King Edward VII Nautical College 1964

Nova Scotian
14th August 2006, 16:22
The attached thumbnail is of a class that graduated from King Teds in March of 1964.

As far as I can remember, and forgive the spellings, the names were.

Back Row Standing (L to R)...Davis(Caltex); Warman(RFA); Dunford(Houlders): Grant (Alfred Holt); Garret(Houlders); May(Houlders).

Front Row Sitting (L to R)...Abbot(?); ? (BP); Shepherd (Andrew Weir); Cobban (?).

Missing...Toothill(Caltex).

Where did you go and where are all of you now?

Split
14th August 2006, 18:20
I was at Edward VII in 1952- too early for you whippersnappers! Did they still have the nurses dances? Is it still there today?

Split

waiwera
14th August 2006, 19:06
Not sure which class this would be?

I was at King Teds from Sept 03 to June/July 04 --------- I always thought that Pre Sea was fixed to a one year course? But maybe there were swhort courses too and of course MAR/

Nova Scotian
14th August 2006, 19:34
Not sure which class this would be?

I was at King Teds from Sept 03 to June/July 04 --------- I always thought that Pre Sea was fixed to a one year course? But maybe there were swhort courses too and of course MAR/

Most of the pre-sea courses were one year in duration and the entrants were sixteen years of age. This particular course was six months in duration and most of the eleven participants were slightly older. As a result, the remission of seatime they received was less.

Cheers.

waiwera
14th August 2006, 19:44
Thanks for the prompt response Nova Scotian

Just goes to show how you forget these points of detail . Take it that these good fellows also boarded at the corner of Cromwell and Gloucester Roads??

Keltic Star
15th August 2006, 06:44
Thanks for the prompt response Nova Scotian

Just goes to show how you forget these points of detail . Take it that these good fellows also boarded at the corner of Cromwell and Gloucester Roads??

In 1958 there was a one term course with 2 months remission of sea service and a one year course with 7 months remission. Yes, the residence was at Cromwell & Gloucetser Roads, Managers were a Mr. Owen and his wife, great people, Weekday Captain was Capt. Miller and also a full time resident Captain, forget his name but never his temper.

BEA stewardess residence across the street, Bert in Mary Poppins was a rookie compared to our lot hopping over the roof's of South Ken after lights out.

macjack
15th August 2006, 10:18
I was at Edward VII in 1952- too early for you whippersnappers! Did they still have the nurses dances? Is it still there today?

Split
I attended KE V11 NC think it must have been May - July 1952 joined BTC (as it was then) 9/9/1952. Thoroughly enjoyed the whole experience. Snowbow Video TANKERS has quite a long clip of tutors and Capt Chase,must have been taken 1951. send me pm for further details.
Regards,
Mac.

Split
15th August 2006, 12:11
We probably knew each other by sight although we all had our groups, didn't we? I was there from for about 4 months from April.

Split

Nova Scotian
15th August 2006, 12:46
We probably knew each other by sight although we all had our groups, didn't we? I was there from for about 4 months from April.

Split
When our program started there was already a one-year program running. Our group was small (11 in all) and we had our own schedule. I don't remember combining with any of the other courses, although we shared the same residence in Cromwell Road and travelled the Tube together to Redmonds Road. It was a very intense program and we covered most of the theory identified in the one-year program along with all the hands on sessions like sailing, boating at Temple and the trip on the "Glen". Having spent 25 years in marine education, I can honestly say it was one of the best training programs I have been involved in. My first trip to sea would have been a lot tougher without the experience.

Cheers.

Split
15th August 2006, 15:56
Hi MacJack,

Sorry to disappoint. I was there for 2nd mate!

Split

non descript
15th August 2006, 17:24
When our program started there was already a one-year program running. Our group was small (11 in all) and we had our own schedule. I don't remember combining with any of the other courses, although we shared the same residence in Cromwell Road and travelled the Tube together to Redmonds Road. It was a very intense program and we covered most of the theory identified in the one-year program along with all the hands on sessions like sailing, boating at Temple and the trip on the "Glen". Having spent 25 years in marine education, I can honestly say it was one of the best training programs I have been involved in. My first trip to sea would have been a lot tougher without the experience.

Cheers.

Yes, wise words.

I had totally forgotten there was a short program as well as the year long one - I remember arriving for the start of the year and trying to sign on for the short one .... based on envy rather than ability; as a result I stayed where I was and did the 12 month course.

bulwark
10th March 2008, 22:35
I did my Mid Apprentice course at King Teds(or should I say the Coopers Arms or the Prospects of Whitby, and other places!!!!) in Sept to Dec '68. My question is , what was the name of the trawler on the river that we did our RT bit of the course on? Can anyone help me on this one? Something says ??Strathallan, just can't remember.
Murdo

mpkk
10th March 2008, 22:44
That's the Glen Strathallan - scuttled off Plymouth at the end of her days.

non descript
10th March 2008, 23:14
Murdo,
You may find this link here (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=7138&highlight=Glen+Strathallan) helpful.
(Thumb)
Mark

bulwark
11th March 2008, 00:07
Many thanks to you both for that. We had a fantastic time aboard her.
Murdo

mclean
11th March 2008, 16:39
As Shell Apprentices, we did a four year correspondence course whilst at sea with King Edwards. Colin

callpor
11th March 2008, 16:59
That brings back some memories. I was on MAR 2 at King Teds in autumn 1964 and then back there for Second Mates late summer 65. Bulwark is so right about the Coopers Arms and other well known local hostelries convenient to the "Stack of Bricks". That fine hostel on the corner of, if I recall, Salmon Lane - which at the time was location of London's smartest Chinese resturant - the cheaper take-aways were down West India Dock Road. You wouldn't recognise the place driving around there today ? Rgds, Chris Allport

Breiz
7th March 2009, 14:31
I was at Edward VII in 1952- too early for you whippersnappers! Did they still have the nurses dances? Is it still there today?

Split

I was there during the Autmun term 1951 just the one term. Louis Mann elesewhere mentioned in this thread when he was Mate on the Glen Strathallen, was a contemporary classmate. The house super was a Mr Gulliver then but all the other names at school and afloat were the same.
One of those strange co-incidences, Capt Griffiths was the master of a loaned yacht the "Berenice" to enter the first Tall Ships race 1956 and manned by the King George VII Nautical College She came 8th (last) in the under 100 ton category. Forty years on my son William joined the same vessel as Mate and did two seasons on her chartering to the well heeled around the Med. He paid off last November in Malta. 'Berenice' is still there awaiting a new owner.
Yes we had the nurses dances under the scrutiny of Mr Gulliver's eagle eye
and sometimes managed a tryst outside of the house in one of the nearby gardens or Parks. I was a very keen model boat builder and used to spend Sundays up at the Round Pond testing ne designs.
Great fun, many happy memories of good pals and adventure looming ahead
at sea.

Sabastapol
7th March 2009, 19:20
Yes I am known in the business as a 'Wrinkly'. Got more than my fair share these days. Seen alot of mail submitted to SN a few years back concerning those at KEVII. Just interested to know if there are any others like me who were there in '51. when Captain Chase was about. And that master of tuition Gwym Williams was at Commercial road. Complete with his black beard, he became Master of the sail training vessel Winston Churchill not long after I left I think.

John_F
7th March 2009, 20:51
And that master of tuition Gwym Williams was at Commercial road. Complete with his black beard, he became Master of the sail training vessel Winston Churchill not long after I left I think.
Sabastopol,
Are you thinking of Captain Griffiths at Commercial Road? He was Master of the Wendorian & went on to become Master of the Winston Churchill. There is a photo of him here:
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/38630/cat/500/sort/2/ppuser/912/sl/j
Kind regards,
John

Sabastapol
8th March 2009, 15:29
[QUOTE=John_F;299102]Sabastopol,
Are you thinking of Captain Griffiths at Commercial Road? He was Master of the Wendorian & went on to become Master of the Winston Churchill. There is a photo of him here:

Made my day John. Yes I got the name wrong. Great to see him again. A number of people in my life that I would like to forget about but not Capt Griffiths. A superb tutor. I seem to remember he got me and others of us involved in a football match, I didn't forgive him for that it nearly killed me! The mind was ok in those days but not the body.

Thanks and best wishes

Sabastapol

Keltic Star
9th March 2009, 02:48
Captain Griffiths was one of the finest men I have ever had the honour to have met.

John_F
9th March 2009, 22:04
Captain Griffiths was one of the finest men I have ever had the honour to have met.
Keltic Star,
Must agree with you. A perfect gentleman & you couldn't wish for a more patient tutor. A great sense of fun as well. Will always remember him.
Kind regards,
John.

Captain John Sutton
9th August 2011, 05:15
I was at King Teds from September to December 1958.

The resident Captain at Comwell Road was Captain Woods, an ex cable ship master I believe. You remember we had a duty cadet at the front door. One night a couple of Jehovah’s Witnesses knocked on the door. The cadet answered it - Captain Woods could see down the hall from his office and yelled out "Who is it" "Jehovah’s Witnesses " answered the cadet, "Take them on the roof and hang them shouted Captai Woods, muttering "they ought to be hung, they ought to be squashed" This became a catch phrase for our group. Before we left we clubbed together and bought Captain Woods a bottle of gin, a beverage of which he was fond.

Our class tutor was Captain Hyde, Keith, who I met again at Plymouth when on the first mid-appreticeship release course.

The teachers at the nautical schools in those days were great men.
None better than Captain Warren Hopwood at Plymouth - a genus of a teacher. I can still recall his lectures all these years on.

I joined Eagle Oil & Shipping Company in January 1959 and retired this year in March 2011, having been involved in shipping continuously since 1959, ship master, pilot in Saudi Arabia and Australia and more recently in management in the offshore oil and gas industry.


In 1958 there was a one term course with 2 months remission of sea service and a one year course with 7 months remission. Yes, the residence was at Cromwell & Gloucetser Roads, Managers were a Mr. Owen and his wife, great people, Weekday Captain was Capt. Miller and also a full time resident Captain, forget his name but never his temper.

BEA stewardess residence across the street, Bert in Mary Poppins was a rookie compared to our lot hopping over the roof's of South Ken after lights out.

P. Barker
10th August 2011, 23:08
I spent a short time there around 1966/7 (I think?) Capt Farquhar and Capt Ted Coolen (?spellings) were there. I shared a room with Dean, Dicken and Costalis, first names included Peter and Richard but can't remember who had which one!

Anyone one remember me? - Peter Barker

Tom Wood
20th August 2011, 04:55
I was at KEV11 NC 50/51 and remember the good (and some not so good ) times but the training was one of the best.
Anyone out there want to correspond online - I'm hoping to put together some interesting moments bookwise and would appreciate any info from class mates any period - any time to keep it alive.
Now in the U.S with relatives - is KE still on the map ?
Hope for replies regards Tom.

Tom Wood
31st August 2011, 00:07
Yes I am known in the business as a 'Wrinkly'. Got more than my fair share these days. Seen alot of mail submitted to SN a few years back concerning those at KEVII. Just interested to know if there are any others like me who were there in '51. when Captain Chase was about. And that master of tuition Gwym Williams was at Commercial road. Complete with his black beard, he became Master of the sail training vessel Winston Churchill not long after I left I think.

Just read your post and would like to exchange nostalgia with you.
I have so many good memories like the nurses in the hotel opposite Chromwell Rd. and the time our class got caught skinny dipping in the Serpentine.
Capt. Chase, Ballard, Griffiths, Fifield, and Gulliver the caretaker et al.
My email (respondtom@aol.com) Cheers!

JEFFGRAY
12th September 2011, 15:14
I spent a short time there around 1966/7 (I think?) Capt Farquhar and Capt Ted Coolen (?spellings) were there. I shared a room with Dean, Dicken and Costalis, first names included Peter and Richard but can't remember who had which one!

Anyone one remember me? - Peter Barker

Hello Peter, by chance in browsing sn i found your thread.
You, i'm afraid i cannot put a face to, but you mentioned Pete Costalis and others. Those i do with many more.
I was there the same time, Sept '67. i was on the first intake that was for a fifteen month duration. First twelve in London, then last three on HMS Worcester @ Greenhithe, kent. This later period was under the name "New Merchant Navy College". Memories never to be forgotten.

papayanni
13th September 2011, 17:55
I was at King Teds from September to December 1962, for a 3 months course. Which seemed plenty as I was desperate to get to sea! It always seemed weird that they made us commute every day right across London from Gloucester road to Limehouse.
I enjoyed the course, even rowing a lifeboat around the docks! As someone has said, it was all great learning, including 4 days in the North Sea on the Glen Strathallen. (Whose engine is (or was) in the Science Museum).
There was a great bunch of guys on my course, none of whom have I seen since!

Joe C
20th September 2011, 14:51
On board the MAGELLAN, 1953

Joe C
20th September 2011, 14:55
On board the Wendorian ,1953.

Joe C
20th September 2011, 15:08
The Class of 1953

cameraman
18th October 2011, 11:17
i attended





































king
I attended the King Edward college for the short,three months course from January 1955 to end April. I ,too, remember with much fondness the Prospect of Whitby and the Grapes,and the enormous amount of energy that I put into playing snooker and billiards,tutored by "Sugar" Reeves, in the evening at Gloucester Road. I must have put some effort into navigation though as at the end of the three months course I was placed with Clan Line of Steamers,but ended my four year apprenticeship with Van Ommeren,s on the Langleeclyde.I still have my meticulously written diaries from those days. Geoff Clarke,now resident in Noosa,near Brisbane Queensland



























I still

Joe C
18th October 2011, 16:17
Drove past Gloucester Road last Sunday,the ground floor seems to be a Post Office.

Sailtie
15th November 2011, 17:15
King Ted's for 2nd Mates. Turned up on January 1st 1964 badly hung over (check the date) and they sat us down and made us sit a two hour exam!
I was not impressed.
Got my ticket though. Hung out with Jerry Carew (RFA), Nicky Solari (BI) and a fellow Royal Mailer called Dick Thorpe. Happy days.

PETER BALLAN
17th February 2012, 16:38
I was at KE7 back in 1959, and remember dear old Hoppy, as a wonderful character, warm and generous man all too kind and humorous. He was with me at Plymouth Tech as skipper of the sailing schooner we had there, at Mutton Cove. He composed the music for guitar for a lifesaving film made on the KE7 ship, which we made out in the Thames estuary off Sahf-end pier, where I had to fall out of the rigging into the oggin.
The apparent anomaly here in the story is, I was asked to leave KE7 at the end of one term, as I wasn't really student stuff, and so went on down to Plymouth for another go. So, I went to both KE7 and Plymouth Tech.

BUT I do remember the Cromwell Rd place, Capt. Wood, crusty old bugger that he was,. A man of the old school and delightful if you liked crusty individuals. Capt. Hussey was also a man of cold and disturbing glare. Wasn't there a 'Dinger' Bell, a gentle feller. Anyone remember the Judo teacher we had who enjoyed flattening his victims full bore down onto the mats ? Cadets there with me were also, Foyle, a ginormous lad, but an OK joe all the same. Campbell, a smooth operator, born for the bridge of something, like Port line .
Capt. Griffiths, a classic black bearded skipper who was a bloody HERO of mine for many years. I would not want to hear or read a bad word about that gentleman. Ran a good ship with a lot of snotties for crew.
Captain Miller, . . . . . a nice man who knew ALL there was to know, without boast of brag. He had a quiet commanding of respect by all about him. The only reason I felt relieved to leave KE7 was, I couldn't stay awake in the morning lectures. Plymouth College was an altogether more stimulatong place for my neredowell attitude !



I was at King Teds from September to December 1958.

The resident Captain at Comwell Road was Captain Woods, an ex cable ship master I believe. You remember we had a duty cadet at the front door. One night a couple of Jehovah’s Witnesses knocked on the door. The cadet answered it - Captain Woods could see down the hall from his office and yelled out "Who is it" "Jehovah’s Witnesses " answered the cadet, "Take them on the roof and hang them shouted Captai Woods, muttering "they ought to be hung, they ought to be squashed" This became a catch phrase for our group. Before we left we clubbed together and bought Captain Woods a bottle of gin, a beverage of which he was fond.

Our class tutor was Captain Hyde, Keith, who I met again at Plymouth when on the first mid-appreticeship release course.

The teachers at the nautical schools in those days were great men.
None better than Captain Warren Hopwood at Plymouth - a genus of a teacher. I can still recall his lectures all these years on.

I joined Eagle Oil & Shipping Company in January 1959 and retired this year in March 2011, having been involved in shipping continuously since 1959, ship master, pilot in Saudi Arabia and Australia and more recently in management in the offshore oil and gas industry.

Mikbew
15th March 2012, 13:27
My mother worked in the canteen around in the late 60's (Doreen) and I used to have a Sunday morning job (whilst at school). There was rarely anyone around at this time - by the sound of it staying somewhere else or recovering from the night before. I used to go into the lounge early Sunday and try and clear up. Foreign students tended to be there Sunday morning and I can well remember having long chats with an Iranian guy - how times have changed.

ian keyl
18th March 2012, 01:40
I was there during sept 67 to dec 67, i remember the laundry room down stairs where they had those dry air (maybe steam pipes) chambers which you pulled out and hung your washing on the wooden rails to dry.
When we were down there doing our dhobi and ironing we would pull the drinks machine out and with a wire coathanger pok it in the back and switch it to free vend.
When the money was running out that and curry sauce on chips from the chinese up the road was all you could afford and weekend used to pass as slow as hell waiting for payday the next week.

I was emergency evacuated off the Glen Strathallen by the PLA medical launch from Southend to North Kent hospital at Gravesend with 2nd degree burns to my lower legs and ankles.

We were at anchor doing radar work in the evening and two of us were sent down to the pantry to make drinks after the lectures. There was a contraption on the floor of the pantry to boil water in an urn this was on some legs and fed by a gas bottle, a vessel went by at speed and its wake rocked us about and the urn and gas flame fell over onto my legs, my chum (cant remember his name) managed to lift himself clear in the small pantry.

The old man was in his cabin next door at the time and herd the screaming and dragged me into his cabin .They wrapped me up in a blanket and gave a pillow to bite to which i did take some pretty big ones,then he jabbed a morphine phial into my thigh to help releave the pain.
They had radioed the PLA who were sending down the launch but it was against the tide which seamed like hours,they put me in a neilson stretcher and got down the stairs but the launch had a lower freboard than ours so I was passed across the gap tied into the stretcher thinking yes Iam a good swimmer but not with this b****y thing on.
I eventually got back to college and must admit I had a great time there meeting all the other lads from various companies.
But it could be a lonely place at the weekends.
Rgds Ian.

Mark Harris
24th July 2012, 09:26
Good morning to all. My name is Mark Harris. I'm not a seafaring man, but I work at London Metropolitan University, which claims King Ted's as part of its ancestry.

Alumni of King Ted's will, I am sure, be sad to hear of the death of Captain Warren Hopwood on 14 July 2012 at the age of 88 and barely a month short of his diamond wedding anniversary. His funeral service was held in Devon yesterday, attended by family and many friends, including some former students of Warren's. The body was cremated and the ashes will be scattered at sea.

Warren's first teaching post was at King Ted's and he later moved to Devon, where he taught at Plymouth. I am related to Warren by marriage, my wife being a daughter of Warren's younger brother.


All you who remember Warren, or who knew him, please wish him God speed, and a safe journey through uncharted waters.

Mark
====

Mariner44
27th July 2012, 15:12
Attached is a class photo of BP apprentices who attended the MAR course at the Stack o' Bricks, Salmon Lane, in the autumn of 1964.

Names of people in the photo are:

Around the table, going anti-clockwise from the right......
A S (Steve) Banyard; Harvey Bennett (me), J P Carter; J E Davies; P C T Edwards; W R Fitzgerald; S C O (Steve?) Forth; S (Steve) Hamill; N E (Neil) Hannam; M Harris; M E (Mike) Hayton; R L (Rod) Lake; S Lawrence; A E Mann; S R Montague.

At the back of the room: left to right:
Mr A F Sawyer (Training Dept); Barry Witham; M D (Mike) Salmon; Mr J Nobes (Training Dept).

The photo was taken on one of the induction days at Britannic House in Finsbury Circus, London.

Are there any of this class members of Ships Nostalgia? (Wave)

callpor
27th July 2012, 15:25
Attached is a class photo of BP apprentices who attended the MAR course at the Stack o' Bricks, Salmon Lane, in the autumn of 1964.

Names of people in the photo are:

Around the table, going anti-clockwise from the right......
A S (Steve) Banyard; Harvey Bennett (me), J P Carter; J E Davies; P C T Edwards; W R Fitzgerald; S C O (Steve?) Forth; S (Steve) Hamill; N E (Neil) Hannam; M Harris; M E (Mike) Hayton; R L (Rod) Lake; S Lawrence; A E Mann; S R Montague.

At the back of the room: left to right:
Mr A F Sawyer (Training Dept); Barry Witham; M D (Mike) Salmon; Mr J Nobes (Training Dept).

The photo was taken on one of the induction days at Britannic House in Finsbury Circus, London.

Are there any of this class members of Ships Nostalgia? (Wave)

Interesting photograph.I was on that MAR Course from Port Line. Recognise a number of faces, particularly Peter Edwards who was best man at my wedding and Tony Mann from Conway days.

Mariner44
27th July 2012, 15:42
It was a great 3 months.....particularly the dances that we organised with live music and a free bar!

We were not forgiven by the young ladies in the Typing Pool at Britannic House. They thought they'd scuppered our 3rd dance evening by saying they'd all come along, but then boycotted us en masse. Thank goodness we'd oversubscribed with nurses from the local hospital at Poplar!

callpor
28th July 2012, 14:38
Harvey,
I have some good memories of that 3 months in Limehouse - still got a few momentos stowed away? We certainly had some fun. A lot of water has flowed under the bridge since then and I have lost tough with everyone on the course. Be interesting to see if you get any further responses.
I recall something about an escapade through the Greenwich tunnel to the Dreadnaught Seamans Hospital where the Matron caught some of us in the Nurses quarters late one evening? Think there were a few similar events around the East End.
Chris

Mariner44
29th July 2012, 05:06
Christ,
I still have some photos from one of the dances that we organised...nothing too embarrassing, mind you. I'm sure I can discern a slight alcoholic haze in the dining hall.

I can remember some shenanigans at the Poplar nurses home, but not the Dreadnought. Clearly I missed out!

A half pint at every pub on the Commercial Road was one of the challenges of a Friday night...I don't remember doing more than a mile. Live music at some of the pubs made it a really great night out.

Harvey

Mariner44
29th July 2012, 05:09
Loops, spell check on the iPad has renamed you, Chris. I didn't realise that Apple offered a "Christening" facilty; I must explore more and see if it does baptisms!

Peter Costalas
13th August 2012, 15:04
Peter,

Found these posts after someone asked me a question about KEVII and I had a memory failure so resorted to Google as usual.

Pretty sure it was Richard Dean, John Dicken and me Peter Costalas - (but can only gtee the last one).

Peter Costalas

rubicon42
12th October 2012, 11:57
I was there from Sept 1960 until Sept 1961 and returned for the Mid App Course from Dec 1963 until the end of March 1964. Can't remember many of the names save Dave Vann, David Absalom, Rod (?) and Peter McGowan who is still a close friend. Saurday nights at Cromwell Road - on the Circle line with platform tickets, a case of beer and two guitars. Mid App Course - more sightings of heavenly bodies on prime verticals resulted in many of us using the time ashore as a recce for a landlubber's life - Ray Gaubert

grahamwilliams
23rd February 2013, 13:58
I attended KE V11 NC think it must have been May - July 1952 joined BTC (as it was then) 9/9/1952. Thoroughly enjoyed the whole experience. Snowbow Video TANKERS has quite a long clip of tutors and Capt Chase,must have been taken 1951. send me pm for further details.
Regards,
Mac.

Hello you youngsters. I was there in 1948?9 before joining Dornoch shipping via Lambert Brothers.Did 4 years as apprentice aboard ss coulbeg for tow years then ss coulgarve. Any memories revived if so please let me know. Thanks graham

johnb42
27th February 2013, 13:23
I was at King Teds for the same period. If I remember correctly (and there's no guarantee of that) you were the one who had done a trip as bridge boy on a Royal Mail passenger ship (Andes?)before starting pre-sea. I remember Wood and even the presentation of the bottle of gin, I remember him growling something like 'never touch the stuff' as he carefully stashed it. Most of the names of the cadets have faded from my memory bank, but I do remember a Coe, a Groves (Joe), a Nind, a Dry and Malcolm Adams who I roomed with. I can also still see faces that I can no longer put a name to. I joined Paddy Henderson from College, but just did my time there. I finished my seafaring with an ENG3 after heart surgery in '97, and retired from all work 18 months ago.
John Brooks

I was at King Teds from September to December 1958.

The resident Captain at Comwell Road was Captain Woods, an ex cable ship master I believe. You remember we had a duty cadet at the front door. One night a couple of Jehovah’s Witnesses knocked on the door. The cadet answered it - Captain Woods could see down the hall from his office and yelled out "Who is it" "Jehovah’s Witnesses " answered the cadet, "Take them on the roof and hang them shouted Captai Woods, muttering "they ought to be hung, they ought to be squashed" This became a catch phrase for our group. Before we left we clubbed together and bought Captain Woods a bottle of gin, a beverage of which he was fond.

Our class tutor was Captain Hyde, Keith, who I met again at Plymouth when on the first mid-appreticeship release course.

The teachers at the nautical schools in those days were great men.
None better than Captain Warren Hopwood at Plymouth - a genus of a teacher. I can still recall his lectures all these years on.

I joined Eagle Oil & Shipping Company in January 1959 and retired this year in March 2011, having been involved in shipping continuously since 1959, ship master, pilot in Saudi Arabia and Australia and more recently in management in the offshore oil and gas industry.

knighta
26th June 2013, 03:46
I spent a short time there around 1966/7 (I think?) Capt Farquhar and Capt Ted Coolen (?spellings) were there. I shared a room with Dean, Dicken and Costalis, first names included Peter and Richard but can't remember who had which one!

Anyone one remember me? - Peter Barker

Peter Costalas was with me in Plymouth for Second Mates' in 1971. He married a Plymouth lass named Sue, and I last heard of him working ashore in Belgium. Try him on Facebook. Alan Knight R852482.

Graham the pipe
29th August 2013, 21:39
Did a 6 month course there from, seem to remember, Jan ~ June '57. Know the year's correct but not sure of the months. Was definitely there in May because a Polish Countess was murdered in Gloucester Road tube station, just over the road from our digs.

I know we never stopped working, day and late evenings, seven days a week. Half of what we did - including being taught how to kill with no weapon - would certainly not be PC in these changed times. Thoroughly enjoyed my time there which set me up for a very memorable apprenticeship and future career with EDs.

grahamwilliams
17th January 2014, 11:32
Hello all, I was also there in 1948/9.Also a great time.(*))
Then joined SS Coulbeg of Lambert Bros for four years.
Great Time at sea. Taught me so much, when I came ashore did my National Service in the Military Police in the 193 Ports Company dealing with troopships at Liverpool, Southampton and Harwich.

Hainman
20th February 2014, 00:04
I was there 2 years after you, by that time they had stopped the nurses dance. However the young ladies from the ballet school house were a great comfort.

msalter
15th March 2014, 14:25
I have posted a detailed account of time at the college when a 'short term' course boarder from Sept to Dec 1959. Anyone interested will find an illustrated documents plus a diary of when I joined my first ship belonging to Strick Line Ltd.
This is posted on the website of www.benjidog.co.uk/Recollections