Offshore heavy lift ships

paul rennison
28th July 2006, 16:40
During the 1970's I worked for about 6 years in the Norwegian sector of the North sea, Mostly in the Ekofisk field, but also in Stavanger Fijord on the construction of the Beryl A & Brent B "Condeep" platforms, There were a number of Heavy lift crane barges or converted tankers in use out there and I wondered if any of the Guys in SN have any pics & details of their dimensions, max lifts etc.
The ones I remember are Challenger (Hereema I think) Micoperi 26 ( Italian converted tanker) & Blue Whale.
Thanks in advance
Rennop (Thumb)

gdynia
28th July 2006, 17:46
During the 1970's I worked for about 6 years in the Norwegian sector of the North sea, Mostly in the Ekofisk field, but also in Stavanger Fijord on the construction of the Beryl A & Brent B "Condeep" platforms, There were a number of Heavy lift crane barges or converted tankers in use out there and I wondered if any of the Guys in SN have any pics & details of their dimensions, max lifts etc.
The ones I remember are Challenger (Hereema I think) Micoperi 26 ( Italian converted tanker) & Blue Whale.
Thanks in advance
Rennop (Thumb)
Paul
I work mainly for Heerema and in my Gallery you will find alot of photos of these vessels which feel free to use. If you do a Google search on Heerema their website gives all the info

sam2182sw
28th July 2006, 20:20
hi GDYINAitis sam here iremember the CHALANGER comming to our yard in the HUMBER shw was a converted T2 tanker by was she big at the time 300 tons lift every body that was in ship repair turned out to see her she came down to pick up an accomadtion unit that we had built at the old DRYPOOL SHIP REPAIRES we loaded it on the crane barge sea fastened to ti and of she went to the north sea next day we recived a phone call in the office can we build another one thay had droped it in the ogging i have a photo of her and on it is all the dinmationsi will get it out and let you have it sam

treeve
28th July 2006, 20:37
Hi Paul ...
Challenger on my page of Heerema

http://freepages.family.rootsweb.com/~treevecwll/anc8.htm

gdynia
28th July 2006, 23:09
hi GDYINAitis sam here iremember the CHALANGER comming to our yard in the HUMBER shw was a converted T2 tanker by was she big at the time 300 tons lift every body that was in ship repair turned out to see her she came down to pick up an accomadtion unit that we had built at the old DRYPOOL SHIP REPAIRES we loaded it on the crane barge sea fastened to ti and of she went to the north sea next day we recived a phone call in the office can we build another one thay had droped it in the ogging i have a photo of her and on it is all the dinmationsi will get it out and let you have it sam
Sam
Cheers for that. She went out of service quite awhile back. Theres actually a model of her in Heeremas Office in Holland will get a photo next time in.

RayJordandpo
8th August 2006, 01:14
I remember in the late sixties there was crane barge called 'Atlas' owned by Brown and Root. It did not have a crane as such but a large 'A Frame' over the stern. During a lifting operation in the North Sea some of the falls fouled and jammed the main block rendering the A Frame useless. They could neither lift or lower the module ( I believe it was part of a platform accommodation block). The solution they came up with was rather ingenious. A sister barge (I think it was the 'Hercules') went into the River Humber inside Spurn Bight and piled in a temporary platform. With the aid of tugs the 'Atlas' manoeuvred over platform at high water. As the tide dropped the module sat on the platform slackening the jammed wires. At low tide the lift was able to be unshackled and released. That Jacket (platform) was still in place for quite some time before being finally removed .
rayjordandpo

gdynia
14th August 2006, 08:01
I remember in the late sixties there was crane barge called 'Atlas' owned by Brown and Root. It did not have a crane as such but a large 'A Frame' over the stern. During a lifting operation in the North Sea some of the falls fouled and jammed the main block rendering the A Frame useless. They could neither lift or lower the module ( I believe it was part of a platform accommodation block). The solution they came up with was rather ingenious. A sister barge (I think it was the 'Hercules') went into the River Humber inside Spurn Bight and piled in a temporary platform. With the aid of tugs the 'Atlas' manoeuvred over platform at high water. As the tide dropped the module sat on the platform slackening the jammed wires. At low tide the lift was able to be unshackled and released. That Jacket (platform) was still in place for quite some time before being finally removed .
rayjordandpo

Ray

A website about her

http://www.barthel-sohn.de/atlas_e.htm

Rennie Cameron
14th January 2007, 07:40
I was visiting Balder in Singapore circa 1996 and the Challenger was tied aft being stripped of wrodly possessions. Most had gone and after that so did the Challenger for scrap. The units used on (I recall) the Forties Field went to Mexico where they/it still works. The Tolteca was one. I was Editor when OPL did the first Offshore vesel series and I included her in "Construction Vessels of the World". That was totally accurate on the first edition. Message me if you wanr an extract but better you maybe check the latest book yourself first. I would hazard a guess that a newbuild craneship (DP3) building in Singapore is being viewed as a replacement aimed at Mexico. Netherlands Offshore owned the now Tolteca and somewhere there is a website dedicated to NOL by ex employees. Trust this might help your research

GALTRA
14th January 2007, 15:28
gdynia, I worked on the Atlas 1 in the 70's but never came across the Atlas mentioned here. Was she the same barge hull or differant vessel? Atlas1 and Hercules had American 509 cranes with boom-rest com wheelhouse foward. Charley

gdynia
14th January 2007, 20:51
Charley
It was a different crane vessel/Heavy Lift Barge

jjdegruijter
22nd January 2008, 19:07
I remember in the late sixties there was crane barge called 'Atlas' owned by Brown and Root. It did not have a crane as such but a large 'A Frame' over the stern. During a lifting operation in the North Sea some of the falls fouled and jammed the main block rendering the A Frame useless. They could neither lift or lower the module ( I believe it was part of a platform accommodation block). The solution they came up with was rather ingenious. A sister barge (I think it was the 'Hercules') went into the River Humber inside Spurn Bight and piled in a temporary platform. With the aid of tugs the 'Atlas' manoeuvred over platform at high water. As the tide dropped the module sat on the platform slackening the jammed wires. At low tide the lift was able to be unshackled and released. That Jacket (platform) was still in place for quite some time before being finally removed .
rayjordandpo
I was on board the Atlas during the accident as a mechanic. When they were hoisting the package with the accomodation of Conoco 1. We operated with to blocks driven by two steam engines one of the steam winches was in lowering position while hoisting. The steam engine blew up and we lost the accomodation the rest of the package was hanging in one block. As soon as we could we went to the Humber towed by one of the tugs of United Towing. I remember the captain his first name was Jack. During the trip I called him several times because the package was hitting the A-frame very bad because of a gail. The frame was damaged so bad that it had to be scrapped when we returned in Rotterdam. In Rotterdam a revolving crane was mounted from Americain Hoist.

Sjaak

RayJordandpo
22nd January 2008, 19:24
The skipper's name was Jack Golden, He emigrated to South Africa were he became master of the salvage tug 'John Ross' Sadly he passed away a few years later
Ray Jordan

RayJordandpo
22nd January 2008, 19:37
jjdegruijter.
Hi,
I see you were on the 'Atlas' when she was involved in building oil jetties in Ireland. Could that have been Whiddy Island in Bantry Bay? I was on the United Towing tug 'Masterman' running anchors for the 'Atlas' at that location. The year was 1968
Ray Jordan

jjdegruijter
23rd January 2008, 15:27
jjdegruijter.
Hi,
I see you were on the 'Atlas' when she was involved in building oil jetties in Ireland. Could that have been Whiddy Island in Bantry Bay? I was on the United Towing tug 'Masterman' running anchors for the 'Atlas' at that location. The year was 1968
Ray Jordan
Hi,
Yes indeed it was Whiddy Island in Bantry bay. I also remeber another captain whose name was Sid. I was several times on the Masterman.

Sjaak

RayJordandpo
23rd January 2008, 23:20
The skipper of the 'Masterman' was Sid Hawkings, well in his seventies now but still enjoying his pint and ciggies. The mate was Fred Fletcher, sadly passed away. I really enjoyed that job in Bantry Bay, we often got ashore for a few pints of Guinness. it was money for old rope. I remember an American crane driver on the 'Atlas' called Pete, he often came on board for a beer. As I recall he had a badly deformed hand but it didn't stop him doing his job.
Ray Jordan

jjdegruijter
24th January 2008, 13:16
The name of the cranedriver, later he became a superintendent, was Pete Niess. He went with us to Okinawa to built another oil jetty for Gulf oil. I don't know what became of him. He was e really nice guy. One time when we were in the docks of Hull I went with Sid to the pub he always went to, I believe it was akind of United Towing pub, but I forgot the name.

RayJordandpo
26th January 2008, 08:07
The pub was called Manchester (Manny) Arms. More towing and anchor handling performed in there then at sea. There was no such thing as a quiet pint in that establishment, you would be knackered rigging towing gear over a pint of beer! By the way I recall an Irish Captain on the Atlas with the surname of Kennedy, all these names are coming back to me now and it was almost forty years ago!
Ray Jordan

jjdegruijter
26th January 2008, 16:23
I was on board the Atlas when they built the temporary platform. When they wer unloading the package something went wrong and one of the tugs nearly went down. I don't know which tug. Yes I remember captain Kennedy as I remeber a lot of guys. I was looking on the internet if I could find Pete Neis and I believe I did find him. He now is 77 years old and lives in Humble Texas.

Sjaak (nickname was snoopy)

RayJordandpo
26th January 2008, 16:42
I remember the accident when the tug got into bother. I can't her remember the name at the moment but it will come back to me. (Tradesman, Merchantman, Masterman?) She got caught in the strong tides of the Humber and got trapped under the platform nearly causing a capsize. The skipper (Charlie Noble) ended up in the water, Charlie was a very strong swimmer indeed but the tide was racing and the water freezing. He woke up in Grimsby hospital, a very lucky man indeed to survive that little incident
Ray Jordan

GALTRA
26th January 2008, 19:15
I was on board the Atlas when they built the temporary platform. When they wer unloading the package something went wrong and one of the tugs nearly went down. I don't know which tug. Yes I remember captain Kennedy as I remeber a lot of guys. I was looking on the internet if I could find Pete Neis and I believe I did find him. He now is 77 years old and lives in Humble Texas.

Sjaak (nickname was snoopy)

Hi there Snoopy, been a long time. Remember this photo? You and I on top of the crane in the middle of the Indian Ocean on the tow to Okinawa. I think Meindert de Vries took it. Next day he got angry and exposed a film in my camera because I took a photo of him asleep on the catwalk.. We had good times on that trip. Niall Kennedy later went to the North Slope, Alaska with Santa Fe but developed a heart condition and had to retire. He and his wife Meave bought a very nice little appartment house in Dalkey, Dublin but before he could enjoy his retirement he suddenly got a massive heart attack and died . She died a few months later. I agree with you about Pete Neis, he was one nice guy. He was the only one to offer his sympathies to me when I learned that my father had died two weeks previously while in Okinawa, and the only one to show his appreciation when I volunteered to stay on board and do anchor watch on my own on Christmas Day in Labuan. He sent out a bottle of whiskey to me. But really they where all pretty nice guys. I often think of Bo, Peanuts, Rama,storeman Fred, Gordan (dead), Richardo, Jose, Mr Kelly the welder foreman, etc. Good to see you are still with us, all the best, Charley

jjdegruijter
29th January 2008, 10:21
Hi there Charley,
The reason I found this site because I was interested in what happend to the Atlas. But I can't find any trace of her. Some time ago somebody told me she was scrapped. After Okinawa I left the company because the barge was laid up in Singapore and I did not like that because they cut down the 12 hour shifts to 8 hours. How long did you work for the company after Okinawa?
Yes I also remember a lot of the guys and I had a great time. The first mat of the Zwarte Zee ( the tug that towed us to Okinawa) now lives Close to me he is now a retired captain.
Nice to hear from you Charley

GALTRA
31st January 2008, 00:58
http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/product.biblio.jsp?osti_id=6162265 Hi Snoopy, Check this site, I'm not sure but I think it could be the same ATLAS1 that is mentioned. I too looked to see what had become of her a few months ago and apart from the attached all I could find was that she had gone to the Gulf of Mexico and was listed by Llyod's Register as working there in 1982/83. She was still listed in 1984 but did not say where she was working. It seems that she may have been fitted with a dynamic positioning system in May 1984 but what happened after I'm not sure. A friend of mine who worked with Brown and Root about 10 years ago thought she was scrapped. I stayed out there on the Atlas 1 working in Java, Brunei, and Labuan for another year or so and then joined Kennedy and a few others in the North Sea as freelancing consultants on oil platforms, ship conversions and anything we could get. The last job I had was the best paid most boring, as on-site inspector for Shell on the Challenger 1 which had been chartered and sublet by them to Philips . i ate a lot of smoked eels on there. I then came home and took a temporary job with the harbour here, but got to like being home and stayed on till I retired four years ago. Charley

RayJordandpo
1st February 2008, 08:00
Does anyone remember the 'Global Adventurer'? she was a crane barge for Brown and Root in the sixties and seventies. I believe she was a converted tanker. I worked with her in Angola (Cabinda) in 1969. The superintendant was an American called Johnny Pyle and most of the deck crew were American. There was a lot of accidents on board at that time, I recall a deck foreman losing his life in an accident on deck. A welder was killed whilst working overside and quite a few were killed or injured when faulty gas bottles blew up. I was on an anchor handling tug called 'Tradesman'
Ray Jordan

gdynia
1st February 2008, 08:12
Ray

Check this out she was the ex Norwegian Tanker Sunnaas converted by Heerema

http://books.google.com/books?id=TW6yMgPdgbQC&pg=RA1-PA206&lpg=RA1-PA206&dq=global+adventurer+crane+barge&source=web&ots=S-suPM1WxJ&sig=PaXsVP3nPtT7PANwKfpixlV90ns#PRA1-PA208,M1

GALTRA
1st February 2008, 12:49
Yes Ray I remember the Global Adventurer and the gas explosion on her. Some where I have a photo of her showing the front of the bridge damage etc. She was scrapped some time ago and again I have the details of that somewhere. Gdynia, Thanks for the link to the info. on B and R, etc. Lots of old names and memories in it, those were the pioneering days, I don't think Health and Safety or the Red Tape guys would allow it to happen these days. Charley

jjdegruijter
1st February 2008, 18:58
I remember the Global Adventurer. It was the m.t. Sunnaas a tanker from
'52-'63. Built in Dundee by Caledon Shipbuilding & Engeneering Co.Ltd. Sold in'63 to GlobalOffshore Structures Ltd, Willemstad-N.A.(Heerema Engeneering.
Converted to craneship by Verolme Rozenburg Netherlands, renamed Global Adventurer. In 1964 she built the REM island (A pirate music station) just in front of the dutch coast. Sold to Brown & Root in 1967 and in 1975 sold for scrap to Kaohsiung, Taiwan. I have got a picture but don't know how to attach it.

Sjaak

jjdegruijter
25th February 2008, 15:12
Ray,
It was the Masterman and the ship was the Glabal Adventurer. I found a newspaper article in my photo album.
Sjaak

RayJordandpo
25th February 2008, 18:58
Sjaak,
Yes I remember now, it was the Masterman, a nice little tug and always well looked after. I enjoyed working with the 'Global Adventurer' they were a good bunch of lads.
Ray Jordan