Start Up

Rangiman
6th June 2006, 14:00
May be there are some other clueless types like me from the catering and deck branches who havn't got the first idea of the procedure for "starting up a ship". Would some erudite ex engineer be kind enough to give us the low down. Even though I was engineers steward once when working by on the 'Tiki, its never occured to me until now.
I'm not silly, I know you have to pull the choke knob before you turn the key, but what then.
Bill (Thumb)

albatross1923
26th January 2007, 12:37
re start up rangiman
doxford 6cyl opposed piston engine heat up piston cooling water tank start cooling water pump start lub oil pump circulate crankshaft bearings and all con rod bearings turn engine with turning gear disconnet top starting air resevoirs 600psi open starting air to engine like wise main fuel supply prime main fuel valves to 6000psi albatross 1923

trotterdotpom
26th January 2007, 12:50
re start up rangiman
doxford 6cyl opposed piston engine heat up piston cooling water tank start cooling water pump start lub oil pump circulate crankshaft bearings and all con rod bearings turn engine with turning gear disconnet top starting air resevoirs 600psi open starting air to engine like wise main fuel supply prime main fuel valves to 6000psi albatross 1923

You asked for it Rangiman.....

John T.

Tmac1720
26th January 2007, 13:19
You puts the big key into the slot on the bridge thingie and turn to the right. Then you turn the key as well until engine starts. On cold mornings the use of the choke is recommended. The choke is usually operated by the Captain grasping the Chief Engineer by the throat.(K)

non descript
26th January 2007, 13:20
Albatross, well done Sir, nice one. (Thumb)

Keltic Star
27th January 2007, 07:14
Push the ship downhill and engage first gear, if automatic use the booster cables from another ship.

Bearsie
27th January 2007, 14:20
I am sitting here laughing at some of the "procedures" !!!
Oddly enough none of them mentioned glow plugs LOL

Seriously? What Albatross said goes.

On small coasters it was similar if different.

handfill day tank,
Fire up the compressor to fill up the start air bottles.
Open valves for cooling circuit.
Turn on the engine crank case ventilation blower (mostly USA for some odd reason)
Fire up the heating boiler and turn the valves to preheat engine (make sure not to send any heat into the captains cabin in july...)
Hand pump engine oil through the engine, from filter/reservoir tank until
pressure shows on certain gauges (forgot how much)

Yodel (german coasters only) at the captain that "she" is ready.

Go on standby, that is to say: stay in engine room with oily rag in hand, and look professional, while the rest of the crew stand on deck in the rain.
Remove yourself from engine room upon request by captain, usually after he is done "playing around" with the controls and she runs at normal rpm (whatever is normal...) just before you leave, turn on the main engine generator and compressor, switch off the auxilary.
Try to get a cup of coffee before the other crew members drink it all.
It may be advisable to simply take the whole pot down with you beforehand.

For the setup on "High Speed Coasters" follow this link: http://mysite.verizon.net/ress3y0n/id27.html and scroll towards the bottom left of the page :)

jim barnes
27th January 2007, 16:32
Captain blows down pipe to engine room ask's if engines are ready, recieves reply of yes then rings telegraph to say which way to go releases mooring tells helmsman where to point it and it's off we go....simple?

owen69
27th January 2007, 17:02
you were a steward and you ask that? you know that nothing starts until you get up and wake them up with a cuppa.

billyboy
30th January 2007, 09:11
boiler room start up on a (cold) steam recip meant inserting a start up nozzle (#1)and lighting it. then strip and clean the Nozzles for the day. at a signal from the 4th engineer replace the #1 nozzle for a #2 nozzle. later when thewre is enough steam to run the auxhiliarys the engineer indicates and in go the big nozzles for the day. (the auxhiliary boiler was started earlier to heat the fuel oil ect) when the steam pressure is high enough the main stops are opened to allow steam into the engine room. when the engine room start the turbined we just increase the revs on the fuel pump to keep the steam pressure up. Think nowadays its all done by mirrors...LOL.

jock paul
1st February 2007, 19:44
I still shudder at the thought of the 'stand by' diesel genny we had on my 1st ship (a steamer). This misbegotten object (MAK) was made, I presume, in the '30's. A 3 cylinder lump tucked behind the main circ. pump. To start you first pumped up the minute air bottle by hand. this usually took about 20 minutes and a copious supply of blood, sweat and tears. This being achieved you very carefully turned it to the EXACT starting mark on the flywheel. Next, remove the 'starting match' holders from the cylinders. This achieved, you inserted a starting match in each holder. They were about 1 eighth diameter and two inches long. This was the big moment! You set a match to these 'fuses' and screwed them into the cylinders as fast as you could, dashed round the genny (or jumped over the flywheel), opened the air and prayed. If you were in luck the engine would pick up and fire into reluctant life. You then shut off the fuel on No1 cylinder and used that as a compressor to recharge the start air bottle. That bottle only held enough air for one start, if she didn't fire at the first attempt you had to pump up again by hand. I swear that I've seen strong engineers crying over that miserable engine!

Peter4447
1st February 2007, 21:45
An interesting thread Gentlemen. I seem to remember hearing about a small engine in use on coasters (I think some were made by Plenty & Son of Newbury that were owned at one time by Everards) that were called bulb engines and had to be started using a blowlamp. Is this correct or am I going too far back in time for our engineering fraternity?
Peter4447(Thumb)

jock paul
3rd February 2007, 12:55
Hi, Peter 4447. Th correct term was 'Hot Bulb Engine". The most famous/notorious probably being those made by Bolinder. Jock

JoK
3rd February 2007, 13:22
We had a 8 cylinder hand crank start emergency diesel-Lister . When all the black gang was wore out from trying to start it, the deckies would try their luck. You NEVER stood in the doorway during this attempt, as it was not unknown to start and they couldn't get the handle off. There would be bodies dashing out that door, while the engineer was trying to shut it down and cursing. Right about then the handle would come off and go flying across the space to crash into the bulkhead.

Our start-up was 4 hours before sailing, start the 2nd main condensor up (the first one was on running auxiliaries), open main steam to the Skinner Uniflows, open the A-drain valves, and put 50 lbs steam on the engines with valves centered. Steam was put onto the steering gear. 30 minutes before sailing, the engineer would start turning the engines, one ahead, one astern at 20 RPM. Every 5 minutes, switching direction. The A-drains were usually left open until you had full away.

johnalderman
3rd February 2007, 13:35
Do they still have Engineers on ships?(Fly)

jock paul
3rd February 2007, 18:46
Do they still have Engineers on ships?(Fly)


Do they still have ships?
Jock

jock paul
3rd February 2007, 18:50
We had a 8 cylinder hand crank start emergency diesel-Lister . When all the black gang was wore out from trying to start it, the deckies would try their luck. You NEVER stood in the doorway during this attempt, as it was not unknown to start and they couldn't get the handle off. There would be bodies dashing out that door, while the engineer was trying to shut it down and cursing. Right about then the handle would come off and go flying across the space to crash into the bulkhead.

Our start-up was 4 hours before sailing, start the 2nd main condensor up (the first one was on running auxiliaries), open main steam to the Skinner Uniflows, open the A-drain valves, and put 50 lbs steam on the engines with valves centered. Steam was put onto the steering gear. 30 minutes before sailing, the engineer would start turning the engines, one ahead, one astern at 20 RPM. Every 5 minutes, switching direction. The A-drains were usually left open until you had full away.

Hi, JoK. I haven't heard of 'A-drain valves' before. Obviously cylinder drains, but what does the term mean?
regards Jock