Tax Laws

gdynia
31st May 2006, 14:07
For years the UK Government have stated that fixed oil platforms, jack up rigs, drill ships etc did not come into the Tax Laws. Yet on the other hand Merchant Vessels all qualified. As having spent several years on Drill Ships which were self propelled had to have Marine Crews and went from A to B under their own steam how were they not included in the Tax Laws.Would like tofind out members opinions and views on this.

lochluichart
31st May 2006, 17:58
Gdynia,
I understood that the law had been changed a couple of years ago.
This apparently was after a test case regarding a crew man on a jack-up working of Yarmouth.
Ruling was that rig was a vessel as it was mobile. So same should apply to semi-subs and drill ships.

Worth checking out.
Lochluichart.

benjidog
31st May 2006, 18:18
What's up Gdynia - don't you think you are paying enough tax? If you have any surplus I will take it off your hands! (*))

Brian

gdynia
1st June 2006, 06:00
Brian,

Wish I wasnt but as Esther Ranson said "Thats Life"

RayJordandpo
10th September 2006, 04:27
For years the UK Government have stated that fixed oil platforms, jack up rigs, drill ships etc did not come into the Tax Laws. Yet on the other hand Merchant Vessels all qualified. As having spent several years on Drill Ships which were self propelled had to have Marine Crews and went from A to B under their own steam how were they not included in the Tax Laws.Would like tofind out members opinions and views on this.
Same as me. Spent many years on self propelled drilling rigs paying full tax. Classed as vessels and requiring certificated watchkeepers for transits. I wrote to John Prescott, Dawn Primarolo and Glenda Jackson. They all came back with the same answer that "you can't call a rig up in a time of war" and that's what the seaman's tax concession is all about (according to them). What nonsense, we are qualified deck officers and We as individuals can be called up if necessary. Their answer was the same regarding this accommodation rig (flotell) that I am on now although we steamed it from Singapore to East timor and back to Singapore. Singapore to Australia (Darwin to Melbourne), all under her own power and us keeping navigation watches. I can't think of a better type of vessel "in a time of war" than a flotell ( hospital ship, troop carrier etc.) the Americans are building rigs of this design for that very purpose.
Ray

Pat McCardle
22nd July 2007, 23:33
All you guys working on semi's, jack-ups, drillships etc are all on a better income than the seamen on conventional 'Ships' & I think it is a way some shipping companies keep their pay rises to the bare minimum when they know that their employee's are getting a tax refund for crew changes outside UK waters or for working cargo at platforms etc, again, outside UK water's? If you are being employed as a 'Seaman', regardless of what 'craft' you are on, then you should be entitled to the F.E.D.

timeout
24th August 2007, 01:12
Got fed up with paying 40% a long time ago, and decided to go "composite"
which meant the next best thing to tax free, you kept 83% of the pot.
I never looked back till brother Gordon changed it all in the last budget, he caused absolute mayhem by declaring composites "dead" it took 12 weeks without any money coming in to sort it back to where it was.

I have had HMRC disqualify me from tax exempt on minor issues, and even had a session at the commissioners, appealing a ludicrous tax bill, the commisioners took a dim view of HMRC stance, and my appeal was upheld, it is definetly worthwhile considering an appeal, as the commissioners give greater import to common sense in an issue, than a vague interpretation of current taxation rules.