British Tweed

Fairfield
24th September 2004, 15:56
One of 5 RIVER Class tankers built between Lithgow/s and Scotts' yards in the early 70s.
This was taken in 1973 at Southampton when BRITISH TWEED new,embarked on her maiden voyage carrying fresh water to Gibraltar in her unsoiled tanks.
She was only scrapped this year as MINAB I

tanker
24th September 2004, 17:03
Now i think in service remain BRITISH FORTH she is under greek flag as CHRYSSI built by Scott s.BRITISH SEVERN as MARUN and BRITISH NEATH
as MOKRAN all Iranian but built Cockerill Yards.!!!

Fairfield
25th September 2004, 21:59
Now i think in service remain BRITISH FORTH she is under greek flag as CHRYSSI built by Scott s.BRITISH SEVERN as MARUN and BRITISH NEATH
as MOKRAN all Iranian but built Cockerill Yards.!!!

Seem to remember that BRITISH TRENT had a serious collision and fire in the 80s.

Springers
22nd August 2006, 20:34
undefinedOne of 5 RIVER Class tankers built between Lithgow/s and Scotts' yards in the early 70s.
This was taken in 1973 at Southampton when BRITISH TWEED new,embarked on her maiden voyage carrying fresh water to Gibraltar in her unsoiled tanks.
She was only scrapped this year as MINAB Iundefined

Re the Pic of British Tweed, did you take it yourself? I joined her at Greenock as a GP3 and did that run to Gibralter.

Broady
25th August 2006, 19:43
I served on a few of these
British Wye
British Fidelity
British Humber
Minab
good ships and plenty of good memories on them

fazak
20th October 2006, 20:57
I served on the British Tweed maiden voyage. The welding and fittings were a disgrace to british shipbuilders. When we sailed and started to roll a bit we discovered loads of empty beer & wine bottles rattling around in the deckhead.Painters who had painted the decks hadn't bothered to pick up rags and rubbish but just painted over them.Whilst tying up on the Bonny river in Nigeria a fairlead dolly ripped off the focsle from it's welding causing the nylon mooring rope to snap resulting in two lads loosing their legs. That said there
was a good crew on board and we did manage to have a few laughs during the trip.
Roy.

rushie
21st October 2006, 00:43
Hi,

The "River" class vessels that saw service in the Falklands were the Esk, Tay, Test, Dart, Trent, Avon and Wye. My late father served on the Test and the Avon and thought they were great ships.

Anyone know why the Tweed may have been any different..?

Cheers,

Rushie

Paul Barford
2nd November 2006, 13:14
Sailed on the 'Tweed in 1985. By this time she was under Stolt management manned by Stolt personel except Master & C/E who were BP men.She was put under the Bahamas flag and renamed "BP Tweed" as was the 'Humber which was managed by Dorchester Marine.
This I believe was a try-out before flagging out the entire BP fleet and at the time,we as Stolt personnel were expecting to manage a chunk of the BP fleet but this did not materialize in the end,the 'Tweed we handed over to Dorchester in early 1986 at Tarragona.
The ship was fitted with a RAS deck & equipment which was still there at the time I was on her, but believe it was never used as the Falklands campaign had ended. It came in useful for barbeque's and sun-bathing though!

willhastie
29th November 2006, 10:46
the two guys on the weed who lost their legs, names were lenny wiseman and dave simmonds. rang them in hospital on our return to swansea,reckoned they were well looked after,but then lost contact. saw them in port harcourt hospital the nurses had mud plastered in their hair,went back onboard and told the ol man gil barber that they could not stay there as the conditions would kill them,gil must have pulled strings as a doc and nurse came down from gib and took them back.

coley70
6th April 2007, 09:30
I sailed on the Tweed when she was the Minab. We were continually shadowed by an American warship up The Gulf. We tied up on an "H" jetty at Bahrain and this warship came in diagonally behind us. Don't know what the port authority was thinking of. We had american sailors spitting at us. The daft thing was we only had 1 Iranian deck cadet aboard. I payed off in Bahrain a few weeks later. I believe she was abandoned at anchor for several weeks off Sharjah shortly after that.

I sailed on the British Forth twice. Did my 1st trip as 4/E on her. Thought she was a great ship, many fond memories. Mostly coastal trading round Oz and NZ. Made it to Fiji as well. Port Moresby but no shore leave.

Also sailed on the British Tay. Major problems with the turbo-blower. The scavenge ports kept choking up. Had to chisel them out frequently.

Coley

kevjacko
15th July 2008, 21:53
My Uncle was the Chief Steward on the Tweed on this voyage, Tony Leslie, he has now sadly passed away a few years ago now. He told me the story of the Tweed and also the trip after when 3 lads sadly lost their lives on the Renown down the tanks. As Chief Steward first aid was his responsibility. I can recall the details of his story vividly, and also from other crew members I met while serving with BP myself. I know this trhread is a couple of years old but I am fairly new to the site and just catching up.

geoff_b
24th July 2008, 15:32
i sailed on quite a few river boats, all good fun as they say,

Vital Sparks
20th August 2008, 15:56
Hi,

The "River" class vessels that saw service in the Falklands were the Esk, Tay, Test, Dart, Trent, Avon and Wye. My late father served on the Test and the Avon and thought they were great ships.

Anyone know why the Tweed may have been any different..?

Cheers,

Rushie

This class were built in yards all over Europe. The best of them were built in Sweden.

gadgee
20th August 2008, 20:50
I have moved the thread from tankers to BP Shipping.

stan302
23rd August 2008, 20:59
I sailed on the Tweed when she was the Minab. We were continually shadowed by an American warship up The Gulf. We tied up on an "H" jetty at Bahrain and this warship came in diagonally behind us. Don't know what the port authority was thinking of. We had american sailors spitting at us. The daft thing was we only had 1 Iranian deck cadet aboard. I payed off in Bahrain a few weeks later. I believe she was abandoned at anchor for several weeks off Sharjah shortly after that.

I sailed on the British Forth twice. Did my 1st trip as 4/E on her. Thought she was a great ship, many fond memories. Mostly coastal trading round Oz and NZ. Made it to Fiji as well. Port Moresby but no shore leave.

Also sailed on the British Tay. Major problems with the turbo-blower. The scavenge ports kept choking up. Had to chisel them out frequently.

Coley

I sailed on the Forth in 1978. Also went to Port Moresby while serving on the Fidelity. Grim place, as I remember, on a Sunday afternoon. Only place we managed to find open to get a drink was the bowling club which was full of Aussies drinking themselves senseless through lack of anything else to do. Happy memories of both ships even though the Forth was the last ship I served on.

RAF
25th January 2009, 20:38
One of 5 RIVER Class tankers built between Lithgow/s and Scotts' yards in the early 70s.
This was taken in 1973 at Southampton when BRITISH TWEED new,embarked on her maiden voyage carrying fresh water to Gibraltar in her unsoiled tanks.
She was only scrapped this year as MINAB I

I stood by both the "Avon" the 1st of the series and the "Tweed" the 3rd od the five.

I remember loading the fresh water in Southhampton through six fire hoses - all that the Port Authority would allow us. It was quite strange loading with the tank lids all open. No need for Inert gas!

I also recall while discharging in Gibralter that it pored with rain the whole time we were there.

The accident in Okreka later in the voyage was very distressing to all onboard as we had reported suspect deck fitting strength on the "Avon" and having stood by them both I know no mods were made.

Good ships and all the modern automation at the time was a real pleasure after the old 16 teens and Bird Boats.

RAF

BillH
25th January 2009, 21:20
Can anyone say for certainty why BRITISH HUMBER although having a river name was not one of the class but more akin to the older Fidelity type in appearance?

Never did find out during our lengthy research for our BP Tanker book.

Bill

Vital Sparks
26th January 2009, 13:50
The received wisom of the time was that the shipyard at Split, having previously bult one of the "Ity" class, tenderd and won the contract to build one of the "River" class. The hull number and name were allocated after which the yard revealed it would be actually unable to build the hull. After considerable legal wrangling it was agreed that they would build another "Ity" boat instead which became known as the "Humberity".

beverlonian
21st July 2009, 22:15
Can anyone say for certainty why BRITISH HUMBER although having a river name was not one of the class but more akin to the older Fidelity type in appearance?

Never did find out during our lengthy research for our BP Tanker book.

Bill

My reply to the same question in another thread.............

Quote:
Originally Posted by James_C View Post
fishcake,
It was only the Humber. She was also the only one built in Croatia. For reasons best known to the management at the time she was given a 'River' name, and as such was included with the other 15 'real' river boats on all company Documentation and management etc.[/I]
My recollections at the time were that the yard in Split (I think) were contracted to buld 3 vessels. Two were the Unity and Fidelity. For whatever reason the last vessel was delayed until the River class was built. Rumour at the time was that the yard did not have the technical ability to build a River class vessel, so BP settled for a third -ity boat but gave it a River class name (Humber) as it was being delivered at the same time as these.
I sailed on the Dart and Kennet, both good vessels with the exception of the boiler automation which was a nightmare.

derekhore
22nd July 2009, 10:00
I stood by both the "Avon" the 1st of the series and the "Tweed" the 3rd od the five.

I remember loading the fresh water in Southhampton through six fire hoses - all that the Port Authority would allow us. It was quite strange loading with the tank lids all open. No need for Inert gas!

I also recall while discharging in Gibralter that it pored with rain the whole time we were there.



RAF

We did exactly the same on the Nordic Breeze (Wallem Shipmanagement UK), 6 fire-hoses through the tanktops to load 32, 000t of freshwater on the QE2 berth!

In Gib, the only berth that could take us was the naval one used by the old Ark Royal, so they laid hoses up the jetty for us to discharge along .. pump for 4 hours, then stop for about 10!!
Great maiden voyage!!!

chrishandel
22nd July 2009, 10:24
Wasn't it one of the River boats where the boiler emptied with the furnace still going? I was in dry dock in Antwerp and it was there having a new boiler fitted.

Memory may serve me wrong

JamesM
22nd July 2009, 10:57
Yes, that was the Tweed. According to the story I heard some work by ships staff had been done on the boiler water level equipment and a particular part had been refitted incorrectly which meant that the low level alarm system did not operate. There then occured a low water level situation, no alarms or burner shutdown happened, and hey presto major tube burn-out.Engineers nightmare.

twogrumpy
22nd July 2009, 20:51
Yes, that was the Tweed. According to the story I heard some work by ships staff had been done on the boiler water level equipment and a particular part had been refitted incorrectly which meant that the low level alarm system did not operate. There then occured a low water level situation, no alarms or burner shutdown happened, and hey presto major tube burn-out.Engineers nightmare.

If I remember correctly, the low level device was a horrible magnetic thing with a magnetic bobbin about 3/4" X 1" which moved up and down inside a SS mounting on top of the boiler, operating a glass encapsulated floppy magnet on the outside. This was all attached to a thin rod, and I mean thin, about 1/8" going down to a large ball float, 12" dia? mounted in a cage in the drum, most unsatisfactory.
As there was a DP cell water level transmitter as well, I connected a pressure switch into this circuit via a timer, this with the magnetic thing gave us belt a braces protection. The time delay was one of the old type which you could hear operating so as the ship pitched and the water level went low I could hear the timer operate, showing the system was working.
(Cloud)

mpkk
22nd July 2009, 21:58
Lost the boiler on loaded passage to Stockholm (?). Diverted to anchorage at Gothenburg where we were lightered by the Dart, who supplied the steam to run our cargo pumps.
On completion the Dart departed and the flare of the Tweed's bow ripped the Dart's port lifeboat to shreds! The look on Terry Tytheridge's face was a picture, he was on board as BP's lightering 'expert'.
Took the Tweed to Amsterdam for repair, virtually the whole crew paid off the day after arrival as the repair was expected to take some time.

beverlonian
29th July 2009, 18:42
Lost the boiler on loaded passage to Stockholm (?). Diverted to anchorage at Gothenburg where we were lightered by the Dart, who supplied the steam to run our cargo pumps.
On completion the Dart departed and the flare of the Tweed's bow ripped the Dart's port lifeboat to shreds! The look on Terry Tytheridge's face was a picture, he was on board as BP's lightering 'expert'.
Took the Tweed to Amsterdam for repair, virtually the whole crew paid off the day after arrival as the repair was expected to take some time.

I was 4th Engineer on the Dart at this time and remember it well - I have some photo's somewhere - must dig them out.

Graham Wallace
29th July 2009, 19:07
Lost the boiler on loaded passage to Stockholm (?). Diverted to anchorage at Gothenburg where we were lightered by the Dart, who supplied the steam to run our cargo pumps.
On completion the Dart departed and the flare of the Tweed's bow ripped the Dart's port lifeboat to shreds! The look on Terry Tytheridge's face was a picture, he was on board as BP's lightering 'expert'.
Took the Tweed to Amsterdam for repair, virtually the whole crew paid off the day after arrival as the repair was expected to take some time.

Was the Mate CN Woods and C/E Ken Rutherford? I was looking at 11th Dec 1974 Ships Movements.
Graham

willhastie
6th August 2009, 10:48
i was on the dart when we lightened the tweed and as we pulled apart the tweeds forepeak just carved through our lifeboat ,i stood there thinking that the tweed was jinxed as her first voyage from govern was a disaster(see other links) this extra episode happened in 1974

myles
9th August 2009, 07:02
i was on this boat for 4 months in rio the back in 82 had some great memories of it and the tamar too the cook was kevin hall . and the ramar razing in gib with rn navy . if any one knows any one who served on them at that time for bp shipping get intouch

myles
9th August 2009, 07:34
My Uncle was the Chief Steward on the Tweed on this voyage, Tony Leslie, he has now sadly passed away a few years ago now. He told me the story of the Tweed and also the trip after when 3 lads sadly lost their lives on the Renown down the tanks. As Chief Steward first aid was his responsibility. I can recall the details of his story vividly, and also from other crew members I met while serving with BP myself. I know this trhread is a couple of years old but I am fairly new to the site and just catching up.

hi i served with your uncle on the boat i was a jcr at the time i can remember have to make him a cup of tea every day he was a good man sorry to hear he has passed away

kevjacko
9th August 2009, 11:43
Hi Myles,

Thanks for that. It must have been a trait of old school Chief Stewards. I sailed with a guy called Joe Vogle from North Shields who was the same era as my Uncle Tony when I was JCR and yep, cup of tea first thing every morning. Same for the likes of Reggie Spong amongst others. The old school chief stewards in BP were hard task masters but I can't recall any I did'nt have a huge amount of respect for because they were to a man in my experience anyway 'fair'.

connie
9th August 2009, 19:06
hi remember reggie spong very well came from reading area, if i remember correctly, wonder what became of him? think i sailed with him on the tenacity or gas enterprise once he knew i could make brown bread and ice cream cassatta he left me alone, like to think we had a mutual respect for each other.lol regards con.

kevjacko
9th August 2009, 19:57
hi remember reggie spong very well came from reading area, if i remember correctly, wonder what became of him? think i sailed with him on the tenacity or gas enterprise once he knew i could make brown bread and ice cream cassatta he left me alone, like to think we had a mutual respect for each other.lol regards con.

Connie,

I am sending you a pm on this one let me know if it comes through ok.

Ryder
13th August 2009, 02:05
I served as mate on the Avon for 2 years with Gil Barber, then as O/M on the Spey and then the Dart for 2 1/2 years. The Swedish boats were far better built then the Scott Lithgow ones. The story was that when BP ordered the SL ones they had just got a contract to build "O" class subs for the RN and all the good welders wre on that contract. Certainly the Avon had plenty of "chicken ****" welding on her. When chipping once around the boat deck bulkheads the bosun come and asked me to look at what they had uncovered , bloody awful welding all covered over with body filler !I seem to remember thay on the Avon in DD we had X rays taken at certain areas on the deck welding that were suspect. Great ships though after the Ity boats. I was also O/M om the HUmber for my sins, she was a "dog.

Tony White"

brooksy
25th August 2009, 01:46
i was on this boat for 4 months in rio the back in 82 had some great memories of it and the tamar too the cook was kevin hall . and the ramar razing in gib with rn navy . if any one knows any one who served on them at that time for bp shipping get intouch

i was on tweed 82 was po .broke my ankle in santos first day on board fell down into the steering flat fom the after rope locker.nearly landed on chief whos name i think was kinsella. had a cushey few weeks whilst it was mending

brooksy
3rd September 2009, 21:38
Have just opened the attachment at the begining of this thread and realised the ship behind Tweed is the Pendennis Castle.My first ship,and the Tweed was the last River class i sailed on(==D)

DWD
3rd October 2009, 17:49
I stood by the Tweed when building at Scotts. As I remember it, she fell off the slipway on the day they launched her, bounced off an Indian sugar boat on the next berth and went into the water. I seem to remember one of the managers at Scotts telling me that she cost them 2m more to build than BP paid for her and that those ships finished Scotts as a commercial concern. She hit the side of the Inchcape drydock coming in off trials and had to have a plate renewed prior to final acceptance. Very little seemed to go right during her first year in service, but we had some good people on board.
Didn't Gil Barber fly the Welsh flag, claiming to be the commander in chief of the Welsh Navy?

derekhore
4th October 2009, 15:13
Didn't Gil Barber fly the Welsh flag, claiming to be the commander in chief of the Welsh Navy?

Gil Barber used to insist on the Welsh flag being flown on the Unity when I was cadet with him, it was my job to look after it and ensure it was hoisted .. much to the annoyance of the mate, Frank Preece!

brooksy
5th October 2009, 21:24
Captain Gill Barber a true Welshman.Spent two years with him on the Kiwi and also the Esk.Always found him a man of principal.