Newest Maersk container ship burns in shipyard

Principe_Perfeito
11th June 2006, 22:04
See the photos here:
http://www.112-odense.dk/2006/Jun/09062006/09062006.htm

Best regards from Lisbon,
Paulo Mestre

treeve
11th June 2006, 22:25
Can't help wondering just what is actually burning so intensely?
After all if it was a building, it would have to be finished Class 0
Spread of Flame, let alone the fire spread precautions in Compartmentation,
What are these structures actually made of? The window frames
themselves were burning - surely thay are not PVCu or something
equally stupid? The ceilings are actually raging in flames - what on
earth were they finished with? In a building of this nature, wiring
would be in Pyro cable. I am just amazed at how much of a fire it
was and how it spread - not at all a reassuring prospect at sea,
I am sure.

Best Wishes
Raymond

Frank P
11th June 2006, 22:44
All I can say is that I am glad that the fire did not happen while the vessel was at sea, and I hope that there were not any casualties.

Frank

hawkey01
12th June 2006, 16:02
An amazing fire and as Raymond & Frank say how does a new build burn so easily. I assumed everything would be flame retardant and near impossible to burn. Mind you think back on the Hyundai Fortune how the superstructure burnt on her. Also do these new accommodation blocks/skyscapers have any external ladders. I asume there are some in there somewhere.
Hawkey01 (Read)

fred henderson
12th June 2006, 18:55
No material is completely fireproof. If the temperature is high enough everything will burn, explode or vaporise, even concrete. Steel is a great conductor of heat, just look at an electric hotplate on a cooker hob. Fire retardent material will delay a fire but the only way to stop it is to remove the oxygen. In my experience the best system in an enclosed space was the good old halon drench and the most effective fire retardent was asbestos.
These will not be in a new ship, and of course the structure is so high that the firefighters cannot gain access. It is probable that the sprinkler system has not been commissioned yet.

Fred

John Rogers
12th June 2006, 19:34
It could be the paint and cleaning material left in the wheelhouse since she was still being finished. Thats quite a fierce looking fire on the bridge.
John.

Ships Agent
12th June 2006, 22:40
See the photos here:
http://www.112-odense.dk/2006/Jun/09062006/09062006.htm

Best regards from Lisbon,
Paulo Mestre
thought for a moment that it was the Maresk Greenock but I am behind the times as I see she has already been handed over to her owners

Jan Hendrik
13th June 2006, 06:05
You can also watch a 1 and half minute film of this fire, go to:
http://www.112-odense.dk/

then click on "film" on the left side and from the 3 options, you take the lowest screen. Double click, download 3.5 Mb.
Please note : no sound.

This website gives you access to all sorts of fires the Odense Firebrigade has dealt with the past few years, just in case you are interested.

This particular vessel of nearly 400 mtr in length supposes to carry 13.500 TEU and is one of a series of four. Massive.
Jan

Tmac1720
13th June 2006, 16:19
If it's of any interest when H&W were outfitting a vessel the bridge area always had lots of waxed paper laid down to protect the deck covering from paint splashes dirty boot prints etc. As well as that the bridge equipment would all be double wrapped in polythene film for protection. Add all that to the usual crap lying around such as air lines, paint tins and assorted bits of wood a fire caused by a small spark can quickly spread. We had a serious engine room fire on the English Star under construction for Blue Star, caused by a welding spark where someone forgot to put down the fire blanket. It only takes a second of carelessness and all hell breaks out.

Principe_Perfeito
13th June 2006, 23:53
A (in)famous loss by fire at Belfast was the beautifull motorship BERMUDA of Furness Bermuda, while being rebuilt by Workman Clark after a devastating fire at the pier in Bermuda in 1931.

Does anyone know what was official cause to the fire?
I only know that the fire started in the engineers quarters.

Best regards from Lisbon,
Paulo Mestre

If it's of any interest when H&W were outfitting a vessel the bridge area always had lots of waxed paper laid down to protect the deck covering from paint splashes dirty boot prints etc. As well as that the bridge equipment would all be double wrapped in polythene film for protection. Add all that to the usual crap lying around such as air lines, paint tins and assorted bits of wood a fire caused by a small spark can quickly spread. We had a serious engine room fire on the English Star under construction for Blue Star, caused by a welding spark where someone forgot to put down the fire blanket. It only takes a second of carelessness and all hell breaks out.