Seagoing Fictional Books

K urgess
7th September 2006, 17:44
We've had the TV shows and we're currently trying to remember the most obscure seagoing films ever so let's try books.

I can't find another thread about fiction books but if there is one no doubt I'll be diverted.

"The Good Shepherd" by C. S. Forester.
"The Wireless Officer" by Percy F. Westerman (Well what did you expect? (*)) )

If this works we could try best shipping reference works in another thread. (Thumb)

john shaw
7th September 2006, 17:56
Although I read voraciously all the Hornblower books as a youngster, the book which I found most exciting was "Moby Dick"-- so that's my choice.As I got older, I came to like the Conrad books, so I guess a close second is "Heart of Darkness"

Please sir (hand in the air), can we have songs next? (*))

awateah2
7th September 2006, 18:00
A modern Author is Brian Callison who I believe was 2nd Mate in Blue Flue, he wrote amongst others a 'Flock of Ships'

pierhead jumper
7th September 2006, 19:16
Try" The Death Ship",by B.Traven.Not for the faint hearted.Pierhead Jumper.

Jeff Egan
7th September 2006, 19:27
Brass Bounders of the Rosemount, read it as a kid, my wife tracked a copy down a couple of years ago and gave it to me as a pressie, its a bit "famous five go to sea" but a good read for a child.

Santos
7th September 2006, 19:32
The best ever sea book in my mind is " HMS Ulysses " by Alistair McLEAN. I have read it and re read it many times, a super book.

Chris.

danube4
7th September 2006, 19:45
My favourite books when I was a teenager.

Percy F Westerman's books. Great writer. I still have, Cadet Alan Carr.
Sea scouts at Dunkirk.
Can't remember the other one.
In the loft somewhere.

K urgess
7th September 2006, 20:08
John

Sorry, bossy sparkie again.

Of course you may have songs next young man. As long as it doesn't turn into a sing, sing or show your...... sort of do. (*))

What about the Geoffrey Jenkins books like "Scend of the Sea" etc.

Being on VLCCs meant reading or drinking. So the first thing was to work your way through the library. Then drink some. Then work your way through the library. Then dri.....

Must admit that the Hammond Innes, Alistair Maclean, C.S.Forester ones are always at the top of the list.

scooby do
7th September 2006, 21:01
Patrick O'Brians books about Royal Navy 1800 fact and fiction woven together in 20 books.
I see John Shaw likes Moby Dick. They made the film just outside Milford Haven, when they'd finished the rubber whale was abandoned and drifted out to sea, coast guard had to send a tug to get it back as it became a hazard to shipping.

Razor
7th September 2006, 21:16
Any of the Tristan Jones books, they were originally thought to be fact. Yachtie rather than big ships, but a good read.

Clem
7th September 2006, 21:25
The Three Corvettes, and The Cruel Sea.

Also, The Boat by Walter Gibson. A harrowing tale of survival.

Clem

fredkinghorn
7th September 2006, 21:42
Anything by Alexander Kent, particularly the "Bolitho" novels.

fred

" avast behind, ( Oooh sailor )

benjidog
7th September 2006, 22:34
The last cruise of the Emden by Edwin P Hoyt is a great (true) tale of a WW1 German light cruiser with an amazing ending.

Morbid Dick also gets a vote and or course The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Montserrat - especially if you remember the film.

On a more fanciful theme there is of course The Rover by Joseph Conrad and dare I say Treasure Island is still one of my favourites. I love to dress up as Long John Silver and say "Arrrghhh Jim Lad" in West Country tones!

Brian

Bruce Carson
7th September 2006, 22:39
Para Handy, as always.

I'm cheating, but I would like to mention a non fiction title that I've enjoyed over and over again:
Richard Henry Dana's "Two Years Before The Mast".

Bruce C.

RayJordandpo
8th September 2006, 01:35
Try and get hold of a novel called 'The Voyage' by the late American actor Sterling Hayden. It's about the transition from sail to steam at the turn of the century. A real harrowing tale of the life of seamen on a iron hulled sailing vessel, bullying officers and the start of the unions in the States. One of those books that you can't put down.
Ray Jordan

aleddy
8th September 2006, 02:42
Midshipman Easy.
Cheer
Ted

Ian Harrod
8th September 2006, 04:00
Norie's Tables!

Peter4447
8th September 2006, 09:07
Although a very tragic story Brian Callinson's The Thunder of Crude is an excellent read. Another that I have enjoyed is Ronald Johnston's Disaster at Dungeness. Both are concerned with tankers.
Peter4447

lakercapt
8th September 2006, 15:00
The tales of Para Handy By Neil Munro.
Get it out every few months and read another few short stories.
Never fails tomake me chuckle even tho I know all the stories!

gdynia
8th September 2006, 15:16
Brian Callison,s Trapps War, read it countless times and will do many more times. Thought his sequel Trapps Peace was a let down.

offcumdum sanddancer
8th September 2006, 17:16
Parahandy of course, for obvious realism, the Glencannon series (I still drink Duggan's Dew of Kirkintilloch) and in the non-fiction line, the Last Grain Race by Eric Newby.

Split
8th September 2006, 21:18
My favourite is still on my bookshelf after being read several times since 1953, I think. "The Caine Mutiny"

Split

Trevorw
8th September 2006, 23:27
Two to me are outstanding: Patrick O'brien, any of his books are enthralling. I mourn his passing, because I've almost read them all. Then there was Percy F Westerman! He was the man who influenced me in my decision to go to sea!

One of his best was, "Coaster" - or at least I think that was the title; it was all about the life of a deck hand on a coaster on the china clay run etc.

jock paul
9th September 2006, 10:42
most of my favourites have already been mentioned, but I would include a novel titled "To the River's End", can't remember the author, but I read it in the 1950's. Abut an Australian lad who goes to sea in tramps and it follows his seagoing career. I believe it was very true to life.
Once, when I was in hospital after an op. the ship's agent lent me the Glencannon Omnibus. I had to stop reading it, I was laughing so much it was bursting my stitches! Very painful. Must try and pick up a copy of that book again.

offcumdum sanddancer
9th September 2006, 14:02
most of my favourites have already been mentioned, but I would include a novel titled "To the River's End", can't remember the author, but I read it in the 1950's. Abut an Australian lad who goes to sea in tramps and it follows his seagoing career. I believe it was very true to life.
Once, when I was in hospital after an op. the ship's agent lent me the Glencannon Omnibus. I had to stop reading it, I was laughing so much it was bursting my stitches! Very painful. Must try and pick up a copy of that book again.

This book, or the first few chapters is available online now at http://gaslight.mtroyal.ab.ca/glencX01.htm as it is out of copyright in Canada

Keith

GEORDIE LAD
9th September 2006, 14:53
I have to agree with Santos(Chris),I read HMS Ullyses when I was living in Nassau in 1961 and it brought chills even in that warm climate.It's a shame that they didn't make a film of it while ships described in the book were still around.
Doug

Roger Turner
9th September 2006, 20:49
I see my suggestion has been "nicked" a few times already, but I nominate "Para Handy " as the finest sailor who never sailed the seven seas, having had the luck to live in Scotland for the best part of 20 years, his turn of phrase and ability to delude himself that the "Fital Spark" when in "trum" was the finest ship in the "Brutish merchant marine" or words to that effect were priceless, especially when he was running a cargo of coal to Lochgilphead - but really the puffers were the lifeline of farflung Scottish Communities. and really highly necessary.
Frank T Bullen I like to read and W.W.Jacobs for seafaring whimsy at the turn of the last but one century if that`s the 1900`s.
Roger Turner

K urgess
13th September 2006, 10:25
So nobody has ever read any Marryat or Bartimeus(EEK)

Shame on you all.:sweat:
PS Sorry Ted didn't notice your little cry in the wilderness for Midshipman Easy

NINJA
14th September 2006, 07:47
I bought a paperback in the States decades ago called "The run for home" by Leland Frederick Cooley published by Avon Books (first published 1958) and it descibes a young boys first trip to sea as an apprentice seaman aboard a tramp steamer in the Americam Mercantile Marine in the mid-1920's. From the shores of California through various ports in the Pacific to Australia and back home.

The description of life on board in the fo'c'sle of that tramp steamer and the crew who sailed on her is remarkable.

Ninja.

baileysan
15th September 2006, 12:17
For tug lovers try Captain Jan by Jan de Hartog.
The Lost Mariner by William Bedford

A factual book however it is a brilliant read is Billy Ruffian by David Cordingly

Norman Trewren
15th September 2006, 21:41
All great reads, the above. Also Ewart Brookes "Proud Waters", "Nor on what Seas" and "To Endless Night". Also Nevilles Shute's "Most Secret"

Eric Parkin
16th September 2006, 12:08
For tug lovers try Captain Jan by Jan de Hartog.
The Lost Mariner by William Bedford

A factual book however it is a brilliant read is Billy Ruffian by David Cordingly

This might be going off thread a bit,and I apologise, but did'nt Jan De Hartog also write PQ17, if I'm not mistaken he was a tug boat Captain with Kwells. I know PQ17 was a highly controversial subject at the time.
I could'nt put the book down until I read from cover to cover.
I've read most of the books mentioned so far, but one sticks out in memory, called The Master Mariner, not sure who wrote it, could be C.S.Forester, its about a sailor on board one of the fire ships sent amongst the Spanish Armada to cause the fleet to leave port and disperse, so they could be tackled piecemeal, and in doing so the sailor is cursed to live forever.
The book is 3 books in one, can anyone shed any light, as I would like to read it again.

STRAWBERRY
16th September 2006, 12:43
My Father lent me a book whan I was aboard RFA Resource in 1985 called, "A Very Ordinary Seaman" which was brilliant. Unfortunately, I do not recall the name of the Author. Another Great Book....."Yashimoto's last Dive" again, the name of the Author escapes me, but a fantastic read!

STRAWBERRY
16th September 2006, 12:48
Norie's Tables!

Ahh good old norie's tables.....a fantastic series of books...read them all cover to cover and when I finished...I read em again....can't wait for his next book!

vic pitcher
16th September 2006, 13:00
This might be going off thread a bit,and I apologise, but did'nt Jan De Hartog also write PQ17, if I'm not mistaken he was a tug boat Captain with Kwells. I know PQ17 was a highly controversial subject at the time.
I could'nt put the book down until I read from cover to cover.
I've read most of the books mentioned so far, but one sticks out in memory, called The Master Mariner, not sure who wrote it, could be C.S.Forester, its about a sailor on board one of the fire ships sent amongst the Spanish Armada to cause the fleet to leave port and disperse, so they could be tackled piecemeal, and in doing so the sailor is cursed to live forever.
The book is 3 books in one, can anyone shed any light, as I would like to read it again.

PQ17 was written by the popular journalist/broadcaster Godfrey Winn, an account of his experience in the PQ17 convoy as a War Correspondant on board the anti-aircraft ship HMS Pozarica (ex-McAndrews), prior to his joining the Navy as an HO OS.

The Master Mariner was the work of Nicholas Monsarrat, uncompleted at the
time of his death.

In my opinion, the definitive war at sea novel is Herman Wouk's "Caine Mutiny."
The finest writer about the British Merchant Navy 1900-1940 was Speysider
"Shalimar" (F.C. Hendry)

Eric Parkin
16th September 2006, 13:44
Your probably right Vic, but I know the book I read was written by a Master of an ocean going tug, owned by Kwells, and I am fairly certain it was Jan De Hartog. As to the title, I am not so certain, but it was about the tragic story of the convoy PQ17.
Thanks for naming the author of Master Mariner, I will have to try and get it.
Regards
Eric.

Bruce Carson
16th September 2006, 16:22
Re: Convoy PQ17
Check the "Literary Depictions" section on the following Wikipedia page.
It lists two books based on the convoy, one of which is by Jan de Hartog.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_convoys_of_World_War_II

Bruce C

Norman Trewren
16th September 2006, 21:29
Jan de Hartog wrote an excellent book about the Murmansk run called "The Captain". Could that be the one you were thinking about?

Eric Parkin
16th September 2006, 22:12
Yes it was Norman, Bruce Carson got it exactly right.
If I remember right, there was litigation regarding the book and events concerning PQ17. But that was war, smoke and confusion, just one of many cock ups that led to a terrible loss of life.

aleddy
12th October 2006, 07:42
Reviving thread with a couple of questions, was Skeleton Coast fact or fiction ? and the ship mentioned Dunedin Star, real or not ?
I,m sure I read the book while at sea.
cheers
ted

beejay
12th October 2006, 08:16
Reviving thread with a couple of questions, was Skeleton Coast fact or fiction ? and the ship mentioned Dunedin Star, real or not ?
I,m sure I read the book while at sea.
cheers
ted

Ted,
The book Skeleton Coast is a factual story and the ship Dunedin Star was in fact very real. Like yourself I read this book at sea,and ironically I was serving on the Dunedin Star II at the time.
Brian

Robinj
12th October 2006, 22:19
Already been mentioned Alexander Kent. Try him in his other guise Douglas Reaman.

aleddy
13th October 2006, 01:14
Beejay,
Thanks for that, must have had the hairs on the back of your neck bristling.
Was the thread in it about the survival only.?
Many years after reading Skeleton Coast I picked up a novel by Morris West ? who creates a lot of fiction based loosly on fact on stories set in South Africa. He had set the plot on smugglers getting into and out of South Africa for diamonds stolen directly from the mines (miners getting the diamonds past security by weird and elabotate schemes)
Their means of entry and exit was Skeleton Coast, the book may have been some help to him.
Over time I think the two books had gelled into one in my mind.
Cheers
Ted

tonypad
13th October 2006, 04:56
What a fantastic collection of fact and fiction has been presented, one of my favourites is The Wreck of the Mary Deare by Hammond Innes, also enjoyed Eight Bells and Top Masts by Christopher Lee, not quite fiction but a very good read. Regards Tony

billyboy
13th October 2006, 05:19
Jan de Hartog wrote an excellent book about the Murmansk run called "The Captain". Could that be the one you were thinking about?

Ah! "the captain" yes a great read indeed. one of those "cant put the book down jobs" love the bit where he was going alongside, rang down full astern and got full ahead... Bump!! ... LOL. great story that one. thanks for the reminder. been all through douglas reeman. nicholas monsarat, cs forrester ect; one which i did enjoy but cant remember the author was "The extra ordinary seaman"

K urgess
18th November 2006, 22:22
A nice gentle book from a gentler time.

"Finished with Engines" by Humfrey Jordan.
Published by Hodder & Stoughton in 1961.

"Thomas Pine and Ian Lindsay, respectively Commodore and Senior Chief Engineer in the Wilde & Flower Shipping Co., Ltd., face the last year of their sea service. Firm friends and often shipmates, they have served the same owners for more than forty years, knowing that, being of the same age, they will be retired together at sixty with years of activity and good work in them.
Taking the Celandine away on her maiden voyage, both of them realise that she will be the last ship in which they will serve. Humfrey Jordan shows how different are the reactions of the two men, and how their problems are eventually resolved.
A Sympathetic, realistic account of life at sea and what it means to men when they must at last leave it for life ashore"
(Dustjacket blurb)

A good read.(Thumb)

gazb159
18th November 2006, 22:31
Hello people,
This is probably completely out of sync with what you are saying here,but,I would personally recommend 'The Perfect Storm',sorry to say,the book is far better than the film,but that is my opinion,being an ex-fisherman,I found this to be an exceptionally good reading.

Keith Adams
19th November 2006, 00:01
I have 14 leatherbound books by Joseph Conrad all to do with the sea. I enjoyed On The Beach by Nevil Shute and all the others you guys mentioned... also I picked up a volume here in the States (used) A Flock of Ships byHugh C. Keith an ex CH. ENG. with Blue Flu... pretty good reading.Snowy.

RayJordandpo
19th November 2006, 01:02
I don't know about the best but I certainly Know what I think is the worst! That 'Hungry As The Sea' codswallop by Wilbur Smith. A good friend of mine was (still is) master of the salvage tug 'John Ross' based in Capetown. Wilbur Smith spent some time on board "researching" for that novel. Boy oh boy they must have spun him some bull---- . The hero of the book was a one man band. I spent several years on salvage tugs, I wish I had a fraction of the energy and nous that guy had. Danny if you are reading this tell me you WERE having a laugh weren't you? (I know I know it's only a yarn)
ps 'What Price Cod' runs it a close second
Ray Jordan

tonypad
19th November 2006, 06:42
Many many years ago, as a young boy, I read one of my Fathers books called The Stone Frigate. A WW2 story about a naval shore base, I don't recall the author or when it was originally published. I wonder if any SN members may have come across it and would have any details, would love to read it again if the opportunity arose. Happy reading, regards Tony

stein
14th January 2007, 16:48
There was an American "coffee table book" named "In Praise of Sailors" that came out a few years ago. Supposed to present the best in art, poetry and prose with a nautical theme, it borrowed very heavily from a book by Frank H. Shaw called "White Sails and Spindrift". This book presents itself as non-fiction, but the reviewer in Sea Breezes would have none of that. And I'll go along, this is so much lying that it has to be categorized as fiction. But can that man lie! Whether you read it in the big anthology or in the original, the first story: "A Cape Horn Rescue" will have you shaking in adrenalin overflow. The story is simple: row across, fetch the poor devils, bring 'em back. But the telling is all the way believable. Virtual voyage indeed! And the ten other "tall stories" are commendable as well. Frank Hubert Shaw, good writer. Stein

shipartist
7th March 2007, 21:44
I'm happy to see that Sterling Hayden's book 'Voyage' was mentioned, he also wrote a biography called 'Wanderer.'
I have the Fox series and lots of others along that line, recently finished a new version of an old ----titled 'The Bounty' by Caroline Alexander which is very informative with little known facts, and also 'Sea Of Glory' about the U.S.
Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842 by Nathaniel Philbrick.

Pat McCardle
7th March 2007, 21:59
I read Richard Hough's Biography of Captain James Cook & followed Cook's voyages using the chart catalogue as a guide to what places, points, capes etc were named from his voyages. RH also wrote Bligh & Christian, also a good read. My next books to read are The Bounty by Caroline Alexander & Over the edge of the world by Laurence Bergreen all about Magellan's circumnavigation.
As a boy who could forget Defoe's Robinson Crusoe? Still a good read!!

OLD STRAWBERRY
8th March 2007, 08:08
All the wonderful books that are described in this thread are great. Unfortunately though My Favourite Book is I'm afraid non-fiction.
The author was a character actor,of mainly small parts in British movies circa late 40s/50s/60s. A rotund gentleman,His name Peter Bull. He entered the Royal Navy during the War and became a Lieutenant and was given command of a landing craft. His Book was entitled "To Sea in a Sieve" and it's the funniest book I've ever read. About a man who had absolutely nothing In common with seafaring and never likely too. His Landing craft really ran by accident but managed to play a part in the scicily landings but some of the predicaments he got into were amazing. also mentioned in the book is Alec Guiness also a lieutenant in command of a Landing craft. try and read it if You can find a copy You won't be disappointed. Rgds.

trotterdotpom
8th March 2007, 11:01
Peter Bull, another great British character actor, Strawbs. I didn't know about his war service. Just looked him up and it turns out he won the Distinguished Service Cross. Turns out he died 1984, age 72. I'll watch out for his book.

John T.

OLD STRAWBERRY
8th March 2007, 18:08
I'm sure John, that there are many more of the old British movie stars who had a big part in the services. Richard Todd was part of the Airborne attack on "Pegasus Bridge" on D Day. David Niven was in the Army. Spike Milligan was in the Campaign in Italy. Do You remember Jimmy Edwards He was RAF and flew Dakota's, I think He was at Arnhem. So did Hughie Green. Spike's books are funny but poignant. The list goes on, amazing chaps.Rgds

Pat McCardle
8th March 2007, 18:17
Corsair by Dudley Pope is another good yarn

JeffM
16th July 2007, 13:54
A bit late, but not mentioned so far, and it is non fiction. Ray Parkin's 1997 HM Bark Endeavour. Not only reproduces in large scale drawings from original plans of Endeavour (cased edition) and details the fitting out but has edited together in side by side, day by day, form the diaries of Cook, Banks, Hickes, Molyneux, Pickersgill and others plus the ships log. Later published in paperback. Better than Horatio H.

Bridie
16th July 2007, 14:47
Two Years Before the Mast
by Richard Henry Dana

Oz.
16th July 2007, 15:29
The Last Grain Race by Eric Newby is my favorite read on a cold windy night .
Could someone oblige please with the names of the Glencannon Books and the Author. Can anybody remember the TV series of Glencannon? It was set on a Scottish Puffer, very entertaining but not as good as the books. I always remember the poor cat in the oven, and I have sailed with all the characters in the books on one ship or another.

K urgess
16th July 2007, 17:40
Glencannon fans can read the first three here (http://gaslight.mtroyal.ab.ca/glencann.htm)

Or to buy here (http://www.glencannon.com/gp_series.html)

Chouan
17th July 2007, 14:11
Bolitho? Douglas Reeman? Good "nautical" fiction?
Dreadful, formulaic stuff. Wooden characterisation, anachronistic dialogue, empty, forgettable dross, along with several other authors and series. Almost as bad as the "Sharpe" series!

Derbyroy
17th July 2007, 14:24
I have to agree with several posters about Brian Callison ,his books always stayed open until read. might i also throw some of the works of Clive Cussler into the mix ? Although a lot of his books are over the top adventurism. in most things nautical his descriptions and methods of working (ships) is right on the mark,(Read) (Read)

K urgess
17th July 2007, 18:13
Currently reading "Two years before the mast", Bridie.
Stuck in San Pedro on page 145 at the moment because every time I pick it up something else drags me away from it. I started reading it for background to my thread about the log of the Bencoolen and it certainly does give a feel for the trade at the time.

PollY Anna
17th July 2007, 19:05
It was reading C.S.Forester that was one of the things that made me want to go to sea. Have moved on since then and have managed to read most of the aforementioned including all of Patrick O'Brian's.

If you want a real read which is a true story you must read Cochrane The Life & Exploits of a Fighting Captain by Robert Harvey. This is the man that both the famous authors based their stories on ie Hornblower & Jack Aubrey
ISBN 1-84119-162-0 Publisher Constable

Napoleon referred to him as "the sea wolf"

Regards Ron

brian daley
18th July 2007, 21:39
Does anyone remember Manuela,with Trevor Howard and Elsa Martinelli?Its a tale of a beautiful stowaway on an old tramp steamer.I saw it when I was on a tramp 45 year or more ago.And that John Wayne and David Farrar movie,I think it was called Duel at Sea,about a German freighter captain trying to get his ship back to Germany whilst being hunted by David Farrar,who played a British warship captain;I think it was The Sea Chase,not Duel at Sea. Both good movies,and for a complete change,there was "The Maggie" the tale of an old Clyde Puffer,wonderfully whimsical stuff.
Has anyone read "In The Heart Of The Sea"? A harrowing tale of shipwrecked whalermen,or the follow up to "Treasure Island","Return to Treasure Island"?
The author has captured the spirit of R.L.Stevensons original,a great read.
As a kid I loved Marryatt,and Conrad, but Somerset Maugham captured the essence of the South Seas with stories like "Rain" and "The Moon and Sixpence"
I gained a Love of the written word during my years at sea,I seem to recall reading about a magician who said that he could give people the power to travel through time and space to anyhere in the world and in any period in history.When he was asked how he could perform this feat,he presented his questioner with a book.That magic has never lost its spell!
Goodnight readers,everywhere
BrianD

paul0510
19th July 2007, 08:56
The greatest sea novels I have found to date all belong to the O'Brian 'Aubreyad' or 'Aubrey-Maturin' series. Or as a 'one-off' excellent and humourous read, how about David Masiel's '2182 kHz' ?
Still have a couple of books I bought mid-70s, 'Shipkiller' (Justin Scott) and 'Supership' (Noel Mostert) both concerning VLCCs. Can't remember whether they were good reads or not.

brian daley
24th July 2007, 21:59
I was having a ponder,as you do,thinking of every and nothing,when I recalled a book I had read many years ago.It was by a seaman called "Dod" Osbourne.It was a helluva read,written in the style of Rudyard Kipling(on an off day)it told the story of how he stole a Grimsby trawler,he was skipper of it,and sailed it to South America.The tale is a true one,he was eventually arrested and got 18 months jail.
The remarkable thing about the trip is that he accomplished it with only a sixpenny atlas and a compass out of a christmas cracker.
The book was called "My Lifes Experiences",but there are others,namely "Dod Osbourne And The Girl Pat".The exploit took place in !936.
Sadly "Dod" was killed on active service during WW 2.
A good read on a cold night.
BrianD

The Captain
24th July 2007, 23:35
I read two good seafaring books as an apprentice but not sure if they were fiction, if so the authors (unknown) did a hell of a good job researching them.
"Kicking Canvas" and "The Cape Horn Breed" both about life as cadets/apprentices on sailing ships towards the end of the sailing era.

John

sparkie2182
24th July 2007, 23:47
anyone read "doctor at sea" by richard gordon?

JeffM
29th August 2007, 14:48
Is the first great sea story Homer's The Odyssey? Having read it a few times over the years I am now listening to the Derek Jacobi reading on CD. Spellbinding!

Pete Legg
29th August 2007, 16:23
The Red Sailor (sorry can't remember the author) mainly about an RN Destroyer during the Korean War. Very popular book in the RN of the sixties, possibly due to its reference to life in RN Detention Quarters. And life in Hong Kong.

Pete.

Tony Breach
29th August 2007, 19:20
Already nominated: Two Years Before The Mast by Dana.
Das Boot. Can't remember the author's name. Awesome & awful.
The Last Grain Race by Eric Newby, recently crossed the bar.
Any Jack Aubrey from Patrick O'Brien.
Can't agree with Nories - it certainly never used to be fictional.

Tony

methc
11th September 2007, 23:54
When I was a lad E.Laurie Long was quiet popular and his stories about Mr.Flynn were "gripping". A search of abebooks.com will find many cheap copies.

JeffM
5th October 2007, 08:42
Thanks to the contribuors of this thread for alerting me to Jan De Hartog and his books. Local library only has two of his stories. Just finished Star of Peace.

John Gurton
5th October 2007, 18:19
try "A Love of Ships", autobiography of George King (BP Chairman)
Seaspray and Whiskey by Norman Freeman
A Merchant Seamans Survival by Edward J Sweeney

G0SLP
5th October 2007, 20:08
Ronald Johnston's 'Disaster at Dungeness' has already been mentioned. He wrote "Sea Story" too. He was a Master with George Gibson, & based that book on the small gas carriers built at Brand Werft in the early 1970s that Gibsons operated.

C.S. Forester's "The Ship" was quite a good read.

'Supership', previously mentioned, was a book that we all had to read when I started my cadetship at Saudi Shields. I forget the reason now...

Mr-Tomcat
5th October 2007, 20:46
Eight Bells and Top Masts by Christopher Lee part fiction in so much as names have been changed, follows the voyage of a 17 year old boy on an old tramp steamer well written and sometimes very witty.

Andrew.