Court Line

nigelcollett
15th September 2006, 17:41
Hi All

Does anybody remember them? My records date from 1968 when they only had about 3 ships left.

However they did try to diversify into aircraft and package travel which I believe was their final undoing.

Couple of pics of Tristars the leased attached

Regards

NigelC

john shaw
15th September 2006, 18:42
My wife has bad memories of Court Line holidays!

In 1974 she went on holiday to Alicante-- Court Line were the airline carrier,in a wide bodied aircraft (probably TriStar).As soon as they arrived, they were informed of "possible" problems with the carrier--then left in the dark until the day of return--then left in limbo, no info, hung around the hotel, overnighted in the lobby as the rooms were relet-- then repatriation via BA to Heathrow ( the holiday had gone from Luton) as the Court Line company had crashed.

But she had a good hols!

FOUFOU
15th September 2006, 21:20
My first trip to sea at 16 as a boy was on the Barrington Court in 1960, I was the only southerner with the Geordie crew they always seemed to question my parentage!! Nice lads though. The ship was just out of drydock but we broke down in the Bay of Biscay, spent the day on my hands and knees.
Averaged nine knots to Capetown,the food was grim I remember the 2nd cooks idea of a trifle was crumbled up fruit cake with custard on the top.
We had a return cargo of iron ore for Port Glasgow and most of the crew decamped smartish myself included, it never put me off though.

Nova Scotian
15th September 2006, 21:39
Though my memory isn't what it used to be, I seem to remember a Court Line master that did a trip with us, as supernumary, on the VLCC Alva Star in 1970. I believe he was to take command of a similar vessel that was building and to be named Halcyon the Great. The names Halcyon Sea and Halcyon Sky ring a bell as Court Line vessels around that time.

Cheers

Pat McCardle
15th September 2006, 22:20
I'm too young to remember all those J.L.Thompson built ships but I remember 'The Court Line Crash' in the 70's

Keltic Star
16th September 2006, 04:49
Remember seeing one of Court Line's Tristars on the ramp in St. Lucia in 1972, they owned the Halcyon Beach hotel there at the time. Another hotel was the Halcyon Cove in Antigua. They were leased by Court line from the island governments who had inherited them when Commonwealth Holiday Inns bailed
out of the Caribbean. Last stay I did in both of them was in 1990 when they still bore the Halcyon name, the Antiguan one still owned by the government and the one in St. Lucia owned by a Dane.. I believe the one in St. Ludia is now part of the Sandals chain. They were pretty good hotels both in condition, management and service.

The day of the banckruptcy, a Court Line Tristar enroute from the Caribbean to the UK had a mechanical problem and landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Passengers and crew were put up in a local hotel. During the night the Captain received a telephone call and was offered a bonus if he could get the aircraft back to the U.K. before the s--t hit the fan. he rounded up all the crew and passengers, put them into taxi's, boarded the Tristar and departed without ATC clearance. Understand they still owe Air Canada for a full tank of gas, which is probably why Air canada can't afford to feed their passengers decent food even to this day!

The following is heresay evidence but from a very reliable source:

At the time of the bankruptcy, "Halcyon the Great" was in Newfoundland and the old man was contacted to get the h--l out of there and sail the ship back to the U.K. An old ship mate, who was an engineer onboad, tells the story of a small Royal Canadian Mounted Police cutter hailing the ship and demanding that she return to her berth "in the name of the law".

Score "Halcyon the Great" 1 - R.C.M.P. 0

trotterdotpom
16th September 2006, 11:52
[!

The following is heresay evidence but from a very reliable source:

At the time of the bankruptcy, "Halcyon the Great" was in Newfoundland and the old man was contacted to get the h--l out of there and sail the ship back to the U.K. An old ship mate, who was an engineer onboad, tells the story of a small Royal Canadian Mounted Police cutter hailing the ship and demanding that she return to her berth "in the name of the law".

Score "Halcyon the Great" 1 - R.C.M.P. 0[/QUOTE]

I knew the Chief Engineer who was on board at the time and it's true they did the bolt with the writ still flapping on the mast. Not sure about the Mounties saying that though, but it sounds plausible. When the ship arrived back in UK the crew had to put a lein on the ship for their wages - can't remember the outcome.

John T.

vic pitcher
16th September 2006, 13:37
[!

The following is heresay evidence but from a very reliable source:

At the time of the bankruptcy, "Halcyon the Great" was in Newfoundland and the old man was contacted to get the h--l out of there and sail the ship back to the U.K. An old ship mate, who was an engineer onboad, tells the story of a small Royal Canadian Mounted Police cutter hailing the ship and demanding that she return to her berth "in the name of the law".

Score "Halcyon the Great" 1 - R.C.M.P. 0

I knew the Chief Engineer who was on board at the time and it's true they did the bolt with the writ still flapping on the mast. Not sure about the Mounties saying that though, but it sounds plausible. When the ship arrived back in UK the crew had to put a lein on the ship for their wages - can't remember the outcome.

John T.[/QUOTE]

When "Halcyon the Great" did a runner, without boatmen and pilot, they sprung her off, just like a coaster. Great piece of shiphandling by the Old Man

R58484956
16th September 2006, 16:38
The 2 court line Tristars G-BAAA Serial No; 1024 and G-BAAB SN;1032 both bought by Cathay Pacific Airways after the collapse of Court. On one trip out of Halifax to LGW no food was bought on board so what was left over from the outward flight was dished out. We arrived LGW hungry but at least home.

gdynia
16th September 2006, 18:46
I believe they are still running a helicopter service in South Africa

janbonde
17th September 2006, 18:16
if I remember during the early 70s they ran the Heli service down off Capetown we did a couple of crew changes via them and also had mail drops, was serving on a VLCC at the time

Tom S
18th September 2006, 08:42
When "Halcyon the Great" did a runner, without boatmen and pilot, they sprung her off, just like a coaster. Great piece of shiphandling by the Old Man

Am I correct in saying that the Captain met an untimely death shortly after he brought the vessel back? I think he was knocked down by a Taxi and killed. If I remember correctly the newspapers at the time thought there was something suspicious about it

vic pitcher
18th September 2006, 09:29
When "Halcyon the Great" did a runner, without boatmen and pilot, they sprung her off, just like a coaster. Great piece of shiphandling by the Old Man

Am I correct in saying that the Captain met an untimely death shortly after he brought the vessel back? I think he was knocked down by a Taxi and killed. If I remember correctly the newspapers at the time thought there was something suspicious about it

I hadn't heard of this, I was told of MO of clearing the jetty by a Humber Pilot
who was a friend of the Master about a year after the incident.

Bob S
18th September 2006, 15:53
See

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=2620&highlight=halcyon+great

For a photo of her under arrest at Tilbury (sorry about the poor quality)

Bob

Hillview
18th September 2006, 19:18
Understood Court Line was in deficit to MNOPF and it was left to the other companies to make up their contributions.

Norm
21st September 2006, 12:07
Didn't the last Court Line ships names all start with "Halcyon"
Halcyon Breeze, Halcyon Days etc. They liked to paint things they owned in pastel colours.

Rennie Cameron
10th November 2006, 21:06
For what its worth I recall the Barrington Court and the Dorrington Court (not sure of the second ship) had Kincaid H&W opposed piston engines. I am sure I saw one renamed "Eva" on the Clyde long time ago but before their demise.

neil maclachlan
10th November 2006, 21:54
Hi Gang,
This is going back a long way's,When I was a kid during the 2nd World War,I lived in Port Bannatyne on the "Isle of Bute" and I recall a ship being towed into Kames Bay after having been torpedoed in the North Atlantic,I think she was called the "Kensington Court" A salvage company called the " Glasgow and Liverpool ,Salvage Company" operated out of the River Clyde, towed ships that were disabled from convoys into the Clyde, beached them on the beach at Kames Bay, do repairs to keep them afloat, then tow them upriver when a drydock became available for permanent repairs. During the war it became a graveyard of ships, awaiting repairs or being broken up. Might be of interest?
Neil Mac.

danube4
10th November 2006, 21:58
Two good pics, Barrington Court and Cressington Court on Riversea site in Memories.
Barney.

Thamesphil
10th November 2006, 22:32
Court Line had an exclusive deal to run charter flights for the Clarkson holiday business and they were keen to buy into it. Court Line took over Clarkson holidays in 1973. H. Clarkson & Co. actually paid Court Line £5.7 million to take the holiday business away as it was losing the parent company money and would otherwise have been liquidated. However, it wasn't the acquisition of Clarkson holidays that caused Court Line to fail. Apparently, it was over-extensive hotel projects in the West Indies.....

The above is taken from "Mighty Things from Small Beginnings", the history of Clarksons first 150 years 1852-2002.

Thamesphil.

captainchris
11th November 2006, 09:50
I served as 3rd Mate/2nd Mate with Court Line in the 70's and was 2nd Mate on Halcyon The Great when we did the runner from Come By Chance in Newfoundland. We were advised that the charterers were going to arrest us before we finished discharging, and two of the mortgage bankers came out to see if we would be willing to take the ship back to the UK rather than have her idle throughout a Canadian winter. Most of the crew were willing and those who were not were flown home. The tugs at the refinery were Cory tugs and the crew told us that were unable to help get her out, so two small tugs were brought in from, I believe, Halifax. They arrived at night and tied up alongside to be inconspicuous. The refinery crew were a bit suspicious and removed the release handles from the quay moorings to prevent us leaving, but after a little recon I found out that a crow bar worked just as well.
There was another tanker ahead of us, loading Naptha!!! so the Captain, Brian Greenwood, from South Shields, asked me to approach the other crew and see if they could create a problem with loading and get the refinery to stop operations so they could batten down for our departure. They agreed to this and we started preparing for departure. We coupled the tugs up, but they remained alongside, hidden from the shore, and we sent two of the crew ashore to connect the gangway on to the crane, and armed with the crowbar quickly let go all the ropes, jumped on the gangway as it was being hoisted up, and we were away. However the tugs were not really man enough for the size of ship, 226,000 dwt, and we had problems with the towing springs breaking, but due to Brian's expertise, we got clear and away.
Going down the Bay, Placentia Radio kept calling to inform us to return and anchor off, but we seemed to develop radio problems, which continual clicking of the pressel whilst tansmitting did not seem to cure, and we tried to inform them that we could not understand them. The Sparky came up to tell us that he had heard various traffic with patrol boats, so as we left the Bay I continually plotted every echo on the radar and checked each boat off as fishing vessels. However there were two patrol boats alongside two of the fishing vessels, which only gave single echo's until they parted from the fishing vessels. As the terretorial limit was only 3 miles, I kept a good plot on the chart and kept Brian up-to-date with our position and by good navigation on the part of Brian we managed to cut a good few corners off, and the Chief gave her the works to achieve 16+ knots until we gained the 3 mile limit, and the Mountie Patrol Boats could only reach 16 knots and gave up.
We then heard that they were sending out helicopters to board us, so we decided to hold an impromptue fire drill and to test the water cannons to see how far they could throw water into the air. We never did see a helicopter, and we continued on Passage to Tilbury, where we were eventually arrested by the Admiralty Marshall. Not quite your traditional arrest as they didn't nail the writ to the mast, just sellotaped it to the wheelhouse door!!
Quite a few of us stayed for, I think, 3 months to look after the ship until she was sold to C.Y.Tung as the Energy Prosperity. A couple of our engineers stayed to deliver the ship with the Chinese crew.
Another outcome of this incident was, that a lot of questions were asked in the Canadian Parliament as to how a tanker could outrun the Mountie Patrol boats, and an order was placed with Vosper Thornycroft for some new 20+ knot patrol boats!!
I believe Brian Greenwood died of a heart attack, although I have heard various stories, but he was alive for a good few years after the incident. He was banned from Canada for this incident, but ironically the first job offer he recieved after the collapse of Court Line, was from CP Ships!!
The other ships, Halcyon Skies, Halcyon Cove, Halcyon Isle, and I believe the Halcyon Days, were all arrested in various locations and the Halcyon Breeze which was on charter to RFA as RFA Derwentdale remained for a time on charter and was then sold off.
It was a really great company when I was with them and a lot of us were sorry to see them collapse.

nigelcollett
14th November 2006, 13:28
Hi Chris

Many thanks for your first had accounts of the Canadian adventure. Nice to hear it in such detail.

Regards

NigelC

gdynia
14th November 2006, 14:37
So that dispels the old story The Mounties always got their Man

purserjuk
14th November 2006, 15:16
For what its worth I recall the Barrington Court and the Dorrington Court (not sure of the second ship) had Kincaid H&W opposed piston engines. I am sure I saw one renamed "Eva" on the Clyde long time ago but before their demise.

The "Eva" was the "Dorrington Court" and was owned by Montelindo Cia.Nav S.A., Monrovia. Suffered a seious engine room fire 14.7.1976 and broken up at Hamburg same year. Her engine was a 4-cyl 2SA "B&W" type built by Kincaid

R58484956
14th November 2006, 16:22
Many thanks Captainchris for your story, it made interesting reading and cleared up a few misnomers.

captainchris
14th November 2006, 17:01
I thought it might be too late for the thread, but luckily some of you caught up on it

Dave Gibbons
17th November 2006, 10:33
Hello Everyone.

I hit upon this site because of my work - I am the House Steward at a National Trust property in Devon, Arlington Court. I monitor ebay regularly in case any Arlington memorabilia comes up, and this week there is a picture for sale of the Court Line's ship Arlington Court.

This came as quite a surprise - we knew there was a Railway Engine with that name, but not a ship. Does anyone know any more about it?

john shaw
17th November 2006, 11:45
Hello Dave

see this entry on this site for pic and info:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/21094/si/arlington%20court

Dave Gibbons
17th November 2006, 12:15
Funnily enough, I just navigated back to here from that very spot!

But now I'm even more confused. I'm thinking that it is a different ship originally built for the same owner as this one, which I found on the web: Spookily, note the day and date!

Thursday, 16th November 1939 D75
'SS Arlington Court' (4,915t) steamer, Rosario, Argentina to Hull with a cargo of grain was sunk by U 43 off the Irish coast, Five of her crew were lost.
Day 75. All times BST. Blackout ends: 08.08, begins: 17.33

http://www.bpears.org.uk/NE-Diary/Inc/ISeq_01.html#D75

So I've gone from no ships to two! Have we a fleet of Arlingtons on the go?

john shaw
17th November 2006, 13:06
it's not uncommon for the same name to be used on ships of consecutive eras.

You might also like to view;
http://www.shipspotting.com/modules/myalbum/photo.php?lid=227528


re the later ship and:

http://www.warsailors.com/singleships/spinanger.html

re the ship you refer to.

The ship photo listed on ebay is of the earlier ship to which you refer.

Dave Gibbons
17th November 2006, 13:47
Fantastic information, John, thank you so much. If only all my research were so simple!

john shaw
17th November 2006, 16:31
my pleasure.

I see that you are bidding on the pic.The caption says it was built 1929-- whilst I cannot say either way, there is an Arlington Court, Official Number 120632, which was built 1905-- whether this is yet another by that name, or the details on ebay are incorrect I cannot say.

May I suggest that you start a thread in Ship Research on here-- there are many with better knowledge and more resources than I, and I'm sure you would have more details,and quite possibly pics, in no time. Good luck.

Keith Adams
17th November 2006, 18:02
Hate to be a pain but I posted a pic of the old "UFFINGTON COURT" in the Gallery a few days ago... hope you get to see it John. Regards, Keith (Snowy)

Steve Woodward
17th November 2006, 18:02
I worked for oregon Steamships ( if ever there was a tramp outfit that was one) we had a capt ,Richard Mudd, and a Mate,Mike Court, Ex court line joine us arround 1975

john shaw
17th November 2006, 18:52
Quote:"Hate to be a pain but I posted a pic of the old "UFFINGTON COURT" in the Gallery a few days ago... hope you get to see it John. Regards, Keith (Snowy)"

Hi Keith-- afraid I don't understand the "pain" part (?)--sorry if I'm slow on the uptake!?-- but I saw the pic from you of Uffington Court-- and a very nice pic it is too. If you view the ship pic on ebay referred to by David,the Arlington Court, they look to me very similar,perhaps sisters?-- before my time I'm afraid, and I know little of these ships.

If you have knowledge of the Arlington Court,I'm sure that David would be grateful for any help.

Best regards

purserjuk
20th December 2006, 16:52
There were two ships named "Arlington Court" for Court Line. The first built 1905, Reg No: 120632, broken up 1933. The second built 1924, Reg No: 147644, torpedoed and sunk by "U43" 16.11.1939 with loss of 7 crew members.

Shipbuilder
4th June 2007, 19:25
FRAMLINGTON COURT
http://img84.imageshack.us/img84/2379/framlingtoncourtimageshpz4.jpg

ccurtis1
24th October 2007, 20:16
my dad sailed on the Ovington Court in the early 1930's and I have photographs of storm damage to the vessel in the south China Sea on her way to Japan. Scary but very impressive.

maritiem
29th November 2007, 07:31
COURT LINE

This tramp shipping company was founded in 1905 by Philip Edward Haldinstein as Haldinstein & Co. Ltd. and based in London.
His ships were all called after country houses with the suffix 'Court', his first tramp ship was completed in November of that year as ARLINGTON COURT.

Only one ship was lost during World War 1, the ILVINGTON COURT which was torpedoed and sunk near Cape Shershel in 1915, Philip Edward Haldinstein changed his name in Haldin in 1915

The fleet expanded greatly in the 1920s and was badly affected by the depression at the start of the depression the company consisted of twenty six mostly new tramps, and some twenty vessels had to be laid up.
The whole fleet of twenty six tramps was registered in 1929 under the United British Steamship Co. Ltd., except for the new DALLINGTON COURT which was registered under an old company called Framlington Syndicate Ltd.
Also in 1929 Laurence Richard Philipps joined with Philip Haldin to form Haldin Philipps Ltd. who remain the managers until 1948 when Sir Laurence retired and the company reverted to Haldin & Co.

A fleet of twenty four tramps were owned at the outbreak of World War 2 and thirtheen were to be lost during that conflict.

A newbuilding programme got underway in 1952 with the completion of BARRINGTON COURT (3) and FRAMLINGTON COURT (3) from Wear shipyards.

Shipowning became a smaller part of activities within the Court Line Group and the company moved into bulk carriers and tankers in the 1960s.
The company changed its naming scheme with new vessels having the prefix 'Halcyon' and also its livery. The group's diversified interests in airlines, package holidays, shipbuilding and repairing led to cash flow problems. As a result it went into liquidation in 1974.
The Sunderland shipyards owned by the Group were taken over by the Government.
Court Line Fleet

Arlington Court (1) 1905 R. Stephenson & Co., Newcastle 1917 sold to Mitchell Steamship Co., London renamed Penylan 4,346
Barrington Court (1) 1906 Palmers & Co. Ltd., Newcastle on Tyne 1917 sold to the Shipping Controller ( mgrs Williams & Mordey) renamed Margam Abbey, 4,367
Cressington Court (1) 1908 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton 1918 sold to Sutherland Steam Ship Co., Newcastle renamed Roxburgh, 1922 sold to Tyneside Shipping Co. (J. Ridley & Son & Tully) not renamed, 1924 sold renamed Fotini, 1935 scrapped as Hillcote. 4,396
Dorington Court (1) 1908 R. Stephenson & Co., Newcastle 1913 sold to P. Gjerding, Bergen, Norway renamed Vally, 1914 sold to Norwegian America Line renamed Romsdalfjord, 1920 wrecked off Sambro Island. 4,426
Errington Court (1) 1909 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 1919 sold to Leeston Shipping Co., London renamed Bournemouth, 1920 sold renamed Despina, 1938 sold to Wheelock & Co., Shanghai renamed Deslock, 8.12.1941 seized by Japanese at Yokohama, 1942 renamed Uzan Maru, 2.5.1942 torpedoed and sunk by American submarine USS Trout. 4,461
Framlington Court (1) 1911 Hawthorn, Leslie & Co. Ltd., Hebburn 1922 sold to Pindos Teamship Co., Greece renamed Cleanthis, 3.12.1942 torpedoed shelled and sunk by German submarine U.181 with the loss of 12 lives. 4,153
Geddington Court (1) 1912 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 1927 sold to Greece renamed Pontos, 1936 sold to Vergottis, London renamed Icarion, 26.1.1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.754 with the loss of 9 lives. 3,989
Hannington Court (1) 1912 J. Priestman, Sunderland 1936 sold to Achille Lauro, Naples renamed Elios, 1940 seized by Great Britain renamed Empire Brigade, 18.10.1940 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.99 with the loss of 6 lives. 5,166
Ilvington Court (1) 1911 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle Ex Dalebank, 1913 purchased renamed Ilvington Court, 6.12.1917 war loss. 4,217
Dorington Court (2) 1915 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton 1937 sold Ernesto Gerarci, London renamed Laleham, 1939 sold to Jos Fritzen & Sohn, Stettin, Germany renamed Harm Fritzen, 1948 scuttled with poison gas shells. 4,818
Framlington Court (2) 1924 Napier & Miller Ltd., Glasgow 1945 sold to Stanhope Steamship Co. (J.A. Billmeir & Co.), London renamed Stancourt, 1952 sold to Lansdowne & Co., Hong Kong renamed Landscape, 1952 sold to A. Magsaysay Inc., Philippines renamed Ami Banker, 1955 sold to Eddie Steamship Co., Formosa renamed Ally, 1958 scrapped at Keelung. 4,888
Arlington Court (2) 1924 Workman Clark & Co, Belfast 16.11.1939 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.43 while in convoy SL7 with the loss of 12 lives. 4,915
Barrington Court (2) 1924 Workman Clark & Co, Belfast 1948 sold to La Tunisienne Steam Nav. Co., London ( Frank C. Strick) renamed Leon de Nervo, 1951 sold to Puerto Rico renamed Electric, 12.8.1960 stranded and lost. 4,910
Ilvington Court (2) 1919 Hong Kong & Whampoa Dock Co., Kowloon Launched as War Sniper but completed as Meandros for S.H.Iossifoglu, Piraeus, Greece, ex Icolos 1920, 1924 purchased from Hellenic Transport SS Co., Piraeus renamed Ilvington Court, 26.8.40 torpedoed and sunk by Italian submarine Dandolo at 37.14N 21.52W on passage Pepel to Glasgow. 5,187
Cedrington Court 1918 Harland & Wolff Ltd, Belfast Ex War Viper built for the Shipping Controller, ex Cabotia 1919, 1925 purchased from Anchor Donaldson Line renamed Cedrington Court, 7.1.1940 mined and sunk near Goodwin Sands. 5,160
Errington Court (2) 1925 Workman Clark & Co, Belfast 1947 sold to Greece renamed Tharros, 1950 sold renamed Athene, later Navidad, 1965 scrapped. 4,913
Jevington Court (1) 1925 Workman Clark & Co, Belfast 24,2.1940 mined and sunk near Cromer Knoll Light Vessel. 4,544
Kensington Court 1927 Napier & Miller Ltd., Glasgow 18.9.1939 shelled and sunk by German submarine U.32. 4,863
Lavington Court (1) 1920 Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland Ex Vincenzo Florio, 1927 purchased renamed Lavington Court, 1937 sold to Atlas Reederei AG, Emden, Germany renamed Afrika, 10.4.1940 sunk by artillery off Ulvik, Norway. 6,569
Mersington Court 1920 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle Ex Giovanna Florio, 1927 purchased renamed Mersington Court, 15.4.1940 sunk at Narvik, wreck refloated sold and used as a hulk in Belgium. 5,141
Nollington Court 1924 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton Ex Conistone, 1927 purchased from Charles Radcliffe, Cardiff renamed Nollington Court, 26.11.1937 lost after grounding near Tortuga. 6,097
Ovington Court 1924 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton Ex Amblestone, 1927 purchased from Charles Radcliffe, Cardiff renamed Ovington Court, 26.11.1940 wrecked on Durban Beach. 6,095
Pennington Court 1924 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton Ex Rochdale, 1927 purchased from Charles Radcliffe, Cardiff renamed Pennington Court, 9.10.1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.254 and lost with whole crew. 6,098
Geddington Court (2) 1928 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 1951 sold to Japan renamed Kyoho Maru, 1971 scrapped in Japan. 6,903
Quarrington Court (1) 1928 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 7.12.1937 sank in Red Sea after engine room leak. 6,900
Rossington Court 1928 Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Glasgow 13.3.1940 sunk in collision with s/s ATHELVIKING. 6,922
Sinnington Court 1928 Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Newcastle on Tyne 1951 sold to Japan renamed Atago Maru, 1955 Fukuzan Maru, 26.10.1961 sank near Guam after hull split. 6,910
Tilsington Court 1928 Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Newcastle on Tyne 1950 sold to Italy renamed Campania, 1961 scrapped at La Spezia. 6,910
Uffington Court 1929 Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland 1952 sold to Sweden renamed Svarten, 1960 sold renamed Ocean Pride, 1963 sold renamed Fu An, 1967 scrapped at Kaohsiung. 4,976
Wellington Court 1930 Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland 1952 sold renamed Pung Jeng, 1969 scrapped at Inchon. 4,979
Aldington Court (1) 1929 Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland 31.10.1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.172 with the loss of 34 lives. 4,891
Bonnington Court 1929 R. Duncan & Co., Port Glasgow 19.1.1941 bombed and sunk by German aircraft in Thames Estuary with the loss of 2 lives. 4,909
Cressington Court (2) 1929 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 19.8.1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.510 with the loss of 8 lives. 4,971
Dallington Court 1929 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 1950 sold to Panama renamed Irene, 1965 scrapped at Ghent. 6,889
Darlington Court 1936 Lithgows Ltd., Port Glasgow 20.5.1941 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.556 while in convoy HX126 with the loss of 25 lives. 4,974
Dorington Court (3) 1938 J.L. Thompson & Sons, Sunderland 24.11.1942 torpedoed by German submarine U.181 with the loss of 4 lives, abandoned and later shelled and sunk. 5,281
Hannington Court (1) 1939 Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland 13,7.1941 on fire and later shelled and sunk by British cruiser. 5,449
Lavington Court (2) 1940 Harland & Wolff Ltd, Glasgow 19.7.1942 torpedoed by German submarine U.564 while in convoy OS34 with the loss of 6 lives, taken in tow and later foundered. 5,372
Cressington Court (3) 1944 Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland Ex Empire Earl built for MOWT managed by Dodd, Thomson & Co., 1945 purchased renamed Cressington Court, 1947 transferred to United British Steamship Co. Ltd, 1959 sold to West Wales SS Co. (Gibbs & Co.) renamed East Wales, 1966 sold to Dalkeith Shipping Co., Hong Kong renamed Universal Skipper, 1970 scrapped at Whampoa, China. 7,359
Aldington Court (2) 1944 Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland Ex Empire Lord built for MOWT managed by W.Runciman & Co., 1946 purchased renamed Aldington Court, 1947 transferred to 1947 United British Steamships Ltd.(Haldin & Co.), 1952 transferred to Court Line Ltd., 1959 sold to Cosmar Shipping Corp, Monrovia renamed Anacreon, 1966 sold to Zirda Cia. Nav., Panama renamed White Daisy, 1967 to Garden City Shipping Co., Panama, 1968 sold to Cia. Nav. Rivabella, Panama renamed Robertina, 15.6.1970 sprang leak off Cape Palmas and beached Cape Garraway and declared total loss. 7,359
Dorington Court (4) 1940 J.L. Thompson & Sons, Sunderland Ex Empire Meteor built for MOWT managed by Mungo Campbell & Co., 1942 management changed to Haldin & Philipps, 1946 purchased renamed Dorington Court, 1956 sold to I.N.S.A. Soc.di Nav. Genoa renamed Giada, 1960 sold to Phoebus D. Kyprianou, Lebanon renamed Sheikh, 2.10.1961 ashore and broke in two Kita Daito Jima. 7,454
Errington Court (3) 1945 Caledon ShipBuilding & Engineering Company Ltd, Dundee Ex Empire Favour built for MOWT managed by Clark & Service, ex Epsom 1947, 1950 purchased from Britain SS Co. (Watts, Watts & Co.) renamed Errington Court, 1956 sold to Cia de Nav. Penelope, Panama renamed Penelope, 1964 sold to Dalia Cia. Nav., Panama renamed Andromachi, 25.6.1969 damaged and set on fire by Israeli shelling at Suez, 1976 scrapped at Adabiah, Suez. 7,056
Barrington Court (3) 1952 Short Brothers Ltd., Sunderland 1963 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Ashoka Jayanti, later Blue Pearl, 1975 scrapped. 6,033
Framlington Court (3) 1952 Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland 1962 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Laxmi Jayanti, 1970 Spyros, 14.5.1973 sank in Bay of Bengal. 5,754
Geddington Court (3) 1954 Short Brothers Ltd., Sunderland 1962 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Rama Jayanti, 1975 Rama, 1976 scrapped at Bombay. 8,357
Hannington Court (2) 1954 Bartram & Sons Ltd., Sunderland 1962 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Gandhi Jayanti, 1974 Gandhi, 1976 scrapped at Bombay. 6,266
Jevington Court (2) 1956 Bartram & Sons Ltd., Sunderland 1962 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Krishna Jayanti, 1975 Shankara, 1975 scrapped at Bombay. 6,248
Dorington Court (5) 1957 Short Brothers Ltd., Sunderland 1963 sold renamed Eva, 14.7.1976 badly damaged by fire and scrapped at Hamburg. 6,223
Errington Court (4) 1957 Austin & Pickersgill Sunderland Ltd., Wear 1963 sold renamed Ratna Chandralekha, 1972 to India Steamship Co. renamed Indian Endeavour, 1975 Tamil Periyarever, 1981 scrapped at Calcutta. 8,176
Cressington Court (4) 1961 J. Boel & Zn, Temse Bulkcarrier, ex Hector Halcyon, 1961 purchased from Hector Whaling, London renamed Cressington Court, 1966 sold to Chr. Salvesen, Leith renamed Inverleith, 1974 sold to Johnson Nav. Co., Panama renamed Manchester, 1981 renamed Manhattan, 1982 scrapped at Kaohsiung. 15,628
Arlington Court (3) 1962 Bartram & Sons Ltd., Sunderland 1963 sold renamed Southgate, 1970 Gela, 1984 Cyclopus, 1986 scrapped. 9,571

Mainsource;
Travel of the Tramps, twenty Tramp fleets Vol. II, N.L. Middlemiss, Shield Publication, 1991.

R58484956
29th November 2007, 15:07
Maritiem Many thanks for the information on Court line, your time and effort is much appreciated.

Paul munton
8th November 2010, 18:53
I was third mate on ss Halcyon Breeze in 1964 under Captain Valentine. I cannot find any photos of the ship despite searching Ships Nostalgia, Court Line etc - Any help?

john.money
15th November 2010, 10:06
Paul - Try this link - hope it what you are looking for - John Money

http://www.benjidog.co.uk/Court/index_files/Page2927.htm

frank brant
13th January 2011, 12:52
Hi Nigel
About the Court Line Ships I was on the Errington Court for 14 months in
1961 To 1962 and found that there was mixed reactions about these ships
some stayed on them as short a time as possible doing no more than one
trip others did more.
From Frank B (Member)

tiachapman
13th January 2011, 13:27
when one was on the board on the POOL we all made a fast getaway to the nearest ale house.

granty
13th January 2011, 13:52
hi captain chris i remember it was quite a good news item on the tele at the time just before that i knew an ex master from court line he had to come ashore because he got sugar diabetis and he got a job at shoreham harbour
as a port control officer his name wsa george wood from grimsby.
regards
granty

bessy
21st February 2011, 12:11
I sailed on the Barrington court as a first tripper deck boy in April 1961,this ship was launced by short bros in sunderland in 1952

TIM HUDSON
21st February 2011, 14:45
I joined Common Brothers tanker Woodburn in early 1975 whose management was recently taken from a defunct Court Line where she was named Halcyon Loch. The ship was owned, I believe, by Bankers Trust of New York. We traded US East Coast- Caribbean before going to lay-up in Molde, Norway.

borderreiver
21st February 2011, 16:51
I was master on her Wood burn for the sell from Commons to the Greeks jan 79
After nearly 5 years she was a bit of a mess
Chris

allbatross
19th April 2012, 19:45
Hi All

Does anybody remember them? My records date from 1968 when they only had about 3 ships left.

However they did try to diversify into aircraft and package travel which I believe was their final undoing.

Couple of pics of Tristars the leased attached

Regards

NigelCi sailed on the barrington court out of glasgow 1st sep 1960till 7th feb 1961 what a trip would take a book to get it down loved every second of it hurricanes and all

Petetherig
4th August 2013, 15:27
I'm a newbie here, but I was very interested in your account of Halcyon The Great's escape from Canada. I saw the vessel at anchor in Come By Chance in 1974. I was on a VLCC called Carnegie, operated by Gatx-Oswego (UK) Ltd.

I sailed with Brian Greenwood in 1979 on a product tanker called Broland. It was owned by Brostroms of Sweden but managed by Denholm Hong Kong. He had a heart attack while we were anchored off Maracaibo awaiting orders. The Venezuelans were very good and got him into hospital quickly. He recovered and in 1980 I had a drink with him at a pub in Shaw, near Oldham. I lost touch with him after that.

Ironically, after Brian had been carted off to hospital we got orders to sail to St. John, New Brunswick!

frank elliott
4th August 2013, 16:10
interesting to read of happenings to the Court Line. I remember them well growing from about 5 tramp cargo ships and diversifying into many other interests and growing rapidly.They also owned Appledore shipbuilders in Devon and in fact they built the large new enclosed shipbuilding yard and were very
successful there. But the empire all crashed like a pack of cards and all in a
very short spell of time. A classic case of expanding too fast and probably all
on borrowed money from the banks. How many companies in the past have
gone the same way? The banks do not take kindly to those who do not repay
speedily! The Banks !!!!!

tom roberts
4th August 2013, 16:53
A pal of mine from the Inde sailed on the Barrington Court in 1954,I met him in Bombay he was deck boy as was I on the British Supremecy His name was Tim Lewis and I believe he was from Rickmansworth,I remember him telling us his dad worked at one of the film studios,Anyone know Tim or might have sailed on the same ship.

macca57
4th August 2013, 19:11
COURT LINE

This tramp shipping company was founded in 1905 by Philip Edward Haldinstein as Haldinstein & Co. Ltd. and based in London.
His ships were all called after country houses with the suffix 'Court', his first tramp ship was completed in November of that year as ARLINGTON COURT.

Only one ship was lost during World War 1, the ILVINGTON COURT which was torpedoed and sunk near Cape Shershel in 1915, Philip Edward Haldinstein changed his name in Haldin in 1915

The fleet expanded greatly in the 1920s and was badly affected by the depression at the start of the depression the company consisted of twenty six mostly new tramps, and some twenty vessels had to be laid up.
The whole fleet of twenty six tramps was registered in 1929 under the United British Steamship Co. Ltd., except for the new DALLINGTON COURT which was registered under an old company called Framlington Syndicate Ltd.
Also in 1929 Laurence Richard Philipps joined with Philip Haldin to form Haldin Philipps Ltd. who remain the managers until 1948 when Sir Laurence retired and the company reverted to Haldin & Co.

A fleet of twenty four tramps were owned at the outbreak of World War 2 and thirtheen were to be lost during that conflict.

A newbuilding programme got underway in 1952 with the completion of BARRINGTON COURT (3) and FRAMLINGTON COURT (3) from Wear shipyards.

Shipowning became a smaller part of activities within the Court Line Group and the company moved into bulk carriers and tankers in the 1960s.
The company changed its naming scheme with new vessels having the prefix 'Halcyon' and also its livery. The group's diversified interests in airlines, package holidays, shipbuilding and repairing led to cash flow problems. As a result it went into liquidation in 1974.
The Sunderland shipyards owned by the Group were taken over by the Government.
Court Line Fleet

Arlington Court (1) 1905 R. Stephenson & Co., Newcastle 1917 sold to Mitchell Steamship Co., London renamed Penylan 4,346
Barrington Court (1) 1906 Palmers & Co. Ltd., Newcastle on Tyne 1917 sold to the Shipping Controller ( mgrs Williams & Mordey) renamed Margam Abbey, 4,367
Cressington Court (1) 1908 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton 1918 sold to Sutherland Steam Ship Co., Newcastle renamed Roxburgh, 1922 sold to Tyneside Shipping Co. (J. Ridley & Son & Tully) not renamed, 1924 sold renamed Fotini, 1935 scrapped as Hillcote. 4,396
Dorington Court (1) 1908 R. Stephenson & Co., Newcastle 1913 sold to P. Gjerding, Bergen, Norway renamed Vally, 1914 sold to Norwegian America Line renamed Romsdalfjord, 1920 wrecked off Sambro Island. 4,426
Errington Court (1) 1909 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 1919 sold to Leeston Shipping Co., London renamed Bournemouth, 1920 sold renamed Despina, 1938 sold to Wheelock & Co., Shanghai renamed Deslock, 8.12.1941 seized by Japanese at Yokohama, 1942 renamed Uzan Maru, 2.5.1942 torpedoed and sunk by American submarine USS Trout. 4,461
Framlington Court (1) 1911 Hawthorn, Leslie & Co. Ltd., Hebburn 1922 sold to Pindos Teamship Co., Greece renamed Cleanthis, 3.12.1942 torpedoed shelled and sunk by German submarine U.181 with the loss of 12 lives. 4,153
Geddington Court (1) 1912 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 1927 sold to Greece renamed Pontos, 1936 sold to Vergottis, London renamed Icarion, 26.1.1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.754 with the loss of 9 lives. 3,989
Hannington Court (1) 1912 J. Priestman, Sunderland 1936 sold to Achille Lauro, Naples renamed Elios, 1940 seized by Great Britain renamed Empire Brigade, 18.10.1940 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.99 with the loss of 6 lives. 5,166
Ilvington Court (1) 1911 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle Ex Dalebank, 1913 purchased renamed Ilvington Court, 6.12.1917 war loss. 4,217
Dorington Court (2) 1915 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton 1937 sold Ernesto Gerarci, London renamed Laleham, 1939 sold to Jos Fritzen & Sohn, Stettin, Germany renamed Harm Fritzen, 1948 scuttled with poison gas shells. 4,818
Framlington Court (2) 1924 Napier & Miller Ltd., Glasgow 1945 sold to Stanhope Steamship Co. (J.A. Billmeir & Co.), London renamed Stancourt, 1952 sold to Lansdowne & Co., Hong Kong renamed Landscape, 1952 sold to A. Magsaysay Inc., Philippines renamed Ami Banker, 1955 sold to Eddie Steamship Co., Formosa renamed Ally, 1958 scrapped at Keelung. 4,888
Arlington Court (2) 1924 Workman Clark & Co, Belfast 16.11.1939 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.43 while in convoy SL7 with the loss of 12 lives. 4,915
Barrington Court (2) 1924 Workman Clark & Co, Belfast 1948 sold to La Tunisienne Steam Nav. Co., London ( Frank C. Strick) renamed Leon de Nervo, 1951 sold to Puerto Rico renamed Electric, 12.8.1960 stranded and lost. 4,910
Ilvington Court (2) 1919 Hong Kong & Whampoa Dock Co., Kowloon Launched as War Sniper but completed as Meandros for S.H.Iossifoglu, Piraeus, Greece, ex Icolos 1920, 1924 purchased from Hellenic Transport SS Co., Piraeus renamed Ilvington Court, 26.8.40 torpedoed and sunk by Italian submarine Dandolo at 37.14N 21.52W on passage Pepel to Glasgow. 5,187
Cedrington Court 1918 Harland & Wolff Ltd, Belfast Ex War Viper built for the Shipping Controller, ex Cabotia 1919, 1925 purchased from Anchor Donaldson Line renamed Cedrington Court, 7.1.1940 mined and sunk near Goodwin Sands. 5,160
Errington Court (2) 1925 Workman Clark & Co, Belfast 1947 sold to Greece renamed Tharros, 1950 sold renamed Athene, later Navidad, 1965 scrapped. 4,913
Jevington Court (1) 1925 Workman Clark & Co, Belfast 24,2.1940 mined and sunk near Cromer Knoll Light Vessel. 4,544
Kensington Court 1927 Napier & Miller Ltd., Glasgow 18.9.1939 shelled and sunk by German submarine U.32. 4,863
Lavington Court (1) 1920 Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland Ex Vincenzo Florio, 1927 purchased renamed Lavington Court, 1937 sold to Atlas Reederei AG, Emden, Germany renamed Afrika, 10.4.1940 sunk by artillery off Ulvik, Norway. 6,569
Mersington Court 1920 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle Ex Giovanna Florio, 1927 purchased renamed Mersington Court, 15.4.1940 sunk at Narvik, wreck refloated sold and used as a hulk in Belgium. 5,141
Nollington Court 1924 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton Ex Conistone, 1927 purchased from Charles Radcliffe, Cardiff renamed Nollington Court, 26.11.1937 lost after grounding near Tortuga. 6,097
Ovington Court 1924 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton Ex Amblestone, 1927 purchased from Charles Radcliffe, Cardiff renamed Ovington Court, 26.11.1940 wrecked on Durban Beach. 6,095
Pennington Court 1924 Richardson Duck & Co, Stockton Ex Rochdale, 1927 purchased from Charles Radcliffe, Cardiff renamed Pennington Court, 9.10.1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.254 and lost with whole crew. 6,098
Geddington Court (2) 1928 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 1951 sold to Japan renamed Kyoho Maru, 1971 scrapped in Japan. 6,903
Quarrington Court (1) 1928 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 7.12.1937 sank in Red Sea after engine room leak. 6,900
Rossington Court 1928 Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Glasgow 13.3.1940 sunk in collision with s/s ATHELVIKING. 6,922
Sinnington Court 1928 Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Newcastle on Tyne 1951 sold to Japan renamed Atago Maru, 1955 Fukuzan Maru, 26.10.1961 sank near Guam after hull split. 6,910
Tilsington Court 1928 Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Newcastle on Tyne 1950 sold to Italy renamed Campania, 1961 scrapped at La Spezia. 6,910
Uffington Court 1929 Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland 1952 sold to Sweden renamed Svarten, 1960 sold renamed Ocean Pride, 1963 sold renamed Fu An, 1967 scrapped at Kaohsiung. 4,976
Wellington Court 1930 Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland 1952 sold renamed Pung Jeng, 1969 scrapped at Inchon. 4,979
Aldington Court (1) 1929 Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland 31.10.1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.172 with the loss of 34 lives. 4,891
Bonnington Court 1929 R. Duncan & Co., Port Glasgow 19.1.1941 bombed and sunk by German aircraft in Thames Estuary with the loss of 2 lives. 4,909
Cressington Court (2) 1929 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 19.8.1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.510 with the loss of 8 lives. 4,971
Dallington Court 1929 Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle 1950 sold to Panama renamed Irene, 1965 scrapped at Ghent. 6,889
Darlington Court 1936 Lithgows Ltd., Port Glasgow 20.5.1941 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.556 while in convoy HX126 with the loss of 25 lives. 4,974
Dorington Court (3) 1938 J.L. Thompson & Sons, Sunderland 24.11.1942 torpedoed by German submarine U.181 with the loss of 4 lives, abandoned and later shelled and sunk. 5,281
Hannington Court (1) 1939 Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland 13,7.1941 on fire and later shelled and sunk by British cruiser. 5,449
Lavington Court (2) 1940 Harland & Wolff Ltd, Glasgow 19.7.1942 torpedoed by German submarine U.564 while in convoy OS34 with the loss of 6 lives, taken in tow and later foundered. 5,372
Cressington Court (3) 1944 Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland Ex Empire Earl built for MOWT managed by Dodd, Thomson & Co., 1945 purchased renamed Cressington Court, 1947 transferred to United British Steamship Co. Ltd, 1959 sold to West Wales SS Co. (Gibbs & Co.) renamed East Wales, 1966 sold to Dalkeith Shipping Co., Hong Kong renamed Universal Skipper, 1970 scrapped at Whampoa, China. 7,359
Aldington Court (2) 1944 Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland Ex Empire Lord built for MOWT managed by W.Runciman & Co., 1946 purchased renamed Aldington Court, 1947 transferred to 1947 United British Steamships Ltd.(Haldin & Co.), 1952 transferred to Court Line Ltd., 1959 sold to Cosmar Shipping Corp, Monrovia renamed Anacreon, 1966 sold to Zirda Cia. Nav., Panama renamed White Daisy, 1967 to Garden City Shipping Co., Panama, 1968 sold to Cia. Nav. Rivabella, Panama renamed Robertina, 15.6.1970 sprang leak off Cape Palmas and beached Cape Garraway and declared total loss. 7,359
Dorington Court (4) 1940 J.L. Thompson & Sons, Sunderland Ex Empire Meteor built for MOWT managed by Mungo Campbell & Co., 1942 management changed to Haldin & Philipps, 1946 purchased renamed Dorington Court, 1956 sold to I.N.S.A. Soc.di Nav. Genoa renamed Giada, 1960 sold to Phoebus D. Kyprianou, Lebanon renamed Sheikh, 2.10.1961 ashore and broke in two Kita Daito Jima. 7,454
Errington Court (3) 1945 Caledon ShipBuilding & Engineering Company Ltd, Dundee Ex Empire Favour built for MOWT managed by Clark & Service, ex Epsom 1947, 1950 purchased from Britain SS Co. (Watts, Watts & Co.) renamed Errington Court, 1956 sold to Cia de Nav. Penelope, Panama renamed Penelope, 1964 sold to Dalia Cia. Nav., Panama renamed Andromachi, 25.6.1969 damaged and set on fire by Israeli shelling at Suez, 1976 scrapped at Adabiah, Suez. 7,056
Barrington Court (3) 1952 Short Brothers Ltd., Sunderland 1963 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Ashoka Jayanti, later Blue Pearl, 1975 scrapped. 6,033
Framlington Court (3) 1952 Wm Pickersgill & Sons, Sunderland 1962 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Laxmi Jayanti, 1970 Spyros, 14.5.1973 sank in Bay of Bengal. 5,754
Geddington Court (3) 1954 Short Brothers Ltd., Sunderland 1962 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Rama Jayanti, 1975 Rama, 1976 scrapped at Bombay. 8,357
Hannington Court (2) 1954 Bartram & Sons Ltd., Sunderland 1962 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Gandhi Jayanti, 1974 Gandhi, 1976 scrapped at Bombay. 6,266
Jevington Court (2) 1956 Bartram & Sons Ltd., Sunderland 1962 sold to Jayanti Shipping Co., Bombay & London renamed Krishna Jayanti, 1975 Shankara, 1975 scrapped at Bombay. 6,248
Dorington Court (5) 1957 Short Brothers Ltd., Sunderland 1963 sold renamed Eva, 14.7.1976 badly damaged by fire and scrapped at Hamburg. 6,223
Errington Court (4) 1957 Austin & Pickersgill Sunderland Ltd., Wear 1963 sold renamed Ratna Chandralekha, 1972 to India Steamship Co. renamed Indian Endeavour, 1975 Tamil Periyarever, 1981 scrapped at Calcutta. 8,176
Cressington Court (4) 1961 J. Boel & Zn, Temse Bulkcarrier, ex Hector Halcyon, 1961 purchased from Hector Whaling, London renamed Cressington Court, 1966 sold to Chr. Salvesen, Leith renamed Inverleith, 1974 sold to Johnson Nav. Co., Panama renamed Manchester, 1981 renamed Manhattan, 1982 scrapped at Kaohsiung. 15,628
Arlington Court (3) 1962 Bartram & Sons Ltd., Sunderland 1963 sold renamed Southgate, 1970 Gela, 1984 Cyclopus, 1986 scrapped. 9,571

Mainsource;
Travel of the Tramps, twenty Tramp fleets Vol. II, N.L. Middlemiss, Shield Publication, 1991.
Common mistake that Haldenstein was the founder of this company.
Laurence Richard Philipps was the founder, with Haldenstein as his partner.

Eddie Wallace
4th August 2013, 19:14
Just Checked my discharge book I sailed on the Dorington Court In december 1954 as AB paid off in Middlesburgh January 1955.don't remember much about her.

ben27
11th August 2013, 01:28
good day maccas57,5.aug.2013,04:11.re:court line.i found it very interesting history of the court line.i looked in my discharge book and found the wellington court,(161366)1947.a long time ago.thanks for posting.regards ben27

IAN M
5th October 2013, 00:28
I have 16 Court Line ships listed, and give details of their demise, in my book SHIPPING COMPANY LOSSES OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR. The Marsa, the only name without Court in her name, is included.

Court Shipper
24th October 2013, 19:22
Hi Nova Scotian,
Great post, - My father joined Halcyon the great as chief engineer. Alan Keam was his name. He worked for Court Line from around 1968 - 73

Court Shipper
24th October 2013, 19:31
Hi Capt. Chris. did you know my father, Alan Keam, who worked for court Line as Chief engineer?