Emma Maersk

dom
14th August 2006, 04:24
it is reported this week that maersk lines new vessel is named Emma Maersk,and has a reported carrying capactity of 11,000 teu's

Pedro Baptista
14th August 2006, 05:45
I colected this from another forum:


IMO nb - 9321483
Callsign - OYGR2
Registration - Taarbæk

Name - Emma Maersk
Built - Odense Steel Shipyard, Ltd - Lindo
Hull nb - 203

L.O.A. - 404.0 m
L.B.P. - 376.0 m
Beam - 56.4 m
Depth - 30.2 [GM: 24.1]
Draught - 15.5 m [GM: 15.0]

Gross Tonnage - 110.000 t
Deadweight - 123.200 t
Capacity - 10.500 TEU (nominal)
Maximum capacity - 13.460 TEU

She was officially named last Aug 12th and she will get out of berth next Aug 16th.

Can't wait to see pictures of her loaded.

Can anyone tell me how many ships had this name before and their IMO's?

Thank you all.

Cheers

Kenneth Morley
15th August 2006, 03:46
(Thumb) Hi, Great to hear of another "Emma Maersk". I was ashore in M****ille in 1950 heard about a tanker wanting a Matros (AB) I hitched to Port-de-bouc bumed a ride out on the potato boat went on board had a talk to the Captain and he signed me on OS, until my papers arrived from New Zealand proving I had served on the Four Masted Barque "PAMIR" I was then made AB. She was the tanker EMMA MAERSK, i stayed on board 2 years, what a fine ship,great food good accomadation first cass captain and mates,also a very happy crew.I should not have paid off but young and the world was my oyster enough said. I will be looking forward to seeing a photo of the new Emma. What great memories Kenneth.

ruud
15th August 2006, 06:28
Ahoy,
Well it's in Danish, but here you are, click on the piccies and they will show up.

http://www.oss.dk/nytFrame.asp (http://www.oss.dk/nytFrame.asp)

Her maiden voyage should be like this:
Aarhus
Aarhus APM terminal, 14 Sep 2006 07:00, 14 Sep 2006 15:00

Gothenburg
Skandiahamnen Gothenburg, 14 Sep 2006 23:00, 15 Sep 2006 16:00

Bremerhaven
North Sea Terminal Bremerhaven, 18 Sep 2006 06:00, 18 Sep 2006 22:00

Rotterdam
APM Terminals Rotterdam, 20 Sep 2006 03:00, 20 Sep 2006 15:00

Algeciras
Algeciras - ML Terminal, 23 Sep 2006 08:00, 24 Sep 2006 14:00

Suez Canal
Canal Zone Terminal, 28 Sep 2006 19:00, 29 Sep 2006 17:00

Singapore
Singapore/PSA Terminal, 09 Oct 2006 01:00, 10 Oct 2006 04:00

Kobe
Kobe Rokko Terminal, 15 Oct 2006 08:00, 15 Oct 2006 20:00

Nagoya
Nagoya Terminal, 16 Oct 2006 11:00, 16 Oct 2006 23:59

Yokohama
Maersk Yokohama Terminal, 17 Oct 2006 14:00, 18 Oct 2006 11:00

Yantian
YanTian Intl. Container Terminal, 21 Oct 2006 16:00, 22 Oct 2006 10:00

Hong Kong
Hong Kong / Modern Terminals Ltd, 22 Oct 2006 15:00, 23 Oct 2006 05:00

Tanjung Pelepas
Pelabuhan Tanjung Pelepas Terminal, 25 Oct 2006 23:00, 26 Oct 2006 19:00

Back to Europe

non descript
15th August 2006, 23:08
Courtesy of Lloyd's List

Cool blue 11,000 teu — giant boxship Emma Maersk smashes every record

By Janet Porter
Tuesday August 15 2006

MAERSK has smashed the world record with a new containership that is at least 10% larger than anything else afloat.

Newbuilding L-203 was formally named Emma Maersk at AP Moller-Maersk’s Odense-Lindo yard in Denmark on Saturday.

The company broke its usual silence about the size of its ships by declaring the nominal capacity of the 397 m long giant at 11,000 teu.

That is 1,000 teu more than the biggest ships being built in Asia. With no chance of other lines taking delivery of tonnage that large at least until 2010, Maersk now has a huge lead time over competitors and the ability to gain considerable economies of scale and much lower slot costs, depending on how capital costs are allocated.

Emma Maersk will also rank as one of the largest refrigerated cargoships in the world, able to take 1,000 40ft reefer containers.

With Maersk’s reputation for understating the true size of its ships, there has been speculation that the theoretical capacity could be closer to 15,000 teu, measured in conventional terms.

Obscuring the practical capacity will be the fact that every cell in the Emma Maersk is thought to be able to take highcube containers. At 9 ft 6 inches, these are 12 inches higher than standard containers.

That would reduce the number of individual containers the ship could load, although not the volume of cargo carried.

The vessel was named Emma Maerskin memory of AP Moller-Maersk chairman Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller’s wife, who died last December.

Their daughter Ane Maersk Mc-Kinney Uggla, accompanied by her husband, Peder Uggla, named the newbuilding.

Maersk said the world’s largest containership would set new standards for safety and environment. The hull is coated with environmentally friendly silicon paint below the waterline, which reduces water resistance and cuts the vessel’s fuel consumption by 1,200 tonnes per year.

Emma Maersk is powered by a 14-cylinder Wärtsilä RT-flex diesel engine which generates 110,000 bhp.

After sea trials, it is scheduled to enter Maersk’s AE1 Europe-Asia service, with the first commercial sailing from Gothenburg in mid-September.

With a width of 53 m, the ship is able to carry 22 rows of containers across its decks. The broadest until now, in service with Mediterranean Shipping Co, takes 18 rows.

Assessing the technical specifications of Emma Maersk,French analyst AXSLiner said the real intake could be as much as 50% greater than the biggest ships now in service.

With seven tiers stacked on deck, and allowing for visibility rules, the ship could carry around 13,500 teu, the firm reckons. An eighth layer would bring nominal capacity to above 14,000 teu.

A 40 ft highcube container is equivalent to 2.24 teu, says AXSLiner. If Maersk’s figure of 11,000 teu was based on highcubes, capacity in terms of standard boxes would equate to about 12,300 teu.

Maersk is thought to have another 10 E-class ships on order at the LindØ yard for delivery up to mid-2009. But later ships in the series could be stretched to as much as 420 m, according to AXSLiner, bringing nominal capacity to 15,000 teu with seven tiers on deck.

rushie
18th August 2006, 02:15
I've tried the Maersk website ....and there is no mention of said vessel.!! There again you have to pay to access regions of the site...what a bunch of ......

Disgusted of Devon

Peter Eccleson
18th August 2006, 10:44
If you follow Ruud's link and click on 'homepage' to the left, it allows you to select English before re-entering the launch news page

PE

Thorsten
19th August 2006, 23:29
Hi everybody
Have a look at these pages:

http://www.fotokritik.dk/?x=/kritik.html_pic=263250

and

http://www.maersk.com/NR/rdonlyres/DA9D71D3-9824-43D8-B6D2-49F50745781C/0/EMMAMÆRSK.jpg

rushie
23rd August 2006, 16:56
From www.HamptonRoads.com -

It’s longer than the Eiffel Tower is tall , wider than the width of a football field and it can officially hold 11,000 20-foot-long shipping containers, though some suggest it can pack in even more.

And it floats.

Next month, the Emma Maersk, the world’s largest container ship, will enter service between Asia and Europe, hauling toys, electronics, clothing, and whatever else can be packed into steel boxes. The vessel, bigger than an aircraft carrier, will hold at least 1,400 more containers than any of the other 3,700 container-carrying vessels now plying the seas. Its capacity will greatly exceed the size of vessels regularly calling on the port of Hampton Roads; those vessels typically can hold between 4,000 and 5,000 20-foot-long containers.

“That’s a lot of containers,” David Tozer said of the Emma Maersk’s 11,000-container capacity as reported by its owner, Maersk Line. Tozer oversees the worldwide container ship inspection program for London-based Lloyd’s Register, which certifies the seaworthiness of ships.

Yet Tozer and other industry experts say Maersk’s figure understates the ship’s true capacity. Based on its 1,303-foot length and 184-foot width, they estimate it could carry up to nearly 15,000 20-foot containers.

Still, don’t expect the Emma Maersk or a similar-sized vessel in Hampton Roads any time soon, owing to geography and port capacities.

Container ships have ballooned in size to accommodate rapid growth in global trade. The amount of cargo carried in containers has grown by about 9.5 percent every year since the early 1990s, and it’s expected to maintain that pace “well into the next decade,” Tozer said. With the bigger vessels, ship owners are also able to lower the cost of moving each container by spreading expenses – such as for the crew and fuel – over more boxes.

EMMA MAERSK

Dimensions: 1,303 feet in length, 184 feet in width, 207 feet in height and a draft of 51 feet

Engine: 14-cylinder diesel engine producing 110,000 brake horsepower

Cost: Estimated at more than $145 million

Crew size: 13 people

Service speed: 27 knots per hour (about 31 miles per hour)

Route: Asia-to-Europe service with a round trip of 63 days, calling on ports in China, Japan, England, Sweden and the Netherlands, among other countries

Shipyard: Odense Steel Shipyard, Denmark


Source: Maersk Line, Lloyd’s Register

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Consider how much the ships have grown. The first container-carrying vessel, the Ideal X, carried 58 boxes on its first voyage in 1956 from Newark, N.J., to Houston.

In 1998, the Regina Maersk, then one of the world’s largest container ships, docked in Hampton Roads as part of a tour to highlight the need for deeper shipping channels and more expansive cargo terminals on the East Coast to handle larger vessels. The Regina Maersk holds 6,000 20-foot containers.

Just last month, Lloyd’s Register touted the newly built Xin Los Angeles as being the “world’s largest container ship.” The vessel, owned by China Shipping Container Lines, will carry 9,600 20-foot containers between Asia and Europe. It will have that title until September, when the Emma Maersk begins servicing ports in such countries as China, Japan, England, Sweden and the Netherlands.

No ships larger than the Emma Maersk are expected for some time, say industry watchers. One reason is that shipyards are already clogged with work and likely won’t be accepting new orders until 2009, said Gary Ferrulli, president of Global Logistics and Transport Consulting in Chandler, Ariz. The vessels ordered can carry between 9,000 and 10,000 20-foot containers, he said.

For instance, Zim Integrated Shipping Services Ltd., an Israeli line whose North American headquarters are in Norfolk, announced in June that it has ordered four ships capable of moving 10,000 20-foot containers.

Also, there may be little reason to go much bigger than the Emma Maersk, Tozer said. Bigger vessels can be constructed, but there would be very few ports around the globe with shipping lanes deep enough to permit their passage and cranes large enough to service them, he said.

Another problem for mega-ships: keeping them filled, especially should a downturn occur with international trade. Running a ship half-empty is not cheap, he said.

“We believe that she, and her future sisters, are the largest container ships likely to be seen for some time,” Tozer said of the Emma Maersk.

Maersk Line, a unit of the Danish conglomerate A.P. Moller-Maersk Group, will churn out 10 identical sister ships to the Emma Maersk at its own shipyard in Denmark, Ferrulli said. The next ship should arrive at the end of September with another vessel being delivered every four months until the order is complete. Maersk Line, the world’s largest container carrier, confirmed in a written response to questions that sister ships to the Emma Maersk are planned, but spokeswoman Mary Ann Kotlarich said she didn’t have any information to share beyond that.

Such jumbo haulers are initially destined for the Asia-to-Europe trade lane because that’s the longest shipping route, making it the most logical place to try to lessen operating costs, Tozer said. After that, they could be used in routes from Asia to the West Coast, the location of the two biggest U.S. ports.

Bringing these container ships to the East Coast is problematic because they can’t fit through the Panama Canal, necessitating a longer journey through Egypt’s Suez Canal, even if the Panama Canal’s planned expansion is completed as scheduled in 2014, Tozer said. Also, many East Coast ports don’t have shipping channels deep enough to handle such ships .

The Emma Maersk would be a tight squeeze but could fit into the port of Hampton Roads, said Joe Harris, spokesman for the Virginia Port Authority, the state agency that owns three Hampton Roads marine cargo terminals. The authority’s cranes can stretch across the 22 rows of containers on such ships. While the port’s shipping lane is 50 feet deep and the Emma Maersk sits 51 feet in the water, the ship would be able to enter the port fully loaded at high tide, Harris said.

“We’re not sweating it because we are the only port on the East Coast that has 50 feet of water,” Harris said.

Maersk’s sister company, APM Terminals, is building a $450 million cargo handling facility in Portsmouth that’s scheduled to open in July. There are no plans to bring the Emma Maersk to that facility, according to Maersk.

For all its size, the Emma Maersk is not the world’s biggest ship. That honor belongs to the Knock Nevis, a Norwegian-owned supertanker that is 1,502.6 feet long and 226.1 feet wide.

Crew size 13 people...!!!! That little tanker (980gt) that went down in the Phillipines last week had a crew of 23...!!

Rushie

Bjarne Johansen
27th August 2006, 14:49
Hi All

You can find several pictures of Emma maersk on www.shipspotting.com

Best regards

Bjarne Johansen

david smith
27th August 2006, 16:22
two recent emma maersk tankers-
the first was Emma Maersk built 1993 and renamed British Vigilance two years later, becoming the Eugen Maersk in 2002. sold to Hyundai Corp in 2004 now sails as Universal Hope. 158,475gt
the second was built as the Ellen Maersk in 1995 and renamed Emma Maersk in 1997 before also being sold to Hyundai and becoming the Universal Peace in 2004. 158,475gt

A much older and smaller Emma Maersk was built in 1985 and 28.010gt She became Odense Maersk in 1992 before being sold to Great Eastern of India in 2000 and renamed Jag Pankhi she was sold and renamed Fair Voyager and now sailing as Ocean Grace under the Liberian Flag

Aneven older tanker was the Emma Maersk of 1964 35,508 gt and I don't think she is afloat now.

Pedro Baptista
29th August 2006, 22:29
Thank you David. ;)

rushie
6th October 2006, 10:51
From the People's Daily -

Yantian international wharf of Shenzhen, a special economic zone in south China's Guangdong Province, received on Thursday morning the world largest container vessel for the first time.

Leaving Shenzhen the same day, Emma Maersk is on its maiden voyage, which will call at 17 harbors in Europe and Asia including Yantian.

Workers at Yantian wharf used 10 cranes to unload 6,421 containers from Emma Maersk, local harbor management authorities said.

Emma Maersk was built at the end of August by the Denmark-based Odense Steel Shipyard Ltd. for the AP Moller-Maersk Group headquartered in Copenhagen. The 397.71-meter-long mammoth vessel is capable of accomodating 11,000 standard containers with a total tonnage of more than 170,000 tons.

Between January and September, Yantian wharf recorded a turnover of more than six million containers, or almost half of Shenzhen's total, up 12 percent over the same period of last year, the authorities said.

Rushie

david
18th October 2006, 09:11
Hi Shipmates.
I have just literally stumbled across a Japanese site with some incredible pic of her loading in one of the ports Rushie had posted.
Site is in "Google" English as well.
Pics are crystal clear, obviously a pro.
Go to shipphoto.exblog.jp and follow scrolls.
Good Hunting,
Regards,
David D.(Thumb)

shipartist
18th October 2006, 14:08
most impressive is her speed? I haven't clicked on the photo link....we have 1,000 footers on the Great Lakes, Emma's probably five times as wide...

shipartist
18th October 2006, 14:26
just clicked onto high res........wow! What a pilot house...would make a nice cake, lol! Is that a lighthouse in the background, or a candle?

lagerstedt
18th October 2006, 22:53
I see from Tonga's comments they are building another 10 of these ships. How many $'s does it cost to build one, then x by ten to get the cost of the order. Hope like hell there is not another down turn in the world economy. AP Moller must have a very generous banker manager. I see here in NZ the AP Moller group said it was going to reduce the number of ports of call from its current seven to one or two then said it was going stay as it is. Ships of that size (100k and above) must be good for coastal and intercolonial shipping. 100k ships and above would not able to get into any NZ port and I am not sure of OZ. Used to live near the entrance to Botany Harbour in Sydney and it would be interesting to see one enter that harbour let alone try and turn around in the basin near the airport.

Regards
Blair Lagerstedt
New Zealand.

KPC
19th October 2006, 00:17
Good photo of this ship/box KPC Gallery

duquesa
21st October 2006, 21:09
Three fine shots of the Emma Maersk. Ten gantries I believe!!!

Frank P
21st October 2006, 21:41
I see from Tonga's comments they are building another 10 of these ships. How many $'s does it cost to build one, then x by ten to get the cost of the order. Hope like hell there is not another down turn in the world economy. AP Moller must have a very generous banker manager. I see here in NZ the AP Moller group said it was going to reduce the number of ports of call from its current seven to one or two then said it was going stay as it is. Ships of that size (100k and above) must be good for coastal and intercolonial shipping. 100k ships and above would not able to get into any NZ port and I am not sure of OZ. Used to live near the entrance to Botany Harbour in Sydney and it would be interesting to see one enter that harbour let alone try and turn around in the basin near the airport.

Regards
Blair Lagerstedt
New Zealand.

Blair, I think that Mærsk (A P Moller) own the Odense shipyard in Danmark were alot of their ships are built, so that will help with the finance side of things.

Frank

Pedro Baptista
22nd October 2006, 01:35
Blair, I think that Mærsk (A P Moller) own the Odense shipyard in Danmark were alot of their ships are built, so that will help with the finance side of things.

FrankYes, Frank. Odense Steel shipyard do belong to AP Möller Maersk, together with other workshops. For example, when EMMA MAERSK had her bridge destroyed by fire, a whole new superstructure was built somewhere in [I believe, but not sure] Latavia or nearby, by some Maersk Group workshop. ;)

rushie
3rd November 2006, 11:25
From SeaNews Russia -

Quite an interesting little piece this one..!

The imminent arrival of the pride of the AP Moller - Maersk fleet at the UK port of Felixstowe is making big news in the British press which usually only writes about the shipping industry when there is an oil spill or some well known company is the subject of a foreign takeover.

The debut of the Emma Maersk has already prompted industry debate about whether its true capacity is the 11,000-teu declared by Maersk, or maybe 13,500-teu, or even 1,000-teu more.

And insurance underwriters are worried that the total loss of such a ship and its cargo could easily produce a loss of at least $1.5bn.

But here at TradeWinds we are more concerned about a fundamental issue that has been exposed by media reports that appear to suggest the Emma Maersk is sailing for Europe more or less empty.

Rushie

billyboy
5th November 2006, 04:02
The MV Emma Maersk, had docked in Felixtow to off load 3,000 containers befor making deliveries to other ports in europe.
She is said to be the Largest container ship in the world... can anyone tell me if thats right?
see http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/suffolk/6117080.stm for story.

gdynia
5th November 2006, 04:39
So the story goes Billy but for how long thats another matter,no doubt there will be plans on a drawing board for a bigger one. One thing Mate she wont get into Caspian Sea

billyboy
5th November 2006, 07:16
So the story goes Billy but for how long thats another matter,no doubt there will be plans on a drawing board for a bigger one. One thing Mate she wont get into Caspian Sea

Nah! you would need a paddler with extra large paddles to get in there mate...with a fork truck pushing it!...LOL(Thumb)

wakaman
5th November 2006, 08:26
Saw her on TV tonight,it seemed to take ages to pass the camera!!!!

oceantramp
5th November 2006, 11:17
Emma Maersk details 170.000 grt length 1303 feet breadth 184 feet 207 feet in height and a draft of 51 feet. Emma Maersk can carry up to 15000 20ft containers and has a speed of 27 knts. Her crew numbers 13 she is a big ship small crew. I wonder how long before the ships get bigger and the crews smaller. (Pint)

R58484956
5th November 2006, 12:16
Emma Mearsk 13 crew, say 4 mates, 4 engineers, 5 deck crew not a lot to tie her up and a big vessel to keep clean.

billyboy
5th November 2006, 12:22
you lads are right. She is big and the crew is small. soon it will be all done by computer and there will be no crew apart from one to press the stop/start buttons. maybee all captains of the future are being trained by a large computer company already...LOl

R651400
5th November 2006, 12:30
Recent tv coverage of global warming stated not only large containerships such as "EM" but all airlines, particularly budget short haul, are a large contributory factor in emission pollution.
There are now apparently plans to enlarge the Panama canal to take even larger ships in the future.
By that I read it that the all the locks will be enlarged at tremendous cost.

Bob S
5th November 2006, 18:34
Seen at Felixstowe today, 5th November, being worked by six cranes.

DMA
5th November 2006, 20:35
This the start of bigger is best.
Thinks I went to sea at the right time, when it was fun to be at sea.(Smoke)

quietman
8th November 2006, 00:18
I must agree with Dave. In my day we used to get aweek or so in port.then containers came along including keeping watch in port and shore leave hence great experience of all types became a thing of the past

duquesa
8th November 2006, 10:23
Nice video of her rounding Landguard Point at Felixstowe on:-
www.felixstowetv.co.uk/news.php

Cap'n Pete
8th November 2006, 10:35
There is a perception that having fun at sea means having a week in port with plenty of shore leave.
Driving a large container ship is fun and immensely satisfying in itself. The job satisfaction lies in your ability to deliver thousands of containers in the most cost effective method availiable today, thus enriching the lives of millions of people around the world. Much more satisfying than a run up the road to down half a dozen pints in "The British".

James_C
8th November 2006, 19:07
Oh I dunno Pete, I think the British has the edge in this particular case...

LOL

non descript
8th November 2006, 20:25
Nice video of her rounding Landguard Point at Felixstowe on:-
www.felixstowetv.co.uk/news.php


Thanks for that Duquesa, interesting. - Also a monument to mankind's unfailing ability to mess up other people's shots, by standing infront of the camera...

(Cloud)

Ralf I Karlson
8th November 2006, 20:48
How many cartons of Marlboro u recon was required for a "safe" passage of Suez canal of this "boxy-baby"?

Peter B
12th November 2006, 20:50
Yes, Frank. Odense Steel shipyard do belong to AP Möller Maersk, together with other workshops. For example, when EMMA MAERSK had her bridge destroyed by fire, a whole new superstructure was built somewhere in [I believe, but not sure] Latavia or nearby, by some Maersk Group workshop. ;)

I can confirm that the OSS is owned by Maersk. Not only the replacement deck house for Emma, but all deck houses are built in the Baltic. The same goes for a lot of the hull sections as well, and also for all the cargo hold hatches. And a small correction: There is going to be built eight of the class, not ten as widely reported.
Regards, Peter

Hawkeye
13th November 2006, 01:05
Hi
There have been about 8 ships that have carried the name 'Emma Maersk'. For the IMO Numbers & building dates, check this site out: http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz/ship/list

Quote: Yes, Frank. Odense Steel shipyard do belong to AP Möller Maersk, together with other workshops. For example, when EMMA MAERSK had her bridge destroyed by fire, a whole new superstructure was built somewhere in [I believe, but not sure] Latavia or nearby, by some Maersk Group workshop.
Unquote:
As for the Superstructure build, the Emma's accomadation block was lifted of and, from what I have seen on another site, the Estelle's block which was almost finished was lifted onto the Emma instead.

I missed seeing her in Felixstowe, but plenty of my shipmates did see it, and some of them brought back onto the ship press articles about the event. I shall just have to wait until next time.

Regards
Karl

Thorsten
13th November 2006, 12:24
Hello everybody

The former eastern german shipyard Volkswerft in Stralsund belongs to Odense Stålskibsværft and the Maersk Moller Group. They bought this shipyard in 1998.
Take a look on their homepage:
www.volkswerft.de (http://www.volkswerft.de)
This shipyard are building a number of ships to maersk - the socalled PanMax containerships. They also build some of the special ships that maersk own.
For foreign companys they have made a number of ships - for instance ships to the norvegian "Hurtigruten".
Take a look on their homepage:
www.hurtigruten.no (http://www.hurtigruten.no)

Regards
Thorsten

benjidog
16th November 2006, 19:24
Dear All,

There is a lot of interest in Emma Maersk and this has led to multiple threads being started about her. The Moderators have decided to merge them into a single thread so all the information is in one place.

Please make any futher posts about Emma Maersk here.

Regards,

Brian

wa002f0328
16th November 2006, 22:36
Nev if you want her in the Caspian she will be there, where there,s a will there is a way, L.O.L. see ya

gdynia
17th November 2006, 03:54
Bill
Shes as long as the Caspian so I think we would have a few diffuculties.

neillrush
20th November 2006, 12:56
Emma departed from Algeciras today (20/11) bound for Suez, luckily she was delayed from her original time of 06.00 (cos it was dark!) but the sun was nearly in the wrong position as she departed at 12.00
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v628/gibmartrust/EmmaMaersk.jpg
Mind you it's still a big lump of metal!!
Rgds Neill

Gulpers
20th November 2006, 13:01
Nice shot Neil. (Applause)

We have consolidated all the Emma Maersk threads, so I've moved your thread accordingly! (Thumb)

Peter B
20th November 2006, 16:18
I posted this in response to a photo and thought I would put it here as well:

In fact, the deck house is 12 twelwe decks.

Upperdeck:
CO2-room, emergency generator room, garbage room, paint store, deck store, reefer repair shop, fans and turbo vents.

A-deck:
Ship control centre, gymnasium, emergency generator room, Suez crew, linen / crockery and laundry.

B-deck:
Infirmary, dining saloon, duty mess, engineers entrance, galley, cold / dry provision stores.

C-deck:
Six maintenannce crew cabins, one spare cabin, dress locker room and swimming pool.

D-deck:
Electricians cabin, four spare cabins and dress locker room.

E-deck:
Two ships assistents' cabins, slop, "small saloon", IT-café and dress locker room.

F-deck:
Four ships assistents' cabins, one junior officers' cabin and dress locker room.

G-deck:
Five junior officers' cabins and dress locker room.

H-deck:
One senior officers' cabin, pilots' cabin, ship saloon and dress locker room.

J-deck:
Two senior officers' cabins, conference room / library, electric equipment room and dress locker room.

K-deck:
Captains' accomodation, Chief Engineers' accomodation, air condition equipment, electric equipment room and dress locker room.

Nav. Bridge:
Closed wheel house, spanning 56,4 m (185 ft.)

All crew members have separate cabins with private bath and toilet. Senior officers have separate dayroom and bedroom. Captain and Chief Engineer have separate office, dayroom and bedroom.

Gulpers
20th November 2006, 16:27
Thank you for the information Peter. (Applause)

How times have changed! (Thumb)

neillrush
20th November 2006, 18:16
So basically everyone has his own self-contained flat, my dear ole grandad would turn in his grave!
Rgds Neill

Peter B
20th November 2006, 20:00
So basically everyone has his own self-contained flat, my dear ole grandad would turn in his grave!
Rgds Neill
...that would actually be his or hers! Maersk employes quite a few female officers these days, including engineers, chief officers and captains. I am not aware of any female chief engineers, but that doesn't mean there aren't any.
When the Georg Mærsk was delivered earlier this year, it was a woman, Michele de Linde Gladwin, who took command (go to www.oss.dk (http://www.oss.dk), click the British flag, then select "News" in the top bar, select "News" again in the left pane bar, then select "Namegiving of newbuilding L 202 from Odense Steel Shipyard").

James_C
20th November 2006, 21:27
Women at sea? Bad luck I tell ye.
Just like Meenisters travelling on Macbraynes Fine Steamers....

LOL


(the Scottish lads will get it!)

tell
21st November 2006, 02:27
courting disaster building ships of this size, don't under estimate that gal with the green dress on

Hawkeye
21st November 2006, 15:28
Women at sea? Bad luck I tell ye.
Just like Meenisters travelling on Macbraynes Fine Steamers....

LOL


(the Scottish lads will get it!)

So is 13 (crew size)

kepowee
22nd November 2006, 13:34
hi all i have,nt been to sea for forty odd years what i,de like to know is how can they stack these containers so high on deck without the ship rolling right over are they biult with an exrta wide beam and what are they like in realy heavy weather hope i dont sound too thick ken powell

Brian Dobbie
22nd November 2006, 18:48
Probably she has containers 12-14 high under deck plus bunkers and ballast means she won't roll over.
The big box boats are good sea ships, when loaded, very little in the way of rolling. Bit of the wobbles as you look frd and see the bow moving from side to side.
Brian

Cap'n Pete
22nd November 2006, 21:04
The Emma Maersk has a crew of 13, but accomodation for 30 and lifeboat capacity for 38. I would be interested to hear SN members views on why there are so many spare bunks on this fine ship.

James_C
22nd November 2006, 22:19
Probably to accommodate the shore side maintenance squad/fire fighting crews etc for when it all goes wrong, seeing as they've haven't got a cat in hells chance of controlling an incident with 13 men. It's hard enough with 25!

wa002f0328
22nd November 2006, 22:56
If we look at the shape of hull closely, the draught she has, and the speed she is doing,it looks good, but the testing will come when she hits a bit of a rumpus, I am sure she will survive,

bestf1
23rd November 2006, 16:27
vidio Emma
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/265696/emma_maersk/

bestf1
24th November 2006, 08:42
I have got a question
Hov long takes loading EMMA

Jan Hendrik
24th November 2006, 11:42
I guess that all depends on the number of cranes they put over her and whether it is a full load or a full discharge, something that never happens in regular container ports.
So the answer is hard to give I suppose, but usually one crane does 20-25 lifts per hour and in sophisticated ports a bit over 25 per hour, this is both 20 footers (1 TEU) and/or 40 footers (2TEU), so in case they get say 8 cranes within half an hour operating after berthing, then you can make your own calculations. Example as follows:
Perhaps this vessel would "exchange" say 5000 TEU per port (20 footers) , based on 25 lifts per hour , this brings it to:200 hours , and with 8 container cranes then this gives you: 25 hours, in reality add another 5 hours, so there you have it.
Jan

bestf1
24th November 2006, 12:56
Thank you Jan!!

dom
24th November 2006, 13:32
looking at the build of the first box boats with the accommodation block more or less right aft,and looking at the Emma Maersk why is the accommodation housing nearly amidships,is it for hight for the bridge over the containers

Cap'n Pete
26th November 2006, 18:00
The early box boats had massive vibration problems with the accommodation block placed aft.

Being post-panamax, the Emma Maersk does not have to comply with the PanCan line-of-sight restrictions but she does have to comply with the IMO visibility requirements which is 2 x ship's length or 500 metres forward of the bow, whichever is less - no prizes for working out which the Emma Maersk has to keep to.

Most box boats these days restrict the length of the accommodation block to 40' ie the length of a box.

cybergibbons
26th November 2006, 22:42
Maersk have said there is a minimum crew of 13 - and that might be the case at the moment, being the maiden voyage and wanting to show off and all. I should imagine it will go up bit by bit as maintenance needs arise.

It looks quite technically advanced - two electric motors around the prop shaft, a combined gas/steam turbine for power, active stabilisers.

Peter B
26th November 2006, 22:48
As Cap'n Pete has already mentioned, the line-of-sight is one reason for moving the bridge forward.
Another, and in this case vital, reason is to be found below deck: Due to the large hatch openings, the stiffness of the hull of containership suffer from the same problems as a shoebox without the lid on; they lack longitudinal stiffness against torsional movements. Several measures are put in place in order to compensate for this. In this context, the engine room can be seen as a giant "stiffener box", inserted into the middle of the hull, thus dividing the "hull beam" in two. Among the other measures can be mentioned that the upper parts of the hull sides and the deck are built with incredible strength and large plate dimensions. In Emma and her sisters some of the hull plates are 98 mm thick.
This location of the engine room results in a very long propeller shaft (140 m) and therefore the shaft tunnel takes up a lot of valuable space that could otherwise have been used for containers. On the other hand, locating the engine room where the cross-section of the hull is nearly rectangular means that the engine room can be very short. The lower, central part with the main engine extends some metres aft of the deck house, but apart from that the machinery is located under the deck house, in the shaft tunnel (primarily the two 9 MW shaft motors) and under the wing tanks (fin stabilizers, directly fore and aft of the engine room).

Among all the articles posted on the internet about these ships, this one from DTU (Technical University of Denmark) is one of the better. In danish only, unfortunately: http://www.dtu.dk/upload/dtu%20kommunikation/dynamo/dynamo7/15_enklasseforsig.pdf (http://www.dtu.dk/upload/dtu%20kommunikation/dynamo/dynamo7/15_enklasseforsig.pdf)

Peter B
27th November 2006, 02:42
Saturday 25. november the third of the class was named "Eleonora Maersk".

bestf1
27th November 2006, 11:59
I hove got a question
Who is captain Emma ?

non descript
27th November 2006, 12:06
I hove got a question
Who is captain Emma ?

The present Master is Captain Henrik Solmer

The ship is named after Mærsk Mc-Kinney Møller’s late wife, Emma, who passed away in December last year.

Any Port in a Storm
29th November 2006, 17:38
hi all i have,nt been to sea for forty odd years what i,de like to know is how can they stack these containers so high on deck without the ship rolling right over are they biult with an exrta wide beam and what are they like in realy heavy weather hope i dont sound too thick ken powell

I recall that only the first two layers on deck contain cargo - the rest are empty...

bestf1
29th November 2006, 18:58
Thank you for the information Tonga

R.Philip Griffin
1st December 2006, 13:19
Re:cost of these container ships. Maersk is one of the biggest shipping conglomerates in the world. They have an enormous off shore oil company with rigs, work boats and crew boats. They have their enormous shipping company with all sorts of cargo trades, and now they are involved with building ships both for themselves and other cash customers. I don't think they are hard up for a quid. Grifmar

Cap'n Pete
8th January 2007, 21:11
There's a rumour today that the Emma Maersk is having steelwork problems making it necessary for her to return to the yard - has anybody heard anything about this?

Hawkeye
9th January 2007, 00:09
Hi
Don't know about the steel problems, but the Emma has been in Felixstowe for the last few days, next port shown on the Felixstowe web site is Rotterdam.

Karl

KIWI
23rd March 2007, 02:21
Would be interested to know how the crew of thirteen is made up.Assuming engineers don't keep the old four on & four off that dept could probably get by on a chief & two other engineers but assuming every one can be multi tasked it still seems very light crewing.Doubt there would be a game of cards after dinner. Kiwi

Ali Bain
23rd March 2007, 09:08
To each their own Pete but I found the container ships, or more particularly the senior officers who ran them a total turn off. I gave them a chance and did four voyages in the early days (1974-1976) I thought so little of them that I left the industry altogether, and I know quite a few others who did the same. The day I saw one of my workmates taken ashore in a straight-jacket was the day I decided the job was no longer for me.
Regards-Ali. Bain ex professional 3/e

Javi
25th November 2007, 22:41
Hi im really curious about if somebody knows what is the total air draft of Emma Maersk and her sisters i read around here is about 207feet but i have the feeling is more than that from keel to top mast,

Ron Stringer
25th November 2007, 22:51
Hi im really curious about if somebody knows what is the total air draft of Emma Maersk and her sisters i read around here is about 207feet but i have the feeling is more than that from keel to top mast,

But Javi, air draft/draught is the distance from the surface of the water to the highest point of the ship. The distance from the keel or lowest point of the ship to the surface of the water is excluded from the air draught.

Javi
26th November 2007, 09:17
ohh thanks a lot i always tought air draft was the total height of the ship from the very bottom to the top because i guess it can change depending how loaded is the ship sorry my ignorance about that and thanks for correcting me so i should ask the total height of the ship then?

Jan Hendrik
26th November 2007, 13:07
Grifmar,
You say that "now they are also involved with building ships"....please note the old Odense Shipyard is owned by Maersk since 1917 and their ultra modern yard in Lindo, Odense where the world's largest container ships are built, opened in 1957.

Adding to your list: Maersk Containers, they have several 100.000's containers and also own their own container newbuilding yards incl 2 in China.
A giant company indeed.
Jan

Ron Stringer
26th November 2007, 18:30
so i should ask the total height of the ship then?

Yes that is correct Javi. The air draft is important when the ship has to pass under bridges or container cranes. Depending on the loaded condition of the ship, the air draft will change. A ship that can pass under a bridge when it is deeply loaded, may not be able to pass under when it has discharged its cargo and is lightly loaded or in ballast.

Thorsten
27th November 2007, 20:54
The Dimensions of Emma Maersk are: 1,303 feet in length, 184 feet in width, 207 feet in height and a draft of 51 feet.
Thorsten

makko
27th November 2007, 21:26
Thanks for the data Thorsten:

Therefore Emma's "air draft" at design draft would be 207 - 51 = 156 feet.

Rgds all,
Dave

WestPac'er
11th July 2008, 04:01
Emma Mearsk 13 crew, say 4 mates, 4 engineers, 5 deck crew not a lot to tie her up and a big vessel to keep clean.

Not a lot to stand watch either, pretty thin list.

andrew wilson
12th July 2008, 19:22
[QUOTE=Cap'n Pete;87694]There is a perception that having fun at sea means having a week in port with plenty of shore leave.
Driving a large container ship is fun and immensely satisfying in itself. The job satisfaction lies in your ability to deliver thousands of containers in the most cost effective method availiable today, thus enriching the lives of millions of people around the world. Much more satisfying than a run up the road to

RobW
14th July 2008, 11:11
In reality there will be many more people on board - including "flying squad" maintanance crew and a plethora of cadets - the figure Maersk quotes is really only the figure which could theoretically manage the ship. You will likely find at least 25 people on board large Maersk Line vessels. Minimal manning, which prevailed in the 1980's, appears to have been mostly abandoned by shipowners as it actually worked out cheaper to have larger crews on board and subsequently less downtime and shorter dry dock periods.

Cornelia
26th April 2009, 19:06
In reality there will be many more people on board - including "flying squad" maintanance crew and a plethora of cadets - the figure Maersk quotes is really only the figure which could theoretically manage the ship. You will likely find at least 25 people on board large Maersk Line vessels. Minimal manning, which prevailed in the 1980's, appears to have been mostly abandoned by shipowners as it actually worked out cheaper to have larger crews on board and subsequently less downtime and shorter dry dock periods.

Yes, these numbers are the minimum size of crew a ship can be ran with. So the above is absolutely right :-)

Klaatu83
26th April 2009, 19:30
Regarding "Air Draft":

I sailed on several of Sea-Land's "Atlantic Class" (formerly U.S. Lines' "Econs). Although nowhere near the size of the Emma Maersk, they they were the largest container ships in the world when new in the mid '80s. They were originally intended to go into Savannah, which has a bridge. For that reason the ships looked as though the deck house had been cut off short, without any visible stack or masts sticking up above it. With Sea-Land We regularly sailed under the Bayonne Bridge en route to Port Elizabeth, where air draft was also a serious issue. We had to lower a retractable main mast and could not transit at high tide. Eventually we simply stopped bothering to raise the mast at all. Nevertheless, there were a number of cases of masts striking the Bayonne Bridge (though not, I'm glad to say, on any of the ships when I was on them).

Thorsten
26th April 2009, 21:20
Hello all of you guys who are interested in Emma Maersk
The Danish Television made a film about Emma Maersk - it lasts 28 minutes and is very interesting. Unfortunately it is in the danish language without subtitles, but nevertheless look at the pictures and imagine...... (the are 79 steps to walk onboard from the quay)
Here is the link:
http://www.dr.dk/odp/player.aspx?http://www.dr.dk/odp/check.html?uniqueid=B0D0E6B0-FFDC-43D3-8732-1123868EB1FB&mt=programstab&st=frontpageTab_0&furl=http%3A//www.dr.dk/odp/default.aspx%3Ftemplate%3Dprogramserie%26guid%3DED F2A469-15B6-46C6-B138-835806449505%26back%3D%252fodp%252fdefault.aspx%25 3ftemplate%253dprogrammer%2526%23c0&surl=http%3A//www.dr.dk/Forms/Published/PlaylistGen.aspx%3Fqid%3D359353%26odp%3Dtrue

Simply copy this link and insert in a new browser.

Regards Thorsten

Alistair Macnab
26th April 2009, 21:39
Heard that only the first four of the "Emma Maersk" will be completed (instead of the 10/12/14- take your pick- originally conceived) the state of today's world trade and particularly of the world's container trade in consumer goods has gone south. Hubris anyone?

Thorsten
26th April 2009, 22:58
Hello
There are 8 ships in the 11000 TEU containership-series beginning with:
L 203 Emma Maersk - 2006
L 204 Estelle Maersk - 2007
L 205 Eleonora Maersk - 2007
L 206 Evelyn Maersk - 2007
L 207 Ebba Maersk - 2007
L 208 Elly Maersk - 2007
L 209 Edith Maersk -2007
L 210 Eugen Maersk - 2008

The newest series of 6 ships are 7000 TEU containerships:
L 211 Margrethe Maersk - 2008
L 212 Marchen Maersk - 2008
L 213 Maren Maersk - 2008
L 214 Mette Maersk - 2008
L 215 Marit Maersk - 2008
L 216 Mathilde Maersk - 2009

L 216 was the last ship which Maersk has built in his shipyard and it might close in 2010.
Homepage: http://www.oss.dk/

Regards Thorsten

Peter B
25th May 2010, 11:46
As some will remember, there was a lot of dispute over the actual size of the "Emma Maersk" class when they first started to come out in 2006. Maersk claimed they were 11000 teu vessels, whereas external sources rated them at sizes typically varying from 13500 till 14500 teu, with some claiming up till 15000 teu.
As other companies started to launch vessels above 11000 teu, but with significantly smaller dimensions, it became apparent that 11000 was an understatement for the "Emma Maersk" class.
Today I saw the first "official" information from the Maersk Group, indicating the true size of these eight vessels. Our in-house news magazine at the Odense Steel Shipyard Ltd (builders of the vessels and owned by Maersk) brought a picture of MV Ebba Maersk anchored off Gibraltar, carrying 15011 teu. According to the magazine, this is a world record.

The photo is here: http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/234306/title/15011-teu-on-ebba-maer/cat/500

Wanstead
10th June 2010, 12:27
Unfortunately, they are not paying their way!