Hungry Hogarths

notnila
14th July 2006, 23:46
Nobody out there prepared to admit signing on a Baron Boat? Ijoined the Baron Pentland 1962 in Bremen( Prescot St Pool ) gave us £1 each and put us on the train to Harwich.8 month trip 7 ports.Wish I was in her now.

lakercapt
15th July 2006, 22:50
I will admit to signing on a Baron Boat.
Sailed 8 horrible months on Baron Kinnaird and stood by Baron Pentland when the sold it to Greek shipping interests.
Spent 5 months on Baron Cawdor for maiden voyage and were not happy that I went on vacation at that time.
Never went back
Not a masochist.
Scottish Ship Management as they became has a web site.
www.scottishshipmanagement.com.
They don't like adverse comments!!!!!!

ARRANMAN35
16th July 2006, 12:33
Hi,
Joined the Baron Dunmore in drydock Birkenhead in September 1956,
a natural draught coal burner built in 1933.
One trip to Cuba for sugar, Guantanamo Bay no less, feeding was of the
usual company standard and accomodation was indeed basic.
Learned sufficient, that one trip not to pursue a career with them.

dom
16th July 2006, 12:43
never sailed on a baron boat,there were to many companys around like them,why should they have all the fun,but i belive there was one baron boat out of glasgow you could not get a job on,i think it was only short trips of about one month, full glasgow crowd home port,good run

ARRANMAN35
16th July 2006, 16:58
Nobody out there prepared to admit signing on a Baron Boat? Ijoined the Baron Pentland 1962 in Bremen( Prescot St Pool ) gave us £1 each and put us on the train to Harwich.8 month trip 7 ports.Wish I was in her now.

Baron Dunmore was in Burntisland discharghing alumina ore from Takoradi in
Dec 1956.
Have posted a piccie of her in the Gallery.

Don Sangster
24th July 2006, 06:20
Joined the Baron Ramsey in Cardiff in March 1955 biggest mistake I ever made down to the West Coast of Africa to Accra and Takoradi to load Manganese we had to trim coal
from the tween decks for the black gang not very good in that heat arrived in Calais
late June they wouldn't pay us off we had to stay for a week and then take her to
Birkenhead she was Built in 1929 scrapped in 1961 she was as basic as they get
Don Sangster R572077

vangooler
24th July 2006, 11:46
I must be having a SENIOR'S moment. My book says I joined the Baron Ardossan as an EDH in Liverpool 21/10/59 and left her in London 28/01/60. It must have been an uneventful trip. For the life of me I can't remember anything about the trip. Anyone out there who may have been on her that can help get the little grey cells working?

tercar
25th July 2006, 11:18
Hi Don
I joined the Baron Ramsey in1951 or 2, same run as you. No fridges just the icebpox on the boatdeck.
Did you find the chess set I helped carve out of a broom handle?

James MacDonald
8th September 2006, 18:23
I joined the Baron Belhaven in St Johns NB April 67 as AB. Discharging sugar then we were chartered on the famous MANZ run.looking back Im sure I enjoyed these days.although our modern day seamen wouldnt get up the gangway ( or wouldnt go up the gangway ). We arrived at Greenock on Nov 67 only to have her sold to the Greeks. :)

K urgess
8th September 2006, 19:28
Commonly known as the "Baron Wemyss ya F**ker". Seemed to be some sort of a war cry.
Joined for my very first trip as junior sparks at Dagenham wharf in July 1966. I couldn't find it so I went back to the gate and was told that the tide was out so I should go back and look over the edge. Lo & Behold there she was.
My first chief sparks refused to sign on 'cos he'd met the Old Man before (Capt Della Minnards - see my gallery). Couldn't get a full crew so he went up and lined up the miscreants at the pool and took his pick.
London to Tampa, Panama, Lyttelton, Dunedin, Bundaberg and Mackay. Set out for Japan and ended up in St John's NB. Back to Tampa, Bluff, Dunedin (Christmas & New Year), Mourilyan, Singapore, Suez and Liverpool by end of Feb '68.
BOT feeding, hardly ever anything fresh. Just about everybody jumped ship except the officers and some of us were sorely tempted in Kiwi. I dined out for years on that trip. Enjoyed every minute of it (Thumb)

PS Attached souvenir

Roger Turner
9th September 2006, 22:19
Baron Dunmore was in Burntisland discharghing alumina ore from Takoradi in
Dec 1956.
Have posted a piccie of her in the Gallery.

Was that the one I saw at the ore berth outside Takoradi harbour as we entered - The crew were over the side probably scaling and painting and some body had written "HUNGRY BASTARD" in red lead - somebody said she was a Hogarth ship.

lakercapt
9th September 2006, 23:29
Fubar
That was the era I sailed on Baron Kinnaird and the exact same route.
What a miserable experiance and I could write a book about all the going on.
Alas the captain had only sailed in Hogarth's and did not know how the other half lived. Thought that everything was as normal. Normal there was not how other ships operated.
After sailing from Liverpool to Tampa and Panama Canal to N.Z. we arrived there to find that there was no mail. Just short of a capital punnishment crime.
It was only the fact that we had two strong apprentices and us three mates that the ship got out of many a port. That included the master who did not understand when the parting should stop. Course when when some of the crew are in his quarters what chance of disipline.
Eventually I had to have a heart to heart with the master and tell him enough was enough and we would not do it again.
Hardly spoke to me for the rest of the trip.
Eight months and it certainly was not one of my most pleasant experiances. It is said that the brain forgets some of the miserable occurances so the ones I rememer must have been only the average. I finally got the letter from my wife confirming that the rabbit had died at the same time she wrote me of the birth of our daughter.
I was told that they improved when they ammalgimated with Lyle Shipping but in my opinion they could only go up as they were worse than any other outfit I worked for.

Felt sorry for the apprentices and they had to complete their indentures with them.

K urgess
10th September 2006, 02:45
Lakercapt
I've searched my memory and re-read my diaries and my experience of Hogarth's seems completely removed from your description. This was my first ever trip to sea as a sparkie and I had no idea what to expect. I'd sailed as a steward on a Danish ship while at college but that had been more of a cruise with the Captain making sure I didn't come to any harm.

I'd left home in July '66 expecting to join the Bendoran and was "Shanghaied" on to the Baron Wemyss when I got to Marconi's depot in East Ham. My mother kept my first ever letter and according to that my impression after my first night on board was that she wasn't too bad but a little on the small side. My first chief RO refused to sail but his replacement wasn't much older than me and not one for the usual practical jokes or a hard taskmaster. A very good teacher instilling me with habits I used all through my career as a sparkie.

My letter home suggests that the Mate was promotoed to captain while the regular one went on leave. I can't remember him clearly at all, obviously didn't leave much impression. The regular captain rejoined in Christobal in August. Captain Minnards was a bit of a tyrant in some ways but very fair and appeared to know how to handle a ship. We managed to drop a lifeboat in the Gulf of Carpentaria at lifeboat drill when the falls parted company with the boat because of rotten wood. The move to pick it up again seemed so effortless. We just went around in a circle, stopped with it alongside at number 2 hatch and hoisted it onboard with the derricks. Funny how you remember some things clearly even though they're not written down whereas my diary reminds me of things I just can't remember at all.

He had a policy of no spirits except for senior officers and special celebrations and only 6 beers per man per week. I think this was possibly the cause of some strife. His other annoying habits were that he had to have noon when the sun was overhead so the clocks were advanced or retarted in multiples of 3 minutes (3 watches) which was hell for someone having to start watch on GMT. The other was lecturing us poor sparkies on our morals while sitting on top of the broadcast receiver in the radio room. Woe betide me if I scraped my chair across the deck after he'd gone to bed. Lovely choice of language, wishing to see targets on the radar stand out like "red hot pr**ks"!

There's a thread going on about favourite watering holes at the moment and I can never remember the names. I have a note in this diary about the "Plains" in Lyttleton. Also the "Broadway" and "Gresham" in Dunedin. If anybody reads this far and remembers these places I'd love some memory jogging. The only thing I remember is "Knock three times and ask for Mary". Because of the Kiwi licensing hours most drinking was done after hours by special invitation. It was also pre-decimal. I'd fallen in love in Dunedin so I was happy as a lark.
So far I don't remember anything untoward. She shook like mad when empty so that it was almost impossible to write or drink from a glass. The food was nondescript but edible. We had a pair of Maltese cooks who could work wonders. It's the first time I'd seen an omelette made from dried eggs. They seemed to make the meagre rations go a long way.

We appear to have sunk two beacons and gone aground while leaving Bundaberg. So much for ship handling although that was probably the pilot's fault. I don't think I was very impressed with Queensland having walked to somewhere called Burnett Heads and found even less. Mackay appears to have been a lot better with swimming and lots of "birds" on the beach.
We seem to have broken down a few times crossing back across the Pacific judging by the number of sharks caught. We'd set out for Japan, which I was looking forward to, and ended up in St.John, NB. There's another one "The Centennial" in St John which I vaguely remember because of a certain waitress.

This appears to be where the trouble has started. I got on well with most of the crew and they seemed OK but they must have taken extreme exception to the beer quota. The first jumpers were the 2nd/Stwd "Bootsie" and a donkey greaser, in St John. We'd also had a change of 3rd mate in the same place. An AB had been signed off in Mackay but I think he was an Aussie working his passage home. There had been some empty beer bottles thrown at a tug as we passed through Panama on the way to Canada which had caused a visit by the Canal police.

An EDH was paid off in Tampa and the crew left the ship refusing to sail. I remember that we officers singled up and were ready to cast off when they decided to rejoin us as the accomodation ladder was about to be raised. I think this may have been caused by us either running out of beer altogether or the rationing having been introduced.

While bunkering in Christobal we were tied up in front of the Huntsfield who were only too happy to sell our crew all the beer they could carry. During transit one of the helmsman didn't turn up for his trick so the Mate was sent to get him. He got thumped for his trouble so they persuaded the current helmsman to continue. The relief helmsman then turned up on the bridge just a little worse for wear and thumped the mate again. Before he could be restrained he then thumped the Old Man. That was too much for even his drunken mates so they removed him forcibly. It couldn't go unpunished so the Canal police were called and he was taken off in handcuffs at Miguel lock. I got a chewing from the Old Man because I'd shaken the bloke's hand as he left. He thought I'd agreed with what the bloke had done but the fact was he was from Hull like me and it was just a courtesy.

We appeared to have relieved Kiwi of a few jumpers because all the missing crew was replaced when we arrived at Bluff just before Christmas. Although we also lost an AB who jumped here. We had problems with a derrick when the gooseneck collapsed under load and it punched a hole in the deck. Nobody was hurt but it was close.

Luckily we managed to get back to Dunedin and true love on Christmas Eve. There's yet another one "The Ravensbourne Harbour View Hotel" I do remember this and gallon jugs of beer and "schooner" glasses. I've still got a seven ounce HANZ beer glass.
On New Year's Day the sport seems to have been throw sparklette over the side according to my scribblings. All in fun of course! What happened later wasn't in fun. An example of British seaman's justice. One of the new crew members that had joined in Bluff had an appetite for very young girls from what I remember. Something to do with the Harbour View Hotel which didn't go down well so he was shown the error of his ways by his shipmates and then paid off.
This was one of the few places I thought of jumping. We were both offered jobs TV servicing but decided we'd rather come back home and go out legally than live expecting the "knock".
The bosun was paid off in Dunedin after suffering a nervous breakdown and a DBS was taken on board and locked up in a spare cadet's cabin. We finally left Dunedin on January 5th 1967 and went to load sugar at Mourilyan.
We only had one apprentice and he was an Aussie from Melbourne. He was paid off in Mourilyan and flown home. We signed on a new bosun, an AB and a DHU before sailing for Singapore.

Nothing much more seems to have happened. Probably because we were on our way home relieved that we weren't going to have to complete the full two years of our articles. We docked in Huskisson, Liverpool on February 26th.

Because I was an extra sparkie my cabin was on the boat deck in the cadet's accomodation just aft of the funnel. We only had one cadet and there were about 4 cabins. I think the arrangement was peculiar to Baron boats although I seem to remember reading in a thread that Blue Flue or someone had something similar.

I just seem to have accepted that the crew were a rough lot, that the food wasn't much good, that the lifeboats were rotten, that ships broke down a lot, that water rationing was normal, that my sink would regurgitate the contents of the waste pipes in rough weather and that if you played poker with your shipmates for long enough you would end up all evens again no matter how many beans you got up to.

And very lastly the Old Man asked me to come back! I have not recorded my reply! (LOL)

ARRANMAN35
10th September 2006, 20:30
Was that the one I saw at the ore berth outside Takoradi harbour as we entered - The crew were over the side probably scaling and painting and some body had written "HUNGRY BASTARD" in red lead - somebody said she was a Hogarth ship.


Hi Roger,
This would have to have been late Nov, early Dec 1956,
fortunately I was not on board then.
Must say that the " ships side graffiti " reflected the
on board circumstances.

eldersuk
12th September 2006, 12:45
Has anyone got a pic of Baron Inchcape (II)? It would be much appreciated for forwarding to an ex Baron boat man in New Zealand.

Derek

lakercapt
12th September 2006, 16:23
Has anyone got a pic of Baron Inchcape (II)? It would be much appreciated for forwarding to an ex Baron boat man in New Zealand.

Derek

Derek
if you go to WWW.scottishshipmanagement.com
they have photos of their last ships and a guest book yu can ask if its not posted
regards
Bill

Tony Breach
12th September 2006, 21:16
Sir William Reardon Smith was master in Hogarth's barque DRUMADOON in 1881 at age 25. He did OK for himself!

Hogarths got caught with 8 Ruston AO engines in 4 bulkies. (Reardon Smiths also got caught & RFA) Anyone know who paid for that fiasco & the re-engining of the ships?

robertblack36
13th September 2006, 14:00
I was on the island of Masirah just of the coast of Oman 1966 to 1967.
there is, or was, a "Cairn" commerating the demise of the crew of the Baron Inverdale or Baron Inverclyde (i am not sure if the names are correct) that had run aground on the island.The natives of the killed the crew when they came ashore. An RN gunboat was sent to the area and the Sultan? of Oman was told that the islanders had to be punished. The Sultan, (if these events are correct) had all the males over the age of twelve killed and the islanders were not allowed to have any brick built homes. They were still using old oil drums from the power station when i was there.The date as to when this happened, as most dates now, seem to have been in the grey-matter that has now gone into limbo.
On the Western end of the island there was an old counter-stern cargo vessel
named "Electra". The story of her, is that they miss-judged the tide (flooding
not ebbing). After getting safely off, the vessel re-floated, some of the crew went back onboard and made sure she was hard and fast aground.
On the Eastern end there was a tanker name World Glory. The tale on her was, that she was on her maiden voyage. I have posted this in here, in the hope that some of the Hogarth Co. stalwarts can expand/correct my memories.
The odd BP tanker (the three twelve type) would call in and pump ashore fuel
to the tank farm.
And to finish (my memory is having flashbacks) there is a stop-over landing stage for British Imperial Airways flying seaplanes to the eastern routes. They winched the seaplane out of the water up a ramp. The date when built was written in the cement, again i cannot remember, my memory has stopped flashing.

I seem to have written much more than i intented to this thread, sorry to have waffled on, "having one of my senior moments".
regards
Robert.

K urgess
13th September 2006, 14:34
Baron Innerdale was built in 1896 and lost in 1914 in a collison in the Red Sea with the African Monarch whilst on passage from Port Said to Calcutta with salt. The name doesn't appear to have been used again.

The only Baron Inverclyde was scrapped at Bilbao in 1972.

Hope this stirs the grey cells Robert

Cheers

trotterdotpom
13th September 2006, 15:20
Sir William Reardon Smith was master in Hogarth's barque DRUMADOON in 1881 at age 25. He did OK for himself!

Hogarths got caught with 8 Ruston AO engines in 4 bulkies. (Reardon Smiths also got caught & RFA) Anyone know who paid for that fiasco & the re-engining of the ships?

Tony, Scottish Ship Management (Hogarths, Lyles and Lamberts of London) had ships with Ruston AO engines. As far as I know the companies each paid the price themselves. No doubt a couple of heads rolled.

On Baron Ardrossan (the new one), my three month trip took eleven months and finished in Amsterdam where the engines were replaced with Werkspoors - not a huge improvement by all accounts. We had a Ruston Engineer permanently on board, all the way from sunny Lincoln. He was a hero.

John T.

makko
13th September 2006, 16:17
Robert,

Thanks for your waffle and flashbacks! You have cleared up a mystery for me and a friend. My friend was in the RAF as an airframe fitter for 22 years. He told me that he was posted to Oman and that they were not allowed any buildings! They lived in the crates used to transport spares or tents in the desert. There were always locals hanging around for the empty oil drums or any scraps of wood. He only went because it fast tracked him to sergeant rank! On his return to Blighty, because he had spent no money basically in 15 months, he went straight out and bought a big colour television! Remember this was around 1970.

Thanks again Robert!

Dave "Birthday Boy" R.

robertblack36
14th September 2006, 12:53
Baron Innerdale was built in 1896 and lost in 1914 in a collison in the Red Sea with the African Monarch whilst on passage from Port Said to Calcutta with salt. The name doesn't appear to have been used again.

The only Baron Inverclyde was scrapped at Bilbao in 1972.

Hope this stirs the grey cells Robert

Cheers

Hi Fumar. Many thanks for your info, I assume that the name Innerdale was a typing error. I have decided to name the ship Baron Sumthin.
One thing for sure is the Cairn, some RAF gents repaired it when I was there.
I did try to reply yesterday And failed. My memory requires a good shaking, not stirred!!! thanks again, Robert.

robertblack36
14th September 2006, 13:22
Robert,

Thanks for your waffle and flashbacks! You have cleared up a mystery for me and a friend. My friend was in the RAF as an airframe fitter for 22 years. He told me that he was posted to Oman and that they were not allowed any buildings! They lived in the crates used to transport spares or tents in the desert. There were always locals hanging around for the empty oil drums or any scraps of wood. He only went because it fast tracked him to sergeant rank! On his return to Blighty, because he had spent no money basically in 15 months, he went straight out and bought a big colour television! Remember this was around 1970.

Thanks again Robert!

Dave "Birthday Boy" R.

Hello Dave. Many thanks for your reply. I think that your friend may have been at Salalah which is on the mainland of the Oman to the west of Masirah.
A dangerous place to be at that time. The service men and civies (not locals) on Masirah were living in brick built accommodation. Your friend will most likely have been on Masirah, the only way to get to Salahah was by air from there in a rather bumpy flight on a small aircraft. Your friend may have heard of my Baron Sumthin. regards Robert.

K urgess
14th September 2006, 16:43
Robert

Sorry, no it wasn't a typo. If it was then it's the world ship society's fault.
She's listed in the index and on the right page as the "Innerdale". There were only ever two "Invers" as Barons and they were the "Inverclyde" and "Inverforth".

The "Inverforth" was built in 1965, sold in 1969 and is still in service as the "Margio".

I suppose "Baron Dunmore" might also be appropriate.(POP)

Cheers

Tom Logan
4th November 2006, 18:52
Nobody out there prepared to admit signing on a Baron Boat? Ijoined the Baron Pentland 1962 in Bremen( Prescot St Pool ) gave us £1 each and put us on the train to Harwich.8 month trip 7 ports.Wish I was in her now.

I did NOT sign on a Baron boat. But I did join the Bellhaven in Hull as 3rd.Mate,must have been early 1954, worked by for a couple of weeks without signing on, decided I didn't like it mainly as she was bound for Takaridi and not Tampico as I had been told by the Pool in Glasgow, so left her after a stand-up row with the Super, who claimed I couln't 'desert'. Pointed out I had never signed on in the first place. A pity. really, as the super, who shall remain nameless, had been a family friend, and I had been at school with his son. Ah well.

Charles compass
25th April 2007, 03:24
SAILED ON BARON ELGIN IN 57 belgim to cuba,loading sugar in Ceion Fuegus
when castros rebels raided the port,lousy feeder ,arab black gang below
never again...

Charles Compass

Barry Wood
25th April 2007, 04:15
As anyone got a picture of the Baron Garioch I jioned her in Feb 1966 till Oct
1966 she when out they said forr three months it did not help when the enggee blow up in Tampa from there to South Australia then up to Queensland for suger cane and then the rest of the trip we when between
Queensland to Japan I for one really enjoyed myself on this ship
Barry Wood

Larry Dev
17th June 2007, 22:03
I had a narrow escape, was about to join Hogarths in 1961 as an apprentice, got cold feet and declined to sign the indentures. If I remember correctly my first years salary would have been £185 increasing by either £5 or £10 annually until I had completed the 4 years.

notnila
29th July 2007, 00:39
Ye may have sailed in sailing ships,ye may have sailed in tramps,
Ye may have been in whalers off The Grand Newfoundland Banks,
Ye may have been in tanker ships,and had a bloody rough time,
But ye've never been through the mill 'til ye've sailed with the Baron Line!!

Anyone know more verses?I first heard it sung by a"Makam"in the "Baron Pentland"1961/62.

PollY Anna
29th July 2007, 12:32
Hi Notnila

I don't know any extra verses, but I was warned on my 2nd ship all about Hogarths at the same time as you. It must have been a song that was doing the rounds at that time. I heeded the warning and never ever found the courage to try a Baron boat, but now I feel WHAT IF?

Ron

oldsalt1
29th July 2007, 14:11
As I was wandering 'round the docks
A lookin' at the ships
I saw the Baron Cawdor
Underneath the tips
I asked the skipper for a job
He said "You'll do me fine
There's plenty jobs for bums and stiffs in the good old Baron Line"

The mate was from Iona
The skipper from Dundee
The bosun & the chippy from across the Irish sea
The sailors from the Mersey
The fireman from the Tyne
You've never seen such a ****** up crew 'till you sailed with the Baron Line

The cook he was fron Senegal,
The steward from Tyree
We had mutton for the dinner
And curry for the tea
The mates they got the bacon
The crew we got the rind
You've never seen starvation lads
'till you sailed with the Baron Line


Happy Days.

notnila
29th July 2007, 22:04
Great stuff Oldsalt 1!!!Thanks for that.

hawkey01
10th August 2007, 14:42
Barrie,

just been reading this thread. There are two pictures of Baron Garioch in the galleries. One in mine and one other.

Hawkey01

Robin Craythorn
10th September 2007, 12:03
Nobody out there prepared to admit signing on a Baron Boat? Ijoined the Baron Pentland 1962 in Bremen( Prescot St Pool ) gave us £1 each and put us on the train to Harwich.8 month trip 7 ports.Wish I was in her now.

I joined my first ship 'Baron Geddes' as an Apprentice at Redheads yard South Shields in April 1958, ship had just been converted from coal to oil burning.
It only took me a short time to realise that the Captain had got a better job than I had, which gave me the incentive to gat down to the studdies and get my tickets, Had many varied and mostly enjoyable trips with Hogarths servivng later on Baron Herrries, Baron Jedburgh and Baron Kinnaird
I left Hogarths in 1964 by which time I had a Mate's certificate.

regards Robin Craythorn

Bill Davies
10th September 2007, 12:42
I joined my first ship 'Baron Geddes' as an Apprentice at Redheads yard South Shields in April 1958, ship had just been converted from coal to oil burning.
It only took me a short time to realise that the Captain had got a better job than I had, which gave me the incentive to gat down to the studdies and get my tickets, Had many varied and mostly enjoyable trips with Hogarths servivng later on Baron Herrries, Baron Jedburgh and Baron Kinnaird
I left Hogarths in 1964 by which time I had a Mate's certificate.

regards Robin Craythorn

Robin,

Pleased to see you reprieved yourself by giving that well earned Second Mates (FG) its correct title of Certificate. I always thought 'ticket' was demeaning. I sweated blood for mine in 61. Might be appropriate or even overstating things today!

Brgds

stan mayes
1st October 2007, 16:23
Having recently placed a request for contact with a shipmate Harry Campbell in FREECREST during 1951- in Crew Members thread,it reminded me of that voyage...
FREECREST was a tramp of Crest Line - Ivan Ivanovic & Co London..
Chartered by Saguenay Terminals the voyage was 11th July to 17th December 1951..
Signed on at Tilbury and all Deck crew were local to Grays and Tilbury including my brother Les AB ,I was Bosun..
Sailed in ballast for Trinidad and at Chagaramas we loaded bauxite ore for Port Alfred on Saguenay River, 8 hours discharging here then sailed for Dingwall NS..Loaded gypsum ore here for Savannah Georgia...then to McKenzie Guyana and here we loaded bauxite for Port Alfred,discharged cargo then to Newport News Va and loaded coal for Germany..Arrived Hamburg on 25th October.Following discharge of cargo at Diestel Quai we lay by for four days for engine repairs which was ideal for me as my future wife lived in Hamburg..
Sailed in ballast for Baltimore and here we loaded coal for Rotterdam sailing on 27th November.
Clearing Hampton Roads we received warnings of a hurricane and two days later we entered into it.Within a few hours 70 feet seas were completely submerging the ship.In three days we made no headway and the ship suffered much damage..Wire reels,pipes and pipe casings on the foredeck were carried away and washed overboard as was the gangway on port side..No1 derricks were bent and huge seas stove in the lower face of the bridge causing flooding in the officers saloon and cabins.. a lifeboat and davits were damaged... potato lockers were washed overboard and the entrance doors to the crew accomodation aft were stove in allowing tons of water to flood the cabins of seamen and firemen below...with the violent rolling of the ship this water demolished the bulkheads,bunks and lockers.
It was a total shambles.
The seamen and firemen were then accomodated in messrooms amidships..
Captain Taylor remained on the bridge all through this time until the wind decreased in strength..
Arriving in Rotterdam a tug supplied steam to the windlass and winches to enable us to moor ship and to top the derricks.
The ship would be in port a considerable time for repairs so the crew were paid off.
FREECREST was built in 1942 as EMPIRE AUSTEN ..In 1949 renamed FRINTON of Counties Ship Management ...1951 FREECREST Crest Line ... 1955 FAIRWATER Liberian flag ... 1961 APJ USHA Indian owners and 1962 broken up at Bombay..
Surviving that hurricane FREECREST proved a credit to her builders Lithgows of Port Glasgow....
Stan..

PollY Anna
1st October 2007, 17:10
Some story Stan

You had me hanging on sounds like the water got everywhere, but the cargo which was a godsend. I think that illustrates how dangerous the sea is.

Regards Ron

stan mayes
1st October 2007, 21:57
Thanks Ron,
You mentioning the cargo reminded me we had no hatch locking bars.
On receiving news of impending hurricane we - the seamen,Chief and 2nd Officer,2 Cadets and 2nd Engineer passed the runners from derrick head blocks through shackles on deck and accross the hatches,criss cross then hove tight...We used canvas vent covers for chafing on coamings...
May have been some damage or worse if we had not taken these precautions.. Regards Stan.

R58484956
2nd October 2007, 13:21
Stan your memory for the finer details of your trips is truly amazing, when I see a post of yours I know it will be extremely interesting. Keep them coming.

stan mayes
2nd October 2007, 14:53
R58484956 -Thankyou for your encouraging comments..
Not only memory -that sometimes fails me - but I have many diaries,Accounts of Wages,documents,shore leave passes and my Sub Book dating from WINHA 3rd November 1942 to EMPIRE BALTIC 7th May 1956 when I left the sea [but not ships]..
The Sub Book records all subs in ports with dates,Allotments made and Bond issues of beer,cigarettes,soap etc..very helpful in research..
I also have many photos taken during my time at sea..
I am very grateful to my father for preserving these personal treasures..
I feel I should have put Crest Line in a separate Thread as these are Baron boat postings - so will do it now..
Regards Stan...

slick
2nd October 2007, 16:04
All,
Stan's comments and actions (I am in awe of the memory)in the absence of locking bars was a routine occasionally used in Hain's when crossing the Southern from Australia to the Cape, when I look back on the Trevelyan she was pretty low in the water with minimal freeboard you needed everything.
The biggest complaint was from the Chief about "------ Deckies want Steam on deck at sea".
As that well known philosopher Ari Stotle said "Seamanship is the art of improvisation".
Yours aye,
Slick
Yours

stan mayes
2nd October 2007, 18:15
Yes Slick,
Surprising how many tramps did not have locking bars.
I think that was the main reason for the tragic loss of AMBASSADOR although I don't believe it was mentioned at the inquest...Stan.

caswell
9th October 2008, 20:58
never sailed on a baron boat,there were to many companys around like them,why should they have all the fun,but i belive there was one baron boat out of glasgow you could not get a job on,i think it was only short trips of about one month, full glasgow crowd home port,good run

Baron Boat out of Glasgow. Was the Baron Forbes. Built 19179 Ex world war 1 prize. Glasgow Lisbon Whisky out Port home. During war it was said that the Germans "Looked after her". Whisky dischaged in Losbon into rail cars marked Hamburg.see Tramp Steamers At War, George Gunn was an apprentice in her in the 2nd World War. Caswell.

caswell
9th October 2008, 21:16
Has anyone got a pic of Baron Inchcape (II)? It would be much appreciated for forwarding to an ex Baron boat man in New Zealand.

Derek
Hi If you go to H Hogarth & Sons Limited.A short history World Ship Soccierty publication It is still available.Page24 Good photo Baron Inchcape (11) All fleet listed over all years and many photos.

I was in baron Herries and Baron Geddes.

TonyAllen
10th October 2008, 00:00
Worked by on the baron renfrew Liverpool July 1960 the old one, day after she docked and believe me it was the worst kitchen and pantry a had ever seen nothing in the fridges ,pile of food on the floor in the cool room which was unfit to eat but found a large fruit cake and some tea and sugar and that was it.Stand bye captain, chief engineer and steward and myself were the first on board,it was overrun with roaches and was declared unfit for sea,
it was fumigated and the new captain asked me to sign on but I was offered the Catalina star I wish I hadn't bothered it was not the best trip I ever did

Tony Allen

trotterdotpom
10th October 2008, 00:57
Baron Boat out of Glasgow. Was the Baron Forbes. Built 19179 Ex world war 1 prize. Glasgow Lisbon Whisky out Port home. During war it was said that the Germans "Looked after her". Whisky dischaged in Losbon into rail cars marked Hamburg.see Tramp Steamers At War, George Gunn was an apprentice in her in the 2nd World War. Caswell.

Interesting theory, Caswell.

I looked her up in Miramar and the 1922 vintage "Baron Forbes" was originally "Hamburg" built at Luebeck in 1916 for Oldenburg-Portuigiesische DR - maybe she was specially built for the wine and spirits trade.

Man cannot live by beer alone - no wonder those SS men had Red Labels on their Schnappy uniforms.

John T.

vic pitcher
10th October 2008, 10:43
Yes Slick,
Surprising how many tramps did not have locking bars.
I think that was the main reason for the tragic loss of AMBASSADOR although I don't believe it was mentioned at the inquest...Stan.

"Ambassador" had stowed heavy gangway on No.3 hatch and, therefore considered it unnecessary to ship locking bars over hatch. Heavy seas shipped displaced gangway with disastrous results to the tarps and subsequent ingress of water.

shipboard
13th October 2008, 03:58
I am reading with interest about hungry Hogarths, as I was on the pool in Sunderland we tended to join most of our vessels in the whilst in drydock and subsequently I was in a couple of Baron boats in the early sixties, long trips no food.

However there were a few bandit companys aroud at that time, chatty Chapmans, Ropners, West Hartlepool Steam Navigation Company.

I remember on one of Chapmans (the Norton) the Chief Steward a typical belly robber of those days intructing the chief cook not to give the crew a full kipper for breakfast, but to share one between two, also on Sunday(steak egg and chips) to half the steaks.

Happy days alas no more.

shipboard.

billyboy
15th October 2008, 13:09
Think thats the man who went on to run a blackpool guest house. the only breakfast chef to reslice a slice of bacon ... LOL

caswell
12th November 2008, 22:32
I joined my first ship 'Baron Geddes' as an Apprentice at Redheads yard South Shields in April 1958, ship had just been converted from coal to oil burning.
It only took me a short time to realise that the Captain had got a better job than I had, which gave me the incentive to gat down to the studdies and get my tickets, Had many varied and mostly enjoyable trips with Hogarths servivng later on Baron Herrries, Baron Jedburgh and Baron Kinnaird
I left Hogarths in 1964 by which time I had a Mate's certificate.

regards Robin Craythorn

I was also an apprentice in these ships Baron Herries 1952/4 Baron Geddes 1954/6. Caswell

Pat Kennedy
12th November 2008, 22:47
I was in the pool at mann island one day, and a mate warned me that there was a Baron boat looking for a crew. Sure enough, when called through, the pool guy tried to entice me onto a ship he called the 'Barongadies', the Baron Geddes in disguise.
I pleaded an upcoming marriage, and got a berth on a rock dodger. (Firth Fisher)
Pat

ROBERT HENDERSON
12th November 2008, 22:53
Hi Caswell
Did you ever sail with Capt Douggie Wilson, 1st mate Arther Pollock,
or apprentice Allan Cann?

Regards Robert

daveb10
20th December 2008, 20:43
Hello,

I am trying to collect some family history on my grandfather. His name was Robert Reid. He served on Hogarth's ships but may have also worked for other companies. I believe he sailed on Baron Dunmore, Baron Inchcape and Baron Ardrossan.

However the only ship I can be certain about is Baron Dunmore as he was the captain of this ship when M/S Triton (http://www.warsailors.com/singleships/triton.html) was sunk in 1942.

If you ever sailed with him or know someone who did I'd be very interested in hearing from you.

Thanks

David

trotterdotpom
20th December 2008, 23:58
David, you could also try www.scottishshipmanagement.com

Good luck.

JohnT.

daveb10
21st December 2008, 00:21
Thanks JohnT, I'll certainly do that.

David

caswell
6th February 2009, 17:55
Hello,

I am trying to collect some family history on my grandfather. His name was Robert Reid. He served on Hogarth's ships but may have also worked for other companies. I believe he sailed on Baron Dunmore, Baron Inchcape and Baron Ardrossan.

However the only ship I can be certain about is Baron Dunmore as he was the captain of this ship when M/S Triton (http://www.warsailors.com/singleships/triton.html) was sunk in 1942.

If you ever sailed with him or know someone who did I'd be very interested in hearing from you.

Thanks

David Hi I was an apperentice in the Baron Herries and the Master was Robert Reid he left in 1953 to go to the new baron Ardrosssan his wife was from North Wales. Any help. Caswell

caswell
6th February 2009, 18:02
Hi Caswell
Did you ever sail with Capt Douggie Wilson, 1st mate Arther Pollock,
or apprentice Allan Cann?

Regards Robert

Hi Robert I think we did have Wilson for one trip on the Baron Herries but we also had a Wilson 2nd mate who went to Cunard. Come back to me with more info Caswell

ROBERT HENDERSON
6th February 2009, 18:22
CASWELL
I did two voyages on the Baron Douglas about 1949 or 1950, I am not sure exactly when as my DIS A only goes from 1951. Dougie Wilson was Master on both voyages 1st Mate was Arther Pollock. Capt Wilson was a Baron man through and through.

Regards Robert

sidsal
7th February 2009, 12:25
Some old hand I sailed with told me he had been an apprentice with Hungry Hogarths shortly after WW1. They had to provide their own bedding and there were places on the docks in those days where you could buy a "donkey's breakfast" - a sack filled with straw.
He also told me that they were chipping away one day at a deckhouse and the chipping hammer went straight though the wafer thin metal. They summoned the Mate who told them to get some brown paper and make paste with flour. They paper over the hole and later painted it over.
Mind you,some of the old ships in Brocklebanks were a bit primitive. The MAIHAR of 1917 had no fridge - only an icebox, and no running water. The feeding was not brilliant either. It was only when I went into tankers which bought a load of fresh vegetables in Port Said that I found they were cheap there. I was lead to believe greens were very expensive there wheras the opposite was true !

trotterdotpom
7th February 2009, 15:21
Sidsal: "Some old hand I sailed with told me he had been an apprentice with Hungry Hogarths shortly after WW1. They had to provide their own bedding and there were places on the docks in those days where you could buy a "donkey's breakfast" - a sack filled with straw....."

It was probably like that on all ships at that time. In Hull and Grimsby, it was still the same up until the late '60s and probably until the demise of the fishing fleet.

John T.

caswell
7th February 2009, 23:05
I have a photo of captain Robert Reid. Baron Herries

To daveb 10

notnila
8th February 2009, 02:57
Has anyone come across a John Gordon from Pitlochry(that well known source of British seafarers),C/O on the "Baron Pentland" 61/62?A great character,a wee guy about 4'9 tall,with his mouth open!!

sidsal
8th February 2009, 17:22
trotterdotpom
Looked up your profile - love your sense of humour - hospitality industry !!
As the Royle family head would say - "hospitality industry - my **** !!"
Cheers

manowari
10th February 2009, 11:28
Re the recent thread about Baron boats, does any one remember this incident....

The Baron Cawdor was one of three sister vessels built for H. Hogarth of Glasgow and carries the distinction of being the last coal burning tramp steamer under the British flag. She had called at Kilindini and discharged a cargo of coal into lighters and sailed for Lourenco Marques on 24 August 1957. Two days later the ship returned and signalled the lighthouse for two stowaways to be taken off. A day later a boiler valve gasket blew and
both boilers were shut down for the repair. The ship drifted north out of control while the joint was repaired. The boilers were relit but developed steam leaks in the back ends and had to be shut down again on the 27th. That afternoon the Master called for assistance giving his position as twelve miles off Kilifi. The tug Simba sailed and that night located the ship off Malindi with the international signal of two vertical red lights on the masthead
indicating ‘not under command’. A towline was connected and the two vessels headed for Mombasa. On the morning of the 29th they entered Kilindini, where the tugs Tiddler and Toroka assisted with mooring her on the buoys at ‘A’ anchorage. New tubes were fitted to the boiler and repairs completed on 19 September when the vessel sailed for Mozambique.
Three years later she was sold to Japanese breakers and arrived at Hirao on 16 March 1964.

K urgess
10th February 2009, 12:07
Two sources I have make it broken up in March 1960.

caswell
1st March 2009, 22:01
CASWELL
I did two voyages on the Baron Douglas about 1949 or 1950, I am not sure exactly when as my DIS A only goes from 1951. Dougie Wilson was Master on both voyages 1st Mate was Arther Pollock. Capt Wilson was a Baron man through and through.

Regards Robert

Hello Robert Yes Ct Wilson did do a releiving trip as Master i seem to remember they said he was related to some one in management of Hogath.

Caswell

Ardrossan47
9th June 2009, 17:34
I was a cadet on the Baron Belhaven and left when u guys joined.

charles henry
10th June 2009, 17:07
OH THOSE GORGEOUS, LOVELY WONDERFULL AND SIMPLY MARVELOUS BARON BOATS.
Way back about a million years ago I was half way up a net on the side of the
Baron Vernon which had manuevered alongside our lifeboat when she was Torpedoed. I fell back to the lifeboat along with others and the damned thing overturned.

Later we were picked up by the Baron Elgin and taken to Madeira. The only food they had to offer us were HARD TACK BUSCUITS full of weevils.

BUT SHE WAS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL BOAT I EVER SAW
de Chas

KenLin39
10th June 2009, 17:25
I was a cadet on the Baron Belhaven and left when u guys joined.
What year were you on the Belhaven. Ken.

are39
30th June 2009, 06:24
sailed on her 8/6/55 to 27/7/55 haiti london with sugar.got i1 tot for trimming coal and 3 hours overtime for trip.
Big fight in haiti greaser killed and lots of bullets from the local vigilante police
mike bishop

logunberry
26th April 2010, 19:01
I sailed on the Baron Kinnaird in 1965/1966 and that was enough for me
the only crew I can rember are G Downie capt. Archer Kemp.cadet the other cadet was a snotty nose git who's name i can't remember and an sailor called puttnam a nasty bit of work but that was baron line for you. CRAP

philipbalfe
26th April 2010, 20:15
Yes i did a Baron boat gopt it of Prescot st, the man said it will tack you all over the would and it did,so of i went thikign grat.
It wsa my first ship as deck boy and i will never forget the Baron Ardrossan.
The food was so bard most of the time i did not no whot it was,we got back home 7 mouths later only did 5 ports,

Trampshipman
1st June 2010, 14:16
Joined Baron Yarborough 1949, deckboy. Built around 1930 I think. Lived in open foc`sle, deck crowd in starb`d bow and firemen [arab] in port bow. Hungry most of the time, on BOT `Pound and pint` ration scales. No bath or shower, total bathing facilities a`bucket`! Only water supply a hand pump midships outside the galley. No fridge just a `stinking` ice box on lower bridge. Green stinking meat after a few weeks. Everything else full of weevils, `pea wack` had more weevils than lentils, and bread looked more like currant bread. She must have been most primitive of all Baron boats at that time. £7 10 shillings a month was my pay. I LOVED HER !

Regards to all.
Ken.

John Dryden
1st June 2010, 14:58
Nice one Ken,the last three words says it all!

Ian J. Huckin
1st June 2010, 16:39
I did not sail with Hogarths but did spend several years with Tanjong Shipping and Eastern Bulkers Ltd which were the foriegn flag venture of SSM

Sailed on the Baron Wemyss which became the Tanjong (?) then changed to the Kilchrenan. Had those piss poor SWD TM410 engines that replaced the Rustons. Also did another of the twin funnel jobs.

Was out at the Mitsui yard in Tamano for the building of three new EBL bulkers, the last one was the new Barron Dunmore. She was sold before she sailed.

Like I said, I did not sail with HH but I sure did enjoy my time with SSM in its other itterations. Sailed with many many Hogarth, Lyles etc officers and the office staff was from way back too.

Saddest sight was looking back at the lonely Baron Dunmore sitting at anchor while I took the Taichu (was named Cape Wrath or Race on building) out on her maiden voyage. Beautiful ships.

Ernieab
16th August 2010, 03:38
I saild for ten years with SSM on the Baron and Cape ships from "76" but by then they were mostly good feeders with the rare exception. I enjoyed my time with them and visited all corners of the world, that was the good thing about them, you never knew where you would end up. I'm sure if they were still around i would still be there, even if it means a life of grinding down valves on the medium speeds,oh happy days.

sharp
13th October 2010, 21:52
yes signed on BARON INCHCAPE 1958 at Avonmouth loaded cars tilbury for Newpot News coal to Angros dos rios Brazil river plate ports grain to manchester about four months i think not good .

C Brown
9th January 2011, 22:09
Hi. I'm interested in this website because my Grandfather, Eric Alexander Brown, whom I never met, I'm afraid, was first of all an apprentice in the last of the windjammers - shipwrecked in successive years in the early 20th century off Cape Horn in the Swanhilda and the Deccan; and was then in Hogarths, captain of a number of ships, including Baron Lovat, sunk by Italian sub, Marconi, in 1941, and Baron Jedburgh, sunk by U Boat in March 45. He survived all this, but died in 1953 before I was born. Anyone with any information about him - I'd be most interested.
Colin Brown
Edinburgh

caswell
12th January 2011, 21:44
Coiln When the Baron Jedburgh was sunk the crew took to the boats one boats crew picked up by Union castle boat, Capt e a Browns lifeboat made it to Brazilian coast after 2 week.
Fleet history H Hogarth a shot history (illistrated) by A A Mcalister. I was apprentice in them 1952/6. Caswell.

C Brown
14th January 2011, 00:36
Coiln When the Baron Jedburgh was sunk the crew took to the boats one boats crew picked up by Union castle boat, Capt e a Browns lifeboat made it to Brazilian coast after 2 week.
Fleet history H Hogarth a shot history (illistrated) by A A Mcalister. I was apprentice in them 1952/6. Caswell.

Thanks Caswell! Somewhere in the family we have a postcard my Grandfather sent home after arriving in Brazil. You'd have expected after two weeks in a boat he might have had a story to tell, but the PC says something like "Just to let you know I'm fine" - and that's it"!
Colin

charles henry
14th January 2011, 20:57
I never signed on a Baron boat but always had the greatest admiration and love of them.

Why?

In 1944 the Baron Vernon stopped in the middle of a multi sub attack on the convoy to pick up a life boat full from the Tasmania. Unfortunately I was half way up the landing net when she was torpedoed and I fell back (with others) into the life boat which capsised.

Not to worry, the Baron Elgin hauled us off our upturned lifeboat and took us to Madeira. It was certainly a "hungry" ship, all they could give us in the way of food were biscuits as hard as rocks and full of weevils.

BUT

They were the most wonderfull ships I ever knew

de chas

caswell
26th January 2011, 16:42
Hi de chas. Baron Vernon. You may know that this took place 30/10/42 Lat36.06 Long16.59 sunk by U 604.
Baron Egin (Hogarths used this name only once) she servied the war and was scrapped in 1970 but sold by Hogarths in 1958. See A A Mcalister A Short History Baron Line. Regards Caswell.

charles henry
30th January 2011, 16:04
sailed on her 8/6/55 to 27/7/55 haiti london with sugar.got i1 tot for trimming coal and 3 hours overtime for trip.
Big fight in haiti greaser killed and lots of bullets from the local vigilante police
mike bishop

All these years later, am as pleased as punch to find out that the Baron Elgin survived the war.

chas

Trampshipman
5th February 2011, 21:31
I mentioned in an earlier post that I joined the `Baron Yarborough`in 1949. She must have been the most primitive of all Baron Boats at that time. `Open foc`sle` living conditions clipper ship style. [But for`ard of course], deck crowd in starb`d foc`sle, firemen [Arabs] in port foc`sle. No fridge, just stinking icebox on lower bridge, meat green after a couple of weeks. All other foodstuffs full of weevils. BOT
ration scale `pound and pint`. Our only water supply a hand pump `midships outside the galley. Our total bathing facilities a bucket.
Most people would have regarded her as an old `rust bucket`, but she was my first ship and in my eyes she was beautiful. I loved her then and I would love her now !
However the reason for this post is Post 13 by `Not Wanted Here`,
in which he mentions beer quota`s and actually running out of beer aboard the `Baron Wemyss`. Hey `not wanted here` it seems to me that you were enjoying [for a while anyway] sheer luxury with your beer an`all. I`m surprised, I have always had the impression that all British Tramps of those days were `dry ships`. No alcohol or beer. I sailed in several Tramps as well as several Tankers, and the only time any of them ever had beer aboard was at Xmas, and even then it was always a matter of just two cans of beer per man on Xmas day only.
That was it...just two cans per man then `finito`until next Xmas day.
(Thumb)

trotterdotpom
5th February 2011, 23:11
" and the only time any of them ever had beer aboard was at Xmas, and even then it was always a matter of just two cans of beer per man on Xmas day only.
That was it...just two cans per man then `finito`until next Xmas day."

Two beers a year!!! Luxury compared with the ships of today by all accounts.

Not Wanted Here seems to be the new name of the excommunicated former moderator, Marconi Sahib. Not sure why his name changed and others didn't.

John T.

Trampshipman
5th February 2011, 23:30
" and the only time any of them ever had beer aboard was at Xmas, and even then it was always a matter of just two cans of beer per man on Xmas day only.
That was it...just two cans per man then `finito`until next Xmas day."

Two beers a year!!! Luxury compared with the ships of today by all accounts.

Not Wanted Here seems to be the new name of the excommunicated former moderator, Marconi Sahib. Not sure why his name changed and others didn't.

John T.


Yes John, I`ve read the posts and accounts under the thread `foriegn
seamen`. If those accounts are indeed true then my heart goes out to any seamen being exploited in such fashion. Conditions and food were often pretty primitive on some ships of my day, but at least we were always guaranteed our pay. Apart from some Masters robbing us of our `overtime` that is.

Ernieab
10th February 2011, 03:13
Just reading a few stories about the Baron boats during the war and rememberd a story about the owner, he was to be knighted for his companies contribution to the war effort which he duly turned down in return for permition to fly the st andrews cross from the jack staff on all his ships which was granted to him. The baron boats were then the only ships legally aloud to do so. Ernie

lakercapt
11th February 2011, 03:42
Just reading a few stories about the Baron boats during the war and rememberd a story about the owner, he was to be knighted for his companies contribution to the war effort which he duly turned down in return for permition to fly the st andrews cross from the jack staff on all his ships which was granted to him. The baron boats were then the only ships legally aloud to do so. Ernie

Thats a new one to me as I don't recall ever having the Saltire flown on any Baron boats I was on.

Davie M
11th February 2011, 16:13
On the ships I sailed on the Saltire was flown from the foremast top and the HH house flag from the mainmast top.
On a number of occasions we had to take the saltire down as some countries saw it as being superior to the courtesy flag being flown on the Starboard crosstree.
It was good to know they recognised the Scottish flag.
Davie

notnila
11th February 2011, 20:52
The mainmast top is where it was flown on the "Baron Pentland",when I was in her in 61/62
Regards,
Arch.

lakercapt
12th February 2011, 16:20
I stand corrected guys you are right they did fly the Saltire with the HH flag.
The memory is starting to fail on some things and that is the second thing to go!!!!

trotterdotpom
12th February 2011, 22:54
I'm pretty sure I've seen the Saltire flown on the jack staff of Lyles' ships and heard a similar tale of national gratitude - probably apocryphal.

John T.

Ernieab
15th February 2011, 03:03
You more than likely did see the saltire on Lyle ships John, as most of them flew the flag after the formation of scottish ship management although i,m not sure if they did beforehand as i only saild with both companies after they joind forces, Ernie.

caswell
19th February 2011, 20:54
Hi I servied my time in Hogarths 1952/6 All Baron ship flew the Saltire. in the 20the centary. The story goes to distanc them from anther co many years ago. Caswell.

notnila
19th February 2011, 23:12
Just googled it.Quite amazing this Internet thing.
"Hogarth's ships wore the Scottish Saltire at the foremast from 1918 to differentiate their vessels from those of"Lloyd Austrico",due to both having "Baron"as first name of vessels."
You can read the rest here.www.crwflags.com/folw/flags/g8gb-hfho.html
Sorry I don't know how to give you a "Clickon"
Regards
Arch

notnila
19th February 2011, 23:16
Seems I've given you a bum steer.I found the site by googling keywords.
,Hogarth's Baron Line Saltire.

edmund ward
17th March 2011, 00:21
Hello David. Hope this might be of interest.I sailed with Captain Reid on Baron Cawdor joining in Amsterdam 9/5/58.We sailed to Zeebruge for coal bunkers then to Seven islands in Canada.Iron ore loaded for Port Talbot the trip was very eventful the ship ran out of coal three hundred miles west of Ireland and was towed to Waterford by the famous tug Turmoil.We then sailed for Port Talbot arriving 18/6/58.I was the pantry boy to who it was all very exciting.The Baron Cawdor was the last British flagged coal burner. Edmund.

billysummers
1st November 2012, 22:59
anyone name of 4th engineer who was killed in a boiler accident baron wemyss 1966

pelerous
1st January 2014, 22:28
Hello,

I am trying to collect some family history on my grandfather. His name was Robert Reid. He served on Hogarth's ships but may have also worked for other companies. I believe he sailed on Baron Dunmore, Baron Inchcape and Baron Ardrossan.

However the only ship I can be certain about is Baron Dunmore as he was the captain of this ship when M/S Triton (http://www.warsailors.com/singleships/triton.html) was sunk in 1942.

If you ever sailed with him or know someone who did I'd be very interested in hearing from you.

Thanks

David

Hi David,
I was an apprentice with H Hogarth from1954 to1958.
I joined the Baron Ardrossan in London September 1954 and sailed to Colombo and Cochin with a cargo of bagged sugar and second hand London buses. We then sailed for Rangoon where we loaded rice for Colombo. Then it was down to Perth and Bunbury for a cargo of wheat for Dublin and Manchester.
The master was Captain Reid. There were two brothers masters in Hogarth at that time, one Tubby Reid and the other Jimmy Reid.
I did not ever call him Tubby or Jimmy so I do not know which it was
He was a good Master to sail with and took an interest in the apprentices. He once showed me how sew canvas.
Good luck with your family tree.
Hope this was useful.
Pelorus

Oceanspanner
24th February 2014, 00:56
anyone name of 4th engineer who was killed in a boiler accident baron wemyss 1966

Hi Billy,

I was chief sparks on the Baron Wemyss at the time of the accident in Geelong ( Boiler blowback as I recollect ). I am pretty sure that it was not the 4th Engineer who was killed but rather one of the Boilermen. Memory is not so great these days but I think he came from Glasgow. As I remember it we were in Newcastle N.S.W when we heard that he had died and one of the engineers ( I believe it may have been you ) asked for permission to go to Geelong for the funeral but was refused by Capt. John Minnards of whom I will decline to comment as I do not wish to speak ill of the dead. Was probably the worst ship I ever sailed on but remember with fondness the camaraderie of the crew in the face of the adversity that only a trip with Hungry Hogarths can bring.

Cheers