Open Hatch Concept

dom
26th July 2006, 09:31
looking through an old sea breeze i came across an article on open hatch concept,how far did this go.

gdynia
26th July 2006, 09:38
looking through an old sea breeze i came across an article on open hatch concept,how far did this go.
Dom
Still going strong. The present vessel I am on Sea Energy is a ex container feeder vessel with forward wheelhouse. The Container holds which we transport the assembled windfarm towers are fully open. Large salvage pumps are fitted to keep holds dry. Will try and get a photo on the website soon

gdynia
26th July 2006, 09:42
Dom
Still going strong. The present vessel I am on Sea Energy is a ex container feeder vessel with forward wheelhouse. The Container holds which we transport the assembled windfarm towers are fully open. Large salvage pumps are fitted to keep holds dry. Will try and get a photo on the website soon. Dom - Found a photo will put in Gallery now.

dom
26th July 2006, 09:54
i surpose its ok in good weather ,what about extreme weather conditions,would the pumps be run continual,or non return valves/scuppers operate?

gdynia
26th July 2006, 09:58
Dom

We work this system all year round in the North Sea and have never had any problems with it. We also have vessels which sail world wide with Moon Pools that we put Diving Bells thro which are fully open to the sea. Its like sailing with a Swimming Pool onboard with no bottom to it.Theres some strange looking things afloat these days

Thamesphil
26th July 2006, 10:18
There are around 60 hatchless or semi-hatchless cellular containerships currently in service. Probably one of the most familiar designs is the Sietas 168, which has two hatchless holds forward of the accomodation (4 holds total).

The term 'open hatch vessel' is, from a chartering and operational perspective, used to describe large, single-deckers with wide hatches and box-shaped holds, typically used to transport forest products, pipes, steel coils and containers. The Gearbulk ships are a good example of this concept.

Phil

dom
26th July 2006, 10:39
yes,i'am familer with the moonpool, what extent will the open hatch go to in todays large container ship and quick turn around.

gdynia
26th July 2006, 11:41
yes,i'am familer with the moonpool, what extent will the open hatch go to in todays large container ship and quick turn around.
Dom
It has to be soley cost of building a vessel as it will save hugely on not having conventional hatch covers plus as you rightly say shorter turn arounds in port.
Theres a local company in Holland operating new container vessels mostly short sea traders they have this concept. There webpage is
www.wagenborg.com

If you go into site you can change to English.

janbonde
26th July 2006, 15:24
quite a few of Wagenborg trade into the Great Lakes over here

gdynia
26th July 2006, 17:12
quite a few of Wagenborg trade into the Great Lakes over here

Janblonde

They are a very big company these days with alot of new tonnage

Tom Haywood
26th July 2006, 23:45
I seem to remember that "Bell Line" ? were a forerunner with hatchless vessels early 80's?

RayJordandpo
27th July 2006, 00:36
Dom

We work this system all year round in the North Sea and have never had any problems with it. We also have vessels which sail world wide with Moon Pools that we put Diving Bells thro which are fully open to the sea. Its like sailing with a Swimming Pool onboard with no bottom to it.Theres some strange looking things afloat these days
What about the supply vessels in the North Sea which had what they called a cargo "tube" a deep open deck for carrying pipe out to the pipe laying barges. The Norwegians had some and I believe Zapata too.
Ray DPO

cboots
27th July 2006, 03:29
Like Tom H. I seem to recall that the late Bell Line used this concept. I also recall that Contship were building a class of large box boats using this concept. With all the recent takeovers and consequent name changes in the industry I don not know what became of them.
CBoots

gdynia
27th July 2006, 07:45
I seem to remember that "Bell Line" ? were a forerunner with hatchless vessels early 80's?
Tom
Thats correct they had a few feeder container vessels with forward wheelhouses with open hatches

dom
27th July 2006, 09:28
the fore runner i belive were the Dock Express11 and the Dock Express12, looking back to the Atlantic Lady the system is designed to cope with water ingress caused by water shipped in North Atlantic force 11 conditions or as a 'deadship' situation with a safty factor of two,one other thing the accomadation "back to the fo'c'sle"

John B.
17th October 2006, 05:06
Have a look in the gallery under containerships, you will see a photo of Nedlloyd Africa, she is a deep sea containership with no hatches, cell guides extend fom hold to above deck for container stowage and security. I think there were 4 in this class - Africa,Asia, Oceania and europe, they were supposed to reduce port time due to time saved in moving hatch covers and easier stowage with reduced lashings. Extra cost of steel and construction has seen no recent large containership buildings with this concept.