Windsor Lion

Fairfield
19th October 2004, 14:49
Built by Swan Hunter at Wallsend in 1974,one of several VLCCs of 250000dwt built there from the late 60s.

tanker
19th October 2004, 15:48
I think they were 4 sisters LONDON LION -WINDSOR LION-TYNE PRIDE-EVERRET F. WELLS . WINDSOR LION i think was scrapped end 80s as STATE.

Fairfield
19th October 2004, 21:44
Went to see LONDON LION/S launch but it was postponed because of fog!! Did not see her after that.

ChrisS
18th December 2005, 20:28
Hi - I also went to the launch, which was delayed by a strike not fog. As guests, we were shown around the ship on the slip before the Lady Sponsor named her. The management company (Maritime Overseas then part of the Overseas Shipholder Group (OSG)) had at that time my father as MD. I think I am correct in saying that the London and Windsor Lion's were the largest (DWT) ships launched in UK waters - may be wrong, but seem to to remember that. I do know that there were long running legal issues post the launch. I also recall that Sir John Hunter was present at either this naming or the launch of the London Lion, which I also attended. Windsor Lion was named on the 23rd May 1974 at 5.20pm, by Mrs Paul Dixey JP

hammer
21st September 2006, 15:37
I think they were 4 sisters LONDON LION -WINDSOR LION-TYNE PRIDE-EVERRET F. WELLS . WINDSOR LION i think was scrapped end 80s as STATE.

Memory is a bit rusty but I think the order we built them wasEsso northumbria, Esso Hibernia,World unicorn,London Lion,Windsor lion,Tyne pride (biggest one ) and Everret f Wells,then Swans/ Maritime fruit carriers ended when the supertanker boom ended.From memory the idea was to build a series of tankers with work in hand until early 1990,sadly never worked out.

G-Dave
9th October 2006, 02:00
The Everret F Wells was my first vlcc -- I together with another Tyne Pilot, George Ayre who was Swans choice/yard pilot for there new building ,and a North Sea pilot , sailed the vessel on trails from the Tyne .
We opened articles George was the Master the North Sea pilot and myself were the watchkeepers .
The ship stayed in local waters for 14 days while the Turbine was gradually run up to fulll power -- not a lot of fun trying to stay out of everythings way while doing 3 kts.for a couple of days.
When they were happy with the engines the full power measured mile work was done in the Oslo Fjord on a Hi fix Decca system .
After the trails we Dry Docked the ship in Hamburg then took her down to Cuxhaven to hand her over to the New Owners.
We were aboard all told about 21 days.
I made sure I got the voyage entered in my discharge book - The biggest ship I've ever had control of.
Dave

hammer
15th November 2006, 13:52
The Everret F Wells was my first vlcc -- I together with another Tyne Pilot, George Ayre who was Swans choice/yard pilot for there new building ,and a North Sea pilot , sailed the vessel on trails from the Tyne .
We opened articles George was the Master the North Sea pilot and myself were the watchkeepers .
The ship stayed in local waters for 14 days while the Turbine was gradually run up to fulll power -- not a lot of fun trying to stay out of everythings way while doing 3 kts.for a couple of days.
When they were happy with the engines the full power measured mile work was done in the Oslo Fjord on a Hi fix Decca system .
After the trails we Dry Docked the ship in Hamburg then took her down to Cuxhaven to hand her over to the New Owners.
We were aboard all told about 21 days.
I made sure I got the voyage entered in my discharge book - The biggest ship I've ever had control of.
Dave
I was under the impression that they all dry docked in Lisbon after trials.Probably what has happenned is my mate ,a fitter ,went on trials with one and docked in Lisbon and I have taken it that they all docked there.From memory on the bridge there was a plaque near the helm saying 'Beware there is 1150 feet of ship in front of you',memory could be playing tricks,long time ago.

john shaw
12th December 2006, 14:37
Paul

the same pic is on auke visser site-- has it been "borrowed"?

http://supertankers.topcities.com/part-2/id391.htm

she's also on there as "avaj2".


there's a pic of her soon after launch at

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pigstyave/113433062/

She was later managed by W.A.Souter whilst I was with them, but I never had the privilege/misfortune (delete as applicable) of this ship -- though the staffing changes in the Gulf of Mexico by helicopter seemed pretty exotic for c. late seventies.

kevhogg
12th December 2006, 15:10
Heard from one of the old men in Souters when I was there that during the testing of one of the derricks on the windsor or London lion that the derrick and Samson post fell over due to being not fully welded to the deck!!! Not sure if this is true or one of them stories that changes as the years go by??

heth
31st December 2006, 16:53
My husband took some great photographs of the Windsor Lion when he was a photography student in 1974.He framed and sold a few a couple of years ago at the Wallsend Festival and Tynemouth Station and many people stopped to tell us their stories of working on the ships at that time.

peter lugg
23rd April 2008, 10:28
Oh the memories.
I joined the Windsor Lion as she flagged out and became the Meridian Sky. Under the command of Captain Ray Nelson I spent 4 enjoyable months on board as the Radio Electronics Officer. During this time the officers and crew also fitted the Scientific Atlanta satellite communications system, heralding the end for us morse key jockeys. Mind you, as the lecky I was never idle.
By the way, Ray Nelson had us all running around the deck, morning and evening, followed by deck quiotes and several beverages in after the evening session.
Great fun.

Peter Lugg

non descript
23rd April 2008, 10:33
Peter, on your first posting, a warm welcome to you. Thank you for joining the community; enjoy the site and all it has to offer, and we very much look forward to your postings in due course. Bon Voyage

K urgess
23rd April 2008, 14:27
Welcome to the crew, Peter.
You seem to have joined MimCo as I left.
Hope you've found the radio room aboard this ship.
Join in and enjoy the trip.

Duzza
4th December 2008, 17:40
Was one of seven VLCCS - ESSO Northumbria/ESSO Hibernia/Texico Great Britain/World Unicorn/Windsor Lion/Tyne Pride & Everett F Wells

Wills1000
5th December 2008, 15:31
Sorry to be an interloper! Am trying to find out about tankers owned by the Ceylon Petroleum Corporation of Sri Lanka. Seems to operate routes to Colombi from Iran, UAE, Kuwait and others in the Gulf. It may be that the tankers they use are owned by the Government in general, but just keen to know if they own them directly. I thought I would be easy but it appears not so far, although local contacts in Colombo have given their opinion that the company do own some - I just can't find them! Any views greatly appreciated

Bruce Carson
5th December 2008, 15:54
To Heather a warm, if belated, welcome to Ships Nostalgia, it's good to have you onboard.
Duzza, it's also good to have you as a member.
Peter and Chis, I have a good memory, but it's short, and if I have not yet welcomed you to our forum, I do it now--thanks for joining(Thumb)

Bruce

LongReach
11th December 2008, 23:48
Seen a few lists of the supertankers built. There were definitely 8, and I believe in this launch order: Esso Northumbria, Esso Hibernia, Texaco Great Britain, London Lion, World Unicorn, Windsor Lion, Tyne Pride and Everrett F Wells.

12-4
30th December 2008, 12:55
I found this -- on a site that's still under construction and therefore most links within the site do not work but this one does (the webmasters my mate so don't complain):-)

Launch of the WORLD UNICORN at Wallsend

http://www.sidetv.net/shorts/launch/

stephengraham37
6th March 2009, 21:53
My father was the Captain on this ship in the 70's

Herbert 'Ken" Graham

THEDOC
16th March 2009, 11:08
Memory is a bit rusty but I think the order we built them wasEsso northumbria, Esso Hibernia,World unicorn,London Lion,Windsor lion,Tyne pride (biggest one ) and Everret f Wells,then Swans/ Maritime fruit carriers ended when the supertanker boom ended.From memory the idea was to build a series of tankers with work in hand until early 1990,sadly never worked out.

Which one was "re named" on the slip (SS P**S POT) while on the slip, after Newcastle United were beaten by Hereford.

Robert Wheeler
16th October 2009, 23:10
Heard from one of the old men in Souters when I was there that during the testing of one of the derricks on the windsor or London lion that the derrick and Samson post fell over due to being not fully welded to the deck!!! Not sure if this is true or one of them stories that changes as the years go by??

Think the same thing happened on Everett F Wells whilst lifting equipment from a launch off Capetown

petermac
30th October 2009, 17:05
I had the pleasure of sailing onboard the London Lion as Cadet on her voyages from Karg to St Croix. The last voyage was a change of orders at Capetown which ment Rotterdam instead. After that it was over to St Croix tank cleaning on route, then pay off. Later on i joined a much smaller vessel the Durham Teal as second mate to find the Master had also sailed on her at the same time. The Chief Officer on the London Lion was the unforgettable George Sutherland. Herbie was the Old Man. Douglas Cunningham the Third Mate a very excellent goashore to be with! And if the above stephen Graham has sisters Heather and Gillian...then the whole family was onboard 1974 - 75?

carrieA
13th December 2009, 18:23
I remember the Graham family very well - I sailed the London Lion with my dad Ivar Andersen and have some very good memories. Have recently spoken to Pete Davison and decidied to try and find out a little more. Any memories would be welcome

I had the pleasure of sailing onboard the London Lion as Cadet on her voyages from Karg to St Croix. The last voyage was a change of orders at Capetown which ment Rotterdam instead. After that it was over to St Croix tank cleaning on route, then pay off. Later on i joined a much smaller vessel the Durham Teal as second mate to find the Master had also sailed on her at the same time. The Chief Officer on the London Lion was the unforgettable George Sutherland. Herbie was the Old Man. Douglas Cunningham the Third Mate a very excellent goashore to be with! And if the above stephen Graham has sisters Heather and Gillian...then the whole family was onboard 1974 - 75?

djw1
21st December 2009, 22:56
In 1986 I inspected a British built VLCC called the Windsor Lion.
The tanks were gorgeous, strongly built, unusually well protected
with coatings and anodes. The engine room was a bit strange.
For example, two complete sets of feed pumps, loose tube boilers.
But at the time I didn't know much about engine rooms,
and there was nothing suspicious in the Class (LR) recordss.
On my recommendation, we bought the ship and renamed her the State.

What an idiot. The engine room was an operational disaster.
Breakdown after breakdown. The generator control system
was so erratic, prone to blackouts,
that we ended up gagging the governors.
The State's worst habit was breaking main maneuvering valve stems,
rendering the ship powerless for 10 to 12 hours.
This happened four times in the less than two years we owned her.
The State was eating up our best talent.
Other ships were being neglected.

In mid 1988, we sold her to the Iranians
who renamed her the Avaj II.
Two days after we delivered her,
the Avaj II had a major boiler explosion.
The German Chief Engineer died of a heart attack.
The Avaj II traded sporadically after that.

This was my one experience with British ship building.
I vowed never to repeat it.

Jack

Billieboy
22nd December 2009, 10:50
With more than thirty years experience of high pressure, superheated, steam maneuvering valves, I have seen and repaired many, "Heavy", maneuvering valves, I've found plenty of spindles, (valve stems), corroded, (high temperature, electrostatic, grain boundary failure), but I've never, ever, seen a broken one. Someone, obviously, did not know what they were doing, in the Engine Room!

djw1
22nd December 2009, 14:42
Actually the problem was bad design.
We discovered that the former owner (OSG) had not only
gone thru all the ships spares but all the manufacturer's (GEC) spares.
When we studied the failure, it was clear the spindle had a bad stress
concentration. When the keys were worn down a little,
the spindle vibrated, and fairly quickly fatigued and failed
at the concentration. We took this to GEC in Rugby,
and eventually they came up with a different spindle
that seemed to solve the problem.

I too have never seen this kind of problem except on the State,
but that is no reason to jump on the guys onboard.
This business has a remarkable ability to hide its design mistakes.
Nobody other than GEC and ourselves knew about these failures
including Class. So when a problem does get public
everybody is surprised, and the automatic reaction is to blame the crew.

I'd be astonished if other ships of the same class did not have
the same problem. In fact, GEC was already working on a new spindle
design when we walked thru the door.

And that was only one of the State's multitude of problems.
These were the first turbine ships that Swan Hunter had built
in over 40 years. A friend of mine, a Geordie, strongly recommended
to the yard to go to Japan and see how it was being done.
But the Brits had nothing to learn from the Japs,
and as a result the engine rooms were disasters.

KTF

Jack

Billieboy
22nd December 2009, 15:49
Ah! yes Jack, I remember the problem now, Cockburns Ltd of Cardonald had been closed down in '79, so there was nowhere else to buy the maneuvering valves other than Stahl Laval or GEC, (outside Japan). The GEC valves that I was familiar with could handle steam for 17-20.000 Shaft HP, but that would be about the limit, there was a tremendous amount of vibration generated in the valve chest as the steam flow increased. This is a high speed steam flow dynamics problem, which has to be solved, generally by continuous modifications to the valve box over many years.

Cockburns had a similar problem with emergency valves on Nuclear power plants, (COČ, not the steam system), where closing the valve in the required time, when scramming the reactor, was more than slightly difficult, it ended up using modified recoil dampers, off a field artillery piece, it wasn't a case of moving the valve to closed, the problem was stopping it, after it had closed.

stephengraham37
2nd March 2010, 04:24
My father is on facebook if anyone would like to drop him a line. I am sure he would love to hear from anyone that knew him back then! Unless he sacked them!

Just click on my link and he is one of my "friends"

http://www.facebook.com/stephengraham37