Writing a novel, need your help.

Jenken
22nd November 2006, 04:10
Hi everyone. My name is Ken. I just joined this forum and am looking for men/women who have experience on freighter ships and would like to share. I'm writing a novel set aboard a massive freighter ship similar to the Emma Maersk. However, not having worked on any ships, my details are incomplete and I'd like to make the book feel authentic.

If anyone is interested in sharing what they know, I'd appreciate it. I can be reached via private message.

Thanks in advance and take care, all.

gdynia
22nd November 2006, 05:03
Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy your time on site and good luck with your book.

Gulpers
22nd November 2006, 05:18
Jenken,

A warm welcome to the site from Anglesey!
I hope you thoroughly enjoy the SN experience and get some offers of assistance from our members. We are not normally noted for being reticent when asked for advice. Good luck!

I've removed your email address from the public forum to avoid you receiving unsolicited emails from outside SN. (Thumb)

Keith Adams
22nd November 2006, 06:14
I am somewhat concerned that you call them "Freighter Ships" and am curious
to know the era ... current (container ships) or the older ships of Maersk Line?.
Anyway... welcome aboard, I will jump in if you have specific questions.Snowy.

non descript
22nd November 2006, 08:43
Ken, a warm welcome to you. Thank you for joining the community, enjoy the site and all it has to offer and we very much look forward to your postings and hearing news of your quest. There is plenty of scope for assistance from the Members for you here. Bon Voyage

Thamesphil
22nd November 2006, 10:09
Welcome, but I have to echo Snowy. The term "freighter" conjours up images of old cargo liners of years gone by. If you are writing about experiences on current ships and you are concerned about authenticity, I suggest that you familiarise yourself with correct shipping terminology and ship types.

I believe that Lloyds of London Press publish a small booklet called "Dictionary of Shipping Terms" (or at least they used to). It may be out of print but still very useful and can be had from various internet sellers. Additionally, Clarkson Research produces a larger text book written by Dr Martin Stopford, called "Maritime Economics". This can be purchased by going to: http://www.crsl.com/acatalog/Maritime_Economics_-_Martin_Stopford.html

Cheers
Phil

john shaw
22nd November 2006, 10:27
Hi-- I'm inspired-- I have a storyline- an hitherto unknown indigenous tribe from Papua New Guinea build a lunar orbiter and are the first to make intergalactic lurve with the people of Zooxidon6.

I've never been to PNG, nor into space--I know nothing of astrophysics, and I'm no biologist-- is "lunar orbiter" the definitive term?-- can someone with experience give me just a few pointers here?

Scepticism aside-- what is it that causes folk to decide to write about something of which they know nothing?

PS-- the term "larboard" is no longer used in the circles of those in the know, in case your research includes Alexander Kent et al. But you MUST use a few "aye me hearties", a well known phrase among simple freighter folk.

No doubt my response sounds harsh, but get real--I suggest that if you have the luxury of being one of the rare people to be published ,you write on something you know something of-- or you will no doubt join the long list of authors turning out a litany of laughable fiction complete with incorrect terminology.

R58484956
22nd November 2006, 10:31
Welcome Ken to the site and good luck with your book.

non descript
22nd November 2006, 13:19
Ken,

I would echo Thamesphil’s comment and as an unbiased source of comment I would say that anything written by Dr Martin Stopford will be first class. He is to my mind one of the best economic writers in the industry.

Good luck with the writing.
(Thumb)

Jenken
22nd November 2006, 13:41
First off, I will apologize for my laziness in using the term freighter. I simply grasped for the first word that came to mind. I have been researching the cargo industry, VLCCs, the piracy threat through the Malacca Straits, etc and failed in my first post to even use what I'd learned.

And, John Shaw's over-reactionary reply aside, your welcomes are most appreciated.

I'd like to make clear that my novel is not about a container ship. That's merely the setting. And while a large percentage of my readership on this book wouldn't know the difference between a TEU and the IMB, adding the little details enrichens the quilt, so to speak. You all have read books outside your knowledge area where you learned nothing of the trade practices, and still thought the book was fine. Because you didn't know what you didn't know. I could get by with that but I'd prefer to add an extra degree of authenticity, so that people who do know the industry can read it and nod their heads.

I'd like your help in getting the lingo right.

So I do what so many other authors do. I turn to experienced people for help. After all, do you really think all the mysteries being churned out are just by ex-cops, PIs and the like? Or that Dan Brown was a cryptologist, theologian, and art history expert? They started out much like I'm doing right here, right now.

Once again, thanks in advance.

Jenken
22nd November 2006, 13:50
Greetings. My name is Ken.

I'm writing a novel where the setting is a container vessel on the order of the Emma Maersk. I'm looking for anyone experienced in the industry who wants to help me ensure the lingo, trade practices, routines and procedures, etc are authentic.

My original post is here > http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?p=90493&posted=1#post90493

Please PM me if you'd like to help. Thanks in advance.

non descript
22nd November 2006, 14:52
Ken, I have merged your two threads to keep some order on the site - I trust that you are in agreement.

Peter4447
22nd November 2006, 16:05
I find this a very interesting thread as it is said that we all have a book inside of us somewhere. I did come up with what I thought was a perfect nautical story once but, sadly, it never got down the slipways. I would, however, like to ask what SN members think in regard to seafaring stories as one book that I greatly enjoy is Brian Callison's A Thunder of Crude when a VLCC blows up at a Scottish oil terminal. I know that this is based in part on the events of Bantry Bay but Brian Callison did serve with Blue Flue and, as far as I am aware, only on dry cargo ships. Yet for all this, to my untrained eye, his book contains a wealth of detail regarding tankers and their operation. It never ceases to amaze me how people seem to be able to amass such detailed information. Is it just the result of painstaking research or is having a first hand knowledge of seafaring, regardless of the type of vessel involved a major factor?
Sorry I cannot help with information Ken but good luck with the writing.
Peter4447(Thumb)

Jenken
22nd November 2006, 16:28
<snip>Is it just the result of painstaking research or is having a first hand knowledge of seafaring, regardless of the type of vessel involved a major factor?
Sorry I cannot help with information Ken but good luck with the writing.
Peter4447(Thumb)

It's a bit of both. Obviously having a lot of experience in one field can help provide authenticity for a book, but there's a danger as well. Details and items that an experienced author may find interesting or necessary can be detrimental to the pace of the book. Tom Clancy trends towards that line. No one will ever accuse him of skimping on detail. On the other hand, writers who hook up with a SME (Subject Matter Expert) may have the ability to weed out the intricacies and include just the gist of what needs to be conveyed.

I've written in areas where I knew my topic well enough to forego outside input. And then there's something like this project where my knowledge of shipping is slight and I'll need help.

Bottom line, nothing trumps a good story. Characters, settings, action are all fine but secondary to a story that keeps a reader turning pages.

Oh, and don't let that story inside of you go untold. That is my father's greatest regret, that he never set aside the time to write his stories. It's less about being published than it is telling something that needs to be told. Bang it out, even if only you and your close ones read it. You may find you enjoy the process.

daveyjones
22nd November 2006, 16:55
Hi Ken. I applaud your quest to write a book. Writing fiction is much harder than non fiction. As you pointed out Clive Cussler's novels are always well researched which gives authenticity to the storyline of his novels.
Im not quite sure if your intending book is going to be a fictional story on the Emma Mearsk or about shipping in general? Libraries have stacks of books on conventional and container vessels. Seamanship and seadog jargon can also be found through research on the internet.

Welcome aboard our vessel and I wish you well with your intended book.

Cheers Daveyjones

duquesa
22nd November 2006, 16:58
I must confess, whilst initially in agreement with the early responses, I did find the good John Shaw's posting a bit on the harsh side. However, it's a good job we are all different otherwise what a boring old place it would be. Good luck with your writing.

benjidog
22nd November 2006, 21:24
Hi Jenken.

Welcome to the site and good luck with your book.

You have already learned one thing about the MN - a good sense of humour and irony is required to keep you going in adverse circumstances.

I take it you are from the US - a country known for its irony deficiency. :)

Don't take the odd sarcastic remark to heart - the members here are a great bunch.

I will be keeping a look out for John's Zooxidon6 trilogy - I think it may have the makings of a best seller. [=P]

Regards,

Brian

Harry Nicholson
23rd November 2006, 12:33
Hello Jenken, I read what you say with interest. Best wishes for your book. I left the sea in 61 so I won't be much help with the VLCC's not having got above 12000 tons. But teacher at the creative writing class I go to wants us all to produce a draft novel. So I'm having a go. Reached 11,000 words so far and its taken me over. As it's set in the mid 16th century on the banks of the River Tees in Northern England I don't have too much first hand experience of what it was like to be a landless agricultural labourer in those days and district. But I'm having a great time doing the research and the story seems to be starting to write itself. Its all very interesting, like how do you get across the tidal river at Thornaby (onTees) in 1565 when there is no bridge and you have no money for the ferryman? And would a country girl, after only the second kiss, place the young man's hand on her breast? Answers to me on the back of a £5 note.

jim barnes
23rd November 2006, 14:02
following on from John Shaw, i understand what he is saying even if a bit harsh but it brought back memories of a Texan i once new who was working in the oil fields over here 30 so years ago now, well if he saw cowboy films on the TV here he would be for ever commenting on how far away from the truth things where, what we considered a cowboy to be and what he knew to be true to be totally different to reality. Phew said my bit.

john shaw
23rd November 2006, 14:07
And would a country girl, after only the second kiss, place the young man's hand on her breast?

I think she would-- listen to Fairport Convention "The Hiring Fair" (written by Ralph McTell,so you could visit his version too).

Jenken
23rd November 2006, 15:45
<snip> a Texan i once new who was working in the oil fields over here 30 so years ago now, well if he saw cowboy films on the TV here he would be for ever commenting on how far away from the truth things where, what we considered a cowboy to be and what he knew to be true to be totally different to reality. <snip>

The key there was how many viewers were saying the same thing as him and how many shrugged and accepted the fictional version. All writers go beyond what they know at some point when they write because there are always elements to the story that they don't have first hand experience with. In this information society it's a naive approach to believe someone must have done a certain task for years to write well on it. It limits the author.

I don't recall Michael Crichton ever extracting reptilian DNA from amber but that whole Jurassic Park thing worked out pretty well for him.

Anyway, this is an interesting forum and you guys have a well of knowledge that can only make my book that much more authentic. For those who have PMed me, thank you once again.

Hugh Ferguson
23rd November 2006, 16:13
Hi everyone. My name is Ken. I just joined this forum and am looking for men/women who have experience on freighter ships and would like to share. I'm writing a novel set aboard a massive freighter ship similar to the Emma Maersk. However, not having worked on any ships, my details are incomplete and I'd like to make the book feel authentic.

If anyone is interested in sharing what they know, I'd appreciate it. I can be reached via private message.

Thanks in advance and take care, all.

How is it possible to go to sea "on" a ship. One couldn't imagine anyone saying that he/she had gone for a trip "on" a car. It would just sound ridiculous. For an engineer, in particular, to say he has gone to sea "on" this, or that ship sounds even more ludicrous. There he is right down in the very bowels of a ship:he/she, of all people, is unquestionably "in" the ship.
Can we make it a rule in Ships Nostalgia that one goes to sea "in" a ship.
(p.s. and if you do not believe there ever were female engineers read the book, Victoria Drummond:Marine Engineer.
Yours, Hugh Ferguson.

rivet
23rd November 2006, 19:28
Hi Hugh
perhaps going to sea on a ship comes from "signing on" , strange how terminoligy gets disjointed at times. However good luck to Jenkin with his novel, i'am sure he will get all the help he requires as and when he needs it.
We all like a good sea yarn, so the more people that pick up the pen the better. I strongly recommend him to join the Society of Authors, they have been a great help to me. (visit www.dockland.fsworld.co.uk)
PS. Victoria Drummond: Marine Engineer. is available from the Institute of Marine Engineers.

Peter4447
23rd November 2006, 21:36
How is it possible to go to sea "on" a ship. One couldn't imagine anyone saying that he/she had gone for a trip "on" a car. It would just sound ridiculous. For an engineer, in particular, to say he has gone to sea "on" this, or that ship sounds even more ludicrous. There he is right down in the very bowels of a ship:he/she, of all people, is unquestionably "in" the ship.
Can we make it a rule in Ships Nostalgia that one goes to sea "in" a ship.
(p.s. and if you do not believe there ever were female engineers read the book, Victoria Drummond:Marine Engineer.
Yours, Hugh Ferguson.

Hi Hugh
This is a hoary old chesnut in the RN. In my day the lower deck nearly always referred to serving ON a particular ship whilst the officers always referred to serving IN a particular ship. Grammatically the officers were correct, so perhaps that is why they were the officers!
Peter4447(Thumb)

non descript
23rd November 2006, 21:50
Hi Hugh
This is a hoary old chesnut in the RN. In my day the lower deck nearly always referred to serving ON a particular ship whilst the officers always referred to serving IN a particular ship. Grammatically the officers were correct, so perhaps that is why they were the officers!
Peter4447(Thumb)

Hopefully both serve IN submarines (POP)

duquesa
23rd November 2006, 22:31
Tonga, your sense of humour does you credit!

Harry Nicholson
24th November 2006, 00:22
Twas ON the the good ship 'Venus'
By God you should have seen us
The figureheeead was a whooore in bed
And the mast a wizened penis.

James_C
24th November 2006, 00:59
Nice one Harry, the version I knew was a bit different though.

Twas on the good ship Venus,
By christ you should have seen us,
and the figurehead got caught in bed,
sucking on the captai...

Well you get the jist.
LOL

roymuir
24th November 2006, 01:14
Just in quick reply to Rivet; I don't think any of us have ever "signed on" a ship, but signed on that ships articles. As for "on" or "in", I was always taught that a passenger sailed on a ship and the crew sailed in her.

dom
24th November 2006, 01:51
i did a trip in her, i sailed on her, i took her to, english as she is spoken

benjidog
24th November 2006, 18:35
Should we open a hair-splitting forum? ;)

This thread was started with a request for help with a book. Poor old Jenken must think he has joined the "Grumpy old men's Nostalgia" website by now.

Sighhhhh.......

Brian

non descript
24th November 2006, 18:43
Just in quick reply to Rivet; I don't think any of us have ever "signed on" a ship, but signed on that ships articles. As for "on" or "in", I was always taught that a passenger sailed on a ship and the crew sailed in her.

Well that explains why Submarines do not carry passengers. (POP)

barrinoz
25th November 2006, 08:03
Hi, Jenken,
Some people, and John Shaw seems a classic example, tend to eat tacks for breakfast and spend the rest of the day spitting them out in various directions. Pay no attention.
You're absolutely right, Dan Brown wasn't a cryptographer and I'm pretty certain Stephen King didn't know any thinking cars, or clowns who lived in drains. Authenticity, or the appearance of it, is the key to a good yarn. If it's yarns you're after they're here aplenty but you'll have to look for them. I'm happy to help with some terminology. Bear in mind I left the Merchant Navy in 1973 so some of it may be a bit dated. It depends on when – and where – your story is set.
'Freighter' is a distinctly American term, and, I suggest, a shore-side one at that. I'm not convinced American seamen refer to their ships as freighters but maybe they do. The Brits definitely don't.
They are categorised as follows.
Tankers – Bulk wet cargo, usually but not exclusively, petroleum and gas products.
All tanker-men are nuts. This is because they go on inordinately long trips to the most God-forsaken destinations on the planet in stinking hot conditions on 'dry' ships.
Bulk carriers – Dry bulk cargo such as iron ore, wheat, sugar etc.
Reefers. - Carriers of refrigerated cargo (ergo: reefer-igerated).
General cargo.- Carriers of everything else.

There are others, of course, such as passenger ships, purpose built vessels etc; but they're too numerous to mention.
Merchant seafarers are referred to as seamen, not sailors! Sailors are the other lot in baggy pants and funny hats. Weekend sailors are idiots in small boats who think the same 'road' rules apply to them as applies to ships. They're mostly regarded as potential 'road-kill'. Sailors who actually sail are referred to as 'wankers'.
A ship is never referred to as a boat. A ship is a thing of beauty that makes a man of you and of which you keep treasured photographs. A boat is a hole in the water into which copious amounts of money is poured.
The exception to this rule is when a seaman refers to another vessel in her Company 'clothes', such as a “Port boat”, a “Star boat”, a “Federal boat” etc.
Seamen are either “at sea” or “going to sea” or “home from sea”. Do not put the word 'the' before 'sea' in this context. The sea is never rough. You experience 'heavy weather' or 'calm conditions' or something equally benign. The sea is your friend and is not to be disparaged.
Seamanship and terminology.
A ship is an ocean going vessel with a dizzying variety of technical terms very rarely found in relation to anything else.
Ships are always referred to in the female gender.
The pointy bit at the front is the 'bow'. The upward sweep of the hull from the waterline to the gunwhale is known as the 'flare'. Some people, and I'm one of them, have the view that the bigger the flare the higher the beauty. The blunt bit at the other end is called the 'stern'. The cutaway bit of the stern that sweeps inwards is called the 'counter'.
A gunwhale is the flat bit on top of the bulwarks on which you rest your arms. You never sit on the gunwhale. The bulwarks are solid metal walls rising from deck level to about a metre plus in height. Bulwarks are sometimes substituted for rails.
Ships do not go forward and in reverse. They either 'go-ahead' or 'go-astern'.
Ceilings are 'deckheads', walls are 'bulkheads' and floors are 'decks'. Rooms are cabins and all crew quarters are referred to as accommodation. Corridors are 'alleyways'. Dining rooms are 'mess rooms' and in some ships the engineers and officers ate in the 'saloon'. The kitchen is the 'galley'. Irrespective of your location on the ship, everything in front of you towards the bow is 'for'ard', everything behind you is 'aft'.
The bridge is generally the highest point of the accommodation and is usually, but not exclusively, either midships or at the stern. The wings of the bridge are the outdoor walkways on each side of the bridge, that is ; the starboard wing and the port wing. The 'wheelhouse' is the enclosed structure on the bridge. The bridge is the command centre of the ship.
The monkey island is the top of the bridge and generally houses an array of navigational equipment such as radar, antennae, a duplicate binnacle etc;. A binnacle is a brass structure housing a compass.
You'll also find one of those in the wheelhouse just in front of the helm which is a steering wheel. I'm not sure if they have steering wheels any more. A compass is a navigational aid. The compass is housed in gimbals, a swivelling device that keeps the compass on a relatively even keel irrespective of sea conditions.
A windlass is a monstrous winching machine which doubles as an anchor lowering and raising device and a mooring device.
Mooring a vessel is bringing her alongside. Ships are 'tied up' and 'let go'. Leaving port is referred to as 'sailing'. Ropes are not tied, they are 'made fast'. “Splicing the mainbrace” is an idiotic term used by equally idiotic actors who thought the writer knew his stuff. (Take note.)
A Plimsoll line is a mark on a ships' hull (each side) defining the point, in salt water and fresh water, at which the vessel may not submerge, by overloading or any other means because it will be detrimental to her stability.
Hatches are cargo holding spaces below decks. Samson posts are mast like structures used for supporting derricks. Derricks are mast like structures, attached to samson posts by a device called a goose-neck and a variety of block and tackle equipment, used for transferring cargo or stores from ship to shore or vicky verky. A jumbo derrick is a big derrick.
A V.L.C.C. and variations of it are dirty words.

The Personnel.
Top of the heap is the Skipper or Captain referred to as 'The old man' irrespective of age, and addressed as “Sir” (in the old days, anyway) or most often, “Captain”. He has the biggest cabin on board. His main jobs are, to satisfy himself that his navigational officer knows his way around a chart, and to entertain the various 'suits' in all visited ports. Contrary to popular belief the old man has very little to do with the running of a ship and even less with her navigation. All that, “Full ahead, full astern , let go fore and aft” nonsense you see skippers in the movies doing is all done by Pilots. Pilots are people hired by port companies throughout the world to take charge of vessels within their port jurisdictions to prevent their infrastructures being damaged beyond repair by guys who have never navigated a vessel in confined quarters.
Next to the old man is the First or Chief Officer, referred to as 'The Mate' and addressed as “Chief”. This is the guy who gets things done in the deck department. A 'good' mate can be the making of a ship...and a trip. From a deckhand's point of view, the only thing worse than a 'bad' mate is a 'bad' bosun. After the Mate there are the 'second', 'third', and sometimes, 'fourth' mates. The higher the number, the lower the rank. They're basically navigational watchkeepers.
The 'bosun' (boatswain) is the foreman of the deck crew. The deck crew are, of course, the cream of the crop and indispensable to the running of the ship.
The Chief engineer, as his name suggests, is the head honcho in the engine room department. Nobody knows what a Chief engineer does. His cabin is not quite as big as the skipper's. He has a whole bunch of minions trailing him. From 2nd. Engineer all the way down to 9th. on some ships I've sailed on. (Can you believe that? Nine engineers!) They all dress in white (no, that is not a misprint) uniforms/boilersuits to go down to the engine room and emerge spotless. The reason for this is that they share the engine room with a bunch of guys called 'greasers', (they call them motormen, these days).The 'greasers' are led by a guy called the 'donkeyman', (which has nothing to do with his physical attributes). The 'greasers' job is to tell the engineers what all the whirly, twirly, clanking bits are, what, if anything, is wrong with them and how to maintain and repair them. The engineer's job is to tell the greaser then to do that.
The "Sparky" was the radio operaror. His main responsibility was to ensure that the crew got the football results as soon as they were broadcast. There was nothing quite like sitting back in the mess room when the announcer's voice came over the speaker, "Good evening. This is the B.B.C. World Service. Here are the football results. Liverpool 1, Tottenham Hotspur Bcchhhhhhhh; Manchester Bccchhhhhh 2, Bcchhhhh United 2; Bcchhhhh City 3, Bcchhhh Bcchhhhh 1"; and so on. The reception would be so poor you were none the wiser at the end. Hilarious.
The "Lecky" was the electrician. His prime function was to make sure that the winches were so lightly fused that they blew their motors as soon as any load was brought to bear.
The galley staff consist of 'cook', (never call a cook a chef, they consider it an insult), sometimes a second cook, who did the baking, mostly, and various galley boys, pantry boys etc. If you had a good cook, half the battle was won.
Next come the catering department. The catering department existed to wipe the noses and other anatomical extremities of officers and engineers who, apparently, were incapable of making their own bunks, tidying their own cabins or pouring their own tea.
Top of the pile was the Chief Steward who was, actually, a real estate mogul with apartments and villas in exotic locations like Cote D 'azure and Costa Del Sol, all funded from the proceeds of the illegal sale of the provisions meant for the rest of the ship's complement.The second steward was a Chief steward-in-waiting.”Whit? Anither bar of Knight's Castile soap!.Didn't ye buy one three weeks ago?Whit ye daein' wi' it, son, eating it? Awa' ye go, laddie, shower wi' a friend”.
Bringing up the rear, (tongue firmly in cheek, here) were the rest of the stewards. To be fair, they weren't all queers (Gay was a poncy word for fun, back then)but a high percentage were and , in my opinion, some ships were the better for them. Insisted on giving themselves “Girlie” names like, Lisa, Giselle, Tuesday and the like and preferred the term 'queen' to queer. They had their own strange language. I can't remember what name it had but it was a kind of pidgin Latin/English.
“Vada the bona homie, dear”, translated to “Cop an eyeful of that gorgeous hunk over there, darling”. And if there was a pretty young female hanging off his arm, “Vada the palone, dear”, translated to “ Look at that strutting *****”.
Ah, well, I think that will more than do,eh? Some of the information and terminology may be useful to you and, then again, none of it may be. I could have sent it to you via PM but then only you and I would have had the joy of reading it and I really wanted to show off! Good luck to you, Bud. I'll expect an acknowledgment in the preface and a free, signed copy of your blockbuster before it hits the stands. Regards, Barrinoz.

benjidog
25th November 2006, 19:36
An excellent summary Barinoz. (Thumb)

With a bit of luck you have offended most of the nautical hierarchy there while at the same time being very informative! (Thumb) (Thumb) (Thumb)

Regards,

Brian

barrinoz
26th November 2006, 03:09
Mucho Gracias, Benjidog. I'd forgotten a couple, so, not wishing not to offend everybody, I've now included them. Barrinoz.

Keith Adams
26th November 2006, 06:14
Great job Barinoz... had me laughing from the start... so many of your observations are so true... I would buy the book just for the Author comment
about your contribution! With all the "help" I think the novel will make it big. Regards. Snowy.

barrinoz
26th November 2006, 07:52
You're too kind, sir. Cheers, Snowy. Barrinoz.

KenLin39
26th November 2006, 10:07
Hi. I think KenJen was treated a bit harshly over his use of the word Freighter. It appears that only British and maybe the Irish used the term Cargo Ships / Liners as the USA, Canada and most of Europe used the term Freighter. Cheers. Ken.

FREIGHTER = Large Ship or aircraft designed to carry Freight.

Dutch - Vrecht. German - Vracht = Ships cargo.

LEEJ
26th November 2006, 13:44
Classic, barrinoz. Just as I remember it.

Pull together.(==D)

Lee

Jenken
26th November 2006, 14:59
That was fantastic. New idea: I'm scrapping the book and just copying/pasting your dissertation into short story format.

Tell me where to send the seven figure royalty statements!!

Thanks again, that was great.(Thumb)

Mad Landsman
26th November 2006, 21:20
Not very long ago there was a series of small paperback books called: 'The Bluffers' Guides' They covered a large variety of subjects from Photography & Golf to Psychology & Marketing. The books were packed with real facts, written by people who knew their subject but put across in a very amusing manner.
There was one subject of which no mention is made - Anything whatsovever connected with Ships & the Sea.
Having read your post Barrinoz I have to say that there is definately room for a further book in the series, well done!

dnobmal
26th November 2006, 21:50
With regard to the general description of a Masters duties and workloads,that is how it was perceived in 1973, but in this present day for sea-going members it is far from the truth, more so if you are on a short run feeder service and performing your own pilotage and all the various duties required by the Company/Ports/Regulations/

barrinoz
27th November 2006, 12:09
You're absolutely right, dnobmal. I have tenuous connections to the industry even though I'm long shoreside. Nothing is the same anymore. No disrespect was intended to anyone and I'm delighted that all of you, so far anyway, have seen the humour in the piece. Barrinoz.

John Briggs
27th November 2006, 12:17
Hey, Barrinoz - really funny stuff. Took me right back on board. Just wish I was able to put my thoughts down like that. Ever thought of writing a short story, set on a ship?

barrinoz
4th December 2006, 11:49
Thanx, John. No, but I've done the next best thing.......I think. It's probably frowned upon, (re-directing, I mean) but I have a web site which you might care to visit : www.hebridessence.com

JoK
4th December 2006, 12:37
Barrinoz, excellent post.
You had me laughing before the 0800 frolics here in the office. (Frolics meaning finding out what boats.. oops ships, were damaged over the weekend)

JoK
4th December 2006, 23:30
Hugh Ferguson said:

"p.s. and if you do not believe there ever were female engineers

And that would be me.
Female with Chiefs Motor with steam endorsement. ;)

Chouan
22nd August 2007, 16:32
How is it possible to go to sea "on" a ship. One couldn't imagine anyone saying that he/she had gone for a trip "on" a car. It would just sound ridiculous. For an engineer, in particular, to say he has gone to sea "on" this, or that ship sounds even more ludicrous. There he is right down in the very bowels of a ship:he/she, of all people, is unquestionably "in" the ship.
Can we make it a rule in Ships Nostalgia that one goes to sea "in" a ship.
(p.s. and if you do not believe there ever were female engineers read the book, Victoria Drummond:Marine Engineer.
Yours, Hugh Ferguson.

As a mate, I always sailed ON a ship, not IN a ship. Perhaps its a departmental thing.

Chouan
22nd August 2007, 16:42
Try reading a couple of Brian Callison books, I'd suggest "A Ship is Dying", or The Auriga Madness", or a book called "The Blue Road", to get a feel for the relationships onboard.

wood butcher
23rd December 2010, 01:04
Everyone who has led an interesting life such as we should write of their experiences for those in the family who come after us.I have done it for my Grandchildren and of course their children.I wish my Grandfather had done the same,I never knew him,but I found out that he had been at the Somme and Pachendale,he had also been a prizefighter, what a tale he could have told,if he could have got it down on paper.

calvin
23rd December 2010, 09:09
i remember a book called supership about the voyage of the p.o ardshield tanker as far as i recall maybe mind going life aboard was nearly all the same in catering and watchkeeping and leaning storing just differrent types ships and cargos real old tramp ships to modern sd14s parel tankers to vlcc and ulcc then the box boats took over one of the main box boats were act and the po bat boats but mind getting older so forgive any mistakes