Uncharted U-Boats Discovered off Orkney Islands

Gulpers
23rd November 2006, 06:04
A hydrographic team working on board the Coastguard Tug 'Anglian Sovereign' has discovered two uncharted First World War German U-Boat wrecks off the Orkney Islands.

See url for BBC article: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/north_east/6172692.stm

benjidog
23rd November 2006, 08:52
Interesting find Ray.

I presume they will be treated as war graves and left in peace. At least I hope that will be the case - it would be disgraceful to disturb them after all this time.

Brian

jim barnes
23rd November 2006, 09:08
Be ideal to identify the subs so any surviving relatives could know the fate of the crew, better than the unknown?

Gulpers
23rd November 2006, 12:42
Jim, according to the article they have been identified. (Thumb)

Plans of the two U-boats have been examined by experts, who have identified the wrecks as U-102 and U-92, which may have been sunk by a series of mines.

ddraigmor
26th November 2006, 00:41
I hope they got the boats and numbers right!

According to Kriegsmarine records, U-102 was a Type VIIB boat that was reported lost in the Bay of Biscay, no messages having been heard from her after 30th June 1940. However, there was also a WW1 U-102 - her fate being that on the 30 Sep, 1918, she was possibly mined in the Northern Barrage. 42 dead (all hands lost). For a period of five months from June 1918 US ships laid most 70,000 mines spanning the North Sea's northern exits. The Northern Barrage - as it was known - , formed an attempt by the Allies in mid-1918 to seal up the northern exits of the North Sea to enemy (invariably German) U-boats. The minefields stretched from the Orkney Islands to the Norwegian coast.

U-92 was a Type VIIC reported scrapped during 1944 - 1945. However, there was another U-92 in WW1 - On 9 Sep, 1918 she was lost for unknown reasons (possibly mined ) off S Fair Isle. 42 dead (all hands lost). She may well have been another victim of the Northern Barrage.

I am a bit of a Kriegsmarine 'anorak' and own a large collection of books about the U-boats - I also reference my material via U-boat net, which is probably the most definitive site available for U-boats of both wars. It would be good for relatives of the crews could now find out what happened to their men folk and gain closure - as well as to make positive ID on both boats and bring to an end their 'eternal patrols'. For those interested, I wrote an article for the BBC about U-boats off Anglesey in WW2. Go to: http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/northwest/sites/history/pages/johngriffiths.shtml

Jonty

Gulpers
28th November 2006, 14:41
Jonty,

Thanks for the comments! The original article says that the two recently discovered u-boats are, indeed, First World War craft.

Thanks also for your link to the Anglesey U-boats. Thoroughly enjoyed reading it since we can almost see those positions from our window! (Applause)

ddraigmor
28th November 2006, 17:45
Ta Gulpers - it's a hobby of mine, and an interest, and just something I enjoy.

Some more info on the two boats.

U-92 'Mittel U' Class built by Kaiserliche Werft, Danzig. Werk Nummer 36. Commissioned under Gunther Ehrlich on 22nd October 1917. Sunk 19.790 tons of shipping, excluding warships.

U-102 'Mittel U' Class built by A.G. Weser, Bremen. Werk Nummer 253. Commissioned under Curt Beitzen on 18th July 1917. Sunk 13,245 tons of shipping, excluding warships.

More info on these boats can be found on: http://www.uboat.net/wwi/types/index.html?type=Mittel+U

I know he rules on links but this is history - and current. Not advertising!

Hope this keeps you all posted.

Jonty

Gulpers
28th November 2006, 18:01
Thanks again Jonty. (Thumb)

No problem with the links because it is all relevant to this discussion - in any case, if nothing else, it keeps this thread active and gives more folk an opportunity to read it! (==D)

rspillar
8th January 2007, 16:43
Hello

You can find some more details of the U-boat discoveries, together with details of how to view the sonar data at:

http://www.mcga.gov.uk/c4mca/mcga-safety_information/nav-com/mcga-dqs-hmp-hydrography/interesting_stuff.htm

Best regards

Rob Spillard
Hydrography Manager
Maritime & Coastguard Agency

bobby388
8th January 2007, 22:49
can any of you guys tell me i often wondered how did the records know what u boat sunk what or which ship was sunk by i mean night time for example they couldnt have known the name of the ship or the sub curious?
Bobby(Glasgow)

Hawkeye
8th January 2007, 23:03
I hope they got the boats and numbers right!

According to Kriegsmarine records, U-102 was a Type VIIB boat that was reported lost in the Bay of Biscay, no messages having been heard from her after 30th June 1940. However, there was also a WW1 U-102 - her fate being that on the 30 Sep, 1918, she was possibly mined in the Northern Barrage. 42 dead (all hands lost). For a period of five months from June 1918 US ships laid most 70,000 mines spanning the North Sea's northern exits. The Northern Barrage - as it was known - , formed an attempt by the Allies in mid-1918 to seal up the northern exits of the North Sea to enemy (invariably German) U-boats. The minefields stretched from the Orkney Islands to the Norwegian coast.

U-92 was a Type VIIC reported scrapped during 1944 - 1945. However, there was another U-92 in WW1 - On 9 Sep, 1918 she was lost for unknown reasons (possibly mined ) off S Fair Isle. 42 dead (all hands lost). She may well have been another victim of the Northern Barrage.

I am a bit of a Kriegsmarine 'anorak' and own a large collection of books about the U-boats - I also reference my material via U-boat net, which is probably the most definitive site available for U-boats of both wars. It would be good for relatives of the crews could now find out what happened to their men folk and gain closure - as well as to make positive ID on both boats and bring to an end their 'eternal patrols'. For those interested, I wrote an article for the BBC about U-boats off Anglesey in WW2. Go to: http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/northwest/sites/history/pages/johngriffiths.shtml

Jonty

Hi Jonty

As you say in the thread, you have a lot of books on U-boats. I don't if you are aware but there is a site with the name U-Boat.
Here is the link:
http://uboat.net/allies/warships/class.html?ID=24
Regards
Karl

ddraigmor
18th January 2007, 09:13
Hawkeye,

Sorry for the delay - yes, I know www.uboat.net well. I once met up with a buch of users from that site - one came from Australia and one from the US - to visit U-534 up in Birkenhead.

It is a good place for any research on U-boats.

Jonty

Waterways
9th February 2007, 22:45
Liverpool was a major strategic target for the Germans being the prime convoy port, however air bombings stopped in 1942.

U-Boats obviously operated in the Irish sea. I am not awre of any ships being sunk by U-Boats in the Mersey estuary or Liverpool Bay. Where any sunk there?

Also, how many ships were sunk in the Irish Sea by U-Boats?

ddraigmor
11th February 2007, 11:36
Clydeways,

Go to: http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/northwest/sites/history/pages/johngriffiths.shtml

for Irish Sea U-boats. I wrote this piece a while back for the BBC.

Hobby 388 - try www.Uboat.net for those details.

Jonty

KJHeath
1st September 2007, 20:20
http://www.jeanelaine.co.uk/text/U92.htm

Hi I was one of the researchers, together with WW1 U Boat historian Michael Lowrey working on this project. Above is a link to the site with a bit more information about the dive on U 92. U 102 can also be found on the same website. I hope its of some interest

All the best

Kevin

Santos
1st September 2007, 20:56
There was a great program recently on Shipwreck Detectives about the 3 WW2 U Boats found in the Bristol Channel off Padstow. They had run into a deep minefield deliberatly laid in a shipping channel to catch them. Must have been big mines as the U Boats were very heavily damaged.