hull fishing vessels

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humbertug
3rd October 2006, 18:51
as we have a grimsby and lowestoft thread i think we must have a hull one so come on boys get posting

Clem
4th October 2006, 04:22
Hi Colin, it's great that you've decided to start this thread dealing with the Hull scene, I'm sure you'll get a good response from those guys with connections to Hull. I bet there'll be plenty of cross-over between this and the GY thread, as there was in these ports heydays. Lets hope Fleetwood, Milford Haven, Aberdeen, Peterhead, North Shields and all the other 'fish' towns (& citys!) get a presence on here too.

To start things off, do you know of a skipper by the name of 'Yorkie' Ellerby? I know he was a relief skipper of GY190 Northern Spray, standing in for skipper 'Snowy' Tomlinson, in '53. I know nothing of his career prior to this, whether he worked out of Hull, if so which ships etc. I hope you can be of help.

All the best

Clem

K urgess
6th October 2006, 14:27
Come on fellers!

There must be some Hull fishing industry fans out there somewhere.(Thumb)

It's 136 years since my great grandfather sailed out of Hull on fishing smacks and I want to know more.

On a different tack. I can't find out much about the attached photograph. I know she was renamed the Ross Trafalgar but nobody makes it clear whether that was done in 1966 or she was launched in 1966. There is also some confusion about her number.

The photo was taken at her launch at Dunswell. Date anybody?(?HUH)

Anybody got any info they want to share?

trawlercook
6th October 2006, 15:10
Hi Colin, it's great that you've decided to start this thread dealing with the Hull scene, I'm sure you'll get a good response from those guys with connections to Hull. I bet there'll be plenty of cross-over between this and the GY thread, as there was in these ports heydays. Lets hope Fleetwood, Milford Haven, Aberdeen, Peterhead, North Shields and all the other 'fish' towns (& citys!) get a presence on here too.

To start things off, do you know of a skipper by the name of 'Yorkie' Ellerby? I know he was a relief skipper of GY190 Northern Spray, standing in for skipper 'Snowy' Tomlinson, in '53. I know nothing of his career prior to this, whether he worked out of Hull, if so which ships etc. I hope you can be of help.

All the best

Clem
sorry clem it was not me that started the thread it was my brother in-law pete,i have lent my book on hull trawlers to some one,when i get it back i will look up the name "yorkie ellerby" for you i an sure i will be able to enlighten you.i cannot tell you from memory as it was before my time my fishing career started in1965.i have books on most ports and it would have to be the one with all the skippers in that i loaned out so as soon as i get it back i will let you know.
so till then keep her stright(Thumb)

Danleno
6th October 2006, 15:46
Hi There.
The Cape Trafalgar was launched at Beverley in 1957 and her prefix was changed to Ross in 1965 when Hudson Brothers were bought out by the Ross Group. Her Fishing Reg No was H59.
Hope this helps

Danleno

K urgess
6th October 2006, 16:19
Many thanks, Danleno

I can put a date to that photo now.

Cheers

Clem
6th October 2006, 16:22
Hi Dan, maybe you'd like this pic for you avatar, the original Dan Leno! :)

Steve Farrow
6th October 2006, 16:43
Can anybody remember the name of the vessel that almost chopped the Kingston Pearl in half off Immingham. I think it was either an oil tanker or an ore carrier, possibly mid-seventies.
Here is a thumbnail of her being patched-up.
Steve

Kerbtrawler
8th October 2006, 14:50
Can't remember the vessel but on a different note there was an interesting artical about the Kingston Pearl in a book by R F Roberts that talks about an ill fated voyage were they lost one man over board (Joseph Garrard) and another seriously injured during a storm back in 46'
The injured man also died shortly after, I think he was named Raymond Wilson, a Trimmer.
It must have been a really bad storm, the Second engineer also suffered with some cracked ribs.
In the end they recieved assistance from the Kingston Onyx and a tug sent out from Norway

Eventually they made port some 5 weeks after leaving
They had part of the catch condemed and was only able to sell off 14,000 stones out of a total catch of 35,000

Just goes to show that when things go bad at sea they really go bad

Cheers

tercar
8th October 2006, 19:35
Well done Colin, I wondered if anyone would start a Hull thread.
My Dad started his fishing career in Grimsby as a Deckie/Trimmer,
trim coal when not fishing, sparehand when fishing. He moved to Hull in 1935 and eventually became Skipper. I don't remember all his ships,but Stella Orion, and Marath come to mind. I do remember some of the characters of the day,ie Knifer Williams,etc.
My first trip to sea was on the Cape Comorin in January 1949, one of Hudsons.That should have cured anyone but it didn't.

Steve Farrow
19th October 2006, 23:03
I have just received this from Chris Petherbridge who has the Hull Trawlers Smack to Stern web site....THRESH - KENNETH ( Skipper ) 16 Nov 1973 The kingston pearl was in collision with the bulk carrier King Alfred at the mouth of the Humber, 16 crewmembers were taken off and the vessel beached, the Hull Tugs Lady Alma and Masterman were present and assisted throughout the ordeal.
Steve

Clem
25th October 2006, 12:17
Hello all. I'm trying to find the fishing number, without success, of the Hellyer Brothers trawler Sudanese. She was built in 1934 by Smiths Dock.

Regards

Clem

Kerbtrawler
25th October 2006, 13:23
Hi Clem
all I have is the official number 163953
was attacked and bombed 29/05/1941
built by Smiths Dock

got most of the info except the Port Reg

cheers

Steve Farrow
25th October 2006, 16:54
Hi Clem,
Sudanese fishing number was H.104 ( 1938 Olsen's )
Steve

hulltrawler
25th October 2006, 21:18
Hi Clem
1934 SUDANESE
BUILT SMITHS DOCK
ON 163953
Yard No 974
HELLYER BROS HULL
162.1 / 26.7 / 12.9 / 99HP / Engined by Smiths Dock
Registered 08 / 11 / 1934 as H104 SUDANESE

14 02 1939 SINDONIS - Loyal Steam fishing Co Gy - A W Butt Manager

Hope that helps Chris.

Clem
26th October 2006, 02:04
Cheers lads, that's brilliant, I was backtracking her history from Grimsby and was at a loss.

Clem

Mark Taxis
26th October 2006, 15:55
I am on a survey ship which started life as the Marbella, built in Goole 1966.
Now called the John Lethbridge. I will post a photo in the gallery, not sure how to place a photo in the thread
Mark

laurie dixon
26th October 2006, 21:43
1934 the aberdeen trawler loch ard was lost with all hands 14 of the crew been from hull any body with any photographs of the ship and any information I would be very happy to recieve them

slick
27th October 2006, 07:25
All,
An interesting site, I went "pleasuring" on the ST Loch Oskaig in 1957 she must have been one of the last coal fired trawlers out of Hull I think she was a sister ship of the ST Kingston Beryl or was it Pearl?
Which was the last coal fired trawler out of Hull?
Yours aye,
Slick

hulltrawler
27th October 2006, 08:28
Kingston Ruby H477 was the last coal burner for Kingstons and one of the last remaining in Hull been scrapped 1963.chris.

Clem
8th November 2006, 13:33
Hi, can anyone confirm if the number & name, H398 Cassio, were different vessels. One a sidewinder, the other a stern dragger?

Any info. would be great.

Regards

Clem

hulltrawler
8th November 2006, 15:48
H398 Was the Stern Dragger

There was H138 CASSIO and H889 Cassio which where sidewinders.

H398 CASSIO
ON 308558 - Length 223.9 / Breadth 39.1 / 1574 G / 672 N /
Launched 05 Apr 1966
Built Yarrow & Co Ltd Glasgow 1966
Wholefreezer
2350 Bhp - Mirrlees National Ltd
Owned by Hellyer Bros Hull

1978 Moved to Port Albany Australia
1984 Became Honey 1
1986 Orsirichainava 6 Thailand.

Chris

Clem
14th November 2006, 09:57
Thanks for the info. in your last post Chris. Here's another one for you, do you know her fishing number or anything else.

Cheers

Clem



Official Number: 163934
Port of Registry: Hull
Number: H79
Name: Aragonite
Callsign: GWVV
Type: Steam Trawler
Built: 07/34
By: Cook Welton & Gemmell Ltd. Beverly
Gross Tonnage: 315
Net Tonnage: 138
Length: 133.2 ft.
Beam: 24.5 ft.
Draught: 12.9 ft.
(Note: Measurements are in Feet and Tenths of Feet)
Engines: T 3cy. 89 RHP
By: C.D. Holmes & Co. Ltd. Hull
Owner: Kingston Steam Trawling Co. Ltd.
Manager: n/a
Comments: Admiralty Service; Hired as M/S 08/39; only the 3rd trawler in Naval service to be sunk; destroyed by mines laid on the night of 17-18th November ‘39 by Kommodore Bonte's Destroyers; Z19 Hermann Künne; Z22 Wilhelm Heidkamp and Z11 Bernd von Arnim

Fate: Sunk 22/11/39 by mine off Deal

Steve Farrow
14th November 2006, 15:04
The fishing number of ARAGONITE was H. 79. speed 11.3 knots.
Steve

Clem
14th November 2006, 16:53
Cheers Steve.

RayJordandpo
16th November 2006, 00:36
My Grandfather was a trawler skipper out of Hull. He served on the 'Box Fleets'. Don't know much about them but I believe they put the catch in boxes and transferred them to a mother ship. His name was Harry Lead and by all accounts he was a bit of a character, He loved to fight in the boxing booths at Hull Fair (don't know if he ever won or not) His nickname was "BUBA" 'Bring Us Back Alive' - Perish the thought! another nickname I heard him called was "Overland Harry" Now I wonder why? He may have been my Grandad but I think I would have stayed well clear of his ship.
Ray Jordan

hulltrawler
16th November 2006, 09:12
Lost four ships and never a man, parked the Northern Duke on rocks, and always carried a loaded revolver.
Your cousin Brenda says hello and if you wish to e mail her, she can be contacted on my website or through me.

chris.

hulltrawler
16th November 2006, 09:32
Hi Clem
I have uploaded the details of the aragonite I have onto my site, you will notice the Bell.
I spent many years polishing this bell not knowing it`s origin or type of vessel it was from.
chris.

RayJordandpo
16th November 2006, 23:29
Lost four ships and never a man, parked the Northern Duke on rocks, and always carried a loaded revolver.
Your cousin Brenda says hello and if you wish to e mail her, she can be contacted on my website or through me.

chris.

Chris Thanks for that mate, Send my regards to Brenda. Have sent you an email through your website
Ray Jordan

Steve Farrow
18th November 2006, 19:46
Chris
Emailed a photo of ARAGONITE to your web-site
Steve

birgir
20th November 2006, 13:27
Hi everyone

I have seen two references in icelandic reminiscenses to a Hull trawler named Cape Matteman, (just prior to WW2.) Was there such a vessel? I have found it more likely that it was a mis-identification of Cape Matapan.

(Similarly, the Grimsby trawler Belovar became Belle of War, by a writer obviously trying to make a sense out of an unintelligible name.)

Birgir Thorisson

hulltrawler
21st November 2006, 13:17
Hi Birgir
vessel would have been Cape Matapan there is nothing similar to Cape Matteman.

I will place her details on site for you today, not sure about Gy vessel
chris.

hulltrawler
21st November 2006, 13:35
CAPE MATAPAN H238
OFF NO - 149032
BUILT 1925
COCHRANE SELBY
YARD NO 976
LAUNCHED 22 08 1925
REGISTERED 27 10 1925
LENGTH 140.2
BREADTH 24.0
DRAUGHT 13.2
ENGINE BUILDER C D Holmes
HP 96
11 Knots

Owners
1925 Hudson Brothers Trawlers Ltd Hull
1939 - 1941 - HMT PUNNET Admiralty ( Z04 Boom Defence Vessel )
1941 - 1946 Loaned to Turkish Navy renamed ERDEK
1946 - Cape Matapan H238 - Hudson Brothers
1947 - Cape Matapan A80 - Joseph Craig Aberdeen
1948 - Cape Matapan A80 - Woodburn Fishing Co Aberdeen
1948 - Cape Matapan A80 - Aberdeen - Nordic Fishing Co Ltd London
1953 - B Gelcer & Co Cape Town South Africa

1960 While fishing from Cape Town was in collision with the Fleetwood Trawler Bulby FD147 and sunk

birgir
21st November 2006, 16:14
Thank you.
The Belovar is "covered" in the Cook, Welton & Gemmel book, yard no 94 (Beverley)

By the way, In 1907 Hellyers had two large trawlers built by C.W.&G, Roman
(145' long) and Saxon, (140´). Presumably, they were failures, because they quickly sold them. Do you have any idea what was wrong with them?

Birgir

hulltrawler
21st November 2006, 19:32
Not too sure on that one although they where built for and owned by Imperial steam fishing. At this time Hellyers where selling some of their fleet persumably for capital as they where endeavouring to purchase around 25 - 30 vessels for their venture into the boxing fleets.

chris

hulltrawler
23rd November 2006, 23:48
Can any of you good gentlemen with Olsens or such tell me the Port reg of the Cape Tarifa ON 149025 / Built Cochranes 1925 changed name and sold to portugal as ALVERCA 1933.
regards chris.

birgir
24th November 2006, 15:09
Hi everyone.

A trawler was wrecked in Adalvik, Northwest Coast of Iceland, on November 25 1908. All the crew was drowned. From a nameplate found among the debris, it was deduced that the ship was named Faracona, H 56.
Newpaper reports at the time reported that two Hull trawlers vere missing, the Paragon, and the Queen Alexandra.

In checking Gill´s Lost Trawlers of Hull, I found that Paragon H56 was listed as: Wrecked Yorkshire, Humber Estuary during fog, 1. december 1908.
According to the CW&G book, the Queen Alexandra had a long career after Non. 1908. There are no candiates in the Loss list of Grimsby Trawlers.

Does anyone have any clue as to what ship was wrecked in Adalvik?

Birgir Thorisson

Steve Farrow
24th November 2006, 19:34
Birgir,
Could it have been the Hull trawler JAPAN wrecked at Iceland in 1908?
Steve

birgir
24th November 2006, 21:16
No, that was at the other end of the country, and another time. All other ships listed in Lost Trawlers of Hull, within the likely timeframe are accounted for.
People watching on shore recognizrd the trawler as British. In any case, no matching losses are available for German trawlers, and French trawlers were not in this area generally, and certainly not at that time of year. Dutch and Belgian trawlers, could be a possibility, I have no sources to check that, but there was a general consensus at the time that the ship was British.

Birgir

hulltrawler
25th November 2006, 08:05
Hi Birgir
Spent a wee while looking for this and have come to the conclusion it was definately the Paragon H56.

The times news although listing the Loss of the Suspected British steamer thought to be a trawler did not give much info. Also as you state The Paragon was listed by Gill as been lost in the Humber. But when you check the Deaths of the crew they are as follows.

ALLEN,W.(-),Address not traced.[Trimmer]
Lost with all hands,s/t.PARAGON H56
Wrecked,Adelvik Bay,Iceland,24thNOVEMBER,1908.

Regards chris.

Steve Farrow
25th November 2006, 08:41
If it was the PARAGON, I have her in a 1908 Olsen's as being built in 1899,at Aberdeen for the City Steam Fishing Company of Hull.
Signal letters RDGK, Built of iron, 96 net tons,65 hp.
Off No 110707
Steve

hulltrawler
25th November 2006, 10:11
Hi Birgir, Steve.

I have uploaded the Paragon details as I have at the moment, with regard to the two vessels been reported as lost I think the Paragon H56 and the Japan H580 are the most likely the two reported losses and not the Queen Alexandra.

By the sounds of the loss of the Paragon H56 only wreckage was found, subsequently little is written about the account, I think her loss was overshadowed by the epic venture of the Japan survivors and their trek acrosss Iceland.

Regards Chris.

birgir
25th November 2006, 18:33
Hi Chris and Steve.

It seems most likely that Gill is wrong about the Paragon. Two bodies were recovered from the one wrecked in Adalvik, but I do not know if they could be identified. Maybe the trimmer reported was one of them. As to the Queen Alexandra, she may have been late returning, thus raising false alarm, or she may have been grounded in the Humber, and refloated, thus mis-leading Gill.
Contemporary newspapers in Isafjordur may not have followed the story.

Another mistery.

A trawler named Tugela is listed as wrecked in Iceland in december 1910. However the Tugela H 521 official no. 113591 is listed in CW&G book as mined in 1916.

Another Tugela?

Birgir

hulltrawler
25th November 2006, 20:16
As far as I can see the Tugela H521 was the only registered trawler with this name in 1910.

Could have been salvaged and repaired after a standing ?

chris

birgir
25th November 2006, 23:47
The report says that salvage attempts by the Switzer-company salvage vessel "Geir" failed, but obviously they are wrong.

By the way. looking at Steve´s picture of Paragon, I noticed that the funnel markings look very similar to Kingstons. Was City Steam Ship Company part of Kingstons?

Birgir

donald mckay
13th December 2006, 19:00
official no 149025 H234 callsign KTHD 131 tonnes net 96 HP built Selby 1925 for Hudsons Olsens 1931

birgir
1st January 2007, 15:44
Hello folks, and happy new year out there in cyperworld.

In Iceland, there was just published the first volume of a new and expanded version of a biographical lexicon of Icelandic skippers and mates. (I.e. all who had the certificate.) It includes a number of men who moved to Britain and became skippers there.

The first was a man named Arni Eyjólfsson, who in Britain adobted the family name Byron. His entry is largely taken from an obituary published in Iceland in 1918. His career was in short. Born in 1879, Icelandic skippers certificate in 1896 (just 17!) moved to England in 1899, english skippers certificate in 1902subsequently a top skipper until his death.

It is recorded as having occurred on february 7 1917 by a U-boat attack. He tried to escape, but the ship was sunk. There were some survivors. The only loss on that date recorded in Gill´s Lost Trawlers of Hull, and Boswells Loss List of Grimsby Vessels, is the Hull trawler Shakespeare H994, (Hellyer).

Is that the ship? Does anyone know any details about A.E. Byrons demise?

Birgir Thorisson

hulltrawler
1st January 2007, 15:49
Died at sea
BRYON - ARNIE ( Skipper ) 346 St.George's Rd, Hull - Shakespeare H994 - 7 Feb 1917 Sunk by Submarine North Sea

chris

birgir
1st January 2007, 22:39
Happy new year Chris.

Thanks for the confirmation.
Bryon, typo for Byron, I presume.

Birgir

hulltrawler
1st January 2007, 23:42
Hi Birgar
Happy new year also:

Byron A E is as listed on the Commonwealth War graves and the Tower Hill Memorial.

I have PM you further details.

chris

treeve
10th January 2007, 15:35
My Great Uncle George Forward was a Hull fisherman, lived in Sculcoates.
My father told me that George died in WWI; as did his brother Charles, who lived in Grimsby, who died when the THEBAN was sunk.
Is there any way I could discover what boats Great Uncle George worked and when he died and how?

I am also looking for a picture of ST NIDAN, if anyone can help, please?
Best wishes, Raymond

treeve
10th January 2007, 16:40
Just found picture of ST NIDAN on

http://www.hulltrawler.net/Sidewinder/Vessel%20-%20Saint/St%20NIDAN%20H412.htm

lex
15th January 2007, 14:00
Hi All
Found this site a while ago ,its good for maritime accidents and other mishaps,there is an odd end to a Hull trawler on their ,here is the link.

http://www.cargolaw.com/2006nightmare_trawler.sink.html

mattarosa
16th January 2007, 22:49
Hi everyone.

A trawler was wrecked in Adalvik, Northwest Coast of Iceland, on November 25 1908. All the crew was drowned. From a nameplate found among the debris, it was deduced that the ship was named Faracona, H 56.
Newpaper reports at the time reported that two Hull trawlers vere missing, the Paragon, and the Queen Alexandra.

In checking Gill´s Lost Trawlers of Hull, I found that Paragon H56 was listed as: Wrecked Yorkshire, Humber Estuary during fog, 1. december 1908.
According to the CW&G book, the Queen Alexandra had a long career after Non. 1908. There are no candiates in the Loss list of Grimsby Trawlers.

Does anyone have any clue as to what ship was wrecked in Adalvik?

Birgir Thorisson

Hi Birgir
I was just wandering through the threads when I came across this message from some time ago. I can't tell you what trawler this was, but I can confirm that the Times did not know either because I found this entry.

The Times, Saturday, Nov 28, 1908
Reykjavik (Iceland), Nov. 27
A steamer, supposed to be a British steam trawler, totally lost at Adalvik. Crew drowned.

Hilary

birgir
17th January 2007, 00:25
Hi Hilary.

The ship must have been the Paragon. All the evidence point to it, and there are no other likely candidates. Gill is not infallible. (I just noticed that he missed the Lord Carington, stranded on her maiden voyage in 1913. (Strange custom, always to refer to ships as "she", Lord Carington a "she", makes is sound like he was a drag queen or something. :) )

Birgir

treeve
17th January 2007, 01:56
Chris of www.kokand.karoo.net
has been extremely kind and helpful and
I now have the list of vessels
my great uncle worked on.
Very grateful .... all the best, Raymond

mattarosa
17th January 2007, 07:23
Hi Hilary.

The ship must have been the Paragon. All the evidence point to it, and there are no other likely candidates. Gill is not infallible. (I just noticed that he missed the Lord Carington, stranded on her maiden voyage in 1913. (Strange custom, always to refer to ships as "she", Lord Carington a "she", makes is sound like he was a drag queen or something. :) )

Birgir

Ha ha, maybe he was. I don't know why ships are always called she. Perhaps because, like us ladies, they are quite hard to handle!

Hilary

treeve
22nd April 2007, 11:50
The Times 15th January 1920
Trawler in Collision with Battleship
The Hull trawler SINGAPORE was sunk during the gale on Monday night at the mouth of the Humber through collision with HMS ADVENTURE, which was lying with other battleships off Immingham. Skipper Boynton was awarded the DSO for services in the war. There were four survivors, including the mate. They returned to Hull yesterday. They stated that the trawler sank within three minutes of the collision. They had no time to launch th eboats but threw lifebouys and oars overboard. To these they clung for over an hour before being picked up by a boat launched from the warship, which used Very lights. Some of the men hung on to the lifebuoys until exhausted and then sank.

brixhamrfc
25th May 2007, 09:18
Guys, I am being a little cheeky posting this here, but can anyone confirm the ex BM 145 Spartacus is at Hull. It used to be a floating exhibit at the museum, at least until 1999. Many thanks, Trev

Linda Pellatt
12th June 2007, 14:35
Hi All,

I'm from a fishing family just thought you might like to know that here in Hull we have a place called STAND.They are a small fishing musuem who have loads of info on Hull fishermen including fishermen lost at sea.You can also go aboard the "Artic Corsair"

Linda

nicolina
19th June 2007, 05:59
Cape Trafalgar was the second diesel electric trawler in Hull
Portia was the fist one.
Won the Hull Challenge Shield once as top trawler out of Hull
Skipper was John Berry

nicolina
19th June 2007, 06:09
Two skippers in Gy named Ellerby
Father and son came from Lowestoft
A.C Ellerby was the father
Do not now the sons name

nicolina
19th June 2007, 06:14
The last coalburner sailing out of Hull was Helliers Othello

gil mayes
19th June 2007, 07:18
But that was not the end of her.

OTHELLO (FD389) (1963) Last coal fired trawler to operate out of Hull
O.N. 164424. 516g 285n 173.2 x 28.6 x 14.7 feet
T.3-cyl by Amos & Smith Ltd, Hull

27.2.1937: Launched by Cochrane & Sons Ltd, Selby (Yd.No.1180) for Earl Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (Sir Alec Black, Bart, manager) as Le Tiger. 4.1937: Registered at Grimsby (GY398). 5.1937: Completed. 8.1938: Sold to Hellyer Bros Ltd, Hull. 12.1939: Sold to The Admiralty (£30,231) and converted to an anti-submarine trawler (P.No.FY.243). 24.10.1940: In Thames estuary. Rescued crew of mined (acoustic) HMS Amethyst (P. No.T.12). 3.1942: Transferred on loan to US Navy. 3.7.1942: Off US Eastern seaboard. Sunk U-boat (U.215) approx. 300 miles east of Boston and 125 miles south of Nova Scotia. 10.1942: Returned to Royal Navy. 10.1945: Sold to The Hull Ice Co Ltd, Hull. Registered at Grimsby (GY312). 11.1946: Sold to Loyal Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby. 7.1947: Renamed Regal (GY312). 9.1948: Sold to Devon Fishing Co Ltd, Hull (Mark Hellyer & Graham Hellyer, managers). Renamed Othello (H581). 1953: Sold to Hellyer Bros. Ltd, Hull (Mark Hellyer & Graham Hellyer, managers). 1963: Transferred within the Associated Fisheries Group to Wyre Trawlers Ltd, Fleetwood. Registered at Fleetwood (FD389). 1963: Condemned (never made a trip from Fleetwood). Sold to Van Heyghen Freres S.A., Ghent for demolition. 19.4.1963: Delivered Ghent.
Gil.

nicolina
19th June 2007, 07:23
In Grimsby Was An A.c.ellerby Skipper With Northerns

He Did Came From Lowestoft

Had A Son Who Also Was Trawler Skipper

treeve
27th October 2007, 22:19
Hello, Researching the trawlers that my great uncles worked on,
Please can anyone help with details of the following?
H 112 WASP working in 1910
H 721 ROMEO working 1908
H 267 NIAGARA working 1900
H 81 EXCEL working 1895
H 389 DUKE OF YORK working 1899
H 393 BUTTERFLY working 1907
H 160 DEERHOUND working 1897
Best Wishes, Raymond

gil mayes
28th October 2007, 16:40
Raymond
Have one from FMHT database.

WASP (FD169) (1912-1914) iron built
O.N. 98707. 149g 58n 100.5 x 20.5 x 10.7 feet
19??: Lengthened to ?? feet 160g
T.3-cyl by Muir & Houston Ltd, Glasgow
1891: New boiler

14.10.1890: Launched by Mackie & Thomson, Govan (Yd.No.13) for British Steam Trawling Co Ltd, Hull as Wasp. 1890: Completed. Registered at Hull (H112). 15.11.1912: Sold to James H. Marr, Fleetwood. 16.11.1912: Registered at Fleetwood (FD169). 28.6.1914: Fleetwood registry closed. 7.1914: Sold to Sven P. Larsson, Malmö for £1350. Renamed Gunnar. 1927: Laid up owners not recorded. 1928: Sold to Rob Schou, Frederickshaven, Denmark. 1929: Sold for demolition.
Gil.

treeve
28th October 2007, 18:17
Thank you very much Gil. As well as the trawlers (25 in all) that my great
uncles worked on, the loss of the Livingstone and others has fascinated me,
I would like to make this a tribute page. Best Wishes, Raymond

Kerbtrawler
29th October 2007, 10:01
H 721 / GY 735 Romeo
Off No 116127
CWG built 21/02/1903
270 GT 104 NT
Yard No 340
Owner Hellyer SF Co Hull
went to Crampins 02/08/1912
Dimensions 130 x 22
Vessel reported missing - Lost with all hands 06/11/1912

Thats all I have at the moment
Hope it helps.

Steve Farrow
29th October 2007, 11:26
Hi Raymond,
Here is a photo of the ROMEO steaming
Steve

treeve
29th October 2007, 12:46
Thank you Steve and Trevor, excellent ...
The list looked daunting, but with help like this, I am really grateful.
Best Wishes, Raymond

hulltrawler
31st October 2007, 22:04
NIAGARA H267 Built 1894 - Cochrane & Cooper Beverley

On - 105011
Yard No - 113
G - Tons - 170
Launched - 1.10.94
Completed - 10.94
Owner Thomas Hamling

Renamed - 1904 - SATANICLE

Renamed - 1910 - SEEWER

10.12.15 Crushed in ice 9nm S Gorodetsky


EXCEL H81 ?

EXCEL H1187 - Sailing Smack
On - 79449
Owners - Thomas John Boydd
Registered till 1895

EXCEL H302
Built - 1895 - Mackie & Thomson, Govan
Official - 105074
Yard 103
G Tons - 157
Owner - Great Northern Steamship Fishing Company

Sold Aberdeen 1913 - R Watson Lewis , Torry Aberdeen

HMT EXCEL II - 1915 - 1917 Admiralty



DUKE of YORK H224

1893 - Cook Welton & Gemmell

ON - 102926

Yard - 105

Launched - 12.9.93

Length Ft 100.8

Breadth Ft 20.7


Tons Gross - 150

Hp - 58

Owners - 1893 Richard Simpson
1902 London & Yorkshire Steam Trawling & fish Carrying Co Ltd Hull

DUKE of YORK CF2 - Owners - 1904 Cardiff

DUKE of YORK A422 - Owners - 1911 Aberdeen

09 02 1917 Sunk by Submarine


BUTTERFLY H393

1898 - Cook Welton & Gemmell Hull

On - 109026
Yard - 201
Launched - 10 / 02 / 1898
Completed - 16/ 05 / 1898
Length Ft - 110.0
Breadth Ft - 21.0
Tons Gross - 182
Tons Net - 68
Hp - 58HP

1898 - 1912 British Steam Fishing Co Ltd Hull


1912 Sold Holland Re- registered - POSEIDON
Scrapped 1936


DEERHOUND H81
1889 -Cook Welton & Gemmell
On - 95815
Yard - 40
Launched
Completed
Length ft - 100.7
Breadth Ft - 20.9
Tons Gross - 140
Net - 60
Owner 1889 - 1900 Humber Steam Trawling Co Ltd

15 Feb 1900 Foundered North Sea in great gale which resulted in the loss of 4 other Hull trawlers.

Regards Chris

treeve
31st October 2007, 23:08
Many thanks Chris, again, I am indebted to you.
The Excel H81 was what you so very kindly gave me when
I was enquiring about my great uncle's trawler crew records.
Best Wishes, Raymond

hulltrawler
1st November 2007, 00:02
I will check Excel again and let you know
regards chris.

It was the Excel H1187 George Forward was on must have had a tissy fit when I sent you the details

boulton
8th November 2007, 13:37
As we have a Grimsby and Lowestoft thread, I think we must have a Hull one. So come on boys - get posting!


A relative with strong family connections to the fishing industry in Hull, recently directed me towards the following web-site,

www.hulltrawler.net

The chap responsible for this web-site modestly declares,

“I am not a historian or a politician and probably by my writing you will note, I am neither a scholar. My aim is to provide the material on this site, that I have gained in my own research and interest, and that kindly provided by others“.

He continues,

“The site will continue to change and grow so please come back often, I will welcome any contributions of information or photo’s etc, which will enable the site to portray a truer more accurate account of the history and families the site is dedicated to“.

I have found the site totally absorbing, as I imagine will others contributing to this thread.

treeve
8th November 2007, 14:08
Hello boulton, I am sure that Chris - modest as he is, will appreciate your kind comments - have a look at the gentleman who posted previously to yours.

Thanks Chris for the update on the Excel, appreciated. Best Wishes, Raymond

hulltrawler
8th November 2007, 16:03
Hi Boulton and Treeve
Many thanks for your comments, I am in the total picture of all this a newcommer, but like yourselfs find the whole subject of the fishing industry enthralling.

The upmost credits must go to many people like members of this forum and the site who have supplied information and set me on the right course. While the whole process is a learning curve, often of mistakes. If I can go some way to preserve some of our fishing heritage in one accecable place for our future families and generations it is my pleasure to be a part of that.

Regards Chris.

fishdockroad
8th November 2007, 16:07
Hi all,

recently acquired the ships bell off the Arctic freebooter. Dont know if theres anyone on here who may of sailed on her?

boulton
9th November 2007, 16:17
If I can go some way to preserve some of our fishing heritage in one accecable place for our future families and generations it is my pleasure to be a part of that.

Regards Chris.

Chris, thank you. It is appreciated.

birgir
22nd November 2007, 21:26
Ship-owning families in Hull.

A long time ago, I heard a lecturer say that in order to study the history of (Icelandic) fishing industry, you had to study genealogy.

I just received data about the Neptune Steam Fishing company of Hull from Richard Nielsen. It seems that the founder was one Thomas Hamling, who was the major shareholder until his death, sometime before 1909. The bulk of his shares seem to have gone to the wife of one John Robinson, who was the company secretary. A guess would be that he was Hamling´s son-in-law. A John Robinson is listed in Lloyds 1925 as a shipowner, but in Grimsby. Was he a member the Grimsby Robinson family.

Among other shareholders were Arthur Hudson, (any connection to Hudson Brothers?).

Lloyds lists nobody as owner of Hamling´s (like Marsden for Consols). So who were behind that company? I notice that Thomas Hamling & Co, grows big, only after the disappearance of Neptune in 1919.

hulltrawler
23rd November 2007, 01:45
It is a long haul but you are right if you wish to study a history of the fishing industry genealogy plays a big part.

John Robinson married Harriett Ann Hamling in 1883 in Hull, John Robinson - Son in Law - was the executor when Neptune steam fishing Co went into liquidation in 1918. So I persume he was the chairman of the company at that time. I have only just started to research this aspect of the industry so am a little vague.

Thomas Hamling was a prominent smack owner and purchased his first steam trawler in 1886. He owned many vessels of which he was the sole owner till his death on 28 Sept 1903

Neptune Steam fishing co seems to have been founded in 1900, and was liquidated as above.

Both Arthur Hudson and John Robinson where listed as owners of several vessels each, but they must have been managers of the vessels as they all came under the Neptune Steam fishing Co Umbrella.

Thomas Hamling & Co a seperate company was formed around 1907 and several vessels where registered under the management of the secretary E Batchelor.

I still need to find evidence of these companies but it seems although Thomas Hamling may have been the money behind Neptune Steam fishing it was John Robinson and Arthur Hudson who where the controlling members.

I persume Neptune steam fishing co was liquidated to merge it into Thomas Hamling & Co making it a larger concern under the directorship of :
E Batchelor.
John Robinson
Arthur Hudson

Whilst Thomas Charles Hudson was the owner of several vessels from around 1912 it would not be till the end of WWII that Hudson Brothers became a major company, again I need further research on this company.

chris

Richard Nielsen
23rd November 2007, 15:32
Cape Trafalgar was the second diesel electric trawler in Hull
Portia was the fist one.
Won the Hull Challenge Shield once as top trawler out of Hull
Skipper was John Berry

Here is a link to footage of the Cape Trafalgar c.1957.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EswF9uq4NHo

Its not amazing quality because it has been transfered from cine to video to dvd. I have footage of the launch which I will post when I find it.

Richard

birgir
23rd November 2007, 22:31
Chris.

In the data sent by Richard Nielsen about the Neptune company, there is a list of shareholders on three occasions, 1899, 1904, and 1909. The shares were originally 2000, each for ten pounds, but later 2112. With the first list, there is a recorded agreement that Thomas Hamling sells the company the steam trawler Nile, and gets part of the payment in shares, at double value, (6200 pounds worth of shares for 3100 pounds. )
In the agreement Hamling is expressly named the "promoter" of the company.
Hamling held 650 of the original 2000 shares, his wife, daughter, and son-in law 100 each, total 950. Arthur Hudson "fish salesman" held 100 shares.
I do not see a mr Batchelor among the shareholders.
In the last list of shareholders, a John Edward Hamling, skipper, holds 50 shares.
The Neptune company had a trawler named Thomas Hamling built in 1903. It seems that up to the end of WW1, the Neptune and Thomas Hamling & Co. were run concurrently, like Yorkshire,and Pickering and Haldane, or Hellyer and Imperial.
After that, the Neptune seems to have been wound up, and the owners concetrated on Thomas Hamling & Co, until the 1930 when affiliated companies start to emerge. (e.g. the Firth steamship company.)
I wonder about the St. Andrews company. They seem to have a similar naming policy. (Minor saints). A connection?

Birgir Thorisson

nicolina
24th November 2007, 11:19
Hallo Richard Nielsen:
Any chance that you are related to skipper Kenneth Nielsen of Cape Trafalgar???

If so your Grand Father was also a skipper. What was his name

And did the family originally come from Denmark ???

Richard Nielsen
24th November 2007, 13:40
Kenneth Nielsen was my grandfather.

His father, Arthur Nielsen, was a skipper, but I don't think he fished after about 1930. His grandfather (Niels K. Nielsen) moved from Denmark to fish from Hull.

Richard

birgir
24th November 2007, 16:08
Richard Nielsen

Did your great-great-grandfather move to Hull via Iceland? There was a mr N.K.Nielsen in Hull in 1900, who had some years previously resided in Flateyri, Önundarfjörður, as partner in the danish? company "Islandsk Exportforretning". (Icelandic Export company) I wonder if that had anything to do with danish experiments with "snurrevaad", which took place there at the end of the 19th century?

Birgir Thorisson

Richard Nielsen
24th November 2007, 20:42
He came to Hull and then, I believe, went to Iceland to work for Andrew Johnson (the owner of Andrew Johnson Knudtzon). I have not managed to find him on the 1901 census so I don't know for certain what he did from about 1893-1903. His son Arthur was born in Iceland but I don't know how to get documentation.
Any information you could provide about "Islandsk Exportforretning". (Icelandic Export company) would be most welcome.

Thank you,
Richard

birgir
24th November 2007, 21:32
Richard.

Unfortunately I have no information regarding it. I only ran into the reference to your ancestor in connection to the infamous "Royalist" incident in Dyrafjordur in 1899, when three icelanders were drowned when the local sheriff attempted to arrest st. Royalist for illegal fishing. There was a great uproar about, and your ancestor found it necessary to write to the local paper in Isafjörður to explain that he should not be confused with skipper Nilson of the Royalist.

Knudtzon was a well known and established merchant firm in Copenhagen with a trading station in Reykjavík, and other places in the south-western part. Never heard of connection to either the western fiords, or the name Andrew Johnson, but the danish fishing experiments (snurrevaad, I can´t recall the english term, danish seine perhaps?) around the turn of the 20th century are little recorded in local sources, because they seem to have been extraneous to the local economy.

Birgir Thorisson

hulltrawler
25th November 2007, 14:21
Hi richard
Niels was prominent in Hull from 1886 and Skippered several vessels for Andrew Johnson who was associated with Anglo Norwegian Steam fishing co Hull prior to his move to Thomas Hamling and the neptune vessels. as far as I can see there is little break in his fishing career upto 1913 from Hull.
There seem to be a strong link to the agerskows sailing for them or with them on many of the earlier vessels. Will send more by e mail

regards chris.

Longdistancevoyager
25th November 2007, 14:29
I went "pleasuring" in 1962 on the D B Finn ,it`s what decided me to go to Trinity House , and as the deckie learner told me, get on big boats son, so I did !!!!

AGM

tenterden
27th November 2007, 13:37
hello richard
there are a couple of photos of tom nielson in the book HULL & GRIMSBY STERN TRAWLING FLEET 1961-88 is he a part of your family -- jerry

Richard Nielsen
27th November 2007, 18:59
No, I don't think so- I haven't heard of a Tom. Thanks for asking though!

billblow
3rd December 2007, 20:22
Benvolio Imperialist and Lorenzo although Hellyer one time registered to the Northern Fishing Co (Hull) Ltd (Mark & Graham Hellyer) What funnel marking did they carry? Hellyer Bros Ltd white H on blue flag on yellow funnel with black top or two red bands on buff funnel with black top for Northern Fishing Co (Hull)

Steve Farrow
4th December 2007, 10:30
On the excellent TV series Long Way Down did anyone recognise the wrecked stern trawler on the Skeleton Coast? She didn't appear to have been there very long and looked remarkably like an ex- Marr vessel.
Any ideas?

Steve

nicolina
4th December 2007, 14:11
Hallo Tenterden
Skipper Tom Nielsen was Secretary of the Hull Trawler Officiers Guild
Dont know of any trawlers he was skipper on.
An Charlie Nielsen sailed as skipper with the Kingston Company and skipper on
Kingston Galena+Onyx+Agate+Peridot+Sapphire. Was also on the Cape Crozier.
Another relative Richard ???

tenterden
4th December 2007, 16:39
steve
i did not see the long way down programme,but if you look at FLICKR. COM and type in (fishing trawler wreck swakopmund nambia ) there is a stern trawler i think it could be the ARCTIC CHALLENGER or ARCTIC RIEVER it is the same class of ship, the photo was taken on the 17-2-2007, the JUNELLA H249 built 1975 ran aground in argentina and became a total loss i have got some photos of her getting dismantled off the net do you want me to post them for all to see ---jerry

aavh
4th December 2007, 16:57
This looks like Arctic Challenger ( Riever scrapped 1998 in Grena ) last known to me as
" Skouda Jour " a Norwegian Siesmic Guard Vessel. I believe that only two of these vessels were built.

Steve Farrow
5th December 2007, 14:56
I know Terry Taylor re-named her the Onward Challenger and she had a London registration but what became of her I don't know
Steve

hulltrawler
22nd December 2007, 14:33
For a good christmas read

THE FISHING EXPLORER - Last visit to the Gaul by Ernie Suddaby has now been released and is available at Hull Maritime museum and bookshops and also available online at
http://www.maritimeinfouk.com/

ARCTIC APPRENTICE - By Rob Ellis can also be purchased in bookshops and is of his life at sea from 15 to been skipper of many Hull Trawlers.

Regards Chris

RayJordandpo
22nd December 2007, 16:31
Chris,
Looking forward to reading them both, especially 'Arctic Apprentice' as I am
told Rob Ellis gives a good insight into the life of trawlermen and their families ashore as well as at sea, or at least as it was when the fishing industry was thriving.

lollie
12th January 2008, 20:32
hi, i have recently join this site. going through the forums i found your thread about the arctic feebooter, was this the same trawler that went under the name of lord shackleton, if it is my brother sailed on her.

sam2182sw
13th January 2008, 14:18
yes that is the one i have photo of her and i will post them on the site sam

tenterden
13th January 2008, 19:05
the ARCTIC FREEBOOTER H362 built 1966, was sold to stanley, witte, boyd.
on the 9th july 1987, after a refit she sailed for the falklands on the 1st december 1987, she was later used as a dive salvage ship,she was scrapped on the 21 - 9 - 04 in india

lollie
14th January 2008, 17:29
when the freebooter went to the falkland isles, did she go fishing for about 6 months, if this is right ship my brother was on her, i was wondering if anyone as any photos of the crew as i would be interested in looking at them

mattarosa
12th March 2008, 18:02
A couple of weeks ago, I saw a little pocket book for sale on ebay. I noticed someone from the USA asked whether the seller would post it there and I didn't like the thought that a little piece of our history would leave our shores so easily, so I bid on it and I won. I have attached thumbnails to show you what it is like. It is quite tiny, leather covered and bearing the initials G.N.R. and it still has the little pencil.

Inside are pencil-written notes recording a voyage from Hull to Iceland on a trawler in 1922. I don't know the name of the trawler and I don't know if it is mentioned later on as I have only transcribed about half of the notebook. I have not yet found any clues to the person who wrote the notes, but he seems to have been travelling with a person called Charlie Wells. I don't think the writer was a fisherman, though I could be wrong. He seems a bit more like a tourist.

I wondered whether you all might be interested in these notes. I will post the first day's notes and you can let me know what you think. Please note there is hardly any punctuation in the notes. I have put in punctuation to try and make sense of it, but I might not have always put it in the right place. I haven't been able to trace all the place names, especially the ones in Iceland, perhaps one of our members from Iceland will recognise the names from the bits I have transcribed. There are here and there a couple of words I can't figure out, but mostly it is intelligible. I think this person's personality and humour are still quite vivid after 85 years.

I will post the first day after this message, and if anyone would like to hear more, I would be glad to share.

Hilary

mattarosa
12th March 2008, 18:19
August 25th 1922

Left Grantham 9.30 am Arrd Doncaster 10.40 and Hull 12.10. Taxi to Pier Hotel. Boat in river right opposite waiting. Board 12.50. Set sail 1.10. Passd Grimsby 2.10. Raining. Had some champion soup and boiled beef. Spurn Point 3.0. Sick 3.30 pm to 4.30 pm. Wells on couch all afternoon. Went to tea at 6 pm but had to leave it early sick again – no tea, had a biscuit. Passd Flamboro Head 7.45 pm. Lovely sunset. Wells sick. Passed Flamboro 8pm beautiful sunset Charlie too bad to look. Went to bed 9 pm. Charlie bit better. I am alright. Captain a bit white under the gills – several now sick.

Steve Farrow
12th March 2008, 20:01
Great stuff Hilary...........please continue with the trip as I'm sure so many of us will give a wry smile as as memories of our early 'Pleasure Trips' come flooding back, some good and some bad!

Regards
Steve

mattarosa
12th March 2008, 21:12
Here we go, Steve...

August 26th Saturday

Charlie wanted the poe (or pot?) 1.30 am as he had to go outside. Sea very rough as good as being in a swing boat. Charlie is a ?beggar to snore. Got up 6am. Very stormy – Charlie very bad – I was not very grand had to shoot the cat at 6.30. Passed Berwick 7.45 sea still rough. Just had some bread and cheese and coffee took a lot of getting down can’t smoke yet. 9.30 am just been down below to see Charlie he is very bad yet I feel better but am as white as a sheet, sea coming over the end of ship. 10.40 am Charlie much better and sea much calmer. Charlie on the bridge now but he don’t want any food yet – nor me. Sun out grand but very cold wind. 1.30 am much calmer Charlie and I had a leg of chicken each no bread or salt think it has done us good. Only seen two ships today. 1230 pm Charlie gone below to change. Shall be glad when we can have a wash, not had one since left home and shan’t do yet if the waves don’t drop a bit now. 3 pm not washed yet too rough. Just had two ships biscuits. Charlie still sick. 4 pm we are all well. 6 pm sighted Scotland first land since passing Flamboro last night. Wind changed. 6.30 pm had first wash. First meal 6.45 pm passed Aberdeen 7 pm feeling like regular sailors. Boat riding champion. 7.15 pm first pipe of bacca since left Hull. 7.40 pm passed Buccaness and saw a train running. 9.5 pm passed Peterhead saw a very large crane that had been xxxx? 10 pm raining. Went to bed.

Aug 27th Sunday

Head wind fine. Got up at 3.45 am so we could see the north of Scotland passed Ness Head on left Pentland Skerries on right Duncansby Head on left Swonna on right Stroma and John O’Groats on left. 4.45 Kentick Head the entrance to Scaffa (Scapa?) Flow. 5.0 Dunnett Head. Lloys [Lloyds] signal station on left. Hoy Head and Old Man of Hoy on the right. We ?entranced to the Atlantic. 5.30 am saw a thresher shark – Charlie and I had a good breakfast at 7 am. Sausages and chops. Very big rollers in Atlantic but more comfortable than North Sea. 9.15 am Sule Skerry Lighthouse last point we shall see before reaching Iceland – Goodbye – 360 mile from Spurn Point. 9.30 am ?go by Nth. Fixing nets all day – began to blow hard 10 pm ship rolling very much. Shaved today, only saw 2 ships all day – we were close behind one that left Hull 4 hours before us. [470 miles from Hull Bed 10 pm crossed out] had to put box at Charlie’s feet to keep him from sliding out of bed. Sea very rough. Wind blowing a gale.

davetodd
12th March 2008, 21:40
Please carry on Hilary.
Great adventure story.
Regards
Dave

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 02:23
Monday 28th
Although sea very rough we had a good sleep. Charlie woke us up at 5 am snoring like a pig. We are all very sorry for Mrs Wells. Ham and eggs for breakfast in captain’s cabin. Lovely. 9.30 am 570 miles from Hull – sea getting a bit more reasonable. We felt champion. First time I could wash my teeth owing to bad weather. 9.30 am Bond opened. Milk very thick diluted with rum. Captain’s suggestion. Case opened to determine the peculiar noise by the Chief Engineer. We could not find where the noise came from without the aid of hammer and chisel. Captain [I or J?] started to grow a scrubbing brush tash. Wells to cabin at 10 am to make beds and general clean up. 12 pm dinner. 5 Charlie very fond of milk Full up. Tea cancelled till 6pm Charlie had to go forward 10 pm blowing hard got his bottom wet again, had to take his boots and stockings off to back through the water. Very rough. Captain stopped the ship so as to make it possible for him to get back to the bridge. Bed 10.20 pm very rough night did not get much sleep. Mother never rocked us like this ship does.

Tuesday 29th
Got up 6.15 am very rough. Charlie had to go forward and got wet again. His backside was never so clean since Mother finished with him. 7 am Breakfast bacon and tomatoes – we can eat like horses and feel quite fit. Charlie makes a good cabin boy. Beautiful whale close to ship 9 am Jolly good job we did not run into him. Getting foggy. Sea bit calmer. 9.35 am Log 784 miles from Hull. Fog gone, but getting very cold, lovely air. Not seen any ships since Sunday. 2.25 Iceland in sight. Mountains covered in snow. Passed Portland 6.45 All snow. Lovely sunshine. Shot trawl 9.20 pm Iceland time 11.0 pm sun set 11.55 pm. Trawl set and caught fish for breakfast a bout 18 cwt. Charlie could not wait till morning so the boatswain cooked some for supper. Bed 12 am English time. Blowing hard.

Wednesday August 30th
Very rough. 6.30am passed Racaness [?Reykjanes]. Saw steam rising from the hot springs. Skipper very anxious at this point. Very dangerous in bad weather. 8.35 am passing Faxa Bay all men say this is exceptional weather for this time of year. Passed first ship since Sunday 27th. This is a lonely sea and must be terrible in winter time. The sea birds are the sailors only companions and it is good to see how they love them. 9.30 am 975 m from Hull. The ship just parted a little black duck from her brood of little ones, it seemed wonderful how they got together again through the big waves, the spray at this time was reaching above the bridge and struck the windows like a lot of gravel. 9.45 am abreast of Snaefell 4710 ft high. 1.30 pm heavy gale waves washing over bridge. Heating apparatus turned on 2.30 pm. Owing to storm anchored in ?Road Sand Bay 7.40 pm. 1043 miles from Hull.

hughesy
13th March 2008, 07:53
Thats a "great find" you got there love. Liked that line "first pipe of bacca since left Hull"
all the best
Hughesy

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 09:14
Thursday Aug 31st
Gale still blowing. 2 more vessels arrived during the night. We are all busy feeding the gulls with scraps. It is good to see how the men love them. We are anchored in front of perpendicular rocks. They are 1 mile away but they look about 200 yards away. They are covered in snow, wind blowing from East, very cold. Just had a shave, wind cuts face like a knife. Breakfast off cods tongues. Lovely. Time here 2 hours in advance of Grantham. 1 pm sea still running very high. 2 pm 2 more ships arrived. 10 pm anchor weighed, Captain going to try and run to Adlavik? this is midnight here and sun shining lovely.

Friday Sept 1st
1113 miles from Hull. 2.50 am saw the Northern Lights in the sky, this is caused by the reflection of the sun on the ice. 7am arrived at Adlavik? all the rocks covered with ice and snow. Started to fish at 7.20 am first haul 9.30 am comprising of Plaice, Cat Fish, Cod Fish, Soles, Haddocks, Halibuts about 30 cwt in all.

Place 5 4 3½ 2
Haddock 21 17 14 14
Codling 17 13 12 10
Hallibut ½ ½ ½

Total


Plaice 2 5 2 2½ 21
Had 8 30 12 6 122
Cod 7 10 17 13 99
But ½ ½ ½ 3

Finish of 24 hours catch. Total before shifting grounds.
Plaice 23½
Cod 86
Had 116
But 3____
228½

Written in margin “7 ton ½”

Sea has been a dead calm since arriving this morning. Sun quite hot, best day we have had. It seems funny to see so much snow and ice with a hot blazing sun on. It is also a treat to know we may not be swamped any minute.

Sat Sept 2nd

Fine. Shifted to fresh grounds near North Cape. Danish gun boat ?D.O.R. (possibly D.G.R) visited us at 9 am. Good job we were outside the limit. We are now a long way up in the Arctic regions.

Cod 6 22 10 12 10 27 15
Had 8 4 1 20 20 43 20
Place 3 2 1 2 1 6 1
But x x 1 1 2 3
Cat x X 11 10 11 36 16

1 lot of fish lost. Trawl broke.

Cod 102
Had 116
Place 16
Cat 84
Buts __7_
328

This being Saturday and market day Charlie had an afternoon off and went to bed for the afternoon poor chap. Bed 10 pm. Big swell on. Total catch 328 Baskets.

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 09:16
Some of the formatting of the tables has been lost in the last posting, but I hope the info is still understandable. I am not sure our writer can always add up - it's either him or me!

I am really hoping someone can help me with the place names. I have tried to find them in Google but without much luck in some cases. It would be interesting to be able to follow this journey on a map.

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 10:23
I just finished the transcription, so I thought I might as well post the rest in one go. I suppose it will make quite a big post. Hope I am not boring anyone, but I think this little notebook is fascinating. Just wish we knew the name of the trawler. He mentions Captain Leighton. Does anyone know of him, and what trawler he might have skippered in 1922?

Right at the end, I found the signature of the person who wrote these notes. It looks like H G Pearce to me, but I attach a thumb of the page, and I stand to be corrected. I have Googled and there seem to be Pearces in Grantham. I wonder, because of the GNR on the notebook, and also the exact train times he gives for his return journey, whether he was a railwayman, or whether a railwayman (father? grandfather?) gave him the notebook?

By the end of the story, we learn quite a bit about HGP (as I will call him, now).

- He lives in Grantham.
- Has a friend called Charlie Wells, who is married.
- Seems like an adult to me, not a child.
- Likes plums and cods tongues (not together!)
- Likes birds?
- Has a nice sense of humour.

I wonder if we will ever learn more about him, but even if we don't, I am very happy to have read the notes he made aboard a Hull trawler in 1922.

Hilary

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 10:25
Sept 3rd Sunday

Shifted to Straumness. Bit foggy. All on board well. Men appear to be getting tired.

Place 2½ 2 2 1 3 1 3 12
Cod 9 9 8 8 7 3 3 8 57
Cat 28 18 12 5 16 3 10 22 114
Had 13 20 17 7 21 1 12 23 115
Buts 1 1 1 3

Place 13 But 3
Cod 52
Cat 114
Had 115

Total 298

6 pm shifted to new grounds. 7.30 arrived North Cape. Very rough. 1243 miles from Hull.

Sept 4th Monday

Back as Adlavik? Very rough weather. 10 am gale worse running for shelter. Men continually in water, waist of ship full. I got thrown down today first time, had many narrow escapes. Hope all plums don’t get blown off trees before I come home. We have passed many islands and they are completely bare except a kind of moss. 2.45 pm arrived Adlavik? and anchored close to the rocks. We have had an awful day up to now.

Cod 3 4 3 3 3 17
Plaice 3 1 2 1 1 8
Had 7 9 13 12 17 58
Cat 3 1 18 27 23 72
But 2 1 3

Cleared out at 9 pm and ran to and fished in Isafiord. Wind dropped but very heavy swell. Bed 10.30 pm.

Sept 5th Tuesday

Heavy swell, shifted from Isafiord to North Cape. Heavy swell.


Plaice 1 1 5 8
Cod 9 9 10 90 112
Had 6 7 13 110 136
Cat 10 14 20 54
But 1 1
Total 316

Total catch 316 Baskets. Heavy gale all night. Could not run for shelter owing to fog. 70 baskets fish washed overboard. Men continually soaked in water.

Sept 6 Wednesday

7 am Gale blowing away. Sea much calmer, now off Flotavik fishing. Icy winds.

Plaice 3 2 1 3
Cod 7 7 9 99 28
Had 22 18 10 1215 2525
Cat 10 9 6 1613 1110
But 1

Ling 307 (could be 30)
Place 16
Cod 55 266
Had 127
Cat _68
266

9 am Sea calm but very cold. 2 pm Sun out for a little while and quite grand, first time we have seen it since Saturday. Lovely day. It seems funny after the gales.

Sept 7th Thursday

Still fishing at Adlavik? Sea calm but very cold.
Total
Plaice 5 4 1 3 4 4 4 25
Cod 6 7 5 9 10 10 8 55
Had 21 14 3 9 12 10 12 78
Cat 9 7 3 6 4 14 32
Buts 1 1 2

Total 224

Sept 8th Friday

Still fishing at Adlavik? Heavy sea but nice day. Sun very bright but still top-coat weather.

P 5 2 2 3 12
Cod 14 9 18 12 53
H 23 14 7 8 52
Cat 10 4 6 4 24
But 1 shark

Finished fishing 7.20 pm at Adlavik?. Left for Hull 7.45

Total catch
(in margin) 12 big halibuts
21 Barrells of liver

Plaice 114
Cod 566
Haddock 798
Cats 431
Big Halibut 12

Total 1921

And 1 big shark, the liver of which weighed 6 stones. Wind began to blow at 9 pm, expect we are in for a bad passage home. No sleep up to midnight.

Sept 9th Saturday

Very rough all night, also fog. Ship stopped at 2 am to enable captain to take bearings. No body got any sleep. Charlie off his feed. 3 pm fog cleared but seas very high. It is a wonder the ship don’t break in half. The nip in the air is not so keen now we are running south. Rough seas still running. Bed 10 pm.

Sept 10th Sunday

Been very rough all night. Engines broke down at 11.45 am when in middle of the Atlantic. Put right 12.30 pm. Captain wants to catch Thursday’s market but the weather and delay is worrying him. He thinks we shall lose the tide.

Sept 11th Monday

Much rougher, deck always under water, lot of fog, shall be glad when we can get out of cabin and stretch our legs. Losing our appetites. Not had a wash since Saturday, getting a long beard.

Sept 12th Tuesday

Roughest night we have had. Passed Cape Wrath Lighthouse 6.30 am, we were then abreast of the mountains and got a smoother passage, sun shone 9 am quite a treat to be able to get on deck, we have not seen the sun since last Thursday, not been round deck since Friday. Had a shave. First land we have seen since Friday night. Passed Dunnet Head and the Orkneys at 12 pm, signalled to the lighthouse who will telegraph us on to Hull which we expect to arrive on Thursday. 1.45 pm passed the Pentland Firth. It was a treat to see green fields again. North Sea is much calmer than the Atlantic. Bed 8.30 pm.
Sept 13th Wednesday

Had the best nights sleep since been on board. Dull day, no wind, sea calm. 1.30 pm 100 miles from Hull. Passing Whitby 8.30 pm. The lights look lovely, should have liked to get out and have a walk on the prom. 9.30 pm Scarboro looked beautiful.

Thursday Sept 14th

Up at 1.30 am. Entered the river at 3 am. Changed my clothes, this was the first time I had my clothes off since Saturday August 26th. 6.30 am passing Grimsby. Lot of vessels in river waiting for coal. 8.15 am arrd St Andrews Dock Hull, waiting for tide to get inside. We had to fairly creep up the river owing to thick fog. Inside Dock Gates 9.15 am. Landed at the Fish Dock 9.35 am. First basket of fish landed 9.53 am. 169 ton of fish. Had a grand lunch with Captain Leighton at the Pier Hotel 1.30 pm. Left Hull 2.50 arrd Doncaster 3.52 pm. Left 4.56. Arrd Gm 6 pm. 3 ship load of fish condemned on arrival owing to boats being storm bound.

H G Pearce ???
Sept 14th 1922

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 10:30
Well, that is the end of my story. I hope you enjoyed it. Unfortunately, some of the tables did not turn out well in the post, hope this does not spoil your enjoyment.

Bye for now.
Hilary

hughesy
13th March 2008, 11:04
Thanks for posting this, very interesting read. He was a good writer this fella?
Like you say a good sense of humour. The lights would good homeward bound?
all the best
Hughesy

trotterdotpom
13th March 2008, 11:42
Great stuff, Hilary - well done for getting hold of the diary.

GNR and Charlie must have been special guests on board - picked up at the Pier Hotel (presumeably Corporation Pier) and partaking of rum and milk with the Skipper - not to mention cods' tongues, yum! Definitely no ordinary pleasure trippers.

Portland is at the southern tip of Iceland (I thought it an unusual name, not very Nordic is it?) and Snaefel is a mountain visible from the southeast of the country, so I assume the ship went east-about to the North Cape.

Is it possible that the initials DGR could be DGB? That would make your guess at "Danish Gun Boat" correct as Iceland was a Danish colony until 1944.

You got it right about Charlie wanting the poe - when I was a kid we called the toilet the "poe". That's the first time I've seen it written down though. Also the term "champion" takes me back - my father used to say it all the time and once in a blue moon I find myself saying it. I might see if I can bring the term back to life.

GNR seems to have got it wrong about the Northern Lights - nothing to do with the sun reflecting off the ice buyt maybe that's what they thought back in 1922.

Looking forward to the next episode. Thanks.

John T.

trotterdotpom
13th March 2008, 11:49
You added your last post while I was composing mine, Hilary. Thanks for that.

Good thinking about the railway connection - obviously the diary was printed for the Great Northern Railway (GNR) - I just looked it up and the company became part of the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) in 1923 - good timing.

Thanks for posting the story.

John T.

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 14:07
[QUOTE=trotterdotpom;197805]

Is it possible that the initials DGR could be DGB? That would make your guess at "Danish Gun Boat" correct as Iceland was a Danish colony until 1944.

Hi John
Glad you enjoyed the diary.

The notes actually say Danish Gun Boat and then the initials. It makes a lot of sense that it would be D.G.B. although the B in Boat is quite different than the R (I think) after D.G. Still, this is probably what he meant. I keep wondering where these notes were written, it must have been quite hard to concentrate with the rough seas and the heavy swell.

Thanks for the help with the names as well. I did wonder about Portland as it does not sound particularly Scandinavian. I've been poring over maps of Iceland, the North Cape etc and there are some wonderful and exotic names. Portland sounded just a bit ordinary! Snaefel actually sounds a bit Scottish as well, doesn't it?

Hilary

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 14:09
[QUOTE=trotterdotpom;197810]

Thanks for posting the story.

It was my pleasure, John, and I feel now the information is preserved and shared where it might prove useful to someone. I have nothing against America or Americans, but I felt a small warm glow at having kept this little diary within our own shores.

Hilary

nicolina
13th March 2008, 15:31
Regarding skipper Leighton:
In his Biography Icelandic Skipper Trygvi Òfeigsson has this about skipper Leighton.
He was one of Hellyers top skippers and took the Goth out when she was built in 1925 .
His name was William Leighton and some time when he left for fishing in a trawler he used to play tunes with the steam wistle his favorite tune was:
Little girl come sing with me:
But the Dock Authoreties did put an end to this.
He had hoses in both Hull and Scarborough.
This person could well be an candidate to above mentioned skipper!!!

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 16:41
Thank you, Nicolina. I wonder if he had a scrubbing brush tash (moustache)?

I also found a skipper Mr J F Leighton of the Junella, which was arrested by the Icelandic gunboat Thor for alleged fishing in territorial waters on or about 25 March 1958. Perhaps some relation? I see Leighton as a fishing family name on the Hull Trawlers site. Perhaps Chris P will be able to tell us more about them next time he is on site.

I really liked the story about playing the tune. I think some of the trawler skippers were real characters from what I have read.

Hilary

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 17:04
I see from Chris's site that a G H Leighton was skipper of Dayspring H893 in Dec 1893. This is beginning to look like a dynasty!

There is also an Ann Leighton, aged 11, of Goole, a sailor's orphan, in the Port Of Hull Societys Orphan Home Park Street in 1891.

A Leighton, Thomas William, master mariner, at 30 Albany Street, Hull in 1892.

and these

LEIGHTON - WILLIAM GOTH . .
. . .
LEIGHTON JOHN . F JAMES BARRIE . .
JUNELLA

which must be Nicolina's Leighton and the later one I found.

There is so much information on the Hull Trawlers site, I never get to the end of it.

davetodd
13th March 2008, 17:25
Fascinating account Hilary.
I'm sure the author wrote down what he heard, so can I submit the following as a possible area he was fishing in? For what it's worth.
Racaness could be Reykjanes, the South West promontary of Iceland.
Faxa Bay ....Faxafloi or Faxafjord just to the North of Reykjanes
....Sand bay?
Adalin might be Adlavik, but not too sure about this.
North Cape is North cape.
Stroumness is Straumness
?sefjord probably Isafjordur
Flotavig probably Flotavik.
Adlevig probably Adlavik.

Seems that Skipper Leighton knew his way around West Iceland and to catch that amount of fish in 20 days is proves he knew where and when to catch it.

No mention of passage via the Faroe islands, straight to North Cape and back again.

Well done to the crew and to Hilary for sharing this.


Best Regards
Dave

Roger Griffiths
13th March 2008, 21:28
Hello Hilary,
Thanks for taking the time and trouble to transcribe this unique document, a very interesting read indeed.


regards
Roger

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 21:30
Dave
This is all really helpful and I am sure you are on the right lines. I will check with the text and make corrections.

I just decipered the two unreadable words before the milk with rum in it (Monday 28th). I am pretty sure it says "Bond opened". Does that make sense? Is it something to do with accessing the rum when a certain distance from port? (I am guessing).

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 21:33
[QUOTE=Roger Griffiths;197955]Hello Hilary,
Thanks for taking the time and trouble to transcribe this unique document, a very interesting read indeed.

Hi Roger
I think documents like this are important. Future historians will have what past historians rarely had. History from the point of view of ordinary people. Everyone has been very supportive and interested in my little project, so I am very glad I did it.

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 22:28
I have found a William Leighton on the 1901 census in Hull, living at number 42 Tyne Street, with a wife and 5 kids. His age is 35. His occupation is Fisherman (sea) Master. For anyone who knows Hull (which I don't) this is in the civil parish of Sculcoates and the ecclesiastical parish of Newington St John the Baptist.

Could he be our Skipper Leighton? He would be 56 in 1922.

mattarosa
13th March 2008, 22:47
I also found a Hector G Pearce, age 1, in Denton near Grantham (looks a lovely place) but unfortunately, his father, George, is not a railwayman but an ironstone labourer. So I think I better stop trying to be Sherlock Holmes and think about having an early night.

trotterdotpom
14th March 2008, 04:22
Yes, Hilary, the "Bond" was where the booze was kept and because it was duty free, it was sealed by Customs when the ship was in port. It wasn't supposed to be opened until the ship was at sea (outside the three mile limit, I think). If the ship had to return to port for some reason, without having reached the three mile limit, if the seal on the Bond was broken there would be big trouble.

On trawlers the Skipper owned the bond and sold cigarettes and other goodies to the crew. In Grimsby trawlers it could be an Aladdin's Cave of booze, fags, chocolates, etc, but from my very short experience on a Hull trawler, I seem to recall that the alcohol was very limited. That's not to say that the situation was the same way back in 1922 of course.

I'm sure Dave is right about the ship going up the west coast to Isafjord and the North Cape, steaming up the east coast would have been and odd way to go after being off Portland. I'm curious to know whether Snaefel would have been visible though as the mountain is in the east of Iceland. I wonder if it could have been Mt Hekla, the volcano, he could see?

I'm not sure if the word "fell" is used in Scotland, but it certainly is in the Lake District and the Pennines - Scafell in Cumbria is the highest mountain in England. The word comes from the old Norse for "mountain" - those Vikings certainly got about.

Good luck with the rest of your research.

John T.

billblow
14th March 2008, 09:00
Hilary
When John T Trotterdotpom talks of Bond and the goodies there in, boxes of fancy soap comes to mind. When my Mum died 6 years ago and I had to clear the house she had a bedroom drawer full of boxes of what were at the time they were bought in the 1950's expensive soaps all out of the ships bond. There were scores of boxes and although 40 or 50 years old you could still faintly smell them.
Because Dad had bought her them she couldn't part with them. I myself also couldn't part with them all and some are up in the loft.
Billblow

davetodd
14th March 2008, 12:55
Good comments coming in.
I agree with the earlier observation on "Taxi to the Pier Hotel" etc.
These two characters are no ordinary "Pleasure trippers"
Seem to be accomodated in the skippers berth, chops and sausages for breakfast, served tea and biscuits, definitely not normal trawler fare.
Mature men they are for sure, shaving and smoking and writing a day to day account.
Could it be that the notebook really is a Great Northern Railway issue and that the two men were employees of that company.
Some fishing companies on the Humber owned or had shares in coal mines.
Most fishing companies also used the "Fish Train Express" which were fast trains from the Humber ports to many places, especially London.
Grantham was and still is on the main North/South rail system.
It seems a fair assumption that agreements were reached between fishing companies and railway companies for transport of coal and fish.
Consequently I think that Pearce and Wells were offered a voyage by the trawler owner to gain knowledge of the customers business.
If so, then the trawler owner would ask skipper Leighton to look after their
welfare, hence the taxi,the ship waiting off Corporation Pier and dinner at the Pier Hotel on return.
Pearce and Wells appear to have been special passengers on this voyage.

Next week I will try to find market prices for fish in September 1922.

Best regards
Dave

david freeman
24th March 2008, 19:49
Can anybody remember the name of the vessel that almost chopped the Kingston Pearl in half off Immingham. I think it was either an oil tanker or an ore carrier, possibly mid-seventies.
Here is a thumbnail of her being patched-up.
Stevewas this vessel outward or homeward bound in the early 70's. One vessel simply hit the immingham pier in the fog, and this may be a photo of her under repair in the immingham drydock.

Steve Farrow
25th March 2008, 09:38
was this vessel outward or homeward bound in the early 70's. One vessel simply hit the immingham pier in the fog, and this may be a photo of her under repair in the immingham drydock.

I was informed by Chris Petherbridge (Hull Trawler site) that the vessel involved was the bulk carrier, KING ALFRED that collided with the KINGSTON PEARL at the mouth of the Humber on16th November 1974.
regards
Steve

storming
25th March 2008, 12:23
hi does anyone know anything on the perseus , she was blown up in 1915 had relative on it regards

TSJ59
25th March 2008, 21:00
Hello storming
Is this it?

Steam Trawler "Perseus" GY.445, 155grt, 24 July 1915, 60 miles E from Spurn, mined and sunk, 10 lives lost including Skipper

CONSTANTINE, JOHN, Skipper

HARVEY, WALTER, Steward

HIGGINS, ERNEST EDMUND, Apprentice

MACKRILL, JAMES RICHARDSON, Second Engineer

MONCKTON, GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, Deck Hand

PICKETT, WILLIAM EDWARD, Mate

RAMSHAW, HENRY THOMAS WAUGH, First Engineer

WARD, ANDREW, Apprentice

WATSON, GEORGE, Deck Hand

WEBSTER, WILLIAM HENRY, Third Hand

Cheers, Terry

Fiesty Fay
26th March 2008, 20:56
1934 the aberdeen trawler loch ard was lost with all hands 14 of the crew been from hull any body with any photographs of the ship and any information I would be very happy to recieve them

http://www.aberdeenships.com/single.asp?searchFor=fishing&offset=90&index=99100

Name LOCH ARD
Construction STEEL
Type TRAWLER
Date 1931
Official Number 162277
Description Yard Number: 118
Fishing number: A151
Engine number 205, boiler no. 168.
Builder's certificate dated 25 March 1931.
Left Hull 16 January 1934 and not heard of again.
Associated Loch Line Steam Fishing & Trawling Company, Aberdeen
Associated John Lewis and Sons
Dimensions Overall: 14 x 23 11/12 x 140 1/3ft
Gross Tonnage: 351ton


Is this the one you were searching for Laurie

Fay

storming
27th March 2008, 02:21
hi tsj59 ?
thats brilliant mate ! i was looking for a list my relative was henry thomas vaughn ramshaw and i didnt realise he was cheif engineer he liked to be called jack though?
thanks for that also thanks again to Steve Farrow who emailed me a load of

also had another relative william cameron one of three survivors on the edgar wallace sunk outside hull docks.
later in life he was lost on the Hondo ( one of taylors) i think ?some luck eh ? . I use to sail for BUT on the catboats in the early 80ies
Norm

davetodd
27th March 2008, 17:18
Good comments coming in.
I agree with the earlier observation on "Taxi to the Pier Hotel" etc.
These two characters are no ordinary "Pleasure trippers"
Seem to be accomodated in the skippers berth, chops and sausages for breakfast, served tea and biscuits, definitely not normal trawler fare.
Mature men they are for sure, shaving and smoking and writing a day to day account.
Could it be that the notebook really is a Great Northern Railway issue and that the two men were employees of that company.
Some fishing companies on the Humber owned or had shares in coal mines.
Most fishing companies also used the "Fish Train Express" which were fast trains from the Humber ports to many places, especially London.
Grantham was and still is on the main North/South rail system.
It seems a fair assumption that agreements were reached between fishing companies and railway companies for transport of coal and fish.
Consequently I think that Pearce and Wells were offered a voyage by the trawler owner to gain knowledge of the customers business.
If so, then the trawler owner would ask skipper Leighton to look after their
welfare, hence the taxi,the ship waiting off Corporation Pier and dinner at the Pier Hotel on return.
Pearce and Wells appear to have been special passengers on this voyage.

Next week I will try to find market prices for fish in September 1922.

Best regards
Dave
Hello Hilary
Have attached two thumbnails of images from Grimsby local paper for Sept 12 1922.These are from microfilm held at Grimsby Library.
Price of halibut in Gy and billingsgate is the same at 10s. to 12s. while at Aberdeen the price is shown as 1s to 1s3d.
Maybe Davie Tait can throw some light on this as well as some of the quantities given eg. levels,scores.
Arrivals and sailings are given for Grimsby Fish Dock.
If there are similar archives in Hull Library then perhaps your mystery vessel could be found since you know the sailing and arrival dates.
Best regards
Dave

trotterdotpom
28th March 2008, 00:48
Hello Hilary
Have attached two thumbnails of images from Grimsby local paper for Sept 12 1922.These are from microfilm held at Grimsby Library.
Price of halibut in Gy and billingsgate is the same at 10s. to 12s. while at Aberdeen the price is shown as 1s to 1s3d.
Maybe Davie Tait can throw some light on this as well as some of the quantities given eg. levels,scores.
Arrivals and sailings are given for Grimsby Fish Dock.
If there are similar archives in Hull Library then perhaps your mystery vessel could be found since you know the sailing and arrival dates.
Best regards
Dave

Thanks Dave - great stuff. The sad part is I understood "1s 3d", "per lb", "stone" and "score" without even having to think about it.!

There is a photo in the gallery of a Scottish lad messing about with a halibut and I wondered if this behaviour could drive the Aberdeen price down, but reading through the cuttings, the price for Aberdeen seems to be "per pound" but the price at Billingsgate is "per stone". At 14 pounds per stone, this makes the Aberdeen price for halibut a hefty 17s 6d per stone A good day to buy turbot, Missus!

John T.

Gavin Gait
28th March 2008, 00:51
I'd have to ask my Father but I think Halibut/Turbot were sold by the LB back then at Aberdeen. Things have gone full circle with prices on the market not so many £ to the KG !!

davetodd
28th March 2008, 09:28
John T
I bought a fillet of halibut from local fishonger last week.
Paid £8 for it.
My wife and I had four meals from that.
Delicious.
As a postscript to the two thumbnails I have to add this.
The local paper also carried a list of sailings and arrivals for the commercial docks at Grimsby and Immingham.
They give names and tonnages of these vessels, but also the name of the "Capt." of each vessel.
May be of great help to any researcher of master mariners or anyone looking for family history connections.
Really enjoyed the halibut though.
Dave

mattarosa
28th March 2008, 12:08
Dave
Thanks for looking into the price of fish. It reminded me of another purchase I made from ebay a couple of years ago, which was some sort of ledger of fish landings, though I can't remember whether it was lbs and stones or
£ s d. I'll have to see if I can dig that out and have a look at it.

I bought halibut recently because I was making a fish stew and the recipe required 8 sorts of fish/seafood. I honestly don't know if I'd ever tasted halibut before then, but it was delicious.

davetodd
28th March 2008, 14:25
Dave
Thanks for looking into the price of fish. It reminded me of another purchase I made from ebay a couple of years ago, which was some sort of ledger of fish landings, though I can't remember whether it was lbs and stones or
£ s d. I'll have to see if I can dig that out and have a look at it.

I bought halibut recently because I was making a fish stew and the recipe required 8 sorts of fish/seafood. I honestly don't know if I'd ever tasted halibut before then, but it was delicious.
Your welcome Hilary
Surprised though that you've never tasted halibut before, these fish were known as "Dustbins of the ocean" probably because they are "bottom feeders".
Monk fish tails are another great taste, BUT remember to remove the membrane before you cook it!

Best regards
Dave

mattarosa
11th April 2008, 13:21
Hello all
I am posting this query on behalf of a friend.

Does anyone have a photograph of Kingston Beryl H499, either as a Hull trawler or HMT?

I have found a couple of interesting reports in the Times, one of the Kingston Beryl shooting down a Heikel (or was it Heinkel?) and the other the sad report of its loss in 1943 with a list of its crew, but I have not been able to find a picture.

Any help appreciated.
Hilary

hullmna
4th May 2008, 10:34
Hi, can anyone help with information on st Cornelian H506 she went missing in the Northsea 14/01/1916, with the loss of all hands. The names of the crew are on the C.W.G.C. web site and are remembered at The Towerhill Memorial, no panel Number. I am trying to find out if she was fishing or on active service ? as being on the Towerhill Memorial indicates deemed lost due to enemy action. I would appreciate any info regarding her loss. Eddie

Kerbtrawler
4th May 2008, 15:46
According to J.J. Colledge in Ships of the Royal Navy she was requisitioned / Hired 1917 having been fitted with a 12 pound gun. But She isn't shown in the Lloyds war losses

regards

hullmna
5th May 2008, 10:30
The Cornelian which I think you are refering was built 1916/17 by Cochrane of selby offical No 1139316or9 262t
This vessel was still in service 1945 according to Lloyds, it seems there were a number of vessels with this name. Thanks for information. Regards Eddie

gil mayes
6th May 2008, 07:31
I cannot over emphasis the importance of O.Ns. CORNELIAN (113558) was registered at Hull (H506) on 9.6.1900. She is recorded as "missing" and the Hull registry was closed on 25.2.1916. CORNELIAN (139319) was registered at Hull (H575) on 10.9.1917 and requisitioned from the builders for conversion to a M/S. I would suggest that CORNELIAN (H506) was not requisitioned and was on a trip when she went missing.
Gil.

hullmna
6th May 2008, 21:28
Hi Gil, I think you maybe right, I can find no mention of of Cornelian H 506 being requisitioned and no mention into details of her fate except being reported missing on 14/1/1916, or why the names of her crew were subsquently placed on the Towerhill Merchant Navy Memorial. The criteria for inclusion on the memorial I believe is to have been lost due to direct enemy action or war time events considered to have contributed to their deaths. Thanks for your reply, best regards Eddie

Yorvick
8th May 2008, 00:59
Maurice Forester born Hull, Yorkshire 1919 writes this.

I had done well at my Private Nautical School so I was immediately accepted by the Ellerman Wilson Line. But I had to wait ashore until I was assigned a vessel. England and the world were hit by the mid thirties shipping depression. I got my uniform, but no job.

After kicking my heals at home for some time, my father said "Look son, you will have to get some sea time in. And it may as well be with a fishing fleet. Everyone knows, except you, apparently, that Ellerman Wilson are standing people off."

So I took a job as “the lowest form of life" on my father's Arctic Trawler. The lowest form of life actually was a coal trimmer - and he was my boss. The lowest person on board was above me. Those days, boys at sea were really slaves. I would have been 16.

The trawlers sailed to Iceland, Greenland, and right up to the White Sea above Russia. I learned to gut fish, I worked in the ice rooms where the fish was stowed and struggled to heave 7 stone fish baskets across the frozen deck.

In a small iron shed on the stern I boiled fish livers: rendering them down into halibut and cod-liver oil. It was a sickening job as the stern heaved up and down in 20ft Arctic swells. I hated it. My bunk in the fo'c'sle was next to the hawspipe that carried the anchor cable that clanged unceasingly with every roll of the ship. The fo'c'sle had a smell of tar, stale tobacco smoke, fish, sweat, bilge oil and urine. I was to soon add to it with my own smell of being seasick.

It wasn't the sea I hated; it was the hopelessness of life. It was not what I had wanted to do. Other Merchant Service ships took you to another country. You could go ashore. I had dreams of my promised job as an apprentice. I would be standing on the bridge of some liner with a slim pipe jutting out of my mouth and a telescope to my eye; with beautiful young girls on the promenade deck just wanting to get their hands on this handsome young officer. But it didn't happen - apart from the fact I wasn't handsome.

It was 3 to 4 weeks at sea, then 36 hours ashore resting then back to sea.
My father ceased to be my father once we were aboard the ship " I am you father but the moment we step on deck I'm your captain and as far as I'm concerned you are just a useless little bugger from the lower decks"

hullmna
8th May 2008, 23:28
My Great Uncle George Forward was a Hull fisherman, lived in Sculcoates.
My father told me that George died in WWI; as did his brother Charles, who lived in Grimsby, who died when the THEBAN was sunk.
Is there any way I could discover what boats Great Uncle George worked and when he died and how?

I am also looking for a picture of ST NIDAN, if anyone can help, please?
Best wishes, Raymond

Hi Ray, I came across a reference to the Theban on the Hearts of Oak web site: It states the a fishing vessel the Phoebe while 65m off the Humber heard a loud explosion and saw another fishing vessel disappear on 14/11/1918. It was believed to be Theban as she was reported to be the only vessel in the area. There is a Memorial at Grimsby that has the names of her crews including your Great Uncle, the name of the vessel is spelt Theiban. I hope this helps regards Eddie

Lambo's Girl
26th May 2008, 17:49
Hello all

Apologies if this get's posted into the incorrect forum: I'm new here and still finding my way around (and no! Being lost has nothing to do with the fact that I'm a woman!)

So, why am I here? Well, in all honesty, the only time I have travelled on the seas was on a trip to Ireland in the 1980's (and was very ill as a consequence) and then again, recently when I travelled across the Channel. However, I was brought up in Hull (UK) and, most importantly, my father, Michael Lambert (Lambo) was a fisherman for all his adult life until he died in the port of Portland in November 2000.

Although my Mum is still compiling a history of ships he sailed on, I remember, during my childhood, he worked for Thomas Hamlings and, in his later years, for Marr's.

So, that's why I'm here: to keep my father's memory alive; and; hoping some of you will know / remember him and offer me some stories of his life at sea. I hope it goes without saying that I'm extremely proud of my father. He worked hard to ensure he financially supported his family and we had a great relationship. Unfortunately, it's only in my adult years that I realise what a difficult job he did. Lastly, perhaps, by joining this site, I may even learn something about sea vessels, the sea and all you crazy people who love it so much :-)

Well, that's all from me for now but I'm looking forward to getting to know more people on here.

Regards
Michelle
(aka, Lambo's Girl: who is actually too old to be called a girl!)

Richard Nielsen
2nd June 2008, 22:39
Hi,

I don't know if there is a more appropriate place for this, but does anyone have a photo of either Mackenzie (H349) or Macfarlane (H997). This would be much appreciated.

Thank you,

Richard

davetodd
3rd June 2008, 12:36
Richard
Grimsby Central Library have at least one photograph each of:-
Mackfarlane H997 O.N.128120 built 1908 at Beverley 284/116 tons
Owner Neptune S.F.Co. Lost in 1933
Mackenzie H691 O.N. 116093 built 1902 at Hull 256/93 tons
Owner Neptune S.F.Co. Lost 1910

The Library can be found on www.nelincs.gov.uk or by telephone on 01473 323603.
They can tell you of the cost for prints of various sizes.
Hope this helps
Regards
Dave

storming
6th June 2008, 14:53
hi all im back again once again thanks to all for the info on the Perseus .
last week i visited al my long lost relatives in the Faroe islands. while there they told me of a relative called Frederick Petersen who was among ten hands lost in a Faroes ship called the Nordlysid in the Humber i realise it's a long shot and this thread deals with Grimsby/ Hull ships but i was wondering if anyone could help as i am drawing a blank ? sinking date was 1922
thanks for looking
Norm

Lincoln Imp
27th June 2008, 20:59
All,
An interesting site, I went "pleasuring" on the ST Loch Oskaig in 1957 she must have been one of the last coal fired trawlers out of Hull I think she was a sister ship of the ST Kingston Beryl or was it Pearl?
Which was the last coal fired trawler out of Hull?
Yours aye,
Slick
Hi mate I believe the last steam trawler out of Hull was the "Lord Tedder",I was galley boy on the "ross Otranto" at the time and we would frequently race the tedder back to Hull And she would beat us hands down even though the Otranto was diesel electric

gil mayes
27th June 2008, 22:04
Try OTHELLO. Grateful for any correction on this one.
OTHELLO (FD389) (1963) Last coal fired trawler to operate out of Hull
O.N. 164424. 516g 285n 173.2 x 28.6 x 14.7 feet
T.3-cyl by Amos & Smith Ltd, Hull

27.2.1937: Launched by Cochrane & Sons Ltd, Selby (Yd.No.1180) for Earl Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (Sir Alec Black, Bart, manager) as Le Tiger. 30.4.1937: Registered at Grimsby (GY398). 5.1937: Completed. 8.1938: Sold to Hellyer Bros Ltd, Hull. 12.1938: Sold to Earl Steam Fishing Co, Grimsby. 15.12.1939: Sold to The Admiralty (M.O.W.T.) (£30,231). 5.1.1940: Grimsby registry closed. Converted to an anti-submarine trawler (P.No.FY.243). 24.11.1940: In Thames estuary. Rescued crew of mined (acoustic) HMS Amethyst (P. No.T.12). 3.1942: Transferred on loan to US Navy. 3.7.1942: Off US Eastern seaboard. Sunk U-boat (U.215) approx. 300 miles east of Boston and 125 miles south of Nova Scotia. 10.1942: Returned to Royal Navy. 10.1945: Sold to The Hull Ice Co Ltd, Hull. 7.1946: Registered at Grimsby (GY312). 11.1946: Sold to Loyal Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby. 7.1947: Renamed Regal (GY312). 9.1948: Sold to Devon Fishing Co Ltd, Hull (Mark Hellyer & Graham Hellyer, managers). 9.1948: Grimsby registry closed. 9.1948: Renamed Othello (H581). 1953: Sold to Hellyer Bros. Ltd, Hull (Mark Hellyer & Graham Hellyer, managers). 1963: Transferred within the Associated Fisheries Group to Wyre Trawlers Ltd, Fleetwood. 1963: Hull Registry closed. 1963: Registered at Fleetwood (FD389). 1963: Condemned (never made a trip from Fleetwood). Sold to Van Heyghen Freres S.A., Ghent for demolition. 19.4.1963: Delivered Ghent.
Gil.

Biggins searcher
26th July 2008, 01:06
Am new to this website and the internet in general. Have started doing some family history research and am hoping to find out as much as i can about the Great Gale of 6th March 1883 when my great great grandfather Thomas Biggins was lost at sea aboard the smack Britannia H686. If anyone has any information they could let me have or could point me in the right direction as to where or how i can find out more i would be most grateful. Thank you in anticipation.

gil mayes
26th July 2008, 07:35
For a start see Chris Petherbridge's www.hulltrawler.net website for a list of vessels involved and some background.
Gil.

treeve
26th July 2008, 17:24
A neighbour of mine owned the vessel, for which I have extracted the below from the Fishing Vessel Records for Penzance. Please can anyone fill in any details of her history between 1946 and 1973, builder, engine and so on?
Best Wishes, Raymond

PZ 201 Plough (ex LH 192); built 1946 Hull.
Registered Newlyn
Motor Trawler, Mizzen mast.
50 feet o/a length of hull
Breadth 15 feet
Depth 6.7 feet
22.61 grt/nrt
Crew of 3
Registered 19th January 1973 Charles Wilkins, Penzance
3rd September 1975 C Wilkins & T Eggins
12th June 1976 Thomas Eggins, Gulval
15th October 1979 Bryan Frost, Hayle
1st December 1982 Robert Redfern, Redruth
17th March 1984 Vessel no longer fishing.

jon grobler
13th August 2008, 09:20
arctic freebooter

some log books from boyd line - to which freebooter belonged
are housed at the arctic corsair museum in high street ,hull .

the ship & shore museum are open
wednesday, saturday, sunday & bank holiday mondays

Steve Farrow
13th August 2008, 11:24
Thanks for that Jon, I must have a day out on your side of the river and see what good work you have done. I haven't been aboard the ARCTIC CORSAIR since she was in dry-dock and painted all over with red-oxide!. I met Alec Gill and Adam Fowler that day and had a very interesting time.

Regards

Steve

billblow
4th September 2008, 10:13
Can some one tell me if there was both a Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Co Ltd. and a Hull Steam Fishing Co Ltd. If so were they totally different companies or did one evolve into the other.

captsunlight
4th September 2008, 11:00
Hi prior to going to sea with Silver Line I sailed out of Hull in the summer holidays whilst at BNS in 58 an 59 on the Lord Wavell (58) and the Arctic Buccanear (59)

what a great site
Mike Allan

tollers
18th January 2009, 11:44
Hi,

According to records I have the "Othello" was the last coal burning trawler in the Hull fleet. The Othello was built as the Le Tiger.

Tollers

gil mayes
18th January 2009, 18:55
Bill
Hull Steam Fishing & Ice Co Ltd went into voluntary liquidation 6 March 1936 along with Kelsall Bros & Beeching Ltd. A company was formed by Robert S Hewett & Harry F. Hayward - Heward Trawlers Ltd, London who bought the combined fleets (about 40 vessels) and managed to get about half of them, by cannibalising, as near decent vessels out of the lot, many going for scrap (about 16 vessels directly).
Hull Ice Co Ltd, Hull appears to have been a company set up by previous owners to buy back from the Admiralty vessels that had been sold to them in the early stages of WW2. This company bought the vessels en bloc, they were refurbished, reclassed and reregistered being sold on, in most cases, to their previous owners or their subsidiaries. Very pleased if anyone can tell us more about this unique arrangement and how long Hull Ice Co operated as a company.
Gil.

gil mayes
18th January 2009, 19:01
Tollers
Interesting at the end and reference Bill's query about Hull Ice Co Ltd.
OTHELLO (FD389) (1963) Last coal fired trawler to operate out of Hull
O.N. 164424. 516g 285n 173.2 x 28.6 x 14.7 feet
T.3-cyl by Amos & Smith Ltd, Hull

27.2.1937: Launched by Cochrane & Sons Ltd, Selby (Yd.No.1180) for Earl Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (Sir Alec Black, Bart, manager) as Le Tiger. 30.4.1937: Registered at Grimsby (GY398). 5.1937: Completed. 8.1938: Sold to Hellyer Bros Ltd, Hull. 12.1938: Sold to Earl Steam Fishing Co, Grimsby. 15.12.1939: Sold to The Admiralty (M.O.W.T.) (£30,231). 5.1.1940: Grimsby registry closed. Fitted out as an anti-submarine trawler (P.No.FY.243). 24.11.1940: In Thames estuary. Rescued crew of mined (acoustic) HMS Amethyst (P. No.T.12). 3.1942: Transferred on loan to US Navy. 3.7.1942: Off US Eastern seaboard. Sunk U-boat (U.215) approx. 300 miles east of Boston and 125 miles south of Nova Scotia. 10.1942: Returned to Royal Navy. 10.1945: Sold to The Hull Ice Co Ltd, Hull. 7.1946: Re-classed. Registered at Grimsby (GY312). 11.1946: Sold to Loyal Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby. 7.1947: Renamed Regal (GY312). 9.1948: Sold to Devon Fishing Co Ltd, Hull (Mark Hellyer & Graham Hellyer, managers). 9.1948: Grimsby registry closed. 9.1948: Renamed Othello (H581). 1953: Sold to Hellyer Bros. Ltd, Hull (Mark Hellyer & Graham Hellyer, managers). 1963: Transferred within the Associated Fisheries Group to Wyre Trawlers Ltd, Fleetwood. 1963: Hull Registry closed. 1963: Registered at Fleetwood (FD389). 1963: Condemned (never moved to Fleetwood). Sold to Van Heyghen Freres S.A., Ghent for demolition. 19.4.1963: Delivered Ghent.
Gil.

davetodd
18th January 2009, 22:49
Bill
Hull Steam Fishing & Ice Co Ltd went into voluntary liquidation 6 March 1936 along with Kelsall Bros & Beeching Ltd. A company was formed by Robert S Hewett & Harry F. Hayward - Heward Trawlers Ltd, London who bought the combined fleets (about 40 vessels) and managed to get about half of them, by cannibalising, as near decent vessels out of the lot, many going for scrap (about 16 vessels directly).
Hull Ice Co Ltd, Hull appears to have been a company set up by previous owners to buy back from the Admiralty vessels that had been sold to them in the early stages of WW2. This company bought the vessels en bloc, they were refurbished, reclassed and reregistered being sold on, in most cases, to their previous owners or their subsidiaries. Very pleased if anyone can tell us more about this unique arrangement and how long Hull Ice Co operated as a company.
Gil.
Hello Gil and Bill.
I have tried the Grimsby Archives for more information on the Hull Ice Co.
John Wilson advised me to contact the archives at Hull.
Unfortunately they are closed at the moment and will be so for some time until re-opening in a new purpose designed building.
John Wilson is currently off.
His colleague is also off and the Grimsby archives will not re-open until February.
Regards
Dave

gil mayes
19th January 2009, 16:57
Look forward to anything that you discover, Dave.
Gil.

peter drake
3rd February 2009, 20:30
Ross Trafalgar
You have the launch date . She was broken up by Drapers in Sept 78 a Victoria dock
Pete

peter drake
3rd February 2009, 21:00
Clem
According to Michael Thompson's book Othello 164424 H581 was Hull's last coal burner scrapped 1963


Pete

peter drake
3rd February 2009, 21:19
Hi Gil
According to Michael Thompson The Hull Ice Co was founded in 1890s " In 1945 the Hull Ice Co had the distinction of being appointed owners of the ex naval trawlers as they were released back to fishing duties. This was a brief measure to give all the trawler companies a share in the profits until they were able to buy trawlers and resume their trade". The factory closed in Dec 1978

Pete

gil mayes
3rd February 2009, 21:20
OTHELLO (FD389) (1963) Last coal fired trawler to operate out of Hull
O.N. 164424. 516g 285n 173.2 x 28.6 x 14.7 feet
T.3-cyl by Amos & Smith Ltd, Hull

27.2.1937: Launched by Cochrane & Sons Ltd, Selby (Yd.No.1180) for Earl Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby (Sir Alec Black, Bart, manager) as Le Tiger. 30.4.1937: Registered at Grimsby (GY398). 5.1937: Completed. 8.1938: Sold to Hellyer Bros Ltd, Hull. 12.1938: Sold to Earl Steam Fishing Co, Grimsby. 15.12.1939: Sold to The Admiralty (M.O.W.T.) (£30,231). 5.1.1940: Grimsby registry closed. Fitted out as an anti-submarine trawler (P.No.FY.243). 24.11.1940: In Thames estuary. Rescued crew of mined (acoustic) HMS Amethyst (P. No.T.12). 3.1942: Transferred on loan to US Navy. 3.7.1942: Off US Eastern seaboard. Sunk U-boat (U.215) approx. 300 miles east of Boston and 125 miles south of Nova Scotia. 10.1942: Returned to Royal Navy. 10.1945: Sold to The Hull Ice Co Ltd, Hull. 7.1946: Re-classed. Registered at Grimsby (GY312). 11.1946: Sold to Loyal Steam Fishing Co Ltd, Grimsby. 7.1947: Renamed Regal (GY312). 9.1948: Sold to Devon Fishing Co Ltd, Hull (Mark Hellyer & Graham Hellyer, managers). 9.1948: Grimsby registry closed. 9.1948: Renamed Othello (H581). 1953: Sold to Hellyer Bros. Ltd, Hull (Mark Hellyer & Graham Hellyer, managers). 1963: Transferred within the Associated Fisheries Group to Wyre Trawlers Ltd, Fleetwood. 1963: Hull Registry closed. 1963: Registered at Fleetwood (FD389). 1963: Condemned (never moved to Fleetwood). Sold to Van Heyghen Freres S.A., Ghent for demolition. 19.4.1963: Delivered Ghent.
Gil.

manowari
14th February 2009, 23:49
Having read about Hull trawlers, I remembered the Manihine, I worked on in Mombasa. She was the ex Coot built in 1906 at Goole, belonging to Kelsall Bros and Beeching. Re-engined with National Oil engines in the 30s she eventually ended her days on the beach in Dar es Salaam in the 90s where she was cut up for scrap. The pic shows her as she was in the 70s based in Mombasa as a fisheries research vessel..

snacker
26th March 2009, 08:36
I sailed in the Arctic Freebooter second trip from new I did 4 trips 3 as Deckie Learner and then got my spare hand s start for the last trip. Richard Sackville Bryant was Skipper, Joe Callan mate, Dennis Young Bosun Here is a few name,s who were also an her as the same time as me
Sid Trolle 3rd hand
Wick Pullen, Tom Jenkins, Alec Creig, George Tasker, Ronny Wells,Ted Scott, Joe Morley,Dave Hall,Barry Gibson, Billy Platten. Joe Callan gave me my Sparehands start as he took her Skipper and Joe Jefferson was Mate, Sorry to hear she ended up in the scrappers in her day she was a fine ship happy memories

tollers
1st April 2009, 16:18
My Great Uncle George Forward was a Hull fisherman, lived in Sculcoates.
My father told me that George died in WWI; as did his brother Charles, who lived in Grimsby, who died when the THEBAN was sunk.
Is there any way I could discover what boats Great Uncle George worked and when he died and how?

I am also looking for a picture of ST NIDAN, if anyone can help, please?
Best wishes, Raymond

George Forward 4th Hand trawler Lolanthe H1370 22/7/1895

George Forward 4th Hand trawler Excel H1187 22/1/1895

George Forward Cook trawler Pansy H10 12/9/1892

Tollers

BarryJ
5th April 2009, 15:05
Does anyone have information on this vessel, in addition to the details posted on my Milford Trawlers website?

I'd particularly like to know:
what her original 1947 Fecamp PRN was;
when she was registered in Hull (c.1948?), and by whom;
when she was taken off the Hull register;
her subsequent career and fate.

Barry

Roger Griffiths
5th April 2009, 19:04
Hello Barry,
I cannot find her in Olsens 1949 and 1953. A vessel with that O/N has logbooks for 1949 and 1950 in TNA.
If the Cromer RNLI website is to be believed, she could not have been renamed 0n 26/November 1948 as the lifeboat assisted her under the name GEORGES LANGANAY on the 10th December 1948.
If no one comes up with an answer, I will take a look at her logbooks and if I can find them, her registration papers next time I go to TNA.

Just a thought. Her PRN in that photograph. Could it be HARVE 71?

regards
Roger

geordie peacock
5th April 2009, 20:24
Hi all,

recently acquired the ships bell off the Arctic freebooter. Dont know if theres anyone on here who may of sailed on her?

Hi my name is george peacock , and i sailed on the freebooter and all of boyd line ships at one time or another between 1965 to 10 1971

BarryJ
6th April 2009, 12:37
Thanks very much, Roger. She's in Olsen's 1951 as H71, call sign MBPV, but as you say, not in the 1949 and 1953-54 editions.

She's not of great importance in the history of Milford trawlers, but I'm just curious as to what happened to her, and why the Milford firm of Tilbrooks registered her in Hull (unless a Hull firm registered her, and then sold her on to Tilbrooks almost immediately). I'd be grateful for any info, but it's not worth going out of your way for it, Roger!

I found that Cromer lifeboat incident on a couple of sites on the web, and it just increased my curiosity. (The incident wasn't recorded in "The Times".)

Best wishes,
Barry

geordie peacock
6th April 2009, 20:35
I sailed in the Arctic Freebooter second trip from new I did 4 trips 3 as Deckie Learner and then got my spare hand s start for the last trip. Richard Sackville Bryant was Skipper, Joe Callan mate, Dennis Young Bosun Here is a few name,s who were also an her as the same time as me
Sid Trolle 3rd hand
Wick Pullen, Tom Jenkins, Alec Creig, George Tasker, Ronny Wells,Ted Scott, Joe Morley,Dave Hall,Barry Gibson, Billy Platten. Joe Callan gave me my Sparehands start as he took her Skipper and Joe Jefferson was Mate, Sorry to hear she ended up in the scrappers in her day she was a fine ship happy memories

Hi snacker,
My name is george peacock, and i sailed on the freebooter with all th guy's you mention, ted scott was the factory manger. i also sailed with sid trolly's son on another of the arctic boats, was dave hall a big guy who always went on holiday to spain on his leaves. ???

hughesy
6th April 2009, 23:40
Was Tom Jenkins a cook??

all the best
Hughesy

snacker
7th April 2009, 15:05
Hi Tommy Jenks was sparehand and Geordie i sailed with you in the Arctic Hunter remember Mad Moon we sailed boxing day with no mugs on board to make tea in so we emptied all the jam jars and tied tyne round the neck to make an handle Jim Williams was skipper Brian Hodson (Hoddo) was mate steaming homewe had water leak in the cabin and flooded the messdeck we were all sat there having our breakfast with water swilling round our Knee,s some of the crew name,s were Kev Turner George Chapman (Chopper) Alan Thacker Les Hilton Mad Moon was Billy Rhode,s.Dave Hall ended up bosun and used to have a stutter,young Sid Trolle died last year I sailed with him in the Cavalier with Tony Tuton Mick Wainman Tony Keay

snacker
7th April 2009, 15:50
Hi When I was deckie learner on the Freebooter it was my job to clean the bell steaming home as I remember the bell was always locked in a cupboard and was never put up all the time I was in her

Roger Griffiths
19th April 2009, 21:48
Thanks very much, Roger. She's in Olsen's 1951 as H71, call sign MBPV, but as you say, not in the 1949 and 1953-54 editions.

She's not of great importance in the history of Milford trawlers, but I'm just curious as to what happened to her, and why the Milford firm of Tilbrooks registered her in Hull (unless a Hull firm registered her, and then sold her on to Tilbrooks almost immediately). I'd be grateful for any info, but it's not worth going out of your way for it, Roger!

I found that Cromer lifeboat incident on a couple of sites on the web, and it just increased my curiosity. (The incident wasn't recorded in "The Times".)

Best wishes,
Barry

Hello Barry,
Her 1950 logbook says she was owned by Tilbrook PRN H71 address given as the Docks MH. Skipper C J Coombe, 20190, 22 Greville Road.
She looks to have been sold by Tilbrook in 1954/55 to Jens C Gundersen of Kristiansund Norway and continued in this ownership until she was no longer listed in Lloyds Register 1977/78. She kept the name SEA LORD till the end of her career.

regards
Roger

grahamtowa
14th May 2009, 20:38
Any of you Hull guys help with the reg nos of the following, all built at Dundee for Wilson Line? 1917 Domino, 1919 Trentino, 1922 Cavallo and Spero. Thanks, Graham

Roger Griffiths
14th May 2009, 21:43
Hello Graham,
I take it you mean their official numbers?

DOMINO 139322
TRENTINO 139335
CAVALLO 146461
SPERO 146509

I have details of all these vessels from "Wilson Line" by John Harrower WSS


regards
Roger

davetodd
14th May 2009, 23:42
Any of you Hull guys help with the reg nos of the following, all built at Dundee for Wilson Line? 1917 Domino, 1919 Trentino, 1922 Cavallo and Spero. Thanks, Graham

Graham,
I think you have posted your query in the wrong forum.
These vessels were not Fishing Vessels.
Regards
Dave

grahamtowa
15th May 2009, 08:34
Thanks, both of you. I had thought that they were trawlers, but it seems that they were passenger or cargo boats. Sorry, my mistake. Thanks again for your help.

duncmacg
8th June 2009, 19:54
Hi guys-my first posting here
My grandfather was Chris Jordan 1881-1941. He ran a wholesale fish business from Hull's Billingsgate and I see this sidewinder on hulltrawer.net which carries his name (his was Christopher William Jordan and was also Director of Hull City FC at least 1919-1920 season).
Built 1907 but later renamed by Jordan & Wheeldon Ltd to CW Jordan until bought by Spanish outfit in 1930.
Was used as minesweeper 1915 to 1919.
A one time skipper Thomas Swingler and his son Joseph also one of crew.Phil Day Engineer

Anyone know any stories of this boat-was it owned by Christopher William Jordan's business-
Thanks(Thumb)

duncmacg
11th June 2009, 10:33
Just to add to my earlier post. I have found that Jordan & Wheeldon Ltd was operated by CW Jordan out of St Andrews Dock in the 1920's-he traded under name of 'Reliance'.Previously this boat was called 'Atlanta'
Does anyone know if they had other trawlers
cheers
Duncan

birgir
12th June 2009, 15:57
The C.W. Jordan was interestingly enough, a German built trawler for British owners?. Built by Eiderwerft, Tönning, in 1907, 125.2 feet long, 23.1 f wide, and 12.4 feet deep, 223 brt, 86 nrt. (Lloyds.) previous names Atlanta and Smew, later named Maria Theresa. (She is not listed in Walter, so she was not built for German owners, but is identical to his type D2. Interestingly, Knorr (1915) states that Eiderwerft only built 9 trawlers, in the years 1907-1908, and all 9 are accounted for in Walter's "Deutsche Fischdampfer".)

Birgir Thorisson

Postscript. Had a look at the entry at Hulltrawler.net. It has more pertinent detail. Sorry for this chaff.

duncmacg
13th June 2009, 21:50
Thanks Birgir
I should have downloaded better set of pics-I will have another go
cheers
Duncan

yorkie1
18th June 2009, 09:12
I sailed in the Arctic Freebooter second trip from new I did 4 trips 3 as Deckie Learner and then got my spare hand s start for the last trip. Richard Sackville Bryant was Skipper, Joe Callan mate, Dennis Young Bosun Here is a few name,s who were also an her as the same time as me
Sid Trolle 3rd hand
Wick Pullen, Tom Jenkins, Alec Creig, George Tasker, Ronny Wells,Ted Scott, Joe Morley,Dave Hall,Barry Gibson, Billy Platten. Joe Callan gave me my Sparehands start as he took her Skipper and Joe Jefferson was Mate, Sorry to hear she ended up in the scrappers in her day she was a fine ship happy memories

Hello Snacker.
Reading about your trips in the Freebooter bought back my first trips,The first one was on the Stella Capella in 1960 when I was 15 and my last trip was in the freezer Cordella in 1980 and I am still trying to get the rest of my compen,but a lot of the men never lived long enough to collect their money,but when John Prescot put in the three month break rule he must have known he was going to stuff a lot of Fishermeh.yorkie1

holiday
12th July 2009, 17:31
Hi, just been reading this site and wondered if anyone sailed on the MV DANE from Hull. My late husband John Markie was a deckhand on that ship in 1973, he also sailed on the Kingston Pearl.He joined the Merchant Navy in early1982 and lost his life on the "NESAM" a cargo ship late 1982. He was only 33. Anyone remeber him. He also sailed from North Shields on the Ben Vurie and Ben Glas.

koldie
25th July 2009, 10:38
Come on fellers!

There must be some Hull fishing industry fans out there somewhere.(Thumb)

It's 136 years since my great grandfather sailed out of Hull on fishing smacks and I want to know more.

On a different tack. I can't find out much about the attached photograph. I know she was renamed the Ross Trafalgar but nobody makes it clear whether that was done in 1966 or she was launched in 1966. There is also some confusion about her number.

The photo was taken at her launch at Dunswell. Date anybody?(?HUH)

Anybody got any info they want to share?

Cape Trafalgar was lanched at C.D Holmes or Cook Well and Gamlles(both the same company) at Beverley on the 18 Feb 1957, she was towed to Pincess Dock in Hull to be fitted out the owners took delivery 03 Sept 1957 Hudson Bros, on the 26 Nov 1965 her name was change to Ross Trafalgar and her number stayed the same owners Ross Group Ltd and she was scrapped 1978.
Ken Oldridge (my farther worked for the shipyard).

koldie
25th July 2009, 10:49
Hi my name is george peacock , and i sailed on the freebooter and all of boyd line ships at one time or another between 1965 to 10 1971

I sail on the old girl has 4th,3rd,2nd engineer with Ted Nixon (died of cancer the last trip before she went to falmouth mackreling
Ken Oldridge

koldie
25th July 2009, 10:55
Was Tom Jenkins a cook??

all the best
Hughesy

Tom was a factory hand on the Freebooter
Ken oldridge

koldie
25th July 2009, 11:00
Hi snacker,
My name is george peacock, and i sailed on the freebooter with all th guy's you mention, ted scott was the factory manger. i also sailed with sid trolly's son on another of the arctic boats, was dave hall a big guy who always went on holiday to spain on his leaves. ???

yes had some great times on the old girl 4th,3rd and 2nd engineer

Ken Oldridge

WicklowJimmy
25th August 2009, 18:18
Anyone out there sail on the Ranger boats out of Shields?

wahwerit
3rd September 2009, 15:45
as we have a grimsby and lowestoft thread i think we must have a hull one so come on boys get posting

Hello Im the grandson of the late Sydney Wahwerit of Hull who was a mate on the Sargon when she ran aground in Patreksfordur in Iceland 1948. Im trying to get as much information as I can on the accident and also anyone who might have known him . I know that there is a survivor living in Hull who would have been about 16 or 18 at the time as my Father meet him . My father is also called Sydney Wahwerit from Hull

gadfly
3rd September 2009, 23:21
Hello Im the grandson of the late Sydney Wahwerit of Hull who was a mate on the Sargon when she ran aground in Patreksfordur in Iceland 1948. Im trying to get as much information as I can on the accident and also anyone who might have known him . I know that there is a survivor living in Hull who would have been about 16 or 18 at the time as my Father meet him . My father is also called Sydney Wahwerit from Hull

Wahwerit

The wreck report is available for download on this site:

http://www.plimsoll.org/resources/SCCLibraries/WreckReports/14176.asp

Regards

Gadfly

birgir
12th September 2009, 18:43
Which Hull longliner was wrecked at the Westman Islands, Iceland in august 1896?
The longlines salvaged from the wreck instituted the most revolutionary breakthrough in the economic history of that fishing station, in the opinon of an old fishermen looking back in 1958.
Thomas Doodman, was a british longliner captain, who frequented the place in 1898-1900, and went to great lengths to provide what would now be called development assistance, to the "primitive" local fishemen. (Blue ling was for a while known in the Westman Islands as "Doodman´s fish").
Does anyone have any information about this man?

Birgir Thorisson.

snacker
17th September 2009, 14:31
I remember going ashore in Patreksfjiord in 1968 when I was in the Arctic Galliard and 2 wrecks were visible in the harbour one was the Boston Wellvale which had been salvaged by a young Icelandic guy and was put back in to service as the icelandic trawler Ran and the other we were told was the Sargon with her forward mast and bow sticking out of the water. some of the old hands told us the story of her being lost
www.trawlerman.piczo.com

birgir
20th September 2009, 17:31
Snacker.

Your memory must be faulty. Sargon grounded on the shore opposite the harbour at Patreksfjordur. By 1968, only the boiler, and a part of the stem was still visible.
You obviously entered the harbour of Isafjordur, where the salvaged Boston Wellvale and the remnants of the trawler Gudmundur Juni (ex-Jupiter), built at Beverley in 1925, were.

About Doodman, see my post above. I have come across a different spelling, Deadman. (Strange name by the way.)

Birgir Thorisson

Newfoundland Sailor
8th October 2009, 04:10
Do anyone have any photos and info on the Boston Hornet, she came to Canada in the 1950's and was renamd the Zilek. I am writing a book and would like to have a photo for it. I have some photos of some of the other trawlers that came to Newfoundland from England if someone wants them.'

Thanks

hullgirl
13th October 2009, 22:32
Hi my name is george peacock , and i sailed on the freebooter and all of boyd line ships at one time or another between 1965 to 10 1971

Hi this is my 1st post on this forum. I am Ted Nixons daughter, and can remember some of the crew from the freebooter, although I was only 18 when my Dad died. Ted also sailed on quite a few Boyd Line ships, in fact that is the only company he worked for so far as I can remember. It would be great to hear from anyone who knew my Dad or sailed with him!

Trevor
14th October 2009, 13:48
I have uploaded a couple of pictures of trawlers in Hull, not all Hull registered I must admit but I received very little comment from members. There doesn't appear to be an upload for fishing vessels, I've been putting them in Ports and Habours.
Still looking for info on the St Matthew by the way.

K urgess
14th October 2009, 14:21
Trevor
You have to go here
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=10667
and follow the instructions to enable you to see the fishing vessel gallery.
Meanhwhile I will move your two pictures into the appropriate section.

Trevor
15th October 2009, 00:17
Thanks Marconi Sahib,
I think I've got the hang of it now, I wondered where all the trawlers were, given the fact that there were uploads for models, wrecks etc.
Trevor

tollers
15th October 2009, 21:08
Hello there,

I believe that the Othello was the last Hull coal burner she was scrapped in 1963

Tollers

snacker
16th October 2009, 20:13
Hi Have alook at my website www.trawlerman.piczo.com a few pictures on it for you too look at

Trevor
16th October 2009, 21:34
Great website snacker, some of the early pictures bring back memories; sad to see the state of the docks now. I've not been back to Hull for years.
Sailed on the St Matthew with a skipper called Haynes.

mattarosa
17th October 2009, 13:34
Hi Have alook at my website www.trawlerman.piczo.com a few pictures on it for you too look at

Lovely website, I found it very interesting.
Hilary

snacker
17th October 2009, 13:53
hi Trevor the St Matthew became the Macbeth in 1969 owned by B.U.T and was scrapped in 1976 hope this is of some use to you

Trevor
17th October 2009, 15:43
hi Trevor the St Matthew became the Macbeth in 1969 owned by B.U.T and was scrapped in 1976 hope this is of some use to you

I had a quick message that said she became the Wolverhampton Wanderer, and a picture that looked very much like her. She was launched in 1947 and had a couple of sisters the St Bartholomew and I think the St Chrispen. Thanks again and congratulations on the website.
Trevor

snacker
18th October 2009, 11:10
Hi So you were on the first St Matthew she was scrapped in 1967 and you are correct she was renamed Wolverhampton Wanderers She was built at Beverley and launched in 1946

Steve Farrow
26th November 2009, 11:59
Can anybody shed any light on this? A friend of mine was shown a ships bell recently with the name ST. BARNABUS almost ground out and the name ARCTIC RANGER on the opposite side! To the best of my knowledge, the name on the bell always stayed throughout the life of the vessel.

Steve

snacker
28th November 2009, 08:19
Boyd Line in Hull had two Arctic Rangers first one built in 1937 one of Boyd line,s first ships later changed its name to Conan Doyle in 1951. 2nd one built in 1957 and scrapped in 1976, so it is a mystery where this bell came from as there was no St Barnabus sailed out of Hull as far as I know

RayJordandpo
30th November 2009, 15:13
Can anyone tell me what is happening at STAND in Hull ? Reading between the lines there seems to be an awful lot of in-fighting between their members (or one in particular). I was under the impression that the the owners of the bullnose at St.Andrews dock were in the process of cleaning the area up and making it safe so that the annual lost trawlermans day memorial service could continue to be held there. I now hear it is to be held in Princess Quay shopping mall. I was also led to believe that over £100,000 had been raised for a permanent memorial to the Hull trawlermen that had lost their lives over the years. There now seems to a conlict of opinion as to the design and proposed location of the memorial. What is going on?

treeve
30th December 2009, 18:13
An advertisement in June 1915
Does anyone know her registration and history?
Best wishes, Raymond

davetodd
30th December 2009, 19:17
Hello Raymond
The "Marne" appears in the 1917 Olsen's Almanac.
Marne H231 ON 136231 built Hessle 1915 103 tons nett
Call letters JKBS Owners East Riding F.Co.Ltd. Hull
Regards
Dave

Steve Farrow
30th December 2009, 19:28
An advertisement in June 1915
Does anyone know her registration and history?
Best wishes, Raymond

Raymond,

She was first registered in 1915 as H.231, Off No 136231, Call sign JKBS, 103 nett tons 79hp. Sold to J. Rushworth 2/1919. Sold to W.Richmond, Fairfield, Scartho, Grimsby in 3/1919. Sold to the Crampin St.Fg.Co 10/1924 and re-named William Wesney. Orontes St. Fg. Co 4/1929 and renamed Merrivale. Southampton St.Fg. Co. 11/1932. Lost in 1936 at Pentland Skerries.

WW1 Armed with 1 x 6pdrAA Admiralty number 1365

Steve

treeve
30th December 2009, 19:37
Thank you Dave and Steve for the information; found the (not having seen a picture of her) ad and wondered what history was in store for her, which as it happens, is a lot. I hope the new year brings goodness for you both.

davetodd
30th December 2009, 21:32
Thank you Dave and Steve for the information; found the (not having seen a picture of her) ad and wondered what history was in store for her, which as it happens, is a lot. I hope the new year brings goodness for you both.
Thanks for your kind wishes Raymond to which I reciprocate.
Plus a bit more on Marne.
1934 Olsen's has her as Merrivale ( thanks to Steve for the name change ) with a GY registration GY77 and call letters as MFSZ.
Cox's has her with this GY77 when purchased by J.Rushworth.
Also from Cox's, that she kept this registration until her end in 1936.

Best Regards
Dave

treeve
30th December 2009, 22:18
Proper Job!! (Thumb)

gil mayes
31st December 2009, 08:01
MARNE was registered at Grimsby (GY77) on 7.2.1919. She was renamed WILLIAM WESNEY (GY77) on 3.11.1924 and MERRIVALE(GY77) on 23.5.1929. She is noted 'Totally lost' 18.2.1936 and her Grimsby registry closed 27.3.1936.
Gil.

treeve
31st December 2009, 13:10
Thanks and All the best for the New Year. (Thumb)

regint
31st December 2009, 14:42
In 1874 a man called Oliver Petraeus Effersoe bought a 25,60 tons fishing vessel from Hull to Torshavn, Faroe Islands. He called the vessel Stjernen (The Star). It would properbly be listed as "Sold to Danes". I know this is a long shot, but if anyone can identify this ship it will be greatly appreciated.

Happy New Year.

Regin

RayJordandpo
9th January 2010, 19:24
Anyone out there sail on the Ranger boats out of Shields?

Wasn't the 'Gaul' the old 'Ranger Castor'?

Michael Lowrey
7th February 2010, 03:20
Hi Gil, I think you maybe right, I can find no mention of of Cornelian H 506 being requisitioned and no mention into details of her fate except being reported missing on 14/1/1916, or why the names of her crew were subsquently placed on the Towerhill Merchant Navy Memorial. The criteria for inclusion on the memorial I believe is to have been lost due to direct enemy action or war time events considered to have contributed to their deaths. Thanks for your reply, best regards Eddie

Eddie,

Just found your question. In general you are correct about the CWGC criteria. However, commeration was liberally granted in the case of the crews of missing ships, including fishing vessels. If it disappeared in a war zone, typiclly the assumption was made that the loss was war related. In the case of fishing vessels that went missing from 114 - 1916, the specific hazard would be German cruiser-laid mines in the North Sea.

Best wishes,
Michael
uboat.net

snacker
7th February 2010, 08:45
hi tsj59 ?
thats brilliant mate ! i was looking for a list my relative was henry thomas vaughn ramshaw and i didnt realise he was cheif engineer he liked to be called jack though?
thanks for that also thanks again to Steve Farrow who emailed me a load of

also had another relative william cameron one of three survivors on the edgar wallace sunk outside hull docks.
later in life he was lost on the Hondo ( one of taylors) i think ?some luck eh ? . I use to sail for BUT on the catboats in the early 80ies
Norm

A relation of mine lost his life on the Hondo and is body is buried on one of the scottish islands not far from were the hondo sank his last name was leach

www.trawlerman.piczo.com

Steve Farrow
7th February 2010, 11:12
I have just posted a painting of the HONDO GY 701 in the Gallery under Maritime Art.

Regards

Steve

Michael Lowrey
7th February 2010, 20:16
I'm looking for information on the Hull trawler RUBY (H494), which was taken into Royal Navy service and torpedoed and sunk with all hands on October 17, 1917.

Best wishes,
Michael

gil mayes
7th February 2010, 21:55
You will have detail of the U-boat involved, Michael.

RUBY (H494)
O.N. 139299. 251g 98n 121.8 x 22.6 x 12.2 feet
T.3-cyl by Charles D. Holmes & Co Ltd, Hull

11.12.1915: Launched by Cochrane & Sons Ltd, Selby (Yd.No.659) for Kingston Steam Trawling Co Ltd, Hull as RUBY. 28.9.1916: Completed. 29.9.1916: Registered at Hull (H494). 17.10.1917: Torpedoed by U-boat off Ushant; no survivors. 5.12.1917: Hull registry closed 'Total loss'.
Gil.

Michael Lowrey
8th February 2010, 03:28
Gil,

Thanks. Am trying to track down owners and builders for the vessels hit by U-boats in World War I.

The sinking of RUBY was only explained about a year and a half ago. U-boats generally didn't intentionally torpedo trawlers, and in any case, no U-boat claimed RUBY.

RUBY was taken into Royal Navy service and it seems was being used as a patrol and escort vessel. On October 17, 1917, U 53 torpedoed the British steamer POLVENA out of a convoy. The U-boat's captain, Kplt. Hans Rose, decided against putting a second torpedo into the steamer as he considered her sinking to be inevitable.

The minelaying U-boat UC 79 then arrives on the scene and fires a single torpedo toward POLVENA. RUBY was one of the vessels assisting POLVENA; UC 79's torpedo struck the trawler, not the steamer. UC 79 presumed she had finished off POLVENA, and that's the way the action was attributed out in the German official history. The location would be about 48°50'N, 05°10'W.

Best wishes,
Michael

gil mayes
8th February 2010, 07:34
Michael
Probably able to help with owners and details, either PM or mail direct, Roger G has my mail address.
Gil.

dickb
26th February 2010, 22:12
Hi there, just noticed this site while looking up the Nesam. My father served as the Bosun on the Nesam and was one of the survivors on that night she went down.

cueball44
14th March 2010, 22:41
Can anybody remember the name of the vessel that almost chopped the Kingston Pearl in half off Immingham. I think it was either an oil tanker or an ore carrier, possibly mid-seventies.
Here is a thumbnail of her being patched-up.
Steve

i sailed on the kingston pearl 1960 when i was 16 as galley boy, aero walker was one of the deck crowd, his son alan was pleasureing with us the last i heard he was skipper on the stern drags,his dad died many years ago and did'nt see his son climb to were he is,he would have been proud of him, w.hawker.

wightspirit
16th March 2010, 10:59
Hi

Does anyone have information/photographs of the Hull registered trawler Crestflower? She was owned by the Yorkshire Steam Fishing Co Ltd (A Turgoose, manager) and registered as FY367. She was requisitioned by the Admiralty in 1939 for minesweeping duties. Built in 1930 by Cochrane's, she was bombed and sunk south of St Catherine's Point in July 1940 with the loss of two crew. No official records exist concerning her loss (or none that I can find). All I have is a bow photo of her lying alongside the Lord Brentford.

Dave W

Blue in Bim
16th March 2010, 12:56
I have just joined and have been catching up on the fishing fleet. I left the UK in 1979 aboard the Ross Resolution, built 1948 as a steam trawler, refitted with a 7 cyl Ruston in 1964 but retained the prop so had a large reduction gearbox. The slowest speed possible was 7 knots so a lot of in and out of gear when going alongside ! Crossed the Atlantic to Barbados (where I left her) and continued through Panama and the Pacific and ended life on the great barrier reef during a storm.

chadburn
16th March 2010, 14:17
Did Yorkshire Steam Fishing belong to Jack Ellis?

trotterdotpom
16th March 2010, 14:54
Ross Resolution was actually a Grimsby trawler, I think. Started out as Rinovia, then Ross Stalker, then Ross Resolution and finally aground on Emily Reef near Cooktown, Queensland, as "Debut".

I assume you sailed with Dick Brooks. He reputedly put her aground after a row with the authorities over the ship not being granted a licence to carry passengers. He and his Samoan wife stayed aboard the wreck for about three years after she went aground. Not sure what happened to him after that.

Attached is a photo of Debut up on the reef, taken a couple of years ago.

John T.

Kerbtrawler
16th March 2010, 21:41
Hi

Does anyone have information/photographs of the Hull registered trawler Crestflower? She was owned by the Yorkshire Steam Fishing Co Ltd (A Turgoose, manager) and registered as FY367. She was requisitioned by the Admiralty in 1939 for minesweeping duties. Built in 1930 by Cochrane's, she was bombed and sunk south of St Catherine's Point in July 1940 with the loss of two crew. No official records exist concerning her loss (or none that I can find). All I have is a bow photo of her lying alongside the Lord Brentford.

Dave W

Here's what I have on her
Crestflower H239
Official Number 160894
Built 05/1930 Cochranes of Selby
Yard number 1075
367 Gross 142 Net
150.3 x 24.5 x 13.2
Quarter deck 81' Focsle 21' later 24'
1930 owned by Yorkshire SF Co
until 1938 when she went to H Markham Cook
Call Sign was LFVH until 1938 then GJMZ
08/1939 purchased by the Royal Navy
Went to Doigs of Grimsby for conversion to a Minesweeper
Fitted with 1 x 12 pdr
Lost 19/07/1940 - she foundered after recieving damage after a German air raid
Foundered 50' 29" N by 1.18W off St. Cathrines Point Isle of Wight

hope this helps

cheers

wightspirit
17th March 2010, 10:18
Thanks Kerbtrawler. That's a bit more to add which I didn't have.

Dave W

Blue in Bim
17th March 2010, 14:58
Yes, Dick Brooks it was. I met him in a pub in England after he returned from Dubai having sold a smaller trawler as a water carrier. I drove him round the ports looking for another one to buy and found Ross Resolution in Hull (altho' she was registered in Grimsby) laid up due to the Cod war. He bought her and we took it down to Plymouth for a little cleaning and painting before leaving in Sept '79

Ian Cox

trotterdotpom
17th March 2010, 22:28
Thanks Ian. He sounds like a larger than life character - ex Norfolk Bobby, I believe. A couple of TV programs were made about him when he and his wife were camped out on Emily Reef, but I never saw them. Any idea what happened to them?

John T.

Blue in Bim
19th March 2010, 16:55
No idea at all. I heard his wife sailed off on a fishing boat that passed which he wasn't too sad about as she had become 'with child' a couple of times and he had 'the snip' when he was in his first marriage! I was sent an article about him living on board from a Brit w/e newspaper magazine and that was the last I heard PC 680 according to the article by Richard Shears (YOU magazine). I seem to remember the first trawler he took to the Gulf was Dauntless out of Ipswich. He certainly had some stories !!!