Riversdale Technical College Liverpool

Derek Roger
3rd September 2006, 13:29
Today 3 rd Sept 2006 is 43 years to the day since I started my apprentice ship with Thos & Jno Brocklebank Limited at Riversdale Tech .
3 rd Sept in 1963 was in fact a Sunday and is the day I found the Aigburth Hotel while scouting my way around the college.

Any other " Aiggie " patrons of that era ??
Derek

trotterdotpom
3rd September 2006, 14:12
Happy days, Derek, you struck gold on the first day. I heard a lot of "Aigee" yarns from a Scouse Electrician who was a regular. After starting study leave at Riversdale (about 15 years after you) I too bumped into the place. On my very first "session", in walked my Lecky pal - I never looked back! My niece attended John Moore University, the new look Riversdale Tech, during the early '90s and also became an Aigburth Arms fan. I hear it's still going but in a re-vamped style - maybe not to the taste of former patrons. I also hear that Riversdale is now a housing estate - that's progress.

John T.

Jeff Egan
3rd September 2006, 14:56
Attendend Riversdale for three months each year 1965, 66, 67, 68 Aigburth Arms for a pie and a pint was favorite lunch or Scallop and chips from the chippy on the other side of the road.

Derek Roger
3rd September 2006, 16:13
I heard the Aigburth Hotel is long gone since they widened the road from where the old dual carrigway ended ( by the cricket ground ) right through to Speke.
The last night we were all in the front Lounge in 65 things got a bit out of hand and a piece of the wooden trim from behind the padded seat which went around the perimeter came away in my hand ?. Its probably the only piece of the place still in existance.

Derek Roger
3rd September 2006, 16:36
Corrction . I have just posted my Indentures in the Galery and found the date to be 62 not 63 . 44 years ago since I strted work ; what happened to the time !!!!!!!
Happy Days .

Jeff Egan
3rd September 2006, 16:52
Came away in your hand Derek how could that have possibly happened (*)) (*))

R870708
9th September 2006, 13:51
Still the best pint of Guiness that I recall and the mushy peas and chips from the chippy not far from there kept us alive after sailing in the Mersey over the river at the Tidal Pool.

Prior to going to Riversdale I went to Dundee college of Technology in Bell Street with Captain Creelman as one of the tutors, head of college was Captain Alan Gardiner.

Stuart Watt was anothe Gadget as was Stewart MacDonald who I understand sailed with BP for quite a few years, any takers on current whereabouts of any these folks would be appreciated.

Derek Roger
9th September 2006, 14:43
Your local in Dundee would have been the " Bread " Bredalbane Arms . Jimmy Stirling was the owner.
Best pint in " The Aiggie " in the early 60s was a pint of "D" which I remember was diamond '; dont know who made it but it was strong and good .
The other favorite there was " brown mixed "

Razor
9th September 2006, 14:58
Your local in Dundee would have been the " Bread " Bredalbane Arms . Jimmy Stirling was the owner.
Best pint in " The Aiggie " in the early 60s was a pint of "D" which I remember was diamond '; dont know who made it but it was strong and good .
The other favorite there was " brown mixed "


Double Diamond, brewed by Ind Coop I presume?

trotterdotpom
9th September 2006, 15:16
........
The other favorite there was " brown mixed "

In Bristol a mixture of half a pint of brown ale and half of bitter used to be known as a "brown split" - there were a couple of pubs around town where you wouldn't be game to ask for one!

John T.

R870708
9th September 2006, 18:37
Memories of the "Bread" are to say the least hazy!
Although I hailed from the three "j's" Jute, Jam and Journalism city, it was a parting of sweet sorrows on my first departure for my first trip of 18 months.

The times we spent at the boatshed, along the waterfront at Broughty Ferry, sailing and rowing the old whaler, which had to be brought back up the beach each time on wooden rollers over the stony beach, would now be classed as "barbarism" or at least cruelty. If we had any issues with what we were being asked to do the penalty was to carry one of theses rollers, a hefty lump of wood, whose name I forget, for 30 or 40 feet over our heads!

My other memory's of Riversdale (70/71) was living in a single occupancy room in the Tower Block with a view over the Mersey rather than the dorm style of living which a few of my other classmates had to do, I recollect they were apprenticed to an Irish outfit which had a red hand on the funnel, any takers as to the Company?

Razor
9th September 2006, 22:50
My other memory's of Riversdale (70/71) was living in a single occupancy room in the Tower Block with a view over the Mersey rather than the dorm style of living which a few of my other classmates had to do, I recollect they were apprenticed to an Irish outfit which had a red hand on the funnel, any takers as to the Company?[/QUOTE]

Head Line?

trotterdotpom
10th September 2006, 00:52
My other memory's of Riversdale (70/71) was living in a single occupancy room in the Tower Block with a view over the Mersey rather than the dorm style of living which a few of my other classmates had to do, I recollect they were apprenticed to an Irish outfit which had a red hand on the funnel, any takers as to the Company?

Head Line?[/QUOTE]

Correct - Head Line with the Red Hand of Ulster.

John T.

John-M
12th September 2006, 12:57
Happy days.

Spent many a night in the Aiggie. Fond memories of the young lassies from Calder Hall, I M Marsh and Notre Dame teacher training colleges!

John M

Derek Roger
21st September 2006, 16:29
I M Marsh !!!
The lassies used to follow Riversdales Rugby team during home games . One of our local fixtures was with the police cadets at their campus and they too of course frequented the Aiggie and went to I M Marsh dances .
There was intense rivarlry and the lads on both sides played up to the lassies
watching ( There was more boxing I think than rugby played on such fixtures
My brother Cameron who followed me at Riversdale met a young Lass at I M Marsh whom he married ( Poor lad had a shortened career with Brocks when he was required to " get a shore job " )

John-M
21st September 2006, 20:50
Not just follow. I can remember a couple of games between the I M Marsh lassies and the Riversdale lads!
Seem to remember that there was always lots of ripped shirts.

The landlord of the Aiggie used to let us cash cheques (max £2). What we had to do before cashpoint machines.
That £2 wouldn't last long on a night out these days!.

Bryan Neary
22nd October 2006, 11:56
I was at Riversdale from 64-66 and remember the Eggie well. The beer (Walkers of Warrington) was pretty foul and most people seemed to drink it half and half with a bottle of Brown Peter (also awful tack!). My digs were in Alma Road. I made a nostalgic trip back about fifteen years ago and was disappointed to discover that the new Eggy was an ultra-modern soulless sort of place - nothing like the establishment which lost all it's tables and chairs to a pyramid on the main road one Saturday night!

M29
10th May 2007, 12:35
I was at Riversdale from 64-66 and remember the Eggie well. The beer (Walkers of Warrington) was pretty foul and most people seemed to drink it half and half with a bottle of Brown Peter (also awful tack!). My digs were in Alma Road. I made a nostalgic trip back about fifteen years ago and was disappointed to discover that the new Eggy was an ultra-modern soulless sort of place - nothing like the establishment which lost all it's tables and chairs to a pyramid on the main road one Saturday night!

Hey Bryan, remember me? Where did you go after we left College.
I went into Bibby Line until 1975 when I swallowed the pick. Now teaching at City of Bristol College.

Alan Melia

Chouan
18th June 2007, 09:07
I was there, on and off, of course, from '74-9. Interesting place. There was a strange bloke who used to announce the time in the mornings over the loudspeaker system, in a very curious voice. The chippy (greasy annie's we called it) was terrible. But, once you've a few pints inside you, things like that didn't seem to matter!
Peter

Peter Martin
17th September 2007, 21:48
Mon Dieu! Cashing cheques! Me too. The landlord's name was Terrence Rattigan. No relation, I think to the literary genius.

Derek Roger
18th September 2007, 01:51
I was there, on and off, of course, from '74-9. Interesting place. There was a strange bloke who used to announce the time in the mornings over the loudspeaker system, in a very curious voice. The chippy (greasy annie's we called it) was terrible. But, once you've a few pints inside you, things like that didn't seem to matter!
Peter

When i first went to the "Chippie " across the road from the Aiggie I ordered a meat pie and chips and was astounded to find it full of potatoes ! With little meat . In Scotland Meat Pies actually had Meat as the main ingredient .

It was almost as bad as the " Mince " tatties and carrots and my digs . This was a sort of gravy with little mince ' lots of old wooded carrots served over a sloppy mashed potato mess . One of the lads took his dinner and put in in a bag and took to to Riversdale to our HR Rep who was also the PE teacher who had " recommended this place " Nothing happened so he moved ! I stayed as the land lady was deaf and we cou;d come and go as we pleased . Once I showed her how to make porridge ( with salt instead of sugar ) and then at least we had a hearty breakfast with porridge we could eat and the usual egg bacon and toast .
In retrospect we didnt do too badly on our pittance of a living allowance .

Three of us used to buy a loaf of bread and 6 pence of chips for lunch ; cut the loaf in 3 ( very accuratley ) then eat the innards of the loaf and stuff it with the chips and any sauce / butter we could get our hands on . Not too bad (a real Chip Buttie ) this was then washed down with a bottle of brown ale which cost 10 pence . The meal itself cost 1 shilling and 4 pence split 3 ways which meant someone was always a penny down !! On average it meant lunch was one shilling and three pence ( Including the beer ) We had our priorities set correctly I venture .
Happy days Derek

PS There was a bookie along the road called Joe French ; In my 2 year I became quit interested in th horses and managed to clean him of six pounds and change for a 4 shilling bet . He was not well pleased and had to scrape around the back of his drawer to pay me out ( I lived well for the next couple of weeks .) Also picked 3 out of the first four in the Grand National Team spirit ; Out and About and Purple Silk . I did not Pick Red Rum who I think ran 3rd . Again I did well but would have done great if I only knew how to bet forecasts !!!
Oh Happy Days

Peter Martin
18th September 2007, 07:38
Greasy Annies; of course: But on 'High Days' & 'Holidays' it was by bus to 'Chius' - toward the Dingle. Chicken & mushrooms in a foil container and yet another plastic spoon to add to the collection wedged neatly between the notice board and the wall in your 'cabin' at River House.

Chouan
18th September 2007, 19:49
My most memorable experience, circa 1977, Second College Phase, I think:
Thursday evening, after dinner, en masse, waiting for Top of the Pops in the lounge, watching Tomorrows World. There was an item about some new sailing rig for dinghies.
Engineer Cadet:
"Designed by an engineer"
Deck Cadets (plural):
"Electrical Engineer"
Engineer Cadets (all of them, shouting):
"At least he wasn't a Navvy!"
Deck Cadets (Full throat):
"At least he's been to sea!"
Silence from the Engineer Cadets, some of whom have up to another 18 months at college yet before their first trip.

Peter Martin
22nd April 2008, 08:30
Not just follow. I can remember a couple of games between the I M Marsh lassies and the Riversdale lads!
Seem to remember that there was always lots of ripped shirts.

The landlord of the Aiggie used to let us cash cheques (max 2). What we had to do before cashpoint machines.
That 2 wouldn't last long on a night out these days!.
Remember that well! Landlord's name was Terrence Rattigan - without literary illusions!

Phil C
27th April 2008, 01:37
Anybody remember the name of the chap who ran the domestic section at riversdale house. He always had a duffel bag over his shoulder.
Phil

oceangoer
27th April 2008, 02:44
Between voyages I often used to live at the Blue Funnel hostel/house in Riversdale Road (1958 - 1962). Hutson was in charge of the Middies at the time (BluFlu 2nd Mate who had eyesight problems and came ashore).

The Aiggie Arms was a haven through those years although the beer wasn't the best. In the end I resorted to what they do in Middlesborough (a pint touch ........ 98% bitter and 2% lemonade on top). Some very friendly young ladies used to frequent that pub, l fell in love several times :)

luigi
14th July 2008, 19:11
Anybody remember the name of the chap who ran the domestic section at riversdale house. He always had a duffel bag over his shoulder.
Phil

I think it was Mr Sewell? Looked like an old hippie.

Chouan
15th July 2008, 08:32
Seward, I think. Pleasant bloke. He wore a suit that was far too big for him on what was laughingly called the "formal dinner" on wednesday nights.

Phil C
17th July 2008, 11:27
Thanks both for that, yes I think it was Seward.

oglebilluk
22nd August 2008, 19:35
To bring you up to date in a frustrating way.

The "Aigy" that we knew so well is long gone - it became a car showroom

However the owners of the site must realise that we are getting no younger and, as if by magic, the boarding is now up around the site advising that it is about to become sheltered housing - getting ready for us once again

Bill

Pat Kennedy
23rd August 2008, 19:17
I had the most terifying experience of my life at Riversdale tech College.
I was working for a company which supplied and maintained Compressed air breathing apparatus on board ships, and a Blue Funnel Superintendant engineer named Denis Naylor, conned me into giving a short talk on the servicing of said equipment to "a few officers"
It turned out to be a gathering of 25 Blue Funnel Captains and Chief Engineers, who all vied with each other in asking difficult questions.
This was my first ever experience of public speaking, and nothing will ever be so hard. I was a nervous wreck when it was over, but Denis pressed a large scotch on me and said, "you did really well, want do do another next month?"
I politely declined.
Pat

stevesmi
16th September 2008, 17:59
I was at Riversdale in 1970,71,72 as a Radio Officer student so didn't mix too much with the non-R/Os. I wonder if any ex-Riversdale R/Os are reading this?

freddythefrog
24th September 2008, 22:37
Was at Riversdale tech as trainee R/O 1965 to 1967, did all my tickets here, some good lecturers and a great crowd of Radio lads on the courses, had some great times, how time flies.Ah! the memories. I would do it all over again if i could---no regrets at all.
Derek--did you not have some "gaffer tape" to fix the piece of wood back
together or did you need a souvenir?? from the pub up the road--ha-ha.
good old days eh!! regards ftf
PS shame it has all been knocked down now and a housing estate built in place of it.

Derek Roger
25th September 2008, 15:34
Was at Riversdale tech as trainee R/O 1965 to 1967, did all my tickets here, some good lecturers and a great crowd of Radio lads on the courses, had some great times, how time flies.Ah! the memories. I would do it all over again if i could---no regrets at all.
Derek--did you not have some "gaffer tape" to fix the piece of wood back
together or did you need a souvenir?? from the pub up the road--ha-ha.
good old days eh!! regards ftf
PS shame it has all been knocked down now and a housing estate built in place of it.

I still have that piece of wood lurking somewhere in a drawer : No doubt all that remains of the Aiggie !
Happy days Derek

Barber Hector
27th September 2008, 15:09
I picked up on this forum before going to bed the other night and it caused a sleepless night. I was at Riversdale Tech Sept 1955 to Easter 58'ish and left with 2nd class PMG certificate and part one of First Class. Joined Holts and came back 6 months later and finished off my 1st class.
But those years were absolutely crap. Aged 16, no money, in digs at Penny Lane and a long way from home. Study study and more study. Dark days but it did pay off.
Riversdale in those days was so new it actually under control of Liverpool University and we all had Riversdale Tech blazers with their badge and 'University' scarf.

When I first read the above comments on Riversdale, the Aigburth Arms Hotel came up foremost in discussions and initially I wondered why I never saved up a few pennies and visited the place. Then I realised I wasnt old enough ! So I guess the above contributors were some years older than me.

Mr Kinsman was the Principal, George[?] Brown was head of department, lecturers were Mr Thornton, Mr Griffiths and Gordon Andrews. There was another chap who used to fill in on occasion but cant remember his name.

Holt's baby farm was across the road and the lads looked very smart in their uniforms. There were a few Alfred Holt chaps in for upgrading their certificates and I thought that is the future company for me.

And I never looked back.

A contibutor to the forum mentioned that Riversdale was now a housing area, which is a shame, but the sports field alone would be gold in the eyes of some developer. Perhaps someone could enlighten me on its present situation.

I remember Holts Personnel Manager Charlie Metcalf trying to dissuade me from returning to college to complete my 1st Class because he would have to pay me an extra ten bob [I think] per month ticket allowance !
For my sins I spent a year on the UK coast, coasting some ships with a passenger licence that required a 1st class certificate. I was sick to death of Glasgow's Elderslie dry dock by the end of my penance !!

CrazySparks
29th September 2008, 15:05
I was at Riversdale 1973-1976 on the R/O's course. I was 16 years of age, fresh and innocent from North Wales. It was one of the best periods of my life and set me up for so many things. I well remember some of the excellent yet humorous lecturers by face if no longer by name (although Jackson, Parker, Gerry, Cotton, Harris come to mind). They were excellent teachers and I remember them all with great affection. The anecdotal tales they told us motivated us well in our studies, keeping us keen to get our tickets.

The fact that the college is no longer there is a great sadness to me, but more than that, its passing marks the carelessness with which the UK treated its once great legacy of maritime skills, which should have been nurtured and developed. In particular, marine electronics remains a substantial industry globally, and the UK should be a key player, demanding skilled people from such institutions as Riversdale.

It strikes me that one can find a good many pages on the web for the other radio colleges, but very few for Riversdale - sad. Anyone got any good photographs of the place in the 70's?

I learned to drink in those 3 years - and man - did I learn well!

Best 2 U all.

David W
29th September 2008, 16:36
Being a Garston lad by the time I had been barred from the Aigburth, the Heath and the Garston my leave was up and it was time for another ship.

M29
1st October 2008, 20:28
Was at Riversdale tech as trainee R/O 1965 to 1967, did all my tickets here, some good lecturers and a great crowd of Radio lads on the courses, had some great times, how time flies.Ah! the memories. I would do it all over again if i could---no regrets at all.
Derek--did you not have some "gaffer tape" to fix the piece of wood back
together or did you need a souvenir?? from the pub up the road--ha-ha.
good old days eh!! regards ftf
PS shame it has all been knocked down now and a housing estate built in place of it.

Freddy
You and I must have studied together or just one year apart. I was there 65/66, went to sea 67.

Brown was Head of the Radio Section, Griffiths was no 2. Andrews ran the Radar section. Ray Pilgrim (radar) was also there. (he is on friends re-united). Mr Parker taught Tech Elec. Mr Bruce taught "cabin" and Mr Teasdale (slightly crazy) ran labs. There was an older guy who taught radio who said "erm" every other word and I'm now ashamed to say that in boring lectures we would plot "erms" against time on a graph. He had the SG Brown headphone swindle and we all bought these of him. Cotton was also there and became involved in the Association of Marine Radio Colleges. Happy days!

Alan Melia

degsy
2nd October 2008, 19:03
Today 3 rd Sept 2006 is 43 years to the day since I started my apprentice ship with Thos & Jno Brocklebank Limited at Riversdale Tech .
3 rd Sept in 1963 was in fact a Sunday and is the day I found the Aigburth Hotel while scouting my way around the college.

Any other " Aiggie " patrons of that era ??
Derek

The Aigburth Arms Hotel was,sadly, knocked down and they built an effin monstrosity and called it "The Kingsman" . In memory of the Liverpool Kings Regiment, the walls where adorned with pictures from the First World War. Some of these where quite gruesome. I remember my mother and father coming back from there and saying "never again they should not have knocked the Aigburth down" Like most pubs now it has gone through a few changes, at present its a carvery bar, if you like that kind of alehouse. The Aigburth was an old alehouse with bags of character, however us local lads did'nt do particularly well with the women down there. They where attracted to exotic seafaring types from Riversdale or the intelligentsia from Liverpool Uni's hall's of residence who used to frequent the place. Still had a few goodnights there.(Pint)

CrazySparks
3rd October 2008, 12:35
Interesting.
When got to Riversdale in 1973 the Kingsman was already there and the Aigburth Arms was just off Elmswood road. Happy memories of both really.
Oh! And we were still drinking Brown&Bitter! Gallons of it.

freddythefrog
9th October 2008, 13:22
Hello M29 alan
Yes i remember you quite well, think you wereabout 6 or 9 months ahead of
of me at Riversdale, you probably with Simon Tudor-Jones class (RIP). Yes remember all those lecturers name as well but what about Gerry Ludden he very good in my mind and Johnny Halton too.
I stayed on for 1st class and radar thats maybe why we left around same time, me in june 67. Happy days indeed alan. 73's de ftf

luigi
16th October 2008, 22:07
Interesting.
When got to Riversdale in 1973 the Kingsman was already there and the Aigburth Arms was just off Elmswood road. Happy memories of both really.
Oh! And we were still drinking Brown&Bitter! Gallons of it.

Maybe you're thinking of 'The Kinsman' which was at the top of Beechwood Place (opposite Greasy Annies) - as opposed to The Kingsman?

CrazySparks
18th October 2008, 10:10
Maybe you're thinking of 'The Kinsman' which was at the top of Beechwood Place (opposite Greasy Annies) - as opposed to The Kingsman?

Aha!!! You're right, Luigi. Guess I'm getting old and doddery!

luigi
18th October 2008, 23:49
Aha!!! You're right, Luigi. Guess I'm getting old and doddery!

Join the club!!!!!

Phil Houghton
27th October 2008, 16:15
My friends flood of memories come back to me when I read about this college. I was their in 77 and comuted every day from St Helens on the train. Whilst I was their sanctions where in place on the teaching front so you could expect not to have any lessons till late afternoon, this being the case it was the norm to visit the Sportsman in St Johns precinct and on to the Hoffbrau house to watch the dancers and sup stynes. by the time you got back to lesson if capable it went by in a blur. still passed though. later after coming ashore I was working for a stevedore firm in Goole and whilst also being the companies trainer I met up with an External verifier for the qualification I was deliverring who on checking my CV was only a senior principal at Riversdale during my time their. So we spent most of that visit reliving the past. I also remember Ivor Thornton (get in the Barrell) doing Rule of the Road. Going away to Conniston for the week or weekend to Lawson House and spending many an evening in the Ship inn in Conniston supping Hartleys. Yes good times. What about the Chinese chippy for spring roles, where he would shout as you entered the door 'Wha you want'!!!

"Paddy" walsh
19th November 2008, 18:50
All those memories flood back now as I read all the "posts" on the " Aiggie".
Sad to know its gone, as I guess is "riversdale house" the old B.F. hostal were i first stayed in 1961 before all the expansions started. The Aiggie and the pies over the road are good memories as were the girls from the teaching college who had such grand accom. !
Had planned to revisit all that area on day on a trip back to the U.K. but will now strike that one off the "bucket list".
Thanks to all for the postings and good to see the odd AH man about from my time.

Derek Roger
19th November 2008, 21:35
All those memories flood back now as I read all the "posts" on the " Aiggie".
Sad to know its gone, as I guess is "riversdale house" the old B.F. hostal were i first stayed in 1961 before all the expansions started. The Aiggie and the pies over the road are good memories as were the girls from the teaching college who had such grand accom. !
Had planned to revisit all that area on day on a trip back to the U.K. but will now strike that one off the "bucket list".
Thanks to all for the postings and good to see the odd AH man about from my time.

Paddy the pies were terrible !! Could not get a real meat pie ( Scotch Pie ) just the meat and potatoe version with very little meat > We used ( 3of us ) buy a fresh loaf of bread ; cut in in three and then get a shilling of chips ( split in 3 ) and stuff them into the loaf . A real "Chip Buttie " If we were flush we could get some Margarine to lubricate the mess!

Not very norishing but kept the hunger pangs at bay . This allowed us to have a brown ale or 1/2 pint at lunch for at least 3 days of the week before pay on a friday .

The Riversdale meals in the canteen were quite good but a bit expensive ! Aiggie and a chip buttie was the order of the day .


Happy Days Derek

Paul Baxter
20th November 2008, 10:17
The best was a Brown mix. A newcastle bottle of brown over a bitter.

Do any of you remember the tale of two middies going through the wall of the house opposite the cricket Club.
In a Hilmam Imp?
We where both stone sober that thursday night even being at the Blue Angle as well.

M29
20th November 2008, 14:34
Hello M29 alan
Yes i remember you quite well, think you wereabout 6 or 9 months ahead of
of me at Riversdale, you probably with Simon Tudor-Jones class (RIP). Yes remember all those lecturers name as well but what about Gerry Ludden he very good in my mind and Johnny Halton too.
I stayed on for 1st class and radar thats maybe why we left around same time, me in june 67. Happy days indeed alan. 73's de ftf

Freddy
thanks for reply, yes Halton was the "erm" man.
Yes, I was with Simon Tudor Jones, Jim Laughlin, Richard Walton etc.
Gerry Ludden came from a private radio school that closed down and yes, he was good, especially on radio circuits.
Jim Laughlin went into lecturing, Richard Walton joined Marconi depot in Liverpool.
All the best
Alan

Ron Stringer
20th November 2008, 14:57
Richard Walton transferred from Liverpool to Marconi's Chelmsford office and worked for me for a while. Moved to the department dealing with offshore comms and the last I heard was working for Shell offshore in the Shetlands. That was probably 20 years ago.

andyp1
10th December 2008, 13:26
I did Phase 3 Engineer @ Riversdale back in 82/83 and lived in the newer single cabin accommodation next to the original "Aulis" house of Ocean Fleets, although we still used the dining hall attached at the rear of the houses.Phase 1 & 2 cadets lived in the tower block towards the back end of the site
The Kinsman Pub was still the college local and the beer was truly terrible, thank god for the off licence over the road which sold draught beers / wines / spirits.
The young ladies of IM Marsh and others were still as predatory, cheered us on playing rugby at the Oydessey Club next door and played a mean game of hockey.
I had reason to go back to Liverpool recently with work, the old college site & Halls are now fashionable riverside mews houses, however the old Ocean Sports Club ( the Oydessey) is now a sports club.
The Swan in Wood St is still going - it was like a time warp going back, and rumour has it that the Cabin Club is still open, but the old Royal Infirmary Nurses Home is now a car park.
Happy Days(Jester)

KiwiSpark
7th March 2009, 07:56
Freddy
thanks for reply, yes Halton was the "erm" man.
Yes, I was with Simon Tudor Jones, Jim Laughlin, Richard Walton etc.
Gerry Ludden came from a private radio school that closed down and yes, he was good, especially on radio circuits.
Jim Laughlin went into lecturing, Richard Walton joined Marconi depot in Liverpool.
All the best
Alan


RIP Simon Tudor-Jones. Worked with him on RFA Black Rover, he 2 R/O, gunnery officer, also known as DWARFO - and anyone who knew Simon will know that he was vertically challenged!! Nice guy, sad to hear his loss.

I was at Riversdale 85-88. First year at Riversdale Rd. after that ended up in the city centre in temporary place until the radio section could be set up in Mabel Fletcher college in Old Swan. Madness!

Jim Loughlin is a friend, know him and his family well. My uncle used to be a priest at his church but unfortunately lost contact with him when we moved down to NZ 2 years ago. I know he was working for the RIS down in the midlands last I heard of him.

Happy memories of the place, Gordon Andrews, Willie Williamson to name a few, and Jim of course.

All the best to ex-Riversdale people.

Geoffrey Stone
8th July 2009, 22:41
I was at Riversdale from 64-66 and remember the Eggie well. The beer (Walkers of Warrington) was pretty foul and most people seemed to drink it half and half with a bottle of Brown Peter (also awful tack!). My digs were in Alma Road. I made a nostalgic trip back about fifteen years ago and was disappointed to discover that the new Eggy was an ultra-modern soulless sort of place - nothing like the establishment which lost all it's tables and chairs to a pyramid on the main road one Saturday night!

I was living in digs at 144 Alma road at the same time - any connection?

Fahad
8th September 2009, 11:17
I studied in Liverpool from 83 to 1988. I remember my British friends i.e. Tony Wignal from Liverpool Mr. Whithead...etc

Anyone rememer me, please email me on (fahad.akeel@yahoo.com)

David Allsop
8th October 2009, 21:09
I was at Riversdale as BP Deck Cadet in 1980.
Stayed at Kinsman House in Beechwood road. Always remember Derek on the tannoy, "good morning its 0h seven thirty hundred hours"
And whenever an external call came through to the common room it would be announced on the tannoy, great sport getting him to announce " phone call common room Marc Bolan, etc etc".....
I remember the lunchtime orals with the legendary Ivor Rutherford, your turn in the barrel boy. sound one short blast on the ships whistle alter course to starboard and pass round the stern... he got me through those dreaded orals.
Few names I remember Alex Wetton, Dick Biscombe, Ian Starkie, Ian "bones" from RFA" John kennedy, Farhad Cheoum Kherabadi,a foreign Cadet I think, Miss Jones, Tim Leary, Craig (Bo) Story,

great to hear from anyone around that era.
I have photographs which I will post
Best reagards
David

jonboysez
10th October 2009, 21:51
I was at Riversdale about 1975-76 I think, on 1st year of OND marine engineers course. I was a trainee engineer cadet with Bibby Line, but I only stayed about 6 months - home sick (I was only 16 and not from a seafaring background) - I decided engineering wasn't for me after all, but I have fond memories staying at Kinsman House and visiting the Aigburth Arms and a soul music club in Liverpool on a weekend. I too remember that bloke on reception who did the wake up calls on the tannoy of a morning - he sometimes got it wrong "it is now 7:30, I mean 8:30" didn't he have a slight German accent? Anyway he was a good chap, he used to leave the fire door open round the back stairs so we could get in in the early hours of a Sat/Sun morning after a night out, otherwise it was a case of throwing stones up at one of the windows as the front door was locked at around midnight. I rember a formal meal (was it Christmas?) we had in the dining room with the top table occupied by the important folk (maybe the principal of the college was there I can't remember) - anyway I want to own up to what happened after the top table had vacated - whilst the meal was on a cork fired onto our table, so I sneakily throw it over my shoulder back to where I thought it had come from, then someone else on that table throw it back onto our table (this was whilst the top table was still occupied) - the cork was going back wards and forwards for a while followed by bits of orange peel etc - when the top table had vacated fully, a barrage of brussel sprouts were fired at the table nearest the back wall - they all ducked on that table and the wall was plastered with them! I also remember when we had just moved into Kinsman House dorms us freshers were visited one night by the older students and they turned over every bed in the dorms, some with folk still in them - they got a roasting for that! I wish I could remember the names of the other Bibby Line engineer cadets in the dorm with me - there was a lad surname Taylor from Yeadon, and a lad from Sunderland who I used to go down Liverpool with on a Saturday night clubbing, and a lad from Derby (Paul?) About a year or two after I had left Bibby Line they had one of their ships go down off Japan sunk without trace and there were cadets onboard so I think what might have been if I had been unlucky enough to have been on it - I hope none of the lads I knew were on it. I'm now a boring accountant still living in Huddersfield!

GARYJONES
7th January 2010, 14:45
Crikey - what amazing memories flood back reading these posts. I was there in 1970/71 as a deck cadet with NZSCo. My other NZS shipmates there were Carl Rolaston (Roly); Bruce Hardy; Lawrence Mowatt (Mo); Tim King; Phil Jarman; Andy Wilson; Martin McCartan (Mac); and Roger Jones (the 'Vicar').

Anyone remember me/us?

Fond memories of 'Greasy Annies'; crowding round the TV watching TOTP; and smuggling a girl or two in from IM Marsh.

Nostalgia isn't what it used to be!!

Gary (Jones)

Orchidea
12th January 2010, 13:34
Was at Riversdale tech as trainee R/O 1965 to 1967, did all my tickets here, some good lecturers and a great crowd of Radio lads on the courses, had some great times, how time flies.Ah! the memories. I would do it all over again if i could---no regrets at all.
Derek--did you not have some "gaffer tape" to fix the piece of wood back
together or did you need a souvenir?? from the pub up the road--ha-ha.
good old days eh!! regards ftf
PS shame it has all been knocked down now and a housing estate built in place of it.

I was there same time as you but didn`t complete the course as I was commuting by public transpoprt from Southport can you imagine that in `65?and went to sea as a purser.Do you remember Eddie Murphy or John Saphier? that lecturer with west country accent,Parker and of course Mr.Teasedale.

Jerry wes
3rd March 2011, 21:23
I was at Riversdale between 1975 and 1978 as a deck cadet for P&O. My main memory was from the Tower block, the Engineer cadets glued to the TV on a Sunday evening watching the Muppet Show. The really awful Mild at The Kinsman, Greasy Annie's and of course the Cabin Club on Wood Street ever weekend. Happy times

david.hopcroft
5th March 2011, 11:10
I was at Riversdale 62-63 doing PMG 2 then PMG 1. Back in 64 for a BOT Radar Cert.

The view of it all on Google Maps is pretty depressing - looks like yuppy flats.

David
+

oglebilluk
27th March 2011, 12:05
I too well remember Riversdale Tech; starting there as an Engineer Apprentice with the mighty Brocklebanks as recently as 1955 (or so it seems!)
Also the 'Aiggie' and further up the road a small Bents pub which had a cosy warm fire for a cold day.
As I now live in the area I'm aware of the many changes. The original Aigee was demolished and ultimately a car showroom was built; after several ownerships this too was demolished. Now they are building RETIREMENT APARTMENTS on that site - so they are ready to welcome us back. The attached thumbnail is the site plan and artists impression now posted on the security fencing.
For good measure I've also posted to my gallery some pictures taken in the vicinity.
Enjoy the memories
Bill

Derek Roger
27th March 2011, 15:30
Before our finals I used to study at the Aiggie at one of the tables by the bowling green. On the evening before our Math final George Harwood our math teacher was bowling ; he came over and asked why I was studying in a pub . I explained that my digs were too noisy ( land ladys son was a budding Beatle and always making a din with his Guitar)
George looked over my shoulder at the suff I was working on and said " I wouldnt bother with that ! turned over a few pages of my notes and said " wouldnt bother with that either " He did not tell me what to study but it helped knowing what not to bother about .
Indirectly the landladys son and the Aiggie helped me with Math .

Happy Days Derek

peteloud
23rd October 2011, 17:34
I started at Riversdale the same time as you, Sept. 1962. (49 years ago). I was with Shell Tankers, but gave it up before my apprenticeship was up. I left to do a B.Sc. with CEGB.

It was sad to give it up, I was a bit of a ship freak and spent my weekends going round the docks ship-spotting and going aboad a few varied ships. I decided that a degree with CEGB would lead to a better career.

In my first year I lived just behind the Aigburth, but out at Crosby in my 2nd year.

I remember that my salary was 158 per year in my first year, although we did get 4 7s 6d a week subsistence.

Derek Roger
3rd September 2012, 18:49
Its 50 years ago today ( also a monday ) that I started with Brocklebanks as an apprentice at Riversdale .
About this time of day we were all up at the Aiggie getting to know one another .
I think I will have a beer .
Happy Days Derek

peteloud
3rd September 2012, 19:25
Its 50 years ago today . . . . . I think I will have a beer .
Happy Days Derek

We must have started on the same day. I was with Shell.

I was having a beer when notification of your posting came in. I was stood at the rail, with my beer, looking at the poop deck . . . . of a narrowboat, on the marina where I now live.

Since my early leaving of Shell I only met three of my Shell class-mates. Glynn Turnbull, who did the same as me and left Shell to do a B.Sc. and work for CEGB. I only met him once a couple of years after jacking in, and have no idea what happened to him.

I met up with 'Haggis', Ron Young a few years ago. He was living in USA but retired to Scotland a few years ago. We stay in contact.

I also met up with 'Clog', Colin Parsons. This is a very sad tale. Check out the story at,
http://www.peterloud.co.uk/indonesia/jalan_jaksa.html

Is there a British Merchant Navy anymore?

Peter Eccleson
3rd September 2012, 20:06
This thread is a great 'nostalgia jogger' -I was at Riversdale on the R/o course in 1970 - 1971 when we were 'evacuated' from the Wireless College , Colwyn Bay after it closed. Great memories of the Aigbuth Arms and nights out in Liverpool. Went back in 1973 to do my radar ticket but had more 'disposable income' then as an employed R/O. Shame he place as gone!

Varley
6th September 2012, 10:50
This thread is a great 'nostalgia jogger' -I was at Riversdale on the R/o course in 1970 - 1971 when we were 'evacuated' from the Wireless College , Colwyn Bay after it closed. Great memories of the Aigbuth Arms and nights out in Liverpool. Went back in 1973 to do my radar ticket but had more 'disposable income' then as an employed R/O. Shame he place as gone!

Pete, I think our move came from internal pressure not external vacuum! David

Peter Eccleson
6th September 2012, 13:27
Dave....I believe that you are correct! was the vacuum formed by removal of available cash??? Never did really explore the reasons 'Kipper' shut the show down.

Jimmytwo56
8th September 2012, 16:24
I was at Riversdale from 72 to 74. My first year I lived in Kinsman House. The caretaker / doorman was a polish gentleman. Have happy memories of that first year. 16 years old and had my first pint in a pub in Garston . A new pub was opened on the main Aigburth road , across the road was a chippy "greasy Annies" where I had my first taste of a meat and potato pie. On Sunday's a group of us played war games with miniature soldiers, wish I could remember the gentleman who ran it. I do remember that the meals were awfull .

Varley
8th September 2012, 17:15
Dave....I believe that you are correct! was the vacuum formed by removal of available cash??? Never did really explore the reasons 'Kipper' shut the show down.

Pete, At the time I thought we all assumed that the cost of fitting the needed SSB and tighter tolerance kit wasn't 'worth the candle'. David V

Peter Eccleson
9th September 2012, 23:17
Dave - I am sure that a 'bit of marketing' at the time would no have been misplaced. A sob story to Marconi, IMRC and KH would have produced the goods at little to no cost no doubt. Ah well! That's nostalgia for you.

Ron Stringer
10th September 2012, 07:52
Dave - I am sure that a 'bit of marketing' at the time would no have been misplaced. A sob story to Marconi, IMRC and KH would have produced the goods at little to no cost no doubt. Ah well! That's nostalgia for you.

I know that Marconi gave "special discounts" for equipment supplied to radio colleges (I suppose all our competitors did likewise) but not having been involved on the sales side, I don't know the amounts involved. But I would point out that by 1988, when SOLAS was amended to adopt GMDSS, it was already crystal clear that there would be no further requirement for ships to carry a dedicated radio officer - GMDSS had been over 10 years in the making!

The UK's Dept. of Transport had reversed its previous policy of setting high standards for the construction, manning and operation of British ships and instead had stated its intention to apply only the minimal standards set by IMO. So it was probable that someone responsible for the funding of Riversdale, recognising that the British shipping and shipbuilding industries were in steep decline and that the remaining businesses were already moving away from the UK, decided that further investment was not justified by the foreseeable reduction in demand for British officers and crews.

Varley
10th September 2012, 10:48
I know that Marconi gave "special discounts" for equipment supplied to radio colleges...But I would point out that by 1988, when SOLAS was amended...

... minimal standards set by IMO...

Ron, Pete and I are talking of 1970 not 90. We and others of Colwyn Bay's first MRGC intake were turfed out after year one, decanted to Riversdale. Year two only did practical (bar morse of course) but Colwyn Bay was equipped with Oceanspan era kit with not a semiconductor (of more than two electrodes anyway) in sight - I guess the lecturers would have needed some upskilling as well. With publically funded colleges still providing radio courses I suppose there may also have been issues with student grants. All in all I suspect the return on additional investment was unattractive (or perhaps suicidal).

I cannot resist adding that I don't think the standards of IMO are the problem or that much different from UK (having been largely drafted from them). I grant perfomance specifications like echo sounders - UK; phasing not permitted, IMO not mentioned. Radar; target colour to be independent of return strength - were different and, by and large, less stringent. The issue is how 'spritually' Johnny Foreigner adheres to them. An owner can have a good ship registered under the least attentive flag. He can also have a British registered wreck. Perhaps it is because that same wreck would have had to have British officers that it could trade despite its disadvantages. Any fool can run a competently designed and built vessel when its young - it is in its teenage years that finessing tells.

Ron Stringer
10th September 2012, 11:57
Ron, Pete and I are talking of 1970 not 90. We and others of Colwyn Bay's first MRGC intake were turfed out after year one, decanted to Riversdale.

Apologies for misreading your posts. I thought you were referring to the closure of Riversdale, not Colwyn Bay.

As far as the comparison of IMO recommendations with the UK equipment performance standards is concerned, the crux was that in the 1980s (and subsequently) the DoT was under Government direction to reject all attempts to modify the old UK specs (largely dating from the 1960s) in order to reflect developments in technology. I was a member of various UK industry working groups and committees involved and the DoT/DTI civil servants were very unhappy with the change.

The official justification was on the grounds that the old UK specs satisfied the existing IMO standards and the UK government was committed not to demand anything of a higher grade for their shipping. It was deemed to be a handicap on the British shipowner to demand any higher standards or the adoption of new ideas. So although technology moved on, the UK carriage requirements and standards stood still, until others had caught up. They now move only when IMO (a facility for determining the lowest common denominator and then adopting it for future application, after a decade or two) deems necessary.

UK companies that had developed more advanced technology were unable to sell it in their home market - shipowners in general fitted only what the regulations demanded. Denied a home market, they had great difficulty selling overseas.

An example of an alternative approach was the development of anti-collision radar where, following its development by American manufacturers and some high profile marine incidents, the USA unilaterally demanded the fitting of anti-collision radar on all vessels (regardless of registry) in certain categories when visiting the USA. All vessels, note, not just its own flag ships. Not much evidence there of sticking to IMO standards. Only US manufacturers benefited from the new carriage requirement.

Later, when carriage of ARPA was strong-armed through IMO, which country had manufacturers offering such products off the shelf?

david.hopcroft
10th September 2012, 19:38
Ron -

I did my PMG at Riversdale in 1962-63. The main Tx It was an Oceanspan (VII I think) that we were told was from the spare Radio Room on the Gothic during the Royal Tour. Had you heard of this before, or can you confirm it ?

David
+

Ron Stringer
10th September 2012, 23:07
Ron -

I did my PMG at Riversdale in 1962-63. The main Tx It was an Oceanspan (VII I think) that we were told was from the spare Radio Room on the Gothic during the Royal Tour. Had you heard of this before, or can you confirm it ?

David
+

Sorry, no I can't help with that and although I know the MIMCo technician from So'ton depot who sailed on that trip, I regret to say that he will not remember what happened to the additional gear fitted for the tour.

david.hopcroft
11th September 2012, 19:11
Thanks for that Ron.

It was however the last time I saw Marconi gear. Job offers were a little scarce at that time. Mr Brown had already suggested we stayed on after the PMG 2nd to try for a 1st, which many of us did. I had a fairly quick offer from AEI and so my first trip was with a T50MH and G11/12. I went back for a BOT Radar on the Locator at Riversdale, and went straight to a BTH RMS2 !

Mr B at Riversdale also advised that we tried for a C & G Intermediate Telecomms as it would be easy for us. Good advice also - it was !
David
+

Scelerat
26th September 2012, 09:06
I was at Riversdale from 72 to 74. My first year I lived in Kinsman House. The caretaker / doorman was a polish gentleman. Have happy memories of that first year. 16 years old and had my first pint in a pub in Garston . A new pub was opened on the main Aigburth road , across the road was a chippy "greasy Annies" where I had my first taste of a meat and potato pie. On Sunday's a group of us played war games with miniature soldiers, wish I could remember the gentleman who ran it. I do remember that the meals were awfull .

I was there on Phase 1, '75 and phase 2, in '77, I think. I was lucky enough to be invited to the bloke with the wargames stuff. The entire ground floor of his house was devoted to the hobby, with a vast array of very well made scenery and well painted figures. However, the only game I was involved in degenerated into an unpleasant argument about the ability of a jeep to avoid being hit by a german anti-tank gun, which got very silly, and very serious, so I never returned.

Derek Roger
26th September 2012, 13:27
We must have started on the same day. I was with Shell.

I was having a beer when notification of your posting came in. I was stood at the rail, with my beer, looking at the poop deck . . . . of a narrowboat, on the marina where I now live.

Since my early leaving of Shell I only met three of my Shell class-mates. Glynn Turnbull, who did the same as me and left Shell to do a B.Sc. and work for CEGB. I only met him once a couple of years after jacking in, and have no idea what happened to him.

I met up with 'Haggis', Ron Young a few years ago. He was living in USA but retired to Scotland a few years ago. We stay in contact.

I also met up with 'Clog', Colin Parsons. This is a very sad tale. Check out the story at,
http://www.peterloud.co.uk/indonesia/jalan_jaksa.html

Is there a British Merchant Navy anymore?

Do you remember "Bronco Lane " ? either Shell or ED,s who wouod take his guitar up tothe "Aiggie" and entertain us .

Cheers Derek

Tony Selman
26th September 2012, 14:10
Ron and David. You must have both been there at the same time as me but at this distance I cannot recall either of your names. I went there in September 1961, dramatically failed my 2nd Class part 1 first time and then went through to get 1st Class with no further failures leaving Riversdale in very early 1964. I can recall the Oceanspan VII but do not recall the Gothic story. I must say that I also do not recall jobs being particularly hard to come by then, certainly when I was looking anyway. I got a job with Brock's within the first hour of starting to look and as far as I can remember I don't think any of my peer group struggled either. I know Brian Cotton and Jim Loughlin very well, I will ask them about the Gothic Oceanspan story.

Tony Selman
27th September 2012, 09:37
I have now heard from Brian Cotton. He trained at Riversdale in 1955-56 and it was said then that the Oceanspan 1 at that time was ex Gothic but that it was fairly quickly removed. We are tracking back further with Albert Owings who worked at Riversdale for a long time and he may well know for sure. For those of you who may remember him Albert is a WW2 R/O veteran who was sunk 3 times and is still going strong and turns up to the ROA AGM every year. I think he is about 90 now.

trotterdotpom
27th September 2012, 11:53
Brian Cotton wasn't the Marconi Manager at Takoradi depot in the early '70s, was he?

John T

ppgflyer
22nd February 2013, 18:41
Attended Riversdale from 1974~1977, CGLI option. Cunard Line 1977~1985, now living in Los Angeles.

Lived in a Flat on Whitehedge Road, flat mate was Peter Duff.
Fond memories of The Sportsman's Arms and the band there called Supercharge. What a great time of my life those three years were.

Went back and did my Advanced Marine Radio & Radar ticket plus CGLI Full Tech Cert in Radio & Telecommunications.
Teachers I remember, George Dempsy and Miles O'Shea, Brian Cotton.

A Navi friend of mine, Phill Edawards (Barbados) told me about a site called "Friends United", when I entered "Riversdale College" in the search there were several folks that showed up, but I remember being speechless when I discovered the photo's someone posted of C-block being demolished. So sad.
There were also photo's of a class trip to the Lake District, when we went it snowed, anybody else remember their trip up there?

Was back in the UK in January and was going to take my son to show him the college, but as it's gone there was no point wasting the gas.

Greg.

seagem (Cornish)
18th March 2013, 21:22
'Bronco' was EDs and a year ahead of me (Riversdale '63-'65 and '66-'67) as an engineer cadet in River House. There was another guy (anyone out there to remind me?) in the same year with a banjo. We could drown out the Tamla Motown, no problem.

Landlord of the Aiggie was Paddy Threlkeld and I used to like a dram of Dewars Ancestor Scotch, which the brewery allowed him 12 bottles a year. I think I did four of them for him and it was 2/6d a tot, rather than 2/3d like the rest, and he had to fetch it from the Cocktail Bar, where we lads never ventured. When cash was tight, a pint of mild in the public bar was 1/4d. As mentioned in another post, Paddy would always cash a cheque.

Cheers is indeed the correct salutation,

Cornish (as I was known in those days, otherwise Greg Morcom)


Do you remember "Bronco Lane " ? either Shell or ED,s who wouod take his guitar up tothe "Aiggie" and entertain us .

Cheers Derek

Derek Roger
19th March 2013, 15:59
'Bronco' was EDs and a year ahead of me (Riversdale '63-'65 and '66-'67) as an engineer cadet in River House. There was another guy (anyone out there to remind me?) in the same year with a banjo. We could drown out the Tamla Motown, no problem.

Landlord of the Aiggie was Paddy Threlkeld and I used to like a dram of Dewars Ancestor Scotch, which the brewery allowed him 12 bottles a year. I think I did four of them for him and it was 2/6d a tot, rather than 2/3d like the rest, and he had to fetch it from the Cocktail Bar, where we lads never ventured. When cash was tight, a pint of mild in the public bar was 1/4d. As mentioned in another post, Paddy would always cash a cheque.



Cheers is indeed the correct salutation,

Cornish (as I was known in those days, otherwise Greg Morcom)

Our paths must have passed in the Aiggie at some time then . One of our players in the Riversdale Rugby Club : Mel Wilson with Blue Flue ; ordered a pint of Shandy ; half and half to quench his thirst after a game . He was unhappy as he was charged the same as a pint of bitter ( expected to pay for the half pint bitter only ). It caused a bit of a row ! He was told that as it was mixed it was classed as a cocktail . Thereafter he would order a pint ; drink half of it and top off with the free lemonade that was on the tables for the peasents who put in in their Scotch .

Happy Days . Derek

Hartonman
23rd March 2013, 14:38
I was there off and on from 1965 to 1968, a pie and a pint most lunchtimes in the Aiggie or scallope and chips from the chippy across the road.

seagem (Cornish)
26th March 2013, 20:10
I was at Riversdale from 64-66 and remember the Eggie well. The beer (Walkers of Warrington) was pretty foul and most people seemed to drink it half and half with a bottle of Brown Peter (also awful tack!). My digs were in Alma Road. I made a nostalgic trip back about fifteen years ago and was disappointed to discover that the new Eggy was an ultra-modern soulless sort of place - nothing like the establishment which lost all it's tables and chairs to a pyramid on the main road one Saturday night!

Bryan,

In another memory that might have been about number 4, or perhaps 6, with Mr Mines and his wife Gina? Our paths may well have crossed there.

They were my digs for the Phase 3 (engineering) year of 1966-67, there being insufficient room in River House. There were about 9 of us, from a variety of companies, resident at 4.00 a week, paid for, in my case, out of the 5/5/- company subsistence. Meals were served with a dog escort, a Great Dane leading and an Alsation as rear-guard. If we said 'Boo' to the 'Dane, it scarpered, but no one said anything to the Alsation. It was a grand house in its day and looks, from Google, as if it is well refurbished now.

Whilst there, I bought my first car - an oil burning, '56 Morris Minor Series 2, with the 804cc, overhead valve, A30 engine and a split 'screen. We could pack in either 6 (or 7) of us for the run around to Riversdale. The middle passenger in the front, Phil Robinson of ED usually (his dad was an old man with EDs), had to do the gear changes for me! (What seat belts? There weren't any.)

Anyway, I/we survived to have memories!

Greg Morcom

Donga
27th August 2013, 14:20
Hi Gregor,

Great to hear your memories, in such detail, but they were great days with an engineering training that was second to none. It has stood me in good stead throughout my career. So many memories & where to start. A group of us, with Bronco at the head, used to go down the Dock road, singing up a storm in the pubs. I`ve always tried to look out for him in pop groups over the years but to no avail. He was more talented than many that made it big, including the Beatles. Remember the Smallwoods, Captain & Mrs, how I fancied her, a mature lady with poise. River house used to be locked up, I think at midnight, so the fire door was the only way in after the bewitching hour. Captain Smallwood cottoned on to this & was waiting one night for any miscreants, of which I was one. Remembered Phil, who was prematurely bald & the original hippy. He held the record for the best lift while hitch hiking in Europe, a lift by US Army helicopter to Aachen. There`s a book of memories in our many hitch hiking exploits. So many names are flashing through my brain, Dai Waddell, who left to do a degree & played football like Garth Bale. Mike Smith ?, who was asked to leave. I`ve forgot the circumstances. Rod or was it Rob, whose room was on the top floor & was drown off a beach in Lagos. Big Mac, not the MacDonald variety but the original from Old Swan. I sailed with him on a few occasions but his most infamous exploit was in Blackpool where we went to celebrate after our final exams. It was Scots week. We were in a pub on the front when one of our lads was attacked, I`m not sure whether it was Mike Gardner or Howie. However the group that were doing the attacking didn`t realise how big, in all senses, our group was. It was the wild west.
The police arrived with dogs but the only one of our group to be taken in was Big Mac. Good to hear from you Greg.

Peter G

Turbine6
27th August 2013, 16:30
Started at Riversdale in 69, first year in digs and then in Kinsman House tower block. Sad to here it is now a housing estate. Suppose not much need for a lot of cadets these days.

seagem (Cornish)
27th August 2013, 17:17
If you are Gilly, then it defines which one of of the two Pete Gs of my year you are - the Lancastrian (Blackburn). The other was from Middlesbrough and I often wondered where life took him. It was Rob Morton who was drowned at Tarkwa Beach. I remember Mick Gardner well but perhaps you would refresh my memory regarding Howie (from Worcester), who, as I recall, was a Shell guy, like Henk and George Hosker. I did call at Henk's old home address, in Bristol, a few years ago and his dad gave me his phone number. We did speak but never met up subsequently.

I went to the annual Elders of Elders Lunch in Liverpool this year (June 2013). There were none of our guys there but someone I spoke to mentioned 'Manxy', (from Bronco's year), who is now back on the IOM. I also spoke to a Burmese deck officer who later sent me the phone number, in Burma, for the Burmese deck cadet I had as cabin mate on my Burma trip, on Yoma, over Christmas, 1965, and I have now spoken to him. There is a chance we might yet meet as his daughter runs a couple of businesses for him in UK and he visits occasionally.

I followed Phil, The Original Hippy, on to the Fian (or was it later, on to Forcados?), where they had made for him, in suitably flowery cloth, by a Lagos tailor, a boiler suit that he used to wear for 'Stand By'. He was always referred to as 'Flower Power' and you might recall that he had a FP wedding on the cliffs at Newquay. Earlier this year, I also spoke to the the 2/Eng from Fian, who is now 82 and has seen better health.

Like Dai, I left (1970) for a degree (Sheffield Poly), where the Riversdale OND seemed to have taken me comfortably through the first two academic years. However, the learning process started when I discovered that the quarto size paper that we used at Riversdale had gone the way of the dodo, replaced by A4, and SI metric had replaced the myriad systems encountered earlier. I retired to Wiltshire from London in 1999 and now spend 3-4 months a year in Fife, whence cam the wee Scot 'Jock' C, although there is no one with his surname there now. It was him who was 'requested to leave' after an incident near Palm Cove, one of the seamier Liverpudlian establishments in which we prepared for seagoing life. Upon reflection, I think that 'Mike Smith' may have been 'Tony Smith' who gave support to try and stop his departure, possibly with the help of his brother, who was a 2/E.

The Rod in the year was Rod T from Amlwch and the class of '63 answer to Big Mac was Gordon Kincla. I have also a couple of stories about Mick Birkett, but for a different forum.

If, like me, you recall a lost youth, and in case you haven't found it already, take a look at
http://www.elderdempster.org/

'Cornish'



Hi Gregor,

Great to hear your memories, in such detail, but they were great days with an engineering training that was second to none. It has stood me in good stead throughout my career. So many memories & where to start. A group of us, with Bronco at the head, used to go down the Dock road, singing up a storm in the pubs. I`ve always tried to look out for him in pop groups over the years but to no avail. He was more talented than many that made it big, including the Beatles. Remember the Smallwoods, Captain & Mrs, how I fancied her, a mature lady with poise. River house used to be locked up, I think at midnight, so the fire door was the only way in after the bewitching hour. Captain Smallwood cottoned on to this & was waiting one night for any miscreants, of which I was one. Remembered Phil, who was prematurely bald & the original hippy. He held the record for the best lift while hitch hiking in Europe, a lift by US Army helicopter to Aachen. There`s a book of memories in our many hitch hiking exploits. So many names are flashing through my brain, Dai Waddell, who left to do a degree & played football like Garth Bale. Mike Smith ?, who was asked to leave. I`ve forgot the circumstances. Rod or was it Rob, whose room was on the top floor & was drown off a beach in Lagos. Big Mac, not the MacDonald variety but the original from Old Swan. I sailed with him on a few occasions but his most infamous exploit was in Blackpool where we went to celebrate after our final exams. It was Scots week. We were in a pub on the front when one of our lads was attacked, I`m not sure whether it was Mike Gardner or Howie. However the group that were doing the attacking didn`t realise how big, in all senses, our group was. It was the wild west.
The police arrived with dogs but the only one of our group to be taken in was Big Mac. Good to hear from you Greg.

Peter G

john g
28th August 2013, 10:31
Hi Gregor,

Great to hear your memories, in such detail, but they were great days with an engineering training that was second to none. It has stood me in good stead throughout my career. So many memories & where to start. A group of us, with Bronco at the head, used to go down the Dock road, singing up a storm in the pubs. I`ve always tried to look out for him in pop groups over the years but to no avail. He was more talented than many that made it big, including the Beatles. Remember the Smallwoods, Captain & Mrs, how I fancied her, a mature lady with poise. River house used to be locked up, I think at midnight, so the fire door was the only way in after the bewitching hour. Captain Smallwood cottoned on to this & was waiting one night for any miscreants, of which I was one. Remembered Phil, who was prematurely bald & the original hippy. He held the record for the best lift while hitch hiking in Europe, a lift by US Army helicopter to Aachen. There`s a book of memories in our many hitch hiking exploits. So many names are flashing through my brain, Dai Waddell, who left to do a degree & played football like Garth Bale. Mike Smith ?, who was asked to leave. I`ve forgot the circumstances. Rod or was it Rob, whose room was on the top floor & was drown off a beach in Lagos. Big Mac, not the MacDonald variety but the original from Old Swan. I sailed with him on a few occasions but his most infamous exploit was in Blackpool where we went to celebrate after our final exams. It was Scots week. We were in a pub on the front when one of our lads was attacked, I`m not sure whether it was Mike Gardner or Howie. However the group that were doing the attacking didn`t realise how big, in all senses, our group was. It was the wild west.
The police arrived with dogs but the only one of our group to be taken in was Big Mac. Good to hear from you Greg.

Peter G

Hi Peter seem to recognise a couple of names although I was at Birkenhead (phase 1) and Riversdale later. Was Howie also known as "stasher" and Mike Gardner an ED apprentice ?....John G

alan ward
28th August 2013, 11:53
Re post #90
I had the pleasure of sailing with Gordon Kincla twice,once on the Orchidea with Whitco he was,I think 4th.Engineer and then on the Temple Bar when he was 3rd.He`d been working on a power station in Oxfordshire prior to that.Great fun was had and we were together for 6 months and then 4.He married a lovely Icelandic girl called Helga and is still at sea,commuting to ther Falklands.(Maybe he`s retired now)They live outside Reyjkavic when at the last contact she was breeding Icelandic sheepdogs!their children Dylan and Sara are in Brighton.

Donga
2nd September 2013, 21:32
Mike Gardner was an ED Cadet who lived, I think at Formby. Howie was a Shell cadet who was from Worcester & was quite a ladies man but with a top of the range Citreon to drive, the type driven, at the time, by the French police. He had no problem with where to go on dates. I can see all the faces of the ED Engineering cadets in my year but names escape me, it`s not old age, my memory has been poor all my life. I can see a blond haired cadet, privately educated, who`s father was in the RAF at a base in Shropshire. I went down there with him & enjoyed a great weekend with lots of female company. Another was Ray from Wavertree, who was the 1st cadet I went into Liverpool with on my 1st night there. It was a fairly violent introduction to Liverpool. We met two girls in the El Kabala coffee bar on Bold street & agreed to take them home to Old Swan. However on board a bus at Pier Head we found ourselves being attacked by 4 lads. After a short hiatus one of the girls intervened, as it turned out one of the lads was her boyfriend. Needless to say that was the end of that short relationship. Another was Scotie, whose real name I am sure I never knew as he was a very quiet lad, some would say surly. Many faces but few names, but full of good times. I have still got the River House booklet whose Introduction begins with a quote from Kurt Hann, founder of Gordonstoun, as follows " It is wrong to coerce people into opinions; but it is our duty to impel them into experiences"

andyp1
3rd September 2013, 15:07
As a Phase 3 Engineer with Shell, I was fortunate to have guidance on "local matters" from those who were Ocean cadets such as Makko, who knew all the attrctions and pitfalls that went with them ! Some of our intake had spent time in the "Falklands war zone" so had wisely invested their war bonus in new sports cars which were most effective. Happy and very hazy days indeed- an early intoduction into college life was the evening cruise on the "Royal Iris" followed by the official tour of the Swan pub & Cabin Club, where the completion of the membership application form was a rite of passage!

makko
3rd September 2013, 15:40
Oh dear! The beer cruises are best forgotten! Especially extracting Mr. McPherson from some rather dire circumstances and the brawls at Seacombe Ferry. Another memory, skipping workshop to do "foreigners" with Mr. Pisani. Do you recall my "Import Emporium" which operated at times out of the back of Dom's little van?
Cheers, Glug!
Dave

john g
3rd September 2013, 21:33
Thanks for info yes it was "stasher" with a citroen with running boards he was at Riversdale for phase 3....Mike Gardner I know well as I worked with him for close on 40 years till he retired early about 5 years ago .....a company based in Birkenhead involved in the food and pharmaceutical machinery business....not seen him since....does any one remember Paul Burkey he as a Shell app if I remember had some flash sports cars in phase 3 ....john g

andyp1
6th September 2013, 08:59
Dave, yes the trips to St Asaph to help Dom Pisani on his "foreigners" stay with me- especially the " you can't gas axe that bell housing as it's aluminium" project to fit a new clutch plate in the fishing boat engine. As for extracting Snoopy "Big Nose" McPhereson from challenging circumstances this was a regular event, usually involving beers / nurses / IM Marsh hockey team / irate admirers of the former 2 / constabulary / taxi drivers / night club owners / pub landlords / take away owners / kebab van owners / ........ !!!!!

makko
6th September 2013, 18:19
I still laugh about the gas axe! It was a Perkins P-6 if I remember correctly. Also taking the power washer to Dom's van and blowing the rusty, rotten wing off! Nothing a bit of bailing wire couldn't fix.........

Later on, they used to lend us the farm to ride our motocross bikes. There were however unmarked mineshafts on the land which used to lead to long musings when people were delayed on a circuit. Two of the maddest (funnest) bikes we rode there were a Honda 80c.c. that Dom had "developed" and a Kawasaki Z-200 which I intended to sand race with a 6.5" Metzeler back tyre and street gearing.

I'm now older but in many senses, none the wiser!

Rgds.
Nobby Dave

Derek Roger
6th September 2013, 19:51
Do any of you remember the chap in Shell who used to race Bikes ; came off many a time unharmed . On his street bike in Liverpool on the cobbles he lost it and broke his neck and died . Derek

makko
7th September 2013, 18:52
Derek,

You have many times asked about "Daggy", the Ocean Fleets Cadet Super.

One of his favourite stories was in regard of the "Mile a CC" club which, literally, died out in the late 70's-early eighties. The story went:

"There were some young men. Engineer Cadets. They studied and wanted to go to sea. They earned good wages. They bought motorcycles. They formed a club. Every weekend, they would ride one mile for each CC of their motorcycle. Some had 50's, no problem. Others had 1,000 or 1,200 CC machines, [pause] not a good choice. One weekend, they decided to all ride together, all seven in the club. They rode wide and far. On sunday evening, two returned to digs. Another two, arrived considerably later after prolonged hospital stays which ended their seagoing aspirations. Three returned late, but a little earlier - Although they arrived in pine boxes - Hee, Ha, heehee, hoho, heeehee, haha. Yes, gentlemen, motorcycles are very dangerous!"
Daggy was a LEGEND, definitely.

One Tuesday evening, after a lecture at Odyssey Works, when he would draw the lecture out so that we would be hard pressed for "last orders" at the Park Hotel, I went to ask him a question regarding steam plant. I found him in the top floor, looking into a Radar hood.
"Ahem! Mr. Dalgleish, I have a question and wonder if you could help", ventured I.
He continued looking into the hood and then raised his head and turned to me,
"Do you know what this is?", he asked.
"Yes, a radar display".
"Do you know what you can use this for?".
"Yes, spot nearby vessels or landmasses in low or nil visibility", answered I.
"Yessssss..............Or keep an eye on where the cadets are!".
He had a sense of humour, a little black, but our wellfare and success were always at the forefront.......!

Rgds.
Dave

makko
7th September 2013, 18:53
BTW, anyone who knew Daggy will realize that I tried to literally translate his economy of speech!

Derek Roger
7th September 2013, 22:37
Daggy was from Dundee if I am correct . Derek

jonboysez
16th October 2013, 16:18
Anyone remember the tutor, old bloke with really thick glasses, think he taught electrical engineering in mid 70s, he had a sense of humour - reminds me of Ronny Barker when he was playing "Clarence". He nearly fell over someones bag left in the aisle between the desks one day. If you were one of the first down to breakfast in Kinsman House there was often a sprinkling of dust on the milk in the jugs (they must have been put out the night before) - mind you if you were late down to breakfast there was usually none left!

hibberd
8th November 2013, 11:06
My other memory's of Riversdale (70/71) was living in a single occupancy room in the Tower Block with a view over the Mersey rather than the dorm style of living which a few of my other classmates had to do, I recollect they were apprenticed to an Irish outfit which had a red hand on the funnel, any takers as to the Company?

Head Line?[/QUOTE]

I was there then looking over the cricket ground alley way to Riversdale..

New Haven Neil
15th November 2013, 11:32
Anyone remember the tutor, old bloke with really thick glasses, think he taught electrical engineering in mid 70s, he had a sense of humour - reminds me of Ronny Barker when he was playing "Clarence". He nearly fell over someones bag left in the aisle between the desks one day. If you were one of the first down to breakfast in Kinsman House there was often a sprinkling of dust on the milk in the jugs (they must have been put out the night before) - mind you if you were late down to breakfast there was usually none left!

That was Arnie Kirkbride - took us for electro tech. Poor old bugger could hardly see where he was walking, got me a distinction though!

I was PhI 76-78 and PhIII 79-80, for Bibby Line. Ian Hossack & Mike French, were two other Bibby's names I recall, there were 6 of us I think. I was made redundant in 83 and have worked ashore ever since in a variety of jobs, on the tools in the NHS, retrained in HR, then became an NHS department manager, moved to the Isle of Man (bikes!) and now am office manager of our young offenders team. That seems a long way from Riversdale as an engineer cadet!!

A shame Riversdale is gone, they were good years.

Varley
17th November 2013, 17:46
That was Arnie Kirkbride - took us for electro tech. Poor old bugger could hardly see where he was walking, got me a distinction though!

I was PhI 76-78 and PhIII 79-80, for Bibby Line. Ian Hossack & Mike French, were two other Bibby's names I recall, there were 6 of us I think. I was made redundant in 83 and have worked ashore ever since in a variety of jobs, on the tools in the NHS, retrained in HR, then became an NHS department manager, moved to the Isle of Man (bikes!) and now am office manager of our young offenders team. That seems a long way from Riversdale as an engineer cadet!!

A shame Riversdale is gone, they were good years.

Just to say your young offenders are doing really well. No graffiti on the cottage wall for at least a week.

New Haven Neil
17th November 2013, 18:40
Just to say your young offenders are doing really well. No graffiti on the cottage wall for at least a week.

We try very hard, with limited resources as you might imagine now the way things are! If you do get repeated grafitti, make sure you report it to the neigbourhood police team - if we don't know about it, we can't do anything. The bobbies are pretty much on the ball actually, as a rule. It's a long way from Bibby Line.....!!

endure
1st January 2014, 12:42
I was there 1972 to 1975. Did the MRGC/C&G Telecomms Technicians and Radar ticket all in one go. I think we were the first year where you had to do C&G and couldn't just do the MRGC. I was lucky enough to get one of the first cadetships that BP Tanker offered so did my last year there as a proper employee rather than a local education authority grant bod.

crellintk
1st January 2014, 14:59
Double Diamond, brewed by Ind Coop I presume?

If I remember correctly, the brew was indeed just 'Diamond' - a pretty thin and unimpressive drink served from a garish purple coloured pump. Ind Coope later put some unknown extra ingredients in it, to (not very successfully) boost the taste, rebranding it as 'Double Diamond' serving it from an even more garish red/orange pump.

By modern standards, not a terribly good beer, but we still drank plenty of it.

Met my wife at IM Marsh by the way, and she has managed to put up with me for 44 years. They were exceptional girls.

Ken C.

andyp1
7th January 2014, 10:15
Neil,

If your Ph III time was anything like ours, it would possibly offer a few challenges to some of the young offenders your team looks after (Jester)(Jester)(Jester)

Some of our number have had to resort to going into hiding in South America to escape justice (Gleam)

M Roseblade
28th January 2014, 13:55
Freddy
You and I must have studied together or just one year apart. I was there 65/66, went to sea 67.

Brown was Head of the Radio Section, Griffiths was no 2. Andrews ran the Radar section. Ray Pilgrim (radar) was also there. (he is on friends re-united). Mr Parker taught Tech Elec. Mr Bruce taught "cabin" and Mr Teasdale (slightly crazy) ran labs. There was an older guy who taught radio who said "erm" every other word and I'm now ashamed to say that in boring lectures we would plot "erms" against time on a graph. He had the SG Brown headphone swindle and we all bought these of him. Cotton was also there and became involved in the Association of Marine Radio Colleges. Happy days!

Alan Melia


I was there between the years of 1964 and 1967 and can remember a couple of the lecturers - Mr Teasdale immediately springs to mind. I can remember him sitting all the new students down and asking them to write as fast as they could for a timed minute. After that he asked us to break down what we had written into blocks of five characters - on doing that he informed us that only one person in the room could write at more than 20 words a minute - what chance had any of us got of learning morse code and writing it down at that speed !!!

He definitely was a bit crazy in the labs !! I remember one day that one particular student was irritating him so he asked him to come to the front of the class. He then asked him to hold the two leads of a megger and continued by getting another student to turn the handle.
Following a huge electric shock the irritating student did not bother him again !!! It wouldn't be allowed nowadays.

Eddie Bruce I can remember being a very short Scottish man with a pleasant nature. I think he at one time was a sparks on either the original Queen Mary or Elizabeth - not sure which. One of the other lecturers used to mix his time by lecturing and then spending time on the trawlers off the East Coast - this meant his tickets were kept valid for seagoing radio duties.

Happy days but difficult to remember - must be getting old !!!

endure
2nd February 2014, 23:30
Anyone there 1972-1975? The first C&G Telecomms Technicians year? There was a lecturer called Eddie who was in his first year at the job who mistook us for schoolchildren and treated us like 12 year olds until we complained to Brian Cotton. Andy Simpson? Brian from Wigan? Michael Pugh from Blaneau Ffestiniog? The bloke from Aussie whose name escapes me. The berk who thought it would be a laugh to key the emergency transmitter while I had my hand wrapped round the antenna?

billeng
10th March 2014, 03:39
I virtually lived in the joint 64/66, living at ED's River House.

Bill English

Derek Roger
11th March 2014, 16:19
I virtually lived in the joint 64/66, living at ED's River House.

Bill English

Most of us lived in the Aiggie

marinemec2004
11th March 2014, 16:28
Your local in Dundee would have been the " Bread " Bredalbane Arms . Jimmy Stirling was the owner.
Best pint in " The Aiggie " in the early 60s was a pint of "D" which I remember was diamond '; dont know who made it but it was strong and good .
The other favorite there was " brown mixed "

"A Double Diamond works wonders!!" -remember that?