Auckland Star July 1940

Mark McShane
19th October 2006, 12:44
Guys,

Does anyboady have any connection with the Auckland Star, sunk off Ireland 28/07/40. As the survivors landed in Dingle I find the story interesting and am trying to find out as much as I can. I know that the evening stanard ran a story on the sinking, which featureed photos taken by the deck cadet which showed the ship sinking, any info on the story or the photos would be excellent.
If anyone has anything to offer up i would be greatful to hear their story.

Regards,

Mark

exsailor
19th October 2006, 13:02
Full details of vessel and sinking, including photos available at http://www.bluestarline.org/auckland1.html

Regards, Dennis

Mark McShane
19th October 2006, 14:58
Dennis,

many thanks for the resonse. I have been to this site before and I have the book on which the text is taken from.
I was looking more for some eyewitness accounts or interviews by the survivors.

Cheers,

Mark

Hugh Ferguson
21st October 2006, 15:34
Guys,

Does anyboady have any connection with the Auckland Star, sunk off Ireland 28/07/40. As the survivors landed in Dingle I find the story interesting and am trying to find out as much as I can. I know that the evening stanard ran a story on the sinking, which featureed photos taken by the deck cadet which showed the ship sinking, any info on the story or the photos would be excellent.
If anyone has anything to offer up i would be greatful to hear their story.

Regards,

Mark

Taffrail (Captain Taprell Dorling DSO. RN. wrote in his book BLUE STAR LINE
"The crew, in their 4 boats, set sail (after ship was torpedoed) for the Irish coast. Luck with them, for on July 30th one boat reached Slyne Head L.H., County Galway, while the three others sailed to within 12 miles of Dingle, County Kerry, where on July 31st they were met, and were towed ashore, by a fishing boat. Not a man was lost."
Suggest visiting Dingle: somebody will remember it. Yours, Hugh Ferguson.

Mark McShane
21st October 2006, 17:59
Thanks Hugh,

Would like to travel over to the west, but time as always is a factor. I'll try the Cork library to see what newspaper archives they keep.
Cheers,

Mark

treeve
21st October 2006, 20:49
The Dingle Peninsula ( especially Slea Head and beyond ) is probably the closest you could get to the most beautiful place on Earth. It took my breath away, in more ways than one. Clogher Beach is to be seen to be believed in wild weather. Go there!!

Mark McShane
21st October 2006, 21:15
The Dingle Peninsula ( especially Slea Head and beyond ) is probably the closest you could get to the most beautiful place on Earth. It took my breath away, in more ways than one. Clogher Beach is to be seen to be believed in wild weather. Go there!!

Treeve,

It's a fantastic part of the world alright, I've been into Dingle on an LE Orla, Irish naval service.
They changed the name a few year back, so now it is no longer Dingle, but its Irish name, An Daingean. A few local irish speakers kicking up that it the english name should no longer be used.

Cheers,

Mark