Eric Newby R.I.P.

Richard Green
23rd October 2006, 15:13
Sad to note the passing of the author of one of my favourite authors. Writer of "The Last Grain Race" about being a crew member on "Moshulu" a Finnish sailing clipper bringing grain from Aussie to Europe via Cape Horn. Later joined the SBS and was captured on an operation raiding the Italian coast. Escaped after 3 years captivity and lived rough in the Appenines, meeting his Solvenian future wife. Perhaps best known for his book "A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush"....

RCHARLTON
23rd October 2006, 15:51
The Moshulu is berthed at Penns Landing in Philadelphia and is now a floating restaurant. You can see a picture of her in my gallery.

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/5990/cat/500/ppuser/937

jock paul
23rd October 2006, 20:43
I am also saddened by his death. One of the great travel writers of our time. His book "The Last Grain Race" must be the outstanding record of the last days of the four masted barques in the Australian trade. I first read it when I was 14 and have re-read it half a dozen times since.

cboots
24th October 2006, 08:06
I heard the news on the radio this morning and was saddened by it being a great fan. I too would rate his "Last Grain Race" one of the finest accounts of a sailing passage ever written.
CBoots

slick
24th October 2006, 08:26
All,
I too am saddened by the death of Eric Newby, his book The Last Grain Race was a truly inspirational story.
I still use a phrase from the book, one of the sailors describes the forthcoming weather as "The wind she going to blow strongbody tonight", and to paraphrase him describing successfully rounding Cape Horn as " with twenty five men and a Cook as the being in a yacht club that no money could buy you into"
Yours aye,
Slick

Hugh Ferguson
18th May 2011, 18:00
Sad to note the passing of the author of one of my favourite authors. Writer of "The Last Grain Race" about being a crew member on "Moshulu" a Finnish sailing clipper bringing grain from Aussie to Europe via Cape Horn. Later joined the SBS and was captured on an operation raiding the Italian coast. Escaped after 3 years captivity and lived rough in the Appenines, meeting his Solvenian future wife. Perhaps best known for his book "A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush"....

The raid he was participating in was an attempt to sabotage a Luftwaffe and Italian air-base in Sicily-I believe. Pedestal Convoy was about to take place and this was a brave attempt to take out a major threat to the safety of that convoy.
He, having escaped from his prison camp, found refuge in the Appenines which is where he met his wife to be. A truly great author.

Pat Kennedy
18th May 2011, 19:21
I read Eric Newby's book, The Last Grain Race, as a first trip deck boy on the Blue Funnel Ship Achilles.
Outward bound from Liverpool to the Far East, and having a difficult first couple of weeks. Newby's experiences made mine seem like small beer. A wonderful read.
RIP

terry morrow
18th May 2011, 20:07
The ship the MOSHULU, in eric newby's "THE LAST GRAIN RACE" was
I think in one of the scenes from the GODFATHER PART TWO, sailing
into NEW YORK past the "STATUE OF LIBERTY", can any members
confirm this.
Regards Terry Morrow.

slick
19th May 2011, 07:43
All,
I had yesterday occasion to recount to a colleague (we were talking about the HMS Ganges mast) the tale of Newby joining the Moshulu in Belfast and being told by the Mate to climb the mast, by the time I had finished he had just about passed out he suffers from severe Vertigo!!

Yours aye,

slick

price
19th May 2011, 10:18
There is another book, "Learning the ropes" by Eric Newby, a large soft back published by John Murray 1999, price 14.99, a complimentary photographic record to the book "The Last Grain Race". Well worth having.
Bruce.

Donald McGhee
24th May 2011, 08:19
Amen to all the tributes to this great author. He really told it like it was and some of us had it soft compared to what these sailing appies experienced.

Heres to you Eric. (Pint)

memyself
1st June 2011, 22:18
I still have a copy of the Last Grain Race. What struck me was the style of writing was very factual, informative and slightly humorous and a rattling good read at the same time, right up my street.

Something Wholesale is a entertaining insight in to the post war rag trade.

Why anyone should just walk out of a good job (OK he hated it) to go on a whim to the other side of the world with virtualy no experience in mountain climbing is in the tradition of great british adventurers. But A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush resulted from that.

Anybody who hasn't read any of his books are missing a treat.

GlennysF
8th June 2011, 02:41
I read A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush while at sea with my husband. I'd run out of my own reading material and it was about the only thing available. I didn't fancy it much but once I started I couldn't put it down. I've now read just about everything he wrote, and I'm truly sorry to hear of his death.

James_C
8th June 2011, 03:05
Like many, I started off reading "The Last Grain Race" and recently I bought the accompanying picture book.
I've read most of his other stuff, but what stood out for me personally was "Slowly down the Ganges". A remarkable record of post partition Indian life, and for the Brockies/Bankies/BI men/Clannies etc amongst us, a real treasure trove of nostalgia.
He was a remarkable man and who is one of the few men I would honestly think of as having truly lived his life.