid in his early 20s at the time


"Port Vale" was featured within the past couple of weeks in the Gy Telegraph "Bygones" supplement.

Clem
8th September 2006, 10:22
Hi John. I'm sure everyone knows, but there's a good article about GY484 Port Vale on the Cosolidated Fisheries Ltd. website.

http://web.ukonline.co.uk/rayricho/vale.htm

Have you turned up any more info. about GY641 Lacerta, Greenland etc?

Regards

Clem

john shaw
8th September 2006, 10:34
My outlaws promise to raid the files when we get back from France early Oct-- they are (as usual) tucked away in an attic somewhere--they believe there may be trawlers related stuff there-- when I get any further I'll update you. Re the painting, it will not photograph with the glazed frame, and I don't think she who must be obeyed would thank me for ruining her expensive frame-- perhaps Hilary would photograph her copy as discussed previously? Regards.

trotterdotpom
8th September 2006, 12:38
"Port Vale" was featured within the past couple of weeks in the Gy Telegraph "Bygones" supplement.

Thanks John, I'll see if it's still on their website.

Clem, here is a scanned copy of 'Port Vale' painted by Steve Yarrow. Steve has painted numerous Grimsby trawlers, all of this quality. Think he has a website but unable to find it at the moment.

John T.

Whoops - having some trouble adding photo, will try again.

Tried again but picture file seems to be too big - anyone got any ideas?

mattarosa
8th September 2006, 13:37
Cool thanks he is picture 4th male from right just his head showing his wife is in fron to him in black dress i have sent to my mom to try and find out who the other people are. John Monger Retired from the Ernest Holt and was on her from her maden voyage in 1948 so i assume he was not on GY 625 at the same time but what do i know. My Grandfather passed away in 1987 at age 86. this is amazing i will try and find out more from my mom's sister who still lives in Clethorps in there family home.

many many thanks i am so excited i cant tell you

Brilliant. Are you able to date the picture from the people in it that you know?

mattarosa
8th September 2006, 15:53
Does anyone know whether

GY924 Unitia and

A 663 Unitia

are the same trawler?

Thanks
Hilary

Clem
8th September 2006, 17:50
Brilliant. Are you able to date the picture from the people in it that you know?

Hi Hilary/Dave. I can confirm the photo of your Grandfather & Grandmother was taken in 1956. Also in the photo are the Mayor and Mayoress of Grimsby (Alderman Matt Quinn and his wife), you can see the Mayoral chains round his neck.

The Captain Blighe figure, stood next to the Mayoress, I thought was your grandfather until you told me different!

Cheers

Clem

Clem
8th September 2006, 18:14
Thanks John, I'll see if it's still on their website.

Clem, here is a scanned copy of 'Port Vale' painted by Steve Yarrow. Steve has painted numerous Grimsby trawlers, all of this quality. Think he has a website but unable to find it at the moment.

John T.

Whoops - having some trouble adding photo, will try again.

Tried again but picture file seems to be too big - anyone got any ideas?

I use Photoshop to resize jpegs (ie. 600x450), then save copied files, at about 75kb.

I'll google 'steve yarrow' it'd be interesting to see his work. Have you seen Jenny Morgan's paintings? Have a look in my gallery, or search in Fishing Vessels gallery. She's a very talented artist, my favourite.

Cheers

Clem

mattarosa
8th September 2006, 21:19
I'll google 'steve yarrow' it'd be interesting to see his work.

Could it be Steve Farrow?

http://www.trawlerart.com/index.htm

trotterdotpom
8th September 2006, 23:58
Could it be Steve Farrow?

http://www.trawlerart.com/index.htm

Sorry, silly me - the 'F' looks like a 'Y'. It is Steve Farrow.
Being a technotwit, still having trouble with upload of picture.

John T.

Steve Farrow
9th September 2006, 10:21
Hi Clem,
I received your email this morning and have just replied. Thanks for directing me to this web site, I shall be a regular visitor from now on!
If I can help with any trawler photo's then please ask and that applies to anybody reading this.
Steve Farrow www.trawlerart.com

Steve Farrow
9th September 2006, 11:28
I just wanted to say congratulations on your purchase, I think it's brilliant how things get "rescued" by enthusiasts. If not for that, everything would be gone.

Clem - was the Rehearo actually originally registered at Grimsby under the name John Burlingham? I haven't got that one on my list, so perhaps I should add it.
Hi FDR,
I have a decent photo of the REHEARO. If you eamil me I will forward this to you .
Steve

mattarosa
9th September 2006, 11:37
Hi FDR,
I have a decent photo of the REHEARO. If you eamil me I will forward this to you .
Steve

Many thanks, Steve, and welcome here. I am sure you will be a big help to us all.

I have emailed re the pic.

Hilary

mattarosa
9th September 2006, 11:38
[QUOTE=mattarosa]Many thanks, Steve, and welcome here. I am sure you will be a big help to us all.

I hope we can be of help to you somehow as well.

trotterdotpom
9th September 2006, 12:01
Hi Clem,
I received your email this morning and have just replied. Thanks for directing me to this web site, I shall be a regular visitor from now on!
If I can help with any trawler photo's then please ask and that applies to anybody reading this.
Steve Farrow www.trawlerart.com

Welcome aboard, Steve.

You may have seen that I have a print of one of your paintings. I'm sure I'm just one of many to admire your talent.

I used to live a few doors down from the "Lifeboat" on Cleethorpes front - is it still jumping?

John T.

Clem
9th September 2006, 20:02
Hi Clem,
I received your email this morning and have just replied. Thanks for directing me to this web site, I shall be a regular visitor from now on!
If I can help with any trawler photo's then please ask and that applies to anybody reading this.
Steve Farrow www.trawlerart.com

Welcome to SN Steve, I'm very pleased you could join us. Thanks for the email, I will post the images soon.

Regards

Clem

Clem
9th September 2006, 20:34
Official Number: 181392
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY484
Name: Port Vale
Callsign: MXWY
Type: M. Trawler
Built: 10/57
By: Goole Shipbuilding & Repair Co. Ltd. (Goole)
Gross Tonnage: 427
Net Tonnage: 140
Length: 138 ft. 8 in.
Beam: 28 ft. 4 in.
Engines: Diesel
By: Mirrlees Bickerton & Day; Stockport
Owner: Wendover Fishing Co. (Grimsby) Ltd.
Manager: Consolidated Fisheries Ltd. Grimsby
Comments: 3/75 to Consolidated Fisheries Ltd; 7/78 to Colne Group (Colne Shipping Co.) Lowestoft; registered as LT309; ’81 oil rig standby
Fate: 07/01/87 sailed to scrapyard

Attatched is Steve Farrow's painting of this vessel, courtesy of John T.

mattarosa
10th September 2006, 11:13
Clem

Your specs are great, do you have any for any of the ships in my list (message #69)?

About to try and photograph the print I have (Call of the Sea) for everyone to see. Adrian Thompson used to have a website, but I can't find it now. As I mentioned, I have seen prints of his on ebay.

Hilary

mattarosa
10th September 2006, 11:44
Sorry, this is the best I can do. It is a bit scewiff because it is in a place where the sun is shining on it today!

The photo may not be brilliant, but the painting is lovely. It is signed by the painter who has added the message

"Remembrance of those who face peril on the sea!"

Hear, hear.

Hilary

john shaw
10th September 2006, 11:52
Hilary-- thanks for doing that-- nice inscription on yours, ours (#186) just has artists signature-- you must have influence!! regards.

Steve Farrow
10th September 2006, 12:08
Welcome aboard, Steve.

You may have seen that I have a print of one of your paintings. I'm sure I'm just one of many to admire your talent.

I used to live a few doors down from the "Lifeboat" on Cleethorpes front - is it still jumping?

John T.
Thanks for those kind words John.........Sorry to say that the Lifeboat Hotel was demoished a few years ago to make way for new flats!

Clem
10th September 2006, 13:54
Clem

do you have any for any of the ships in my list (message #69)?

Hilary

Hi Hilary, sorry for not getting back to you. I'm a little disorganised at the moment, I need to look through the thread and compile a 'to do' list! At the moment I seem to be tackling the latest posts first. I promise I'll get things in order of first come first served. (*))

Thanks for you patience, and thank you for posting 'The Call of the Sea'.

Clem

birgir
10th September 2006, 14:44
Thanks for that. When I visit a friend I'll check his books to see if there was more than one G.I.C. The year 1916 helps.

Were the crews of these four boats line fishing?

Clem


HI.

The G.I.C was registered in Iceland in 1898. The open boats (from the fishing village "Grindavík") were had both long-lines and nets. They were at the time still oared, as Grindavík, because of it´s absence of harbour facilities could not support heavier engine-powered boat. Thus the large crews.

Birgir.

Clem
10th September 2006, 15:55
Thanks for that information Birgir. I'll be able to check, this week, to see if the photo I posted is the same vessel.

Regards

Clem

Clem
10th September 2006, 16:01
Hi Hilary, I'm sure I can find more info. as I've read about this ship. If so I'll update this post and give you a pm.

Cheers

Clem

Official Number: 139941
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY1037
Name: War Duke
Callsign: GKCG
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 04/17
By: Cook Welton & Gemmell Ltd. Beverly
Gross Tonnage: 246
Net Tonnage: 97
Length: 117.4 ft.
Beam: 22 ft.
Draught: 12.7 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: T 3cy 75 RHP
By: Great Central Co-op Engine & Ship Repairing Co. Ltd. Grimsby
Owner: Nottingham Trawling Co. Ltd.
Manager: J.N. Bacon
Comments: 04/17 built for White & Willows; 07/19 Yarborough Steam Fishing; 08/24 H. Bacon; 09/30 Nottingham Trawlers; Admiralty Service 11/39 or 06/40; M/S pennant FY582; A/P trawler 44; 12/44 Parkholme Trawlers; 07/49 Trawlers (Grimsby) Ltd; 04/53 Derwent Trawlers; 01/56 A. Banninster (Trawlers) Ltd.
Fate: Scrapped May 1963

mattarosa
10th September 2006, 18:00
Hilary-- thanks for doing that-- nice inscription on yours, ours (#186) just has artists signature-- you must have influence!! regards.

Absolutely no influence, I'm afraid, but perhaps an influential friend? I got the print as a Christmas present.

mattarosa
10th September 2006, 18:03
Hi Hilary, sorry for not getting back to you. I'm a little disorganised at the moment, I need to look through the thread and compile a 'to do' list! At the moment I seem to be tackling the latest posts first. I promise I'll get things in order of first come first served. (*))

Thanks for you patience, and thank you for posting 'The Call of the Sea'.

Clem

If lack of organisation was an Olympic sport, I'd be a cert for the British team. There is absolutely no hurry, Clem, I'm not going anywhere. Any help, whenever, will be appreciated.

mattarosa
10th September 2006, 18:07
HI.

The G.I.C was registered in Iceland in 1898. The open boats (from the fishing village "Grindavík") were had both long-lines and nets. They were at the time still oared, as Grindavík, because of it´s absence of harbour facilities could not support heavier engine-powered boat. Thus the large crews.

Birgir.

Have you seen this?

http://www.nhsc.org.uk/index.cfm/event/getVessel/vref/170

I've forgotten what the question was, so I'm not sure whether this provides any answers.

Hilary

mattarosa
10th September 2006, 18:16
[QUOTE=Clem]
Owner: Nottingham Trawling Co. Ltd.

Thanks for the spec, Clem. I had to smile at the owner. I was born and bred not too far from Nottingham, and the only link with the sea I was aware of was the annual pit trip to Skegness.

Hilary

Clem
10th September 2006, 18:34
Hi Hilary, Lloyds had War Duke's owners as Kottingham, that threw me at first.
Pleased you found that link to Esther/GIC, though the spelling is open to question. She could have been Ester.

Is your interest in the War duke specific. As you know, I had a relative working on her as a deckie in the 40's possibly his father too.

Clem

Steve Farrow
10th September 2006, 19:05
[QUOTE=Clem]

Maybe GY15 Stockholm should read GY19 Stockham? Do you have a thumbnail of the photo on offer?

Clem
Now why didn't I think of that?

Now attached.

Hilary
Clem,
I have just posted a photo of the STOCKHAM in the gallery
Steve

Clem
10th September 2006, 22:53
Thanks Steve, showed it to my relative.

Clem

Kerbtrawler
11th September 2006, 14:42
Clem I have all of the tech spec on this vessel but nothing stories wise

Do you or anyone out there have any
reason for asking is my Grandfather was a deckie on her back in the late 40's and early 50's.
cheers

Clem
11th September 2006, 22:36
Hi Kerbtrawler, it'd be great if you could post the spec of this ship on here. I remember reading something about the Wellard so, I'll have a look around in my books.

Clem

Clem
12th September 2006, 09:55
Hi Brumblebass & Birgir, I've found a little about the GY157 G.I.C./Esther/Ester (spellings differ), along with Hilary's link to the: National Register of Historic Vessels.

I can confirm she is in Grimsby, tied up alongside the sidetrawler GY398 Ross Tiger in the Alexandra Dock outside the National Fishing Heritage Centre.

I visited Grimsby in January 06 and took some photos of GY398 Ross Tiger, you can see GY157 Esther's bow in the photograph. Next time I go to GY. I'll take some photos of her and post them here.

Note: In previous posts I referred to G.I.C. as GY152. GY157 is the correct number. I have since corrected relevant posts.

Regards

Clem


Official Number: 94083
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY157
Name: G.I.C.
Type: Ketch; Trawler
Built: 06/1888
By: T. Collinson; Grimsby
Registered Tonnage: 85.04
Length: 76 ft.
Beam: 25.5 ft.
Draught:11.3 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Owner: Great Grimsby Ice Co.
Skipper: J. Collinson
Crew (Men): 2
Crew (Boys): 3
Comments: Sold to Yarmouth 05/1896?
Fate: Awaiting restoration in Grimsby; ‘Designated Vessel’ by the National Register of Historic Vessels

http://www.nhsc.org.uk/index.cfm/event/getVessel/vref/170

“Sold at auction on 4 May 1888, this Grimsby sailing smack was launched on 15 June 1888 and named G.I.C. With a crew of two men and three boys she fished for the Grimsby Ice Co. Ltd. until April 1896? when she was sold to Great Yarmouth. In 1902 she was sold to Iceland and renamed ESTHER. Twenty years later she was sold on to the Faeroe Islands, where she remained for the next seventy years. Sold back to Grimsby in 1992, she was incorporated into the historic fishing fleet of the National Fishing Heritage Centre.”

Kerbtrawler
12th September 2006, 11:49
Original Name EL CAPITAN GY 450
Built for Earl Steam Fishing Co by Cook Welton & Gemmel
Date of Build 28/07/1937
Yard No 626
Official Number 164429
Call Sign GZYP

The Length 173 X 28.6 X 14.6, with a Quarter deck 89' and a Fo'scle of 37'
Gross Tons 514, Net Tons 280
Engines 135 NHP, Triple Cylinder 15", 25" & 42" x 27"
Boiler 1 SB 220lb Spt
Producing 12.8 Knots by Amos & Smith.

07/1938 went to Crampins Steam Fishing Co
10/1939 Rqd as A/S Name unchanged Pennant FY 137
Joined the 21st A/S Strike Group, Took part in the Norwegian Campaign
1942 Loaned to USN from February and returned in October and was transferred to the South African Station.
Returned 1945
Acquired by Crampins 1946 registry to GY 300

Her Colours were:
Funnel yellow C on Blue band between yellow and black top. Hull black with white line red boot topping.

was Broken up 09/1961

My Grandfather sailed on the Wellard for 3 months back in 46' as a deck hand,before being reunited with her in 1950. Signed on as a 3rd hand from 20/04/1950 to 18/09/1950. His next trip with the Wellard wasn't until 25/01/1951 when signed on again as 3rd hand until 16/05/1951. next it was 06/12/1951 but as a deck hand until 24/04/1952 his last time with the vessel was 18/05/1952 until 11/10/1952 again as deck hand.

Clem
12th September 2006, 12:22
Hi Raymond, in reply to your post on page 1 of this thread. GY393 Malaga, here's what I found.

Regards

Clem


Official Number: 146901
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY393
Name: Malaga
Callsign: n/k
Type: ‘Castle Class’ Steam Trawler
Built: 1917
By: Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. Ontario Canada
Gross Tonnage: 217
Net Tonnage: 123
Length: 125.7 ft.
Beam: 23.5 ft.
Draught: 12.7ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: T 3cy
By: n/k
Owner: Boston Deep Sea Fisheries
Comments: Built as either HMS TR1 or TR2; 09/1926 to Boston Deep Sea Fisheries
Fate: Lost 1935

Naval Specification
Gross Tonnage: 275
Displacement: 360
Dimensions: 125.5 ft. pp x 23.5 ft. x 12.75 ft.
Armament: 1 x 12 pdr (TR8 only)
Machinery: 1 shaft triple expansion 480 iHP
Speed: 10.5 knots

Notes: HMS TR8 is the only known armed minesweeping trawler of this class on completion, TR1-TR10 (Photo Attatched).

Clem
12th September 2006, 12:45
Thanks for posting that info. Just checked out your website, great job Trevor.

Good Luck

Clem

Clem
12th September 2006, 14:15
...my Grandfather was a deckie on her back in the late 40's and early 50's.
cheers

GY300 Wellard. A. H. Barratt. Died 15th July 1947.

R.I.P.

Clem
12th September 2006, 14:59
Hi Hilary, I found this.

Regards

Clem

Official Number: 161004
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY328
Name: Edwardian
Callsign: GWYS
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 01/1931
By: Cook Welton & Gemmell Ltd. Beverly
Gross Tonnage: 348
Net Tonnage: 148
Length: 140.3 ft.
Beam: 24.6 ft.
Draught: 13.3 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: T 3cy 96RHP
By: Amos & Smith Ltd. Hull
Owner: Loyal Steam Fishing Ltd. Grimsby
Manager: W.W. Butt
Comments: Admiralty Service Hired as M/S trawler 09/39, later purchased Sold 01/46 08/1948 To Hull (Hellyer Brothers Ltd.) renamed H576 Opehlia; Loyal SF had another Edwardian (GY704) lost in 1930
Fate: Scrapped 1954


Fatalities: Boon, Roy, William. Seaman Cook HMT Edwardian, RNPS died 11/08/40

Lest We Forget

Steve Farrow
12th September 2006, 15:06
Hi all,
I have posted a couple of photo's of the Wellard in the Gallery
Steve.

mattarosa
12th September 2006, 22:25
[QUOTE=Clem;76109]Hi Hilary, I found this.

Thanks Clem, that's great.

I found something today as well which I wanted to share. I bought a battered old book, and I didn't hold out any great hopes of it, but I found this pic/article about the launch of Atlantic Seal. It wasn't a Grimsby registered trawler, but I hope you will allow it in your Grimsby Fishing Vessels thread because it was built in Grimsby, by Doigs.

I have an interest in Doigs, so if anyone has any info about them (history, stories, pics, anything, says she, hopefully) I'd be ever so grateful.

Hope you like the item. I've posted it here, but....I hate to come over all girly, but I haven't figured out how to post to the gallery yet.

Thanks again for the Edwardian specs, Clem.

Hilary

mattarosa
12th September 2006, 23:06
[QUOTE=mattarosa;76212][QUOTE=Clem;76109]

I hate to come over all girly, but I haven't figured out how to post to the gallery yet.

Figured and posted.

I'm quite good at parking as well !

Steve Farrow
13th September 2006, 11:17
Hi Hilary....Do you have any information about J.S. Doig's having a drydock at GY. I'm only aware of their slipways, but mention of the dry-dock keeps cropping up!
I will post a photo of the Atlantic Seal in the Gallery. She was managed by Bannisters when she fished from Grimsby They then bought her and re-named her the Saxon Ranger

Clem
13th September 2006, 11:29
Hi Hilary & Steve. You may find this link interesting, the demise of the Saxon Ranger.

http://www.westcoastdivepark.com.au/

Steve Farrow
13th September 2006, 12:26
Hi Clem,
Intersting indeed. It seems abetter option than the burng gun!
Regards
Steve

Clem
13th September 2006, 12:34
At least she's still earning, $25 dollars per day per person to dive, over three years. I reckon she's paid back her scrap value plenty.

How long did you work on her Steve, was the accomodation/working conditions ok?

Cheers

Clem

Steve Farrow
13th September 2006, 12:52
I only did one 'Pleasure trip' It was the Easter of 1963 and I was waiting to join the MN with Buries Markes. The Skipper was a family friend, Tommy Darwood and we fished off the Outer Hebredes and sheltered in Stornaway from atrocious weather.
I also had a couple of trips on the Regardo in 1960, the Ross Lion in 1961 and the Ross Kestrel in 1962. Peter Edge, the manger of Ross Trawlers, called me in his office and asked me if I thought he was running a passenger ships!
Steve

Clem
13th September 2006, 12:56
Peter Edge, the manger of Ross Trawlers, called me in his office and asked me if I thought he was running a passenger ships!
Steve

Ha, that's funny. Did you have to sign articles?

Steve Farrow
13th September 2006, 13:19
Yes I signed on as super-cargo!
Steve

Steve Farrow
13th September 2006, 15:10
Clem.
On a different hread but still dealing with fishing vessels, I have quite a few seine netters that I photographed over the years. If anybody has a particular vessel they would like, and it is in my collection they can have a copy with pleasure.
Steve

Clem
13th September 2006, 15:15
Yes Steve, I visit Grimsby now and then to photograph fishing boats. It's a desolate place now, compared to the past, quite eerie.

Clem

Clem
13th September 2006, 15:23
Steve, I photographed GY305 Laurids Skomager (another of the small boats), tied up in Grimsby a few months ago. She's now called the Rachael S, same Reg.

I've posted her photo, along with your painting of her.

Steve Farrow
13th September 2006, 16:13
Just posted the BEKIMAEL and HULL CITY. How do you post thumbnails?
Steve

Kerbtrawler
13th September 2006, 18:52
Steve, go to post reply and scroll down until you see manage attachments

there is a size of file restriction

hope this helps

mattarosa
13th September 2006, 18:57
[QUOTE=Steve Farrow;76289]Hi Hilary....Do you have any information about J.S. Doig's having a drydock at GY. I'm only aware of their slipways, but mention of the dry-dock keeps cropping up!

Hi Steve
I don't know but I can find out. I know someone who served his apprenticeship there. Will try and call him tomorrow.

Hilary

mattarosa
13th September 2006, 23:32
[QUOTE=Clem;76291]Hi Hilary & Steve. You may find this link interesting, the demise of the Saxon Ranger.

Thanks Clem. I had heard about this, so it was interesting to read about it.

Hilary

mattarosa
13th September 2006, 23:58
Clem.
On a different hread but still dealing with fishing vessels, I have quite a few seine netters that I photographed over the years. If anybody has a particular vessel they would like, and it is in my collection they can have a copy with pleasure.
Steve

Steve
I'd be interested in seeing some pics of seine netters. Is that the most common way to catch fish nowadays? Why is the net called a seine net?

Questions questions.

Hilary

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 07:17
[QUOTE=mattarosa;76393][QUOTE=Steve Farrow;76289]Hi Hilary....Do you have any information about J.S. Doig's having a drydock at GY. I'm only aware of their slipways, but mention of the dry-dock keeps cropping up!

Steve
Sent an email and got this reply:

"Yes Doigs had a small dry dock within its facilities. This was located to
the West of the yard close to the Shear legs (used for fitting out and
lifting engines into the ships)."

I will see what else I can find out.

Hilary

Steve Farrow
14th September 2006, 08:35
Thanks Hilary, I'm certainly keen to find out more about this dry-dock, but finding any information surroundind it's existance has proved negative. I would appreciate any help with this one.
Did you receive the photo of the Doig's workers that I sent last night?
Regards
Steve

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 09:58
Thanks Hilary, I'm certainly keen to find out more about this dry-dock, but finding any information surroundind it's existance has proved negative. I would appreciate any help with this one.
Did you receive the photo of the Doig's workers that I sent last night?
Regards
Steve


Hi Steve
I don't think I received the photo, but I can't remember whether I checked my emails. I was home quite late (for me) and had been partying just a little.
Thank you anyway.

I assume it is the pic in the thumbnail here, which is great. Do you know what date it was taken?

Hilary

Steve Farrow
14th September 2006, 11:49
Hi Hilary,
It was 1967 according to the writing on the back of the photo. Third from right is John Dunham whose father, Skipper Ben Dunham was lost on the RIVIERE in 1953.
I write a monthly article to accompany a trawler painting in the Grimsby Telegraph's Bygones publication, so if you would like me to email any of the these to you it wouln't be a problem
Regards
Steve

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 11:51
Thanks Hilary, I'm certainly keen to find out more about this dry-dock, but finding any information surroundind it's existance has proved negative. I would appreciate any help with this one.
Did you receive the photo of the Doig's workers that I sent last night?
Regards
Steve


Steve
Got chance for a very quick chat with my acquaintance this morning, but afraid we spoke more about your picture than about the dry dock. Will try to do better when there is more time.

Anyway, snippets from the conversation:

He thinks there was a picture in the Telegraph or Bygones recently which showed the dry dock, but he didn't think to scan it (bright spark!)

He said he could draw it from memory, and will do so when he has time.

Re the picture:

He says the guys in the picture were shipwrights working on what was known as the big slipway and they are preparing the slipway ready for a ship coming. This slip was larger than the rest and could take smaller freight cargo ships as well as trawlers. Doigs used to repair some of these ships on this slipway including royal naval auxiliary supply ships. This is also the slipway used to lengthen the Ross "K" class trawlers.

I have been surprised not to be able to find out very much at all about Doigs so any info you come across would be welcome. I will pursue the dry dock story as and when I have a bit more time.

Thanks for sharing the picture.

Hilary

Steve Farrow
14th September 2006, 12:31
Hi Hilary,
That's brilliant stuff.....slowly getting there! I think this is the photo from the paper, plus a shot of the Delphini on the Big Slip.
Steve

Clem
14th September 2006, 12:36
Very interesting folks. I might have heard that Doigs was owned by one of the big trawler companies. Could I be right?

Clem

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 18:47
Very interesting folks. I might have heard that Doigs was owned by one of the big trawler companies. Could I be right?

Clem

Clem
I don't think so originally, but I think it was eventually taken over by the Ross Group.

Hilary

Clem
14th September 2006, 19:10
That's right Hilary, was that about the time the Ross's K class trawlers were being lengthened by Doigs?

Clem
14th September 2006, 20:11
Official Number: 132128
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY696
Name: Sheldon
Callsign: GYGT
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 04/12
By: Cook Welton & Gemmell Ltd. Beverly
Gross Tonnage: 288
Net Tonnage: 144
Length: 130.1 ft.
Beam: 22.2 ft.
Draught: 12.2 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: T 3cy 89 RHP
By: Amos & Smith Ltd. Hull
Owner: Standard Steam Fishing Co. Ltd.
Comments: Admiralty Service; Hired as A/P trawler 1915-19; armament 1-12pdr 2-machine guns?; 01/40 Sold to Sir Thomas Robinson & Son (Grimsby) Ltd. Admiralty Service 05/40; 03/42 M/S; 03/44-01/45 fuel carrier
Fate: Presumed lost in severe weather sometime after 30th January 1953 while steaming to the Faeroese fishing grounds

Fatalities

T. R. Beesley-Skipper
R. T. Beesley-Mate
H. V. Wass-Chief Engineer
B. Cullen-2nd Engineer
H. Hess-3rd Hand
S. B. Blastland-Deckhand
C. A. Robinson-Deckhand
J. W. Swinscoe-Deckhand
G. H. Young-Deckhand
T. Bell-Trimmer
K. Burrett-Trimmer
T. S. Carlton-Trimmer
J. Hayward-Trimmer
S. King-Cook

Two crew had taken ill and were put ashore at Kirkwall (K Hotson-Cook and A. Alger-Deckhand). To be replaced by S. King and G. H. Young.

R.I.P.

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 22:47
[QUOTE=Clem;76599]Official Number: 132128
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY696
Name: Sheldon

Thanks for this Clem. Oh to be so well organised!

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 23:01
That's right Hilary, was that about the time the Ross's K class trawlers were being lengthened by Doigs?

The Ross Group made their offer in June 1963 and the deal was done by January 1964.

Clem
14th September 2006, 23:06
[QUOTE=Clem;76599]Official Number: 132128
Thanks for this Clem. Oh to be so well organised!

I'm getting there :)

Clem
14th September 2006, 23:11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clem
That's right Hilary, was that about the time the Ross's K class trawlers were being lengthened by Doigs?

The Ross Group made their offer in June 1963 and the deal was done by January 1964.

The K class were rebuilt 1966/67.

Clem

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 23:12
Following Clem's posting of the specs, with the sad details of Sheldon's loss, here are a couple of pieces from the Times about it.

The Times, Tuesday, Feb 17, 1953; pg. 5
TRAWLER PRESUMED LOST
ANOTHER STILL MISSING
(first part is item about the loss of the Lowestoft trawler, Guava - I'll transcribe this if anyone is interested)
---
Grimsby, Feb 16
No news has been received of the Grimsby trawler Sheldon, of 278 tons, which was last heard of on January 30 and was due back today from a voyage to the Faroes. The owners, Sir Thomas Robinson and Son, state that they have not yet abandoned hope, and that the Sheldon is presumed to be drifting helplessly, as was her sister ship, the Sargon, missing for seven weeks in 1923.

The Times, Thursday, Feb 19, 1953; pg. 4
HOPE ABANDONED FOR MISSING TRAWLER
Grimsby, Feb 18
The owners of the Grimsby trawler Sheldon , of which nothing has been heard since January 30, stated today that there can now be no further hope for the safety of the vessel and her crew of 14. From reports received from other trawlers it is presumed that the Sheldon was caught in a sudden gale on January 31 and sank.

The Times, Wednesday, Feb 25, 1953; pg.5
A lifebuoy belonging to the Grimsby trawler Sheldon, missing since leaving Orkney on January 30, has been picked up at Burra, Shetland.

Hilary

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 23:15
[QUOTE=mattarosa;76623]

I'm getting there :)


I'm not. (Sad)

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 23:25
The Ross Group made their offer in June 1963 and the deal was done by January 1964.

You can't keep a good woman down!

The Times, Monday, Jun 17, 1963; pg. 18
ROSS GROUP
Ross Group have made an offer for the entire share capital of J S Doig (Grimsby) Ltd, shipbuilders and ship repairers. The directors of J S Doig are recommending acceptance of the offer.

Hilary

mattarosa
14th September 2006, 23:30
Steve
I don't know the source of this picture, but it is called

"Naval patrol boat on Doig's dry dock".

Hilary

Clem
14th September 2006, 23:30
Nice work Hilary. Are you a hoarder, do you have plenty of old copies of the Times stuffed under your bed? (Read)

mattarosa
15th September 2006, 00:13
Nice work Hilary. Are you a hoarder, do you have plenty of old copies of the Times stuffed under your bed? (Read)


No (thank goodness, I'm about to move). I got it all from the Times Digital Archive at my library. It's a great source, I spent endless weekends getting it all and I doubt I've got it all. When I see a trawler mentioned here, I'll always look to see if I've got anything. I also have some interesting stuff about the fishing industry in general or at Grimsby which I'll post as and when I have time.

If there's anything you want me to look for, give me a shout. I have emailed you what I have on Guava.

Hoarder? Definitely.

Hilary

mattarosa
15th September 2006, 00:17
[QUOTE=mattarosa;76635]

I have emailed you what I have on Guava.

I don't know the LT reg but I assume it is the same as the Grimsby registered Guava GY272 ???

Hilary

mattarosa
15th September 2006, 07:40
Here is a nice story which links two things we have spoken about recently, that is the Rehearo and Doigs. It may even throw a little light on Steve's dry dock question. Here, Doigs appear to have been using someone else's dry dock.

The Times, Wednesday, Jun 21, 1933; pg. 4
High Court Of Justice Probate, Divorce, And Admiralty Division, Damage In Dock: Dock Custom At Grimsby, The Rehearo
Before Mr Justice Langton
His Lordship gave judgment for the defendants in this action, which raised a question as to a dock custom at Grimsby. The plaintiffs, Messrs George F Sleight and owners of the steam trawler Rehearo , sued the defendants J S Doig (Grimsby) Limited, ship-repairers, for damage sustained by the Rehearo in dry dock.
The facts, shortly stated, were that in October 1932, the Rehearo was lying in No. 3 Graving Dock at Grimsby (which is owned by the L and N.E. Railway Company), undergoing repairs by the defendants. Certain bow plates had been stripped off, with the consequence that when water was readmitted to the dock the vessel had to float on her bulkhead. It happened that, unknown to everybody, there were a number of open rivet holes in the bulkhead, through which water penetrated, causing the trawler to sink and sustain damage.
Mr D B Somervell, K.C., and Mr G. St C. Pilcher appeared for the plaintiffs; Mr J Dickinson, K.C., and Mr Cyril Miller for the defendants.

JUDGMENT
Mr Justice Langton, in giving judgment, held that there had been no surrender of the vessel by her owners to the repairers for the purpose of repairs and that there was no agreement by the defendants safely to keep the vessel during the repairs. He further held that, as regarded the particular dry dock in question and vessels of the class of the Rehearo, there existed a custom in Grimsby by which responsibility for the care of the vessels during repairs rested with the owners or insurers. At the same time he exonerated the plaintiffs’ watchman of negligence in failing to detect the inflow of water in time to prevent the damage.

Hilary

Steve Farrow
15th September 2006, 08:37
Number 3 Graving Dock referred to in the REHEARO case, was in the Fish Dock. That dry-dock along with number 2 Graving Dock were filled in some years ago and in their later years became home to many of the inshore craft.
These dry-docks ran parallel to each other with number 3 to the East.
Number 1 Graving Dock was in the Royal Dock, to the East of the Dock Tower
Steve

Steve Farrow
15th September 2006, 08:47
[QUOTE=Clem;76599]Official Number: 132128
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY696
Name: Sheldon

Thanks for this Clem. Oh to be so well organised!

I have only ever seen one photo of the SHELDON and it shows her alongside the coal-drops in No3 fish dock.

Clem
15th September 2006, 08:57
[QUOTE=mattarosa;76635]

I have emailed you what I have on Guava.

I don't know the LT reg but I assume it is the same as the Grimsby registered Guava GY272 ???

Hilary

Hi Hilary, thanks for the email.

GY272 Guava is a different ship. She was lost on the 29th September 1957, after she had been sold and renamed. Cut in half by a Yankee Destroyer. I'll post what I have of that story some other time.

Cheers

Clem

Clem
15th September 2006, 09:06
[QUOTE=mattarosa;76623]

I have only ever seen one photo of the SHELDON and it shows her alongside the coal-drops in No3 fish dock.

Very nice painting Steve. Have any relatives of the lost crew ever approached you for a print?

I don't know if you have ever painted the Leicestershire, my great uncle perished when she was lost in 1938.

Regards

Clem

mattarosa
15th September 2006, 09:40
Number 3 Graving Dock referred to in the REHEARO case, was in the Fish Dock. That dry-dock along with number 2 Graving Dock were filled in some years ago and in their later years became home to many of the inshore craft.
These dry-docks ran parallel to each other with number 3 to the East.
Number 1 Graving Dock was in the Royal Dock, to the East of the Dock Tower
Steve

Your local knowledge is so helpful. I haven't visited Grimsby since I was a child (too many other commitments, work and eldercare) but I am thinking of moving somewhere up the East Coast when I retire. A few years off yet, though (but not that many!)

I had many relatives in Grimsby and we often came for holidays, but I barely remember it really. I can't ever remember seeing a trawler in Grimsby, and it is quite possible I never went to the docks area. I have much stronger memories of Cleethorpes (evidenced by numerous photos of gangs of our family on Cleethorpes beach) and staying in a caravan at Ingoldmells.

For me, research into the fishing industry in Grimsby is historical, something I read about in books or hear other people tell me about. For you, I guess, it is a part of your life that once was there and now is not.

mattarosa
15th September 2006, 09:40
[QUOTE=Clem;76664
GY272 Guava is a different ship.

Thanks for the info. I was only guessing anyway, hadn't checked.

Hilary

Steve Farrow
15th September 2006, 10:36
[QUOTE=Steve Farrow;76662]

Very nice painting Steve. Have any relatives of the lost crew ever approached you for a print?

I don't know if you have ever painted the Leicestershire, my great uncle perished when she was lost in 1938.

Regards

Clem

The painting went to a relative of one of the crew and at least two of the prints did. Some times when I hand these pictures over, I hear the very moving and personal and heart breaking stories from these relatives.
I was asked to paint the Aquarious ( bacon's ) for a lady who, as a child, had gone down dock to see her dad sail on the tide. As the ship sailed out of the lock-pits, he opened the wheelhouse door and waved back at her. That was the last time she saw him. She hit a mine 15 miles SE x E of the Outer Dowsing Light Vessel on 25th Feb 1945. Attached are thumb nails of AQUARIUS & LEICESTERSHIRE.

Clem
15th September 2006, 10:57
[QUOTE=Clem;76665]
...I was asked to paint the Aquarious ( bacon's ) for a lady who, as a child, had gone down dock to see her dad sail on the tide. As the ship sailed out of the lock-pits, he opened the wheelhouse door and waved back at her. That was the last time she saw him. She hit a mine 15 miles SE x E of the Outer Dowsing Light Vessel on 25th Feb 1945.

So many tragic tales.

Steve Farrow
15th September 2006, 14:20
Your local knowledge is so helpful. I haven't visited Grimsby since I was a child (too many other commitments, work and eldercare) but I am thinking of moving somewhere up the East Coast when I retire. A few years off yet, though (but not that many!)

I had many relatives in Grimsby and we often came for holidays, but I barely remember it really. I can't ever remember seeing a trawler in Grimsby, and it is quite possible I never went to the docks area. I have much stronger memories of Cleethorpes (evidenced by numerous photos of gangs of our family on Cleethorpes beach) and staying in a caravan at Ingoldmells.

For me, research into the fishing industry in Grimsby is historical, something I read about in books or hear other people tell me about. For you, I guess, it is a part of your life that once was there and now is not.

The Fish Docks have played a huge part in my life, from when I first saw all those steam trawlers in the late 1950's, stem on the 'North Wall' all steam and smoke! What a sight it seemed. So much activity. I was a vessel recorder on the lock pits for a short period, and remember one day logging 83 arrivals and sailings. That of course includes the seine netters and inshores.
It's a different story now, and very sad to see the decay in all of our fishing ports.
I will email some phot's when I get a little time.
Steve

john shaw
15th September 2006, 14:53
[QUOTE=mattarosa;76669]Y I have much stronger memories of Cleethorpes (evidenced by numerous photos of gangs of our family on Cleethorpes beach) and staying in a caravan at Ingoldmells.

Hilary-- ditto-- days out to Cleggy (we lived only 30 miles away), but most holidays late 50s/early 60s were to Ingoldmells or Skeggy in caravans. Ah, it was a simple but great childhood back then.

DON'T go back-- it'll make ya weep. Those places are the pits now.

Clem
15th September 2006, 14:58
It's a different story now, and very sad to see the decay in all of our fishing ports.
I will email some phot's when I get a little time.
Steve

That's a sad sight Steve. My uncle skippered her very early on, 62/63'ish, when she was quite new. He said she was a lovely ship.

Owned by 'Diamonds' before being used by the navy.

This pic. is when she had been taken around opposite the fish market, prior to being devoured by the cutters torch!

Clem

mattarosa
15th September 2006, 15:32
[QUOTE=john shaw;76722

Ah, it was a simple but great childhood back then.

DON'T go back-- it'll make ya weep. Those places are the pits now.

It certainly was. I lived in a pit village in Notts and once a year they had the pit trip when two or three trains would take the whole village to Skeggy. Even if your family had nothing to do with the pit or the Coal Board, someone wangled you a ticket. The ticket would say Train A, Train B etc. Everybody went. The village would be like the Marie Celeste, but bigger and on land.

Can you imagine that nowadays? It would be on the National Burglars Union calendar of events.


Hilary

mattarosa
15th September 2006, 22:45
[QUOTE=Clem;76665]

Attached are thumb nails of AQUARIUS & LEICESTERSHIRE.

The Times, Tuesday, Feb 01, 1938; pg. 14
FEARED WRECK IN ORKNEYS
15 LIVES BELIEVED LOST
One of the six bodies washed ashore on the Orkney Islands during the week-end was identified yesterday, and there now seems little doubt that they are all from the trawler Leicestershire, of Grimsby. The number on part of a wireless set washed up with the bodies had led to its being identified as part of the equipment of the trawler, which should have returned to port last night.
The vessel set out for the fishing grounds on January 7, and the last heard of her was at 1.44 a.m. on Friday, when she was in touch with Wick Radio Station and reported her position as 30 miles north-west of Sule Skerry, a desolate island in the Orkney group.
The body identified was that of Harold Burkitt, a trimmer. He was identified by his mother, who said that her son had on one arm the tattoo marks of a swallow holding a letter in its beak and on the other arm a heart with the letter “M,” which was the initial letter of the name Muriel. Burkitt was 23.
The fifth and sixth bodies were washed ashore yesterday on the Orkney island of Hoy. One has tattooed on the left forearm a dagger and serpent. A cotton kitbag which has come ashore bears the initials “L.E.S.”
It was stated at Grimsby last night that the names of the Leicestershire’s crew are:-
A. Evans, skipper; G. Neslin, mate; C. Slater, first engineer; R. Holloway, second engineer; A. Booth, third engineer; N. Revell, H. Byron, J. Connelly, H. Millor, deckhands; Harold Burkitt and A. Miller, trimmers; A. Blyth, steward; H. Sywords and H. Lancaster, firemen; and R. Mortland, wireless operator.

I have attached a terrible (sorry) thumbnail of the memorial to the skipper and crew of the Leicestershire.

Clem
16th September 2006, 00:42
Thanks for posting that Hilary, can you tell me, is the image taken from the memorial in the Orkneys?

Best wishes

Clem

mattarosa
16th September 2006, 07:41
Thanks for posting that Hilary, can you tell me, is the image taken from the memorial in the Orkneys?

Best wishes

Clem

I'm afraid I can't tell you, Clem, it's just another thing I found under my bed.

Hilary

mattarosa
16th September 2006, 07:43
Thanks for posting that Hilary, can you tell me, is the image taken from the memorial in the Orkneys?

Best wishes

Clem

Clem
Have a look at this page under "Worse things happen at sea"

http://www.joanglee.co.uk/#St.%20James%20Square,%20Grimsby

mattarosa
16th September 2006, 08:57
Our posts about the Leicestershire have made me wonder how many of these trawlers there are and whether they were all Grimsby registered.

I have the following:

GY528 Argyllshire
GY520 Ayrshire
GY196 Bedfordshire
GY398 Berkshire
GY286 Berkshire
GY899 Cambridgeshire
GY180 Cambridgeshire
GY742 Cheshire
GY766 Devonshire
GY524 Fifeshire
GY496 Hallamshire (a red herring in this list, perhaps?)
GY 85 Hampshire
GY332 Hertfordshire
??? Leicestershire
GY426 Lincolnshire
GY251 Lincolnshire
GY924 Oxfordshire
??? Rutlandshire

Are there any more?

Hils

PS - if anyone can fill in the blanks, please do.

Sebe
16th September 2006, 09:11
Found this thread very interesting as it brought back so many memories. Born in Cleethorpes and raised in Grimsby. Spent many a day down the North Wall or fishing at the Fish Dock entrance in late 50's/early 60's. Did a pleasure(?) trip on Ross Hawk (my uncle, Colin Chandler, was Mate) before leaving school. Had a spell as a 'barrow boy' while waiting for exam results and then joining MN.
Only get down to the docks now for the Open Day if I am in UK, but I understand that these are coming to an end(?).
What a change there is now when you remember the docks full of vessels and all the industry associated with it - it really is a sad sight today.
So Guys, keep up the good work - it certainly brings back memories for me.

Sebe (Applause)

mattarosa
16th September 2006, 09:20
Found this thread very interesting as it brought back so many memories. Born in Cleethorpes and raised in Grimsby. Spent many a day down the North Wall or fishing at the Fish Dock entrance in late 50's/early 60's. Did a pleasure(?) trip on Ross Hawk (my uncle, Colin Chandler, was Mate) before leaving school. Had a spell as a 'barrow boy' while waiting for exam results and then joining MN.
Only get down to the docks now for the Open Day if I am in UK, but I understand that these are coming to an end(?).
What a change there is now when you remember the docks full of vessels and all the industry associated with it - it really is a sad sight today.
So Guys, keep up the good work - it certainly brings back memories for me.

Sebe (Applause)


Hi Sebe
I can sometimes find a little story about trawlers that are mentioned, but is an extremely small one for Ross Hawk.

The Times, Thursday, Mar 07, 1968; pg. 2
The Grimsby trawler Ross Hawk was blown ashore in the Humber at Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, last night.

What was it like doing a pleasure trip? If it was before you left school, you must have been very young. Weren't you scared?

Hilary

mattarosa
16th September 2006, 09:22
I'm off to my mum's, which is a computer free zone, for the weekend, so no more from me for a little while. I hope you all have a great weekend.

Hilary

Clem
16th September 2006, 12:30
Found this thread very interesting as it brought back so many memories. Born in Cleethorpes and raised in Grimsby. Spent many a day down the North Wall or fishing at the Fish Dock entrance in late 50's/early 60's. Did a pleasure(?) trip on Ross Hawk (my uncle, Colin Chandler, was Mate) before leaving school. Had a spell as a 'barrow boy' while waiting for exam results and then joining MN.
Only get down to the docks now for the Open Day if I am in UK, but I understand that these are coming to an end(?).
What a change there is now when you remember the docks full of vessels and all the industry associated with it - it really is a sad sight today.
So Guys, keep up the good work - it certainly brings back memories for me.

Sebe (Applause)

Hi Sebe, I'm glad you find this thread interesting, thanks for contributing.
I'll get round to posting some details of GY657 Ross Hawk when I get the time.
I've noted Colin Chandler was Mate on her. Do you have a rough date you sailed, also can you remember the skippers name at that time or any other of the crew?

Best regards

Clem

Clem
16th September 2006, 12:31
I'm off to my mum's, which is a computer free zone, for the weekend...
Hilary

Have a good weekend Hilary.

Clem

Sebe
16th September 2006, 14:35
Hi Sebe, I'm glad you find this thread interesting, thanks for contributing.
I'll get round to posting some details of GY657 Ross Hawk when I get the time.
I've noted Colin Chandler was Mate on her. Do you have a rough date you sailed, also can you remember the skippers name at that time or any other of the crew?

Best regards

Clem

Hi Clem,

The Ross Hawk was fairly new - I remember her arrival from builders, so I think it must have been the summer 1961 when I did a trip, as I joined the MN October 1962 and had spent the summer months on the docks. Can't remember the rest of crew now (another senior moment!) and unfortunately my uncle 'crossed the bar' some time ago. I do know that he sailed on the Bombardier for some time , and prior to Ross Hawk, he was on Restrivo or one of that class.

Just checked the Sidewinder site and Jack Ibbotson was skipper on the maiden voyage of Ross Hawk and I think it was still him when I did the trip.

Sebe (Thumb)

Roger Griffiths
16th September 2006, 15:44
Our posts about the Leicestershire have made me wonder how many of these trawlers there are and whether they were all Grimsby registered.

I have the following:

GY528 Argyllshire
GY520 Ayrshire
GY196 Bedfordshire
GY398 Berkshire
GY286 Berkshire
GY899 Cambridgeshire
GY180 Cambridgeshire
GY742 Cheshire
GY766 Devonshire
GY524 Fifeshire
GY496 Hallamshire (a red herring in this list, perhaps?)
GY 85 Hampshire
GY332 Hertfordshire
??? Leicestershire
GY426 Lincolnshire
GY251 Lincolnshire
GY924 Oxfordshire
??? Rutlandshire

Are there any more?

Hils

PS - if anyone can fill in the blanks, please do.


RUTLANDSHIRE GY335 O/N164417 registered at GY 7/9/1936
LEICESTERSHIRE GY241 O/N164401 registered at GY 25/1/36 LOST 28/1/38
HALLAMSHIRE GY496 O/N67757 registered at GY 1875-1893
AYRSHIRE GY393 O/N108474 registered at GY 1897-1906

Roger

mattarosa
17th September 2006, 21:20
RUTLANDSHIRE GY335 O/N164417 registered at GY 7/9/1936
LEICESTERSHIRE GY241 O/N164401 registered at GY 25/1/36 LOST 28/1/38
HALLAMSHIRE GY496 O/N67757 registered at GY 1875-1893
AYRSHIRE GY393 O/N108474 registered at GY 1897-1906

Roger

Hello Roger
Thank you for your help.
Hilary

Clem
18th September 2006, 21:27
Hi Hilary, hope you had a nice weekend.

Here's your next installment.

Clem


Official Number: 160873
Port of Registry: Grimsby
Number: GY369
Name: Curtana
Callsign: GTNM
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 12/29
By: Cook Welton & Gemmell Ltd Beverly
Gross Tonnage: 354
Net Tonnage: 149
Length: 140.2 ft.
Beam: 24.6 ft.
Draught: 13.2 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: T 3cy 96 RHP
By: C.D. Holmes & Co. Ltd. Hull
Owner: Loyal Steam Fishing Co. Grimsby
Manager: W.W Butt
Comments: Ex. H701 Lady Enid; 06/37 to Grimsby; Admiralty Service; Hired as M/S 08/39-10/45; Armament 1-12pdr; 08/53 sold to Fleetwood
Fate: Scrapped 08/55

Note: She was still named Lady Enid while first registered in Grimsby (Lloyds 1937-38) This vessel is not to be confused with H702 Lady Enid


Fatalities

Henry Davidson (22) deckhand
93 Flinton Street, Hull
Lost overboard, S/T H701 Lady Enid
White Sea, 24th January 1937

R.I.P.

mattarosa
19th September 2006, 07:24
Hi Hilary, hope you had a nice weekend.

Here's your next installment.

Thanks Clem. I had a very nice weekend. A friend had lent me all six volumes of "Distant Grounds" so I had plenty of trawler interest in my weekend. It was interesting to see those old films of the times Steve was reminiscing about.

Hilary

Clem
19th September 2006, 09:19
Yes, they're very good videos, I've seen one them and a few other titles that don't spring to mind.

Clem

mattarosa
19th September 2006, 09:41
Does anyone have any details of a trawler called Cypress that was operational in 1900?

I have just come across a horrible story about a Grimsby skipper called Benjamin Baggott who, in an assault on the high seas, threw turpentine over a negro (who presumably was a member of the crew) and set fire to it.

I hope he isn't Baggott's ancestor, as he sounds like a very nasty piece of work.

Hilary

mattarosa
19th September 2006, 09:51
Another mystery trawler (a mystery to me anyway), the Germania, said to be a Grimsby steam trawler.

In August 1900, the Germania was in collision with the steam Jaegersborg of Copenhagen in the North Sea off Blyth. Three of the crew were saved, but seven were lost, including the skipper, who had the very appropriate name of Fysch (Thomas Wilson Fysch).

Anyone know anything about the Germania?

Hilary

mattarosa
19th September 2006, 11:56
I hope he isn't Baggott's ancestor, as he sounds like a very nasty piece of work.

Hilary

Sorry for the scrambled message. I meant, I hope Baggott isn't anyone on here's ancestor!

Roger Griffiths
19th September 2006, 14:47
Hello,
I have nothing on CYPRESS
GERMANIA GY 540 O/N99715 on GY register 1893-1900 Lost in the North Sea 29/July/1900

mattarosa
19th September 2006, 23:05
Hello,
I have nothing on CYPRESS
GERMANIA GY 540 O/N99715 on GY register 1893-1900 Lost in the North Sea 29/July/1900

Thank you for your help again, Roger. Do you know how many Grimsby trawlers there have been EVER? I think it must be something over 3,000 including the sailing trawlers.

Hilary

Steve Farrow
20th September 2006, 09:14
Hello,
The question of how many Grimsby trawlers there were in Grimsby is an interesting one. According to Charles Cox's excellent "Steam Trawlers & Liners of Grimsby", he lists 1,824 vessels. He also published "Sailing Trawlers & Liners of Grimsby" This deals mainly with the Dandy-rigged smacks (ketch) that used a beam trawl, and the smacks that fished with long-lines.
These numbered 1,258. Large numbers of wooden Seine-net vessels with their pale blue hulls, were also based here although their origin was Denmark.
I believe that only three of these survive today.
Regards
Steve
Thumb nail is of the TOKIO being scrapped

Roger Griffiths
20th September 2006, 19:57
Hello Steve,
Yes, an interesting one and I think one that could never be totally accurate.
My list contains the basic details of some 3,800 GY fishing vessels registered before 1930. I reckon you could add, what, 600/700 vessels registered after that date. Any more ideas or points of view?

regards
Roger

mattarosa
20th September 2006, 20:48
Hello,
The question of how many Grimsby trawlers there were in Grimsby is an interesting one. According to Charles Cox's excellent "Steam Trawlers & Liners of Grimsby", he lists 1,824 vessels. He also published "Sailing Trawlers & Liners of Grimsby" This deals mainly with the Dandy-rigged smacks (ketch) that used a beam trawl, and the smacks that fished with long-lines.
These numbered 1,258. Large numbers of wooden Seine-net vessels with their pale blue hulls, were also based here although their origin was Denmark.
I believe that only three of these survive today.
Regards
Steve
Thumb nail is of the TOKIO being scrapped

So my estimate of 3,000+ was not over the top. It was just a guess. It is a stupendous number. Just think of all the lives down the years that will have depended on them. Not only the fishermen themselves, but shipwrights, netmakers, fish salesmen, fish workers, shopkeepers and all the other ancillary industries.

Steve, I have sent you an email. I hope it arrives safely as my email of 15th September obviously didn't.

Hilary

mattarosa
20th September 2006, 20:49
[QUOTE=Roger Griffiths;77909]Hello Steve,
Yes, an interesting one and I think one that could never be totally accurate.
My list contains the basic details of some 3,800 GY fishing vessels registered before 1930. I reckon you could add, what, 600/700 vessels registered after that date. Any more ideas or points of view?


Well, it looks like my 3,000+ was a serious underestimate! And that I have quite a few (hundreds and hundreds) missing from MY list.

Steve Farrow
20th September 2006, 21:12
Where do you start from? Is it the fishing craft that worked out of the Haven before any of the docks were built, or the very first registration pre-fixed with GY? Then do you include the small inshores? If it is the introduction of steam trawlers, is the starting point the first wooden smack to be fitted with an auxilliary steam engine or the first iron hull trawler without sails? I don't really think it can be defined but the handfull of ships that are left certainly can!

Hilary.......Haven't received your emails as yet.
Regards
Steve

mattarosa
20th September 2006, 21:25
Over the weekend, I was telling my mum about all the things we have been talking about here, especially Steve's memories of what Grimsby used to be like. I also inflicted on her several hours of 'Distant Grounds'.

This all led to her reminiscing about her childhood and teenage years in Grimsby before the war (mum is 84). She told me one very nice story about a chap who got her a pass onto the docks one day and told her to meet him there with a basket, which he filled with fish. I sensed this might have been a budding romance, but obviously the fish didn't get him anywhere at all, as my mum married my dad, who was a Grenadier Guard and had nothing to do with Grimsby, the sea or fish.

A vivid memory for mum was a day when she was walking home from work. The family were living in Cleethorpes at the time (they flitted every five minutes and lived all over Grimsby, Cleethorpes and Little Coates) and she says she was walking along the "main road". She looked out to sea (if it is the sea, my geography is none too bright) and saw a "minesweeper" standing on its end (sorry I don't know which end) with half of it sticking out the water, having been hit by a mine. I asked her if it was a trawler and she was not sure.

Mum says this must have been no later than April 1940, because she then joined the army and wasn't in Cleethorpes any more. She thinks it was early 1940 and not 1939 but she is not sure.

Anyone got any ideas what this ship (minesweeper? trawler?) might have been? I have looked in British Naval Vessels Lost at Sea and the only possibility I can see in the Humber was the trawler Benvolio mined off Humber 23 February 1940. I think that was a Fleetwood trawler. In another part of the list, though, it said off Spurn Head. As I said, my geography is not too bright, and I don't know if you would be able to see that from Cleethorpes.

Can anyone throw any light on mum's mystery minesweeper?

Hilary

mattarosa
20th September 2006, 22:21
[QUOTE=Steve Farrow
Haven't received your emails as yet.
Regards
Steve[/QUOTE]

I must be Spam! I will try again now (2121 hours)

Steve Farrow
20th September 2006, 22:26
Hello Hilary,
The name of that ship could be quite a poser. Many trawlers and sweepers were blown up in the Humber Estuary and they could have come from anywhere in the UK. It was very early in the war though and that should narrow it down a little. Spurn Point is about four miles from Cleethorpes front, so these semi submerged wrecks would be visible at low water. The Benvolio was lost 'Off' the Humber so that suggests out in the North Sea.
I will try and dig a little deeper.
Regards
Steve
The thumb-nail is the HMT William Brady later Tokio

mattarosa
20th September 2006, 22:37
[QUOTE=Steve Farrow;77930]Hello Hilary,
I will try and dig a little deeper.

Thanks Steve. I thought it was worth a try since it was right at the beginning of the war and in such a specific location.

Mum got quite talkative over the weekend, and I also heard the story of the skipper next door who did a midnight flit to Aberdeen when he could not pay off his debts and, to my amazement, the fact that she nearly went on a pleasure trip to Greenland or Iceland (can't remember which), along with his daughter, on his trawler, but her mother would not let her go.
She cannot remember the name of the trawler, but she thinks the skipper was called Woods.

Any sign of my email?

Hilary

Steve Farrow
20th September 2006, 22:58
I have re-checked my emails and nothing has arrived from you. This happens sometimes!
steve.farrow51@ntlworld.com
Regards
Steve

Clem
20th September 2006, 23:03
Hi all, I've been busy these past couple of days.

Great stories from your mam Hilary, they certainly put you in mind of those uncertain times many years ago.

I'm amazed at the number of fishing vessels once registered in Grimsby alone. Imagine the British Isles as a whole? The seas around our coast must have been a hive of activity with ships steaming to and from the fishing grounds.

Regards

Clem

mattarosa
20th September 2006, 23:18
[QUOTE=Clem;77937]Hi all, I've been busy these past couple of days.

Great stories from your mam Hilary, they certainly put you in mind of those uncertain times many years ago.

I'm amazed at the number of fishing vessels once registered in Grimsby alone. Imagine the British Isles as a whole? The seas around our coast must have been a hive of activity with ships steaming to and from the fishing grounds.

I'll probably get banned for saying this but... no wonder there aren't any fish left.

mattarosa
21st September 2006, 07:11
An early morning question before I go to work.

I have on my list GY125 Ross Kelly. My source (apparently) is Olsens of 1975.

Was there another Ross Kelly ex-Kelly GY6?

I have seen a little drawing on Ross Kelly on Doigs slipway, cut in half. I think I must have seen that on Ray Richardson's sidewinder site. Would that have been GY6?

Any help appreciated.

Hilary

Steve Farrow
21st September 2006, 09:49
Hello Hilary,
Yes, they are the same ship. Built in 1956 at Cochranes Shipyard in Selby as a middle water trawler. Six of these 'K' class ships were built, four were fitted with steam engines and two with diesels.
The steam powered ones were....Kelly, Kipling, Kashmir and Kelvin. The two diesels were the Kandahar and Khartoum.
In January 1962 the Kelly was re-named Ross Kelly and in 1967 she worked out of Newfoundland for about a year before returning. She was given a new fishing number GY. 125. In July 1982 she left for Lowestoft and was converted for oil-rig stand by work for Colne Shipping, and renamed Caicos. This work she carried out until September 1987 when she was sold to a Spanish breaker and scrapped.
In 1966-7 they were all 'Chopped in two' and lengthened by 23 feet and out went the steam engines and boilers and in went new Ruston Diesels. This gave these trawlers a new lease of life to fish deep water.
Another steam trawler, the Joseph Knibb was later renamed Kenilworth then, Ross Kenilworth. She foundered off Iceland in May 1962.
Steve

mattarosa
21st September 2006, 11:09
Yes, they are the same ship

Thanks Steve, that is brilliant information.

Did you get my email this morning? (I am at work now so can't tell)

Steve Farrow
21st September 2006, 13:29
Sent you an email....almost a book! It will hopefully await you when get home.
Regards
Steve