Brocklebank Photo's

skymaster
4th October 2006, 01:50
I want to say a great big THANKS to all the Brock guys who have contributed their photographs to this site.When I left Brocks in 1958 I had a lot of great memories but very few photographs.Since joining SN I have been able to fill that gap with all your wonderfull contributions.Nothing gives me more pleasure than getting out my album and showing off our memories of those days.Thanks to everyone and keep them coming.

Mike

benjidog
4th October 2006, 04:38
Mike,

That is one great thing about SN - everyone is only too pleased to share their experiences and photos.

It is nice that you have taken the trouble to thank people for their contributions.

Regards,

Brian

Tony Selman
4th October 2006, 11:38
Skymaster, yes I completely agree. Apart from renewing old seagoing acquaintances one of the great pleasures of this site is revelling in the great photographs that are loaded on here, from your own former companies and others as well. I personally have posted a few and the process generated a very prolonged search to track down a missing box of slides that I knew contained relevant pictures, including those posted recently. Like many I only wish I had taken a lot more when I was at sea. Brock's are particularly lucky with a very active board and a large number of pictures on these threads and in the gallery. All part of the addictive SN experience.

Roger Bentley
7th October 2006, 20:57
Here goes my first attempt at attachments. If successful you will see the Macharda at Sandheads during summer 1956. At the swimming club.
Names read from the left - bottom row, Neil Humphries 4/O, Brian Holland 2/E, Walter Lloyd Williams 3/O, second row yours truly, the 5/E, and Sid Ledger 4/E, at the top of the pyramid one of the apprentices. Hope this brings back some memories. Salaams, Roger Bentley(K)

skymaster
7th October 2006, 21:15
Seem to think I sailed with the guy on left on bottom.Sure brings those memories flooding back,but sometimes a little grey!Thanks.

Cheers

Mike

Tony Selman
8th October 2006, 14:34
Roger, you haven't changed a bit - he lied. The uploading worked as you can see and we look forward to more postings.

Roger Bentley
8th October 2006, 17:15
Re Macharda pix. Many thanks for the kind comments. Glad to know they got through. 50 years ago they were taken, somehow they have stayed with me down the years. Recently I provided some pictures for Tony Spriging's book Beyond the Mersey, and there were others that belonged to Tony. He has asked me to put some into the site so here goes. One of Brocklebank's characters was Geoffey Kenyon who was an ardent photographer, he also had a sense of humour so here he is posing as a diligent 2nd Mate in fog at full speed ahead, and another he took of a Serang which typifies what great seamen we had in the crews. There will be more to follow. Regards, Roger Bentley

roy quirk
8th October 2006, 19:25
HI Roger,
Great photo's.What intrigues me is what is that huge lever for(with the fancy ropework)?
Cheers,
Roy

John Rogers
8th October 2006, 19:30
He looks like a film star, a young and thin Wallace Beery of Tugboat Annie. Or is it spelled Beary???
John

Roger Bentley
8th October 2006, 19:51
Hi Roy & John, I presume you mean the lever to sound the siren!
Here are two electricians hard at work on one of the Magdapur's winches in 1958. The senior was Dennis Williams. This picture also appears in Tony's book Beyond the Mersey. Regards, Roger Bentley

Roger Bentley
9th October 2006, 14:30
The attached shows three rather exhausted engineers on the Magdapur after some big job. As a 'sparks' I can not begin to guess what it was. Their names are from left to right, Pat, Tony, and Dave. Dave was the second engineer.
The other picture was on the same ship same voyage and was taken during our stay at Gan Island, Chris Connerty the 2nd RO is giving it all with his rendition of 'He's got the whole world in his hands' The chap in whites on the left is the 'Chippy' and the chap near the door was one of the shore people from the island. I have dug out quite a few old snaps now, and along with the ones from Tony's book I will carry on putting them in, at regular intervals if you think they merit inserting! Cheers, Roger Bentley

roy quirk
9th October 2006, 23:30
Hi Roger,
Looking at the engineers photo--- I know the feeling,my ship the Markhor,was 16 years older!They would soon recover after a few beers! According to my list of Brocklebank ship visits to Gan, your 2nd photo was taken April 1958,(we were there in Jan '58.)
Cheers.
Roy.

Ron Stringer
10th October 2006, 12:29
The chap in whites on the left is the 'Chippy' I guess he is from the Isle of Man - the three legs give it away!

Tony Selman
10th October 2006, 18:56
Great photos Roger, keep them coming. Other than you I haven't seen anyone I know but I very much enjoy looking at them anyway.

pilot
10th October 2006, 20:03
HI Roger,
Great photo's.What intrigues me is what is that huge lever for(with the fancy ropework)?
Cheers,
Roy

The whistle halyard control?

Cheers

Roger Bentley
13th October 2006, 20:04
Hi, Thanks for the comments. Yes, the lever is the one to yank down and sound the siren, I have another picture of the great Geoffrey Kenyon in his next frame doing just that. This will appear as soon as I can scan it. Meanwhile here is one my brother John Bentley has sent me, he was 2nd R/O on the Manipur at the time and this is of a 21st birthday for someone. It must have been round about 1954-55. John is 3rd from the left almost obscured. Anyone know who the others are? Regards, Roger Bentley

Roger Bentley
13th October 2006, 20:16
(K) Here are two more before signing off for today. The first shows Tony Dunster 4th Mate of the Magdapur posing next to a winch! The other is of a group outside the mission in Madras, left to right Jock Warren senior apprentice. me 2nd R/O, Matt a Scotsman one of the engineers, and Jimmy Dalby Ch/Electrician. We were all on the Maidan at the time. Salaams, Roger

skymaster
13th October 2006, 22:11
Great Photos Roger!

Mike

Roger Bentley
18th October 2006, 16:04
A couple more photographs of the old days! The one of the cricket team is from the Macharda. Back row, Me, Apprentice, Asst Purser/Ch Stwd, Walter Lloyd-Williams 3rd Mate, ? an engineer ?, In the middle Sid Ledger 4th Engineer, front row Apprentice, an Engineer, John Kerbyson 2nd Mate, and Chippy Johnston or Johnson. The other is another picture of the 4th Mate on the Macharda Neil Humphries. Regards, Roger Bentley

Tony Sprigings
19th October 2006, 09:13
With reference to the first photo I am sure that the last one in the top row is Archie Howie.

Roger Bentley
19th October 2006, 20:04
(K) Tony, I thought that was his name, but thought I had better wait until expert idenfication came along. He was on another Brocklebank ship and joined our team. I sailed with him once and he gave me quite a few negatives as he was a fairly keen photographer. Here is one he sent me, obviously of some ladies who were at a party on board. They seem to have actually donned bits of uniform! Regards, Roger

Tony Sprigings
19th October 2006, 20:52
Roger,
No one I met I can assure you. Archie left the sea when he was Second Mate and joined Caledonian Airways as a Navigator. I haven't heard from him or of him for years so don't know if he is still with us.

Tony Selman
19th October 2006, 21:19
Is that a fiver's stripes? I didn't sail with any like that unfortunately.

Roger Bentley
20th October 2006, 17:54
(A) Tony, You are quite right it is a non Brocklebank stripe on the lady on the right, but the cap badge is OK for Brocks. Who were they.? I guess we will never know! I am slowly going through some negatives but sadly the quality is beginning to go after so long. However here are two hardy members of the Magdapur's football team. The large gentleman I think might be Keith McGinty asst purser/ch stwd. The other looking rathered knackered is 'Tod' Sloan the purser/ ch stwd and a great Everton fan. Not sure who the guy in civvies is. Regards, Roger

Tony Crompton
20th October 2006, 20:55
A photo Sam sent me a few years ago.
His wife is Dave Woolfenden's sister.
---------------------------------
Tony C

Tony Crompton
20th October 2006, 21:14
Another photo from Sam taken I believe in 1985.

l to r Captains Evans, Landers, Jackson, Embleton, Brand, Moore, Stoneley (Ch. Eng ), House (Eng. Super) Paddy Jackson,Pritchard, Sam Baxter.
These should bring back many Brocklebank memories.
----------------------------------------
Tony C

skymaster
20th October 2006, 21:36
A couple of photos Sam sent me a few years ago.
His wife is Dave Woolfenden's sister.
---------------------------------
Tony C

Great picture Tony,he really treated me well on my first trip on Mathura[1955]
saved me from Captain Jackson a couple of times!

Mike

Tony Sprigings
21st October 2006, 17:23
Poor old Sam, You shouldn't put pictures of him like that on SN people will get the wrong impression!

S Fraser
22nd October 2006, 12:06
Another photo from Sam taken I believe in 1985.

l to r Captains Evans, Landers, Jackson, Embleton, Brand, Moore, Stoneley (Ch. Eng ), House (Eng. Super) Paddy Jackson,Pritchard, Sam Baxter.
These should bring back many Brocklebank memories.
----------------------------------------
Tony C

Tony,
What a great photo. I sailed with both Erin Jackson and Sam Baxter when they were C/O's on the Masirah and Mangla respectively. Philip Brand was also Master on the Mangla that same trip in 1965. I had the greatest respect for all of them. Even though we have all aged I see them as they were. Great seamen, a credit to their profession, and some of Brocks finest.
Stan

pilot
23rd October 2006, 06:45
Tony, Super 'photo. Many thanks for posting.
Good to see many Gentlemen that I sailed with who made a big impression on a young lad of 16 years old.
Capt. Pritchard who's constant advice to the apprentices was to get a shore job and that life's a bowl of cherries seems to be just yesterday not 1963!
I saw the last of the good old days with Brocks. and feel privilged to have started my career learning from such gentlemen as these.
Best Regards.

Roger Bentley
23rd October 2006, 17:30
Hello again, Here is the promised picture of Geoffrey Kenyon deploying the lever featured in an earlier picture. Moving right along to 1989 or 1990 to Hong Kong where I was on a three year posting, here is a picture of myself, my brother John ( Ex Brock R/O who was visiting) Noel 'Nobby' Grayson who was out on a visit with the Bach Choir and Jim Wort who was running an engineering consultancy out in Hong Kong. I had just come out from the BMH Kowloon having suffered a massive stomach bleed due to a reaction with Brufen, and thanks to the quick reaction of a Major at Sekong Medical Centre he saved the day. I went on a golf tour to Thailand shortly afterwards and even ate the curries without any more reaction! Regards, Roger Bentley

Roger Bentley
23rd October 2006, 18:35
Thought you may interested in the attached. After I retired in 1994, I picked up the picture in a post card exhibition in Harrogate. It was posted on December 27 1923 and has a penny stamp on it. The text reads - Been all over the place, Liverpool, Darlington N.E.R works etc. I expect you are in Switz - So don't know when this will reach you. It is signed H.M. Le. F. Which I am pretty sure means the writer was the famous shipping historian and author of several books. H.M. Le Fleming. The card states the photographer was Cooper - Photo- Seacombe and was sold by the Northern Publishing Co Ltd, Brunswick St,Liverpool. The writer has written in white ink that the ship is the Maihar. She looks pretty good I think! Most post cards of this period feature liners, not cargo ships. Regards, Roger Bentley

Roger Bentley
25th October 2006, 20:55
This is the penultimate cricket team photograph I have, and it was taken on the Maskeliya in 1955. Seated on the rail are Phil? Cooper 2nd Mate, Phil Owen 3rd mate, Dave Cosker senior apprentice 'Dinger' Bell junior apprentice and who was on his first trip. George an Engineer, Electrician, Wally? Kemp 4th Engineer, Sid Ledger (yet again!) and me. I have heard on one of the other threads about a Bell who unfortunately died when with the RAF, is this the same Bell? Regards, Roger Bentley

Tony Selman
25th October 2006, 22:03
Dave Cosker is the only one of those I sailed with. He was C/O on Moss Tankers Luxor with me in 1967 or 68. Dave was an exceptionally nice man but I don't think tankers were his favourite pastime.

mahseer1
25th October 2006, 23:46
Roger

Yes, definitely Ken Bell who I met a couple of times. He was from Dundee and I heard about his sad death after I left the sea in 1964 - I think he drowned in the late 60s. In Dundee Model Boat Club we have a member called Kenny Bell, in his late 60s, who is a distant cousin of Ken but only recalls distant memories of an accident.
Regards
Peter B

S Fraser
26th October 2006, 13:00
This is the penultimate cricket team photograph I have, and it was taken on the Maskeliya in 1955. Seated on the rail are Phil? Cooper 2nd Mate, Phil Owen 3rd mate, Dave Cosker senior apprentice 'Dinger' Bell junior apprentice and who was on his first trip. George an Engineer, Electrician, Wally? Kemp 4th Engineer, Sid Ledger (yet again!) and me. I have heard on one of the other threads about a Bell who unfortunately died when with the RAF, is this the same Bell? Regards, Roger Bentley

Roger,
That is Ken Bell at the back right, who unfortunately drowned in the North Sea whilst in the RAF. I sailed with him as 3/0 on the Maskeliya and 2/0 on the Mathura. A very amusing character, and a sad end.
Stan

Roger Bentley
26th October 2006, 15:54
Stan and Peter, Thank you very much for the information re Ken. He was a very enthusiastic chap and we used to admire his diary keeping of his first trip as an apprentice. He was Scottish as you say. Another Brocklebank 2nd mate Phil Greenall who some of the older hands will remember had a very successful career in the RAF Marine section, retiring as a Wing Commander and picking up the MBE as well. On one of my overseas postings I saw his name in the local Army paper re a rescue mission, and on enquiring if he was the Phil Greenall I had known, received the reply Name from the past come down and get p...ed. Which I am glad to say I did. I last saw him and his wife Kay at the 1993 reunion, since then I understand he has sadly passed away. A great guy with a wicked sense of humour. Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
26th October 2006, 18:13
Here is the last cricket team photograph I have. It was taken by me, and I was on my last trip deep sea in the Masirah 1960. Sadly I cannot remember all the names, but standing extreme left is I think Dave Cosker, then Pete 2R/O, then it looks like John Hornsby 2nd Mate bending over Bob Evans 3rd Mate who is crouching down. Anyone recognise some of the others? While at Sandheads I took the picture of a Brocklebank ship passing us. I know which ship I think it is but would rather wait until one of the experts can identify her. Regards, Roger

Tony Sprigings
26th October 2006, 18:50
I am fairly sure that the ship was the Macharda, does that concur with your thinking?

skymaster
26th October 2006, 19:03
Here is the last cricket team photograph I have. It was taken by me, and I was on my last trip deep sea in the Masirah 1960. Sadly I cannot remember all the names, but standing extreme left is I think Dave Cosker, then Pete 2R/O, then it looks like John Hornsby 2nd Mate bending over Bob Evans 3rd Mate who is crouching down. Anyone recognise some of the others? While at Sandheads I took the picture of a Brocklebank ship passing us. I know which ship I think it is but would rather wait until one of the experts can identify her. Regards, Roger

Iam sure I sailed with chap with glasses I attach photo Mahanada December 1957 yours truly on right.Anyone know his name?

Mike

Braighe
26th October 2006, 20:50
Roger. Phil Greenall was 2nd Mate on Maidan while I was 2 R/O there in 1951/52. There was a story current then that his father had been Master on the Maidan lost in the Jervis Bay convoy. Cannot vouch for this. Willie Macleod

Tony Sprigings
26th October 2006, 21:43
With reference to Captain Greenall. He was Captain of the Matheran which was sunk in convoy in 1940 in the North Atlantic. He was posted amongst the missing. Lew Jeans was the Chief officer They were picked up by the Loch Lomond which in turn was torpedoed and then the H.M.S. Jason picked them up and they were landed finally in Methil.
Cannot vouch for the fact that he was Phil greenall's father but probably it was the case.

Derek Roger
26th October 2006, 23:32
Keep them coming Lads ;
On Tonys Picture I sailed with or knew Capt Brand who I think was apprentice with my late father ( Charles Braid Roger ); Brian Stonely ; Charlie House ( Who was my boss ) and Sam "San " Baxter of my Mahout days and also Mahsud I think. I will post a couple of Sam taken in Melborne at a pool party in Melbourne at friends of my familys residence . Time you lads got Sam on SN .
Wonderfull pictures .

S Fraser
27th October 2006, 13:41
Roger. Phil Greenall was 2nd Mate on Maidan while I was 2 R/O there in 1951/52. There was a story current then that his father had been Master on the Maidan lost in the Jervis Bay convoy. Cannot vouch for this. Willie Macleod

Capt Greenall was Master of the Matheran that was sunk on the 19th October 1940 when in a convoy on passage from Halifax NS to the UK. There is a very concise account the sinking of the Matheran in the Brocklebank History vol.II. He was lost along with 6 other crew members, and the remaining crew were picked up by the Loch Lomond that in turn was torpedoed a day later. The survivors from this incident were picked-up by HMS Jason.
No amount of torment that we Baby-Boomer who joined the MN after the war, may have experienced, can ever equal what the previous generation had been through. I often used to wonder what some of the older Brock officers and the QM's had experienced, but it was never referred to in my presence. Much to their credit they bore whatever scars they had quietly!
Stan

Roger Bentley
27th October 2006, 15:35
Re comments from Willie, Tony and Stan.

I can confirm that Phil's father was indeed the Captain Greenall who was lost in WW2. I was with Phil on the Maskeliya coasting just before he left, he initially went to Littlewoods as a store manager and then joined the RAF. I remember him saying at the time he was resigning that his mother had not wanted him to, as the company had been so good to her following her husband's death. Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
28th October 2006, 16:58
Here is the Macharda lying in Colombo, the smoke addition by that ubiquitous Calcutta ship visitor Dhruba Paul, he always added something to the prints he returned. The other picture is a general scene at the Swimming Club, somwhere most Brocklebank personnel would have visited at one time or another. Going through my faded photos and negatives, how I wished I had got a decent camera in those days! Salaams, Roger

gwzm
29th October 2006, 15:20
Roger,

Very nostalgic picture of the round float at the Calcutta swimming club. Four or five of us would clamber on, stand on one side and start running. this caused the float to tilt more and more, the faster you ran, until we all fell off laughing. Not sure that such behaviour was favourable looked upon by the pukkah sahibs.

I always remember the little signs on the grassy areas around the pool - "Members are kindly requested not to partake of tiffin upon the lawns." Wish I'd taken a photo.

Happy days indeed and long gone for ever.

All the best,

John/gwzm

Roger Bentley
29th October 2006, 16:13
John, Thanks for the reminder of the notice at the club. Yes, the behaviour of 'shippies' on the round float did draw glances from the pukka sahibs and their memsahibs. We were classed in the hierarchy as on the same level as the dreaded 'jute wallahs' I am putting two more photographs with this message. The one of the Chief Elec Dennis Williams shows him in full 'cruel sea' mode having just come off stations on the Magdapur. The other is a rather curious one I found in a book shop. i showed it recently to Brian Turner the ex Brocklebank Catering Superintendent, and he feels sure that he recognised some of the people and thought they were from our agents at Port Said. It is evocative of the 1950s anyway! Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
2nd November 2006, 17:15
I have noticed on some threads that the sampans used to get us ashore at Garden Reach etc., have been described as bumboats. I never heard this description in my time with Bibbbys and Brocklebanks they were always called sampans. Bumboats were those boats laden with dubious wares at Port Said and Aden which came alongside and tried to sell trinkets and rugs of lurid hues. Does anyone agree? Here are two pictures that might bring back memories - a Bank Line Samboat with a Brocklebanks ship beside her, name unknown and a good picture of a sampan. Then one of bumboats approaching the mv Cheshire in 1951 at Port Said. Regards, Roger Bentley

Roger Bentley
2nd November 2006, 17:23
Here are three debonaire chaps, l to r, Neil Humphries Walter Lloyd Williams and Roger Goodson 1st R/O of the Macharda, it looks as if this picture may have been taken after the afternoon beers!. The other is of John Hornsby 3rd Mate of the Mathura posing during a fire drill, note the modern winches behind him, we had two to give the 2nd RO and 2nd Engineer some relief as their cabins were right near them. Regards, Roger Bentley

gwzm
2nd November 2006, 17:32
Roger,

I agree the ferry boats at Garden Reach should, correctly, be called sampans. It always amazed me that the ferrymen lived on board in what was little more than half of a barrel at the after end. When I think back to it, I'm surprised they ever survived: Picture the scene - early morning on the Hooghly, one ferryman performing ablutions at one end (cleaning teeth and washing) using water from the river whilst the other is performing bodily functions at the other end in the same water! See photo in my gallery for the colour of the water..........
One of the apprentices and I survived a dunking in the Hooghly when the sampan was caught in the bore tide and capsized whilst on our way back to Makrana. Fortunately no ill-effects but that was maybe down to taking a swift slug of dilute TCP (not recommended according to the instructions) ...aaaaaaarghhhhh. Did the trick and no ill-effects.

All the best,

John/gwzm

Roger Bentley
2nd November 2006, 20:32
John, A wonderful story, and it must have been a terrifying experience at the time. I recall making a dicey trip on one once, but we made it OK. The same sort of conditions used to apply when we were in the Rangoon river with the Derbyshire, there was a very strong current there similar to the Hooghlyl, and even a sort of a bore at times. Life on the barges never failed to astound me as well, washing in Kidderpore dock water must have left the user facing all sorts of diseases, or perhaps we only saw the very fit barge people, the rest having succumbed ages ago. Kind Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
4th November 2006, 16:32
Here is the Malabar in all her glory. I took it in 1959. The other picture is I think of the Masirah, I took it but I am not sure! Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
6th November 2006, 17:55
I am dredging through the last photos I have of Brocklebank days. I will have a go with some negatives later. Here is George Hazell 1R/O of the Maidan along with Ginger Blackburn 4/O. The other shows Taff Williams 3/O of the Magdapur along with Terry one of the engineers, proudly showing their selection of cameras, but more noteworthy for Taff showing his shirt without collar. Do you remember those shirts, and how we thought the new type plastic collars were hi tech, until they went yellow and stuck to your neck in any sort of warm weather. Regards, Roger Bentley

skymaster
6th November 2006, 21:15
I am dredging through the last photos I have of Brocklebank days. I will have a go with some negatives later. Here is George Hazell 1R/O of the Maidan along with Ginger Blackburn 4/O. The other shows Taff Williams 3/O of the Magdapur along with Terry one of the engineers, proudly showing their selection of cameras, but more noteworthy for Taff showing his shirt without collar. Do you remember those shirts, and how we thought the new type plastic collars were hi tech, until they went yellow and stuck to your neck in any sort of warm weather. Regards, Roger Bentley
Roger any idea of date of Magdapur crew photo?

Mike

Roger Bentley
7th November 2006, 17:07
Hi Mike, Yes I can give definite dates as I took the photo. We signed on 21 March 1958 and signed off 2 October 1958. Hope this helps, Salaams, Roger

skymaster
7th November 2006, 18:52
Hi Mike, Yes I can give definite dates as I took the photo. We signed on 21 March 1958 and signed off 2 October 1958. Hope this helps, Salaams, Roger

Thanks Roger!I was on the trip before you.I actually signed off in Calcutta April 4th and joined mathura for home voyage due to Apprentice on her taken sick.

Mike

Tony Sprigings
8th November 2006, 16:22
Roger,
Would that be Trevor Williams? His wife's name was Myfanwy I seem to remember and she was always saying Pied, Pied,Trev. No doubt the Welsh amongst you can translate!

Roger Bentley
8th November 2006, 19:51
Tony, Yes his name was Trevor. Most definitely a Welshman, not sure if he was married at the time I sailed with him though. The Magdapur officers seemed to change fairly regularly, as the following voyage when you were there there was a different set of mates. You replaced the redoubtable Geoffrey Kenyon and Brian(?) Wilkinson and Trevor were replaced by Messrs Millichap and Lewis. I have uncovered another photo and this shows Mr Wilkinson and another Engineer, can't remember his name but he was a Scout Master I believe. Great days. Salaams, Roger

mahseer1
8th November 2006, 21:50
Tony and Roger

I sailed with Trev when I was apprentice on the Mahronda and for about 18 months on the Masirah when he was 2nd mate and I was third. His wife (who we called Nan) joined him on the Masirah for the Dec '62 to May '63 voyage which culminated in the Mississippi collisions (see thread). She was a lovely, bright young lady and had the company of two other wives on that trip.

Trevor taught me a lot and he had the most beautiful handwriting. I still prize my sight book from that period which I laid out in Trev's style. He also let me copy his extensive "course and distance" tables which I typed out on the C/O's typewriter (can't remember if I should thank Tony Sprigings or Sam Baxter for that).

How's this for coincidence? I took my family camping on Anglesey in the late 70's and took a trip to Cemaes one afternoon. Wandering along the front I heard two ladies talking in Welsh and recognised Nan's voice instantly. I couldn't believe it and neither could she. Over a cup of tea she updated us on Trev's career - he was captain in some Asian company trading between the Persian Gulf and the Far East. They were still very friendly with Capt Simpson and, I think, visited him when they could. I often think about Trev and Nan and wish I had kept in touch.

Regards to all
Peter B

Jim S
8th November 2006, 23:24
Tony, Yes his name was Trevor. Most definitely a Welshman, not sure if he was married at the time I sailed with him though. The Magdapur officers seemed to change fairly regularly, as the following voyage when you were there there was a different set of mates. You replaced the redoubtable Geoffrey Kenyon and Brian(?) Wilkinson and Trevor were replaced by Messrs Millichap and Lewis. I have uncovered another photo and this shows Mr Wilkinson and another Engineer, can't remember his name but he was a Scout Master I believe. Great days. Salaams, Roger.

Could the engineer whose name you forget be John Hoy - He was 2nd Eng on Mahanada on my first coastal trip on joining Brocks as 5/E in October 1962.
I never saw him again although I was pencilled in to do a short trip to the Persian Gulf as 2nd Eng on Maskeliya with John as Chief Eng. in late 1967.
But by then I had decided to seek pastures new and joined Elders & Fyffes.
With Suez Canal closed I did not fancy longer trips around the Cape. - On joining Fyffes I did 6 month trips - how clever was that?

Tony Sprigings
9th November 2006, 09:55
Peter,
It must have been Sam because I left the Masirah in May '62 prior to joining the building of Mahout.
I kept in touch with Jimmy Simpson right up to his death down here in Sussex.Sadly his wife predeceased him and now both his son and daughter in-law have also died. Presume from yours that Trev. is still alive?

R798780
9th November 2006, 11:22
.

Could the engineer whose name you forget be John Hoy - He was 2nd Eng on Mahanada on my first coastal trip on joining Brocks as 5/E in October 1962.
I never saw him again although I was pencilled in to do a short trip to the Persian Gulf as 2nd Eng on Maskeliya with John as Chief Eng. in late 1967.


It does inded look like John Hoy, the deep sea boy scout from Sunderland. From 2/E on Malakand - my first trip in '64 - our paths crossed on and off over the years. He was C/E on Maskeliya in 67, (still sprog), then on the tankers where I was mate; Lumiere in '75, Oloibiri in '76, and a couple of times later on Luminetta.

gwzm
9th November 2006, 16:10
Roger,

Your unknown engineer does indeed look like John Hoy. He was 2/E on the trip I did on Malakand.

All the best,

John/gwzm

Derek Roger
9th November 2006, 16:11
Most definitley John Hoy ; I relieved him as C /E on Luminous in 1973 ( My first vessel as Chief Engineer )

Roger Bentley
9th November 2006, 18:07
Many thanks, I can confirm that he was from Sunderland, and so he is John Hoy. Now for a bit of Christmas Cheer, here is the menu of the Malabar for Xmas 1959. I have been given the initial J but I was definitely there! My discha(K) rge book shows we signed on 5 November 1959 returning on 4 Mar 1960. My daughter Elaine was born on 5 March 1960, a close run thing for me getting home on time! Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
9th November 2006, 20:22
Gentlemen, Given your help in identifying John Hoy, can anyone help with the details of Bob Evans. He was 3rd Mate on my last trip to sea on the Masirah, and was also a great friend of my brother John Bentley - visiting him once and enjoying the delights of Buxton Derbyshire pubs. We did stay in touch briefly, but I had left Brocklebanks and afterwards moved around all over the place plus several overseas tours in my other career. Regards, Roger Bentley

mahseer1
9th November 2006, 21:40
Hello Tony

Sorry to hear about Capt Simpson's family. He and his wife, of course, would have been well into their 100s by now but sad to hear about his son. Did he move down to Sussex to be near his family? I remember Nan saying that he had retired to the Lake District.

Last night I did a couple of searches on internet telephone directories but could not trace Trevor. I think he would be in his early seventies now so hope that he and Nan are still around. I'm hoping that this thread may bring more news.

Regards
PB

japottinger
13th November 2006, 13:14
Hi, Thanks for the comments. Yes, the lever is the one to yank down and sound the siren, I have another picture of the great Geoffrey Kenyon in his next frame doing just that. This will appear as soon as I can scan it. Meanwhile here is one my brother John Bentley has sent me, he was 2nd R/O on the Manipur at the time and this is of a 21st birthday for someone. It must have been round about 1954-55. John is 3rd from the left almost obscured. Anyone know who the others are? Regards, Roger Bentley

Could be Bob Hollingsworth at far left.

japottinger
13th November 2006, 13:17
Many thanks, I can confirm that he was from Sunderland, and so he is John Hoy. Now for a bit of Christmas Cheer, here is the menu of the Malabar for Xmas 1959. I have been given the initial J but I was definitely there! My discha(K) rge book shows we signed on 5 November 1959 returning on 4 Mar 1960. My daughter Elaine was born on 5 March 1960, a close run thing for me getting home on time! Regards, Roger

Ken Pooley from Fleetwood was on the Mahanada in Sept. 1957 when I was on Maihar, also I think on Matra Dec-Feb 1961

Roger Bentley
13th November 2006, 20:33
Ken Pooley from Fleetwood was on the Mahanada in Sept. 1957 when I was on Maihar, also I think on Matra Dec-Feb 1961
Jim - James ?
Many thanks for the two replies. I don't know about the Manipur prospective ident, as this was a photograph my brother sent me, so will check back with him. Re Ken, Bill Hepworth who was the fourth and an ardent angler. Often used to serenade Ken with the paraphrased words from a popular ballad of the time. "Hang down your head Ken Pooley" We all caught the angling bug and but our enthusiasm was somewhat dimmed when someone caught a water snake at the break water in Colombo, and a local ran up shouting and severed the line. He then explained how dangerous they were. Regards, Roger

Derek Roger
13th November 2006, 23:24
Jim - James ?
Many thanks for the two replies. I don't know about the Manipur prospective ident, as this was a photograph my brother sent me, so will check back with him. Re Ken, Bill Hepworth who was the fourth and an ardent angler. Often used to serenade Ken with the paraphrased words from a popular ballad of the time. "Hang down your head Ken Pooley" We all caught the angling bug and but our enthusiasm was somewhat dimmed when someone caught a water snake at the break water in Colombo, and a local ran up shouting and severed the line. He then explained how dangerous they were. Regards, Roger

Bill Hepworth now lives in Scotland and keeps in touch with Alan Atack who also smartened up enough to move North !
I only met Bill once at sea when he came out to the Mahseer as 2 nd Eng to take her home from Colombo . He as well as being a keen angler was an avid hunter and did a number of Safaris . House full of Giraffes Elphant etc .

He is also an fine sculptor and uses the lost wax process. His work is very well known and I understand he has had commissions from the Royal Family.

Roger Bentley
14th November 2006, 12:55
Although Harrogate is well inland, maritime memorabilia crops up regularly. I picked up these two gems when browsing through post card sales at various book fairs here. The one with two warships as well as a Brocklebank ship can more or less be dated to around 1919 - 21. As on the back is reference to HMS Hannibal and a French warship and HMS Rocksand coming through the harbour entrance. The Rocksand and Hannibal were out of the RN by 1922.

The other picture is also from between the wars, look at the car. This is a good view and I think the other ship coming towards the Brocklebank ship is a Blue Funnel ship. I suspect this Brock ship may be one of the class that were later shortened. Any comments. Salaams, Roger

pilot
14th November 2006, 13:07
Roger, 2 gems indeed.

The Suez Canal or to use it's modern name "Marlboro Canal" ?

Rgds. Martin

Tony Selman
14th November 2006, 14:20
A couple of crackers there Roger. Does anyone recognise the ships? I agree with Martin that one looks very much like the Suez Canal but I am not so sure about the other but can't really think of anywhere else.

mahseer1
14th November 2006, 14:42
Roger

Great photos and I'm fairly sure it's Port Said. Several years ago there was an item on TV about a collection of photographic plates found in Port Said. Apparently a local professional photographer had taken hundreds of pictures from the lighthouse over a long period before WWII. The style of those were similar to yours. I believe the collection was up for sale and often wonder what happened to it.

Regards
PB

Roger Bentley
14th November 2006, 14:59
Roger

Great photos and I'm fairly sure it's Port Said. Several years ago there was an item on TV about a collection of photographic plates found in Port Said. Apparently a local professional photographer had taken hundreds of pictures from the lighthouse over a long period before WWII. The style of those were similar to yours. I believe the collection was up for sale and often wonder what happened to it.

Regards
PB

Peter, I should have said that it is of course Port Said. One photograph did say it was taken from the Casino Hotel. I believe you are right that these have come from a collection and it would appear that they have been dispersed or someone is copying them, although the handwriting on them is almost certainly genuine and almost copperplate. Some years ago I even found one posted from the Waratah on her maiden voyage! She being lost with all hands on her second trip and a cause celebre of disasters. Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
14th November 2006, 15:03
Just found this picture, it shows the old 268 radar on the Mathura. I don't think she ever got a more modern one before she was sold. I wasn't a great technical buff, and really found the old Admiralty handbook for fault finding one of the best ever. Salaams, Roger

Tony Sprigings
14th November 2006, 17:53
Roger,
That brings back memories. Whenever it stalled you used to have to kick the door to fire it up again!
Tony

Roger Bentley
15th November 2006, 16:54
Tony, The 268 was an odd creature, do you remember how we had to ensure the silica gel crystals were kept dry and keep swapping over the drier to ensure the air in the wave guide was kept dry? I have another photo for the experts to declare on. I took it in Colombo and I seem to recall that the dredger pictured was one of the most modern in the world at the time, and I think she was Belgian or Dutch. Regards, Roger

Tony Sprigings
16th November 2006, 10:35
Roger,
When I think back to the days of the 268 with it's screen the size of an eyeball I wonder how we ever spotted anything on it. Mind you in those days we thought it was the answer to a maiden's prayer.
Yes, I remenmber the silica gel crystals and the wave guide and the problems associated.

Cannot help with the dredger though I do recall it in Colombo Harbour.

Roger Bentley
17th November 2006, 20:45
I took this canal photograph, this as far as I can recall it shows the damage to a bridge hit by a tanker, but prior to the Suez invasion. I was on the Macharda in 1956 when we would have been one of the last ships through before the Suez invasion. By a curious coincidence one of the members of the Harrogate Vindicatrix Association had been at sea and then left and was called up for the army, he was in the invasion and stationed at Lloyds Signal station guarding against looters, he had a good look round himself and 'liberated' a list of ship and coast stations. This has now finished up in the archives of the Radio Officer's Association. I noted that strangely enough the Macharda's name has been encircled in biro. Was someone watching us go through as one of the last ships? I certainly recall when we reached the USA how anti the feeling was against the British at that time. The picture of Aden was taken from the usual distant berth we seem to get when carrying explosives! Regards, Roger

Tony Sprigings
18th November 2006, 10:25
Looks like the old Mathura before she was shortened. I agree it looks like the Suez Canal
Tony

Roger Bentley
18th November 2006, 12:41
I apologise for not clearly identifying the two old pictures. Whoever took them did say it was Port Said. I agree one seems to show one of the bigger ships that were shortened, and it could well be the Mathura. I have put another picture of the damaged bridge in the canal with this reply. Re my previous remarks on being on the Macharda as one of the last ships through before the invasion. When I joined the Mathura later, we were one of the first to go back through. We got a Russian Pilot a Captain Ivanov who asked Charlie Gray if would accept him, Charlie was reputed to have said "I don't care if you are a Tahitian as long as you get us through" We were drawing 29 feet and sure enough at one point we grounded. Much consternation but we finally got off and carried on. Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
5th December 2006, 19:17
The gremlins must be in as I have tried to send this earlier. However, here goes again. I took this photo from the Magdapur on the Northern States schedule so the period is March 1958 to October 1959. It shows the Furness Withey liner NOVA SCOTIA at the pilotage off Boston, and the pilot vessel is No. 2. I guess they don't make pilot vessels like that anymore, but perhaps a more recent visitor could confirm this. Best regards, Roger Bentley

Tony Selman
6th December 2006, 12:01
Roger, it was still there in 1968 because I took this photo from Maturata in December of that year just as we were about to enter Boston for a 3 month spell in a planned longshoreman's strike.

Derek Roger
6th December 2006, 19:28
Not the Bluenose but very nice nevertheless . Strange rigging arrangement .
I assume the sails were used to potter about waiting for vessels and the diesel used for going alongside .
Jib would be a real nuscience to the pilots .
Care to comment Roger /Tony ?

Tony Selman
6th December 2006, 19:41
Not being a nautical chappie of the sailing fraternity I don't think I can comment constructively Derek. I am open to correction on this but I am relatively sure they did not use an engine to get alongside us because I remember commenting to someone that the whole thing was very skilled under sail or words to that effect. I can only presume the comment was generated because there was no obvious engine wake. I have no doubt that under certain wind conditions, and no wind for that matter, they would have to use the engines.

As far as my little grey cells can remember I think this was the only time I ever saw a sail powered pilot cutter anywhere in the world.

Tony Crompton
6th December 2006, 20:15
The Pilot would board from the small boat, not the Sailing Cutter or "Steaming
Cutter" as they were known in Ports the World over.
In the Pic of Nova Scotia you can see the "Boarding Boat" returning to the Sailing Cutter. In the other pic the boat is in the Davits.
A ship would lie up to windward of the cutter to make a lee for the small boat for boarding the Pilot.
Was done this way in Tees, Liverpool, Humber,Dungeness, Boston, New York,to name just a few.
No Pilot would ever consider boarding a ship from the large cutter!!!
------------------
Tony C

Roger Bentley
7th December 2006, 11:06
Thank you Derek, and the two Tonys. I am glad to see that the boat in Tony's picture is still No. 2. Yes, there is definitely a small boat returning to the cutter in my picture. I had to reduce it from a very large print so some detail was not so clear. They must have had an engine in the cutter, but I suppose they did like to keep some semblance of the Blue Nose tradition. Many thanks for the interest and comments. Regards, Roger

Derek Roger
7th December 2006, 14:37
Thanks Guys I now see how the operation worked . I am however still interested in the sail configuration ? Looks like a mainsail aft and the jib ford ? Any sailors comments ??? or is she rigged for full astern when the wind changes !

Roger Bentley
7th December 2006, 17:53
Referring back to Tony's 1968 picture, it seems to me that the discoloration on the sails may well be caused by fumes from the motor. Any thoughts on this? The cutter had more sail rigged in the 1958 picture. Maybe some old salt will provide the details. My guess is for her being schooner rigged. Regards, Roger

Tony Crompton
7th December 2006, 18:25
One of the points of cutters like that, and latterly steam & motor driven ones was that they stayed on station usually stopped and ships approached them to windward for the Pilot to board from the boarding boat.
I would suggest that the sails were there just to help the cutter lie as comfortably as possible head to wind and sea rather than any great feats of sailing. I would immagine they would occasionally steam back into port for more Pilots to join awaiting ships or land Pilots from outbound ships.(Certainly that was the usual way in UK Ports)
-------------------------
Tony C

Roger Bentley
8th December 2006, 21:28
Still on the subject of sailing type ships. I vividly remember during the 1950s watching the three masted schooner VEGA regularly arriving in Colombo. Here she is alongside. At this time the flag looks like the German flag, but according to some old Lloyds registers I own she was in 1950 under the Danish flag and built in 1919. By 1962 according the register she was owned by a company called Maldivian Nationals Trading Corporation (Ceylon
) Ltd, and under the British flag. Nav aids were DF. For the engineers her engine was shown as a J & CG Bolinders -Oil engine 2SA, 380 X 410 mm NE 30. I never saw her under sail. Anyone else remember this interesting vessel. Also at the same time an ex British corvette trading as a small cargo vessel also used to arrive in Colombo, her name was V. O Chidambaram. Under the Indian flag and formerly the HMS Fritillery. Regards, Roger Bentley

Roger Bentley
10th December 2006, 15:09
Here is another picture of the Vega alongside in Colombo, this shows her graceful lines a little better. Recently my wife and I went for a meal at Peter and Loraine Swift's here in Harrogate. Peter was telling us of a rough time in the Bay Of Biscay on the Malabar, when a lifeboat was carried away, the lower deck house completely flooded and following a vicious crack the deck plates forward of the accommodation could be seen moving. As Peter said thank goodness for the riveted strip round this Sam Boat. The mate was Geoffrey Kenyon the keen photographer, and I have just found a print he gave me of the ship in this heavy storm. Regards, Roger Bentley

Tony Selman
11th December 2006, 18:39
Good photos from your very interesting collection Roger. I personally do not recall seeing Vega in Colombo but I did not visit there for the first time until 1964 so maybe she had moved on, or my memory is failing me. I can only presume from her ownership that she was on the Colombo to Maldives run?

Masirah
12th December 2006, 09:59
The Vega brings back memories, I have a photo I took in Colombo on 29th May 1960. (Masirah). It would be useful to find out more about her, Rogers info is a good start. As to Flag, she was certainly flying the German flag when I took my photo.

Michael Meredith

Roger Bentley
14th December 2006, 21:09
Re Vega, glad to hear I wasn't wrong about her having the German flag, despite what Lloyds of 1962 said. The Maldivian Nationals Trading Corporation of Ceylon, had offices at 78 Reclamation Road, Colombo and in addition to the Vega also had the Maldive Crescent of 1935 and 732 tons and the Maldive Star of 1943 and 1062 tons. Just been to stay with my brother John down in Buxton, he loaned me some prints from the past, two of which are shown here. The Company notice showing all the meanings of the names, and one of two girls from the Middlesborough agents with he thinks was a second mate, the girl on the left was called Pat. I remember she was very witty and recall going up into some of the countryside pubs up in Teesdale whenever anyone had a car to take us. It made a change from some of the town pubs! Regards, Roger

Tony Selman
15th December 2006, 10:54
As always with your photos Roger that is really interesting. I personally do not recall Pat from the Middlesbrough office nor do I recognise the 2nd mate. I do, however, remember the leaflet giving details of the derivation of "MA" names. I remember quite a lot of the origins but what had slipped my memory was that the Maskeliya and Maturata were named after tea areas in Ceylon/Sri Lanka. I sailed on both of those ships so you would have thought that is one fact I would have remembered.

Roger Bentley
15th December 2006, 18:12
Hello Tony, I was quite surprised to see the card, as I don't recall ever getting one myself. However, I sailed on the Maskeliya shortly after her maiden voyage, and all the old timers mentioned the fact that she had been named after a tea plantation, and I think the manager and his wife had actually visited the ship. My brother sailed on the old Mahour while she was still a coal burner, This picture he thinks shows the bunkers almost topped up. The other is of the great 'Spud' Allen or Allan Wood. Not sure which ship this was on. Regards, Roger

A.G.Greenwood
16th December 2006, 00:31
Last photo with Alan Wood was definitely on the old Mahout. the chap with the beard is Andy Farmer (4E or 5E).
Tony Greenwood

Derek Roger
16th December 2006, 00:47
Notice he opened his can of Tennants on the bottom ??? How does that work ????

Roger Bentley
16th December 2006, 14:00
Firstly thanks for update on the Alan Wood picture. This is another of my brother's pieces of memorabilia. It is the Christmas Menu for Voyage 2 of the Masirah. I am sure some of the names will bring back memories. I note particularly with some poignancy that one of the apprentices was Derek Hammond who was the organiser of the first Brocklebank Reunion in 1989. Sadly he passed away some time ago. Salaams, Roger

Masirah
18th December 2006, 09:48
Here's another bit of the past from the same voyage.

Three of the apprentices on Sunday in the Red Sea, we arrived in Aden the following afternoon.

Pete Fuller - engineer apprentice is in the center, full regalia hat and all it just had to be a Sunday, my guess following Sunday rounds by Stan and Owen Prichard, feeling along the tops of wardrobes for dust.

To the right is Roger Newland, senior apprentice, following that trip our paths never crossed so I have no idea what became of him.

I am on the left. I assume that behind the camera was Derek Hammond. Both Derek and I were on our first trip.

I also have the Christmas Menu, with an original John Bentley signature, I can not recall who was responsible fro getting the menu printed but the spelling is interesting with it curious french, also they manged to get me wrong T.M. Merideth should be M.T. Meredith, the initials usually come out correctly but that is not an uncommon mistake with the surname.

Roger Bentley
18th December 2006, 16:01
Hello Masirah, Glad to see that the tradition of getting names wrong was maintained! I note from my brother's menu that all you apprentices duly signed it. I was on the Magdapur at the time and met up with John in Calcutta. The Masirah was my last ship deep sea before coming ashore for good! Thanks for the picture and up date. regards, Roger

Masirah
18th December 2006, 17:45
Hi Roger

My pleasure, the picture only came to light a couple of weeks ago. After that trip I did trips on Matra, Mandasor, Markhor and Maturata before rejoining Masirah in October 59 staying untill Jan 61.

All best wishes to you for Christmas

Michael.

Roger Bentley
18th December 2006, 20:35
Michael, Thank you for the further information. I will be letting John know of the response to his menu. Best wishes for Christmas and the New Year, Roger

Roger Bentley
21st December 2006, 18:04
These are two of the pictures that were reproduced in Captain Sprigings book and which I had sent to him. The one of the Maskeliya was taken by the chief officer Phil Pembridge shortly before we left Calcutta for the Northern States in 1955. He obtained several prints and most of us purchased one as they were so good, The other Brocklebank ship in the picture as far as I remember was the Matheran.
I took the one of the Mathura from the motor lifeboat at Sandheads. This was in 1957, She was my first ship as 1R/O. The 2R/O was Arthur Fletcher on his first trip, in fact nearly everyone was on their first trip in their respective posts, from Captain Charles Gray (Grey), 'Mixie' Michael Taylor as C/O, Mike Cayzer as 2/O, John Hornsby 3/O. Mike Boughton was Purser/Ch Stwd, and the Chief Engineer was an old timer a Mr Brady. Regards, Roger

skymaster
21st December 2006, 19:29
Roger ,I remember the Mathura well ,great ship! great crew!I joined her in CalcuttaApril 14 1957 and arrived London June 3rd.

Mike

Roger Bentley
22nd December 2006, 14:59
Mike, We must have just missed one another, as I see from my discharge book that I signed on her in London on 5 June 57 and coasted until 26 July and then signed deep sea on 1 August returning 23 January 1958. It was an eventful voyage as we had a sort of mutiny at Madras where we were quarantined following the death of a crew member from Asian Flu. We had 4 Indian seacunnies who had replaced the European QMs as the accommodation for European QMs had been deemed inadequate and it was one of them who led the protests. Quite an event! Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
22nd December 2006, 17:46
Here are some more of the photos my brother John gave me. The one in the swimming pool he believes was on the Manipur, he is on the right and the one with the three standing near the rail was probably on the Matheran, the chap on the left was the 2nd R/O but the other two remain unknown at this stage! The third one is of more members of the Tennents drinkers club, again no names. Best wishes to all for Christmas and the New Year. Roger

noel grayson
24th December 2006, 15:37
Here are some more of the photos my brother John gave me. The one in the swimming pool he believes was on the Manipur, he is on the right and the one with the three standing near the rail was probably on the Matheran, the chap on the left was the 2nd R/O but the other two remain unknown at this stage! The third one is of more members of the Tennents drinkers club, again no names. Best wishes to all for Christmas and the New Year. Roger
you
Hi #Roger
A Happy Christmas toand Marion.
Re the photos, the one off the three standing by the rail, the one in the middle is, I think, Derek Owen,Purser/Ch Stwd. The next one, the three drinkers, the one in the middles is Peter Boggan.
Cheers
Nobby

DerekT
24th December 2006, 16:44
Hi all,
Hope everbody has a Merry Christmas, I had posted these shots on the gallery sometime ago but will try to put them here in their rightful category
One of Mawana and one of Markhor, before and after and one I can't remember which ship but was homeward bound, note the homeward bound paint job. I have a few more but have to resize them unfortunately.
DerekT

Roger Bentley
28th December 2006, 16:07
you
Hi #Roger
A Happy Christmas toand Marion.
Re the photos, the one off the three standing by the rail, the one in the middle is, I think, Derek Owen,Purser/Ch Stwd. The next one, the three drinkers, the one in the middles is Peter Boggan.
Cheers
Nobby

Hello Noel, Many thanks for the information on the names, both are now familiar but I can't remember what Peter Boggan was. Thanks for the card and greetings and best wishes to you and Betty for 2007. I am coming to the end of my photographs etc., it is surprising that so many have remained after over fifty years. Perhaps due to every time I went on an overseas tour all our effects were stored lock stock and barrel. Salaams, Roger

Tony Sprigings
6th January 2007, 14:43
Roger,
With reference to the three pictures you posted. The one in the middle in the swimming pool is Derek Evans. The one wearing the mask could have been Archie Howie but I wouldn't swear to that.

Derek Roger
6th January 2007, 17:36
Tony I dont recognise Derek Evans ?? I remember him as a more roundish face with fair hair and some freckles ??

Roger Bentley
7th January 2007, 17:33
Roger,
With reference to the three pictures you posted. The one in the middle in the swimming pool is Derek Evans. The one wearing the mask could have been Archie Howie but I wouldn't swear to that.


Tony, Happy New Year, Thanks for the info. I didn't know Derek and my brother has forgotten any of the names as well! I agree it does look a bit like Archie Howie with the mask on. Just been looking in that odd book cobbled together by David Anand and Gomer Thomas, and see they have a bit about the cadet ships which seems to be a new thread. I will put what I can glean onto that thread later. Salaams, Roger

Roger Bentley
26th January 2007, 15:38
This picture is the last of the photos I brought back from a recent visit to my brother John. He says it was taken around 1955 -56. Ship unknown He is on the left and on the right of the lady in the bar is the fifth engineer. I have put it in, as it shows how rather formal dress was for a run ashore! John complete with MN blazer and tie and the engineer in a smart suit. Rather different these days I should think. Cheers, Roger

Tony Sprigings
28th January 2007, 16:15
Roger, Those were the days when the rising generation looked the part. Nowadays there seems to be a desire to prove that 'jack's as good as his master' and dressing like a dustman (I've nothing against dustmen) is a pre requisite prt of the game.Cheers, Tony

Roger Bentley
31st January 2007, 18:37
Roger, Those were the days when the rising generation looked the part. Nowadays there seems to be a desire to prove that 'jack's as good as his master' and dressing like a dustman (I've nothing against dustmen) is a pre requisite prt of the game.Cheers, Tony

Hi Tony, Yes, things were different then. I seem to recall that when we went to the swimming club in Calcutta in the evenings we had to wear a tie, and I think there was a dress code at the Grand in the evening. Now anyone with a tie is deemed to be very square and old fashioned. I must get some jeans and a leather bomber jacket! Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
16th March 2007, 20:45
Hi, Thanks for the comments. Yes, the lever is the one to yank down and sound the siren, I have another picture of the great Geoffrey Kenyon in his next frame doing just that. This will appear as soon as I can scan it. Meanwhile here is one my brother John Bentley has sent me, he was 2nd R/O on the Manipur at the time and this is of a 21st birthday for someone. It must have been round about 1954-55. John is 3rd from the left almost obscured. Anyone know who the others are? Regards, Roger Bentley


Re the birthday picture on the Manipur.
I have just received an e mail from Peter Swift ex Brocklebanks. He says that the fourth from the left is Tony Jenkins who C/O and the 5th from the right is John Pedley who was 2nd Engineerr. Salaams. Roger

R798780
16th March 2007, 23:59
Hi all,
Hope everbody has a Merry Christmas, I had posted these shots on the gallery sometime ago but will try to put them here in their rightful category
One of Mawana and one of Markhor, before and after and one I can't remember which ship but was homeward bound, note the homeward bound paint job. I have a few more but have to resize them unfortunately.
DerekT

Derek, I believe your homeward bound shot is of the Maipura, two mast tables forward of the bridge with non bi-pod masts and steam winches.

peter wood
17th March 2007, 00:50
Hi all,
Hope everbody has a Merry Christmas, I had posted these shots on the gallery sometime ago but will try to put them here in their rightful category
One of Mawana and one of Markhor, before and after and one I can't remember which ship but was homeward bound, note the homeward bound paint job. I have a few more but have to resize them unfortunately.
DerekT

The last photo is of the Maipura by the open steam winches.

Derek Roger
17th March 2007, 04:11
If you look in my gallery you will see a picture of the Maipura Steam Winches with 5thEng John Smith and apprentice Martin "Paddy " Clarke 1965 .
Derek

Roger Bentley
20th March 2007, 19:49
Starting rather laboriously to go through some old 35mm black and white film. Here is one for the deck - a heavy lift at Colombo. Same ship in dry dock with I think the second engineer looking up at local engineering staff in Colombo. Pretty sure this was one of the trips I did on the Magdapur. Salaams, Roger

Roger Bentley
20th March 2007, 19:52
Two more in the same series dry dock and the heavy lift. Regards, Roger

ken carr
21st March 2007, 12:18
Roger, the two photo's of the heavy lift taken in Colombo aboard possibly, the Magdapur, If this voyage commenced on 31st May 1956 and ended on the 17th Oct 1956 we may have been shipmates. Do you re-call the these heavy items ( I think Boilers) breaking adrift during heavy weather in the MED and having to go into Algiers to have them secured ? If so then we did sail together The senior electrician was Brian Ellis, Yours truly Chotta Batty Sahib
Am I dreaming ???
Ken Carr

Roger Bentley
21st March 2007, 13:21
Salaam do chota batty Ken sahib! My voyages on the Magdapur were in 1958. This is a timely point to insert the photograph of the two electricians on my first voyage on her. On the left is Denis Williams the Ch/Elec and on the right is Steve Brownell the 2nd Elec. Now here is a query what would the book held by Denis be? Did they have circuit diagrams or was it a record of temperatures etc? Best regards, Roger

Eric Walter
27th June 2007, 00:00
Can anyone put names to these faces? I remember the faces well but only one name. Ship was almost certainly the Mahseer - 1967 (or rather the lifeboat belonged to the Mahseer). I was acting fourth mate.

l to r Ken Bell, 2nd Mate. ?? Chief Steward. ?? 2nd Steward. ?? junior engineer.

Eric Walter

Eric Walter
28th June 2007, 10:00
In the photo that I posted yesterday I referred to the person third from left as 2nd Steward. He should be Assistant Purser/Chief Steward.

Eric Walter

japottinger
28th June 2007, 21:30
Defintely the MAIHAR I would recognise her shapely bum anywhere, this was taken before she was rebuilt with 4 lifeboats under gravity davits on the boat deck only and midships deckhouse extended forward.

Danny Simpson
22nd April 2008, 22:27
Tony and Roger

I sailed with Trev when I was apprentice on the Mahronda and for about 18 months on the Masirah when he was 2nd mate and I was third. His wife (who we called Nan) joined him on the Masirah for the Dec '62 to May '63 voyage which culminated in the Mississippi collisions (see thread). She was a lovely, bright young lady and had the company of two other wives on that trip.

Trevor taught me a lot and he had the most beautiful handwriting. I still prize my sight book from that period which I laid out in Trev's style. He also let me copy his extensive "course and distance" tables which I typed out on the C/O's typewriter (can't remember if I should thank Tony Sprigings or Sam Baxter for that).

How's this for coincidence? I took my family camping on Anglesey in the late 70's and took a trip to Cemaes one afternoon. Wandering along the front I heard two ladies talking in Welsh and recognised Nan's voice instantly. I couldn't believe it and neither could she. Over a cup of tea she updated us on Trev's career - he was captain in some Asian company trading between the Persian Gulf and the Far East. They were still very friendly with Capt Simpson and, I think, visited him when they could. I often think about Trev and Nan and wish I had kept in touch.

Regards to all
Peter B

A little late, I know; I have only recently joined SN and am enjoying everybody's discussion.
Following this part of the conversation, here are a couple of pictures from Masirah, showing Trevor and Nan Williams; also Harold and Kate Simpson. I've put a few more in the gallery.

Regards to all
Danny Simpson (grandson of HS)

Derek Roger
23rd April 2008, 03:25
A little late, I know; I have only recently joined SN and am enjoying everybody's discussion.
Following this part of the conversation, here are a couple of pictures from Masirah, showing Trevor and Nan Williams; also Harold and Kate Simpson. I've put a few more in the gallery.

Regards to all
Danny Simpson (grandson of HS)

Very Nice Thanks !

Derek

japottinger
23rd April 2008, 17:07
Queen of the Sunderbans!
Maihar before being remodelled

japottinger
23rd April 2008, 17:16
I wonder if that is one of the big ships before they were shortened

japottinger
23rd April 2008, 17:23
Could that be the back of Les Dow's head C/Elec

S Fraser
23rd April 2008, 21:43
A little late, I know; I have only recently joined SN and am enjoying everybody's discussion.
Following this part of the conversation, here are a couple of pictures from Masirah, showing Trevor and Nan Williams; also Harold and Kate Simpson. I've put a few more in the gallery.

Regards to all
Danny Simpson (grandson of HS)

Danny,
So good to see that you are keeping in touch with some of your grandad's old shipmates. I sailed with him as senior apprentice in 62/63 on the Masirah, when we were involved in the collision in the Mississippi, that Peter Bryant refers to. I also met with your grandfather a few times in his local in Storth just after he finished his active seafaring career, as I lived in Morecambe which was close by.
"Winkey" , as we used to call him was on of Brocks characters.
Regards,
Stan

Danny Simpson
27th April 2008, 15:35
Stan
It's very nice to "meet" you. Also good that you kept in contact with my grandfather. It is a very beautiful part of the world up in Cumbria. I seem to remember that his local in Storth was The Ship - highly appropriate.
I didn't realise until joining SN that he was known as "Winkey", though it is easy to understand why.
Kind regards
Danny

Danny Simpson
21st June 2008, 17:16
Danny,
So good to see that you are keeping in touch with some of your grandad's old shipmates. I sailed with him as senior apprentice in 62/63 on the Masirah, when we were involved in the collision in the Mississippi, that Peter Bryant refers to. I also met with your grandfather a few times in his local in Storth just after he finished his active seafaring career, as I lived in Morecambe which was close by.
"Winkey" , as we used to call him was on of Brocks characters.
Regards,
Stan

All
Further to Stan's posting, I have uploaded a photo, to the "Life Onboard" section of the gallery, that illustrates the nickname of "Winkey". A link is given below.

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/124092

Regards,
Danny

gwzm
21st June 2008, 18:28
Roger,

Your photo: Birthday on the Manipur c 1954-55 - the chap in the middle with the cigarette is John Pedley. I sailed with John on the Mahseer in 1963 and heard, sometime in the early 80s, that he'd crossed the bar.

Salaams,

John/gzsv

Philthechill
21st June 2008, 19:10
Roger,

Your photo: Birthday on the Manipur c 1954-55 - the chap in the middle with the cigarette is John Pedley. I sailed with John on the Mahseer in 1963 and heard, sometime in the early 80s, that he'd crossed the bar.

Salaams,

John/gzsv John! Salaams! I put a photo, with John Pedley in it, under the header "Alan Goonarwardener test his new camera!" If you put my username Philthechill in the "Search" section and scroll through the myriad pictures, I've put on, you'll come across it should you be interested. Phil(Hippy)

Eric Walter
30th September 2008, 16:39
Hello Tony

Sorry to hear about Capt Simpson's family. He and his wife, of course, would have been well into their 100s by now but sad to hear about his son. Did he move down to Sussex to be near his family? I remember Nan saying that he had retired to the Lake District.

Last night I did a couple of searches on internet telephone directories but could not trace Trevor. I think he would be in his early seventies now so hope that he and Nan are still around. I'm hoping that this thread may bring more news.

Regards
PB


Peter, Tony, Danny Simpson and all Brock men,

Sadly I have to report that Trevor "Taff" Williams passed away eleven years ago, aged 64 years, after a short illness.
Trevor left Brocks around 1970 to work on the Holyhead ferries. He left after 8 years when redundancies were looming and worked for United Arab, as Master, between the Gulf and the Far East. He retired, aged 55, and became involved with the local Cemaes community as choir conductor, school governor and an interest in local football.

Myfanwy (Nan) is well and lives near Cemaes. She has fond and happy memories of her trips on the Masirah in the early 60's and of the friends she made on those voyages.

Trevor was mate on my first trip to sea on the Mary Holt, July 1964. On sailing day the Guinea Gulf mate could not make the trip due to family illness and Trevor was called up from leave with only a few hours notice. So short in fact that Trevor could not get to Brunswick Dock in time and we sailed without a mate. Trevor eventually boarded from the pilot boat. I always thought it was at the bar but perhaps it was at Lynas. I was sent down to assist him in boarding and remember him telling me to be extra careful with a small wooden box. I soon found out that this was his sextant box. Trevor only accepted that trip after Brocklebanks promised him that he would be home for the birth of his first child. He missed the birth by two weeks although the child was born prematurely.

Eric Walter

mclean
1st October 2008, 19:02
Eric, I was Third Mate on the Mary Holt,when we sailed from Liverpool on 23 July 1964. Arrived back in Liverpool on 28 September 1964. Unfortunately my memory for names and faces is terrible, however do remember Trevor Williams, a great bloke. Willie Harrison was Master. Regards Colin

wood butcher
13th December 2010, 22:28
Has anyone out there have any photos of the Malakand?,my late Brother Harry James was Carpenter in her in the early 50s.I dont know the dates because unfortunately his discharge book has been lost.

gwzm
14th December 2010, 00:38
Hi Wood Butcher,

Go to the Cargo Ships gallery and do a search on Malakand. There's several photos in there of Malakand.

Happy hunting,

gwzm

Roger Bentley
1st August 2011, 15:26
On Saturday it was my wife's Marian's 80th and my elder daughter brought in some old cards and photos that she had found when sorting our my ex wife's house. Sheila had done a trip with me on the Magdapur in 1958. Among them is this photo which has a menu on the other side for Christmas Dinner on the Manipur 1956. My hunch this is Captain Stanley Broughton and it may well have been taken by Geoffrey Kenyon. My brother John was on the Manipur and it may have been him who sent it to us. Salaams, Roger

Nick_Boyle
11th January 2013, 23:07
This is indeed Captain stanley Broughton, he was my Grandfather. I would be interested to hear from anyone who sailed with him. I am aware that on occasions he was not the easiest to work for and was known as "Farmer Broughton" to some members of the crew. I stayed on Board a number of his vessels during the fifties when I was around five years old. I have some movie pictures taken by my Grandmother in the fifties of life aboard as well as some shots of Calcutta and various other ports Brocklebanks visited. I spent a lot of time with him in the sixties and seventies but he was reluctant to tell me much about his time at sea. I do have a copy of him being "mentioned in despatches" in 1943 and I think he lost three ships during the second world war.

If anyone can fill in some of the history, good and bad, I would be very grateful.

Nick Boyle


On Saturday it was my wife's Marian's 80th and my elder daughter brought in some old cards and photos that she had found when sorting our my ex wife's house. Sheila had done a trip with me on the Magdapur in 1958. Among them is this photo which has a menu on the other side for Christmas Dinner on the Manipur 1956. My hunch this is Captain Stanley Broughton and it may well have been taken by Geoffrey Kenyon. My brother John was on the Manipur and it may have been him who sent it to us. Salaams, Roger