Falmouth tug loss

rushie
30th May 2006, 10:52
Hi,

Whilst in a Falmouth pub at the weekend I heard a story of a BP ship dragging a tug under at the port.

Has anyone got any info of the incident.?

Thanks,

Rushie

dom
30th May 2006, 11:12
belive it was the british sailor 32,000t think it came under the stern and the prop.caught it i belive 2 of the tug lost their lives.
sorry thats all
dom

rushie
1st June 2006, 19:30
Thanks Dom....a sad affair then. By the way the conversation went, I believe they salvaged the tug.

Rushie

treeve
1st June 2006, 21:16
Story on ...
http://archive.thisisthewestcountry.co.uk/2003/6/26/29793.html

Best Wishes
Raymond

Nigel Wing
4th November 2006, 20:50
Rushie.
It was the British Sailor involved with the sinking of the Falmouth tug, Lynch.
Several years later while I was an Apprentice at Falmouth Docks, another accident occured, British Justice, while moving to No 2 drydock from the Queens wharf dragged the tug Codicote Scot on her side, and under, she was also salvaged and subsequently returned to service.

rushie
5th November 2006, 14:00
Thanks Nigel,

I bet BP were popular down there then...!

Rushie

janner
12th November 2006, 20:08
Hi Rushie,

There were two occassions of tugs being sunk in Falmouth since 1950. The first was the Lynch in 1953 which was sliced open by the screw of the British Sailor. Luckily no lives were lost. The second was in 1960 when the St Levan now resting in Vancouver and formerly the Codicote Scot was pulled over by the British Justice before the release pin could be released. The Fireman and Engineer had a lucky escape. The latter was my late father in law.

Hope this also helps

Janner

Nigel Wing
15th November 2006, 21:16
Janner.

the ex Falmouth tug, now in Vancouver is the St Eval. what happened to the St Levan ex Codicote Scot, will need a little research, will keep you posted.

Nigel

Gary Gill
24th January 2007, 18:47
Hi all,
An interesting thread for me, as my grandfather was one of the engineers on the Falmouth tugs from the 1950's to 1970's. I used to go on them a lot as a lad as did my mum when she was young. Health & Safety would not like that at all, these days! Anyway, the earlier postings are correct about the Lynch being pulled over in 1953 and St Levan in 1960. I recall the St Levan left at anchor in the Fal for several months in about the late 1960's as it was going for scrap. The St Mawes & St Merryn had the same fate (There is a photo on the internet of them in the breakers taken in the early 1980's). The St Eval was turned into a luxury yacht and is in Vancouver. Again, there is an article on the conversion that you can find on the internet. The St Denys is now in a maritime museum in Brittany - I keep meaning to visit as I haven't seen her since she was part of Falmouth Maritime Museum in the mid-1980's. I only ever went on the Lynch once, as Falmouth Towage disposed of her about the time I started going on board. I'm not sure what happened to the St Agnes. Getting back to the 1960 incident, my grandfather, Russell Hughes ("Russ") was, I thought, the engineer on board when it happened. Maybe he was the fireman at the time - otherwise I am related to Janner! Coincidentally, I worked in South Africa in 1995, and befriended a chap whose father was in the merchant navy in the 1960's. It turned out his father was on the British Justice at the time, and saw the whole thing. There isn't an awful lot of information around on these beautiful old tugs. Someone on the TugTalk site was in the process of writing a book on them a few years ago, but I don't know if it ever got published. Anyway, regards to all.

R58484956
25th January 2007, 10:04
Welcome Gary to the site enjoy it and thanks for the above information. Bon voyage.

Indie Boy
10th May 2007, 15:48
Hi Rushie,

There were two occassions of tugs being sunk in Falmouth since 1950. The first was the Lynch in 1953 which was sliced open by the screw of the British Sailor. Luckily no lives were lost. The second was in 1960 when the St Levan now resting in Vancouver and formerly the Codicote Scot was pulled over by the British Justice before the release pin could be released. The Fireman and Engineer had a lucky escape. The latter was my late father in law.

Hope this also helps

Janner

Great Topic! I was on the bridge of the BRITISH SAILOR when this happened. We were on our way to the Spithead Naval Review at the time. Our prop had a chunk knocked out of it which gave rise to terrible vibration.As there was not time to fit a spare, we trundled up as it was. After the Review, we drydocked in Southhampton and had it all sorted.
At the time of the incident Falmouth was agog! The Pilot got the blame (I think) and it was all over the local paper and very topical in The Grapes.

Mike O'Brien
12th May 2014, 13:20
I joined the tug Lynch in 1954 following her sinking the year before. The British Sailor was the largest tanker to enter the port at that time and was being berthed alongside the Easter Arm at Falmouth docks. Unusually four tugs were employed to berth the ship due to her size. Two on the bow, two on the stern and one pushing up amidships. When nearing the jetty one tug on the stern pulled to get the way off and the Lynch eased off on the starboard quarter to allow the stern to move to port. The two bow tugs eased up with the starboard bow tug in position to pull the bow off to starboard if required. the Lynch drifted astern and got under the starboard quarter of the British Sailor when she went astern. The propellor struck the Lynch under the stern making three large holes in the hull. She knocked out the tow rope and moved ahead into the docks basin where she quickly settle on the se bed. All the crew got off with nor fatalities.