Seamen's Superstitions (merged threads)

jim barnes
13th January 2006, 18:54
as we all know Friday 13th is one of the most known unlucky times or superstition, do you now any others like i think Aberdeen fishermen not wearing white sea boots surely there will be more and do we believe them or prefare not to chance it? (EEK) (Hippy)

edward
13th January 2006, 20:18
my son edward was born on friday 13th luckiest lad on this planet. regards edward.

benjidog
13th January 2006, 20:24
Mrs Benjidog sincerely believes that if you do washing on New Year's day you risk "washing someone out of the family" and has to do all the washing the day before. Personally I think it is unlucky to do it at all so I am quite happy to let her get on with it for the other 364 days.

william dillon
13th January 2006, 20:59
What a load of B******s.

Coastie
13th January 2006, 21:30
Friday the 13th has always been a lucky day for me, but then I've always been awkward!

jim barnes
13th January 2006, 23:47
What a load of B******s.
remember Dakar Bill?? (Ouch)

Phill
13th January 2006, 23:55
Friday the 13th....Ask my young boy, he decided to break his leg and put him self in 6 weeks of traction, just by doing the long jump at school, he didn’t go to School today

Cheers Phill
(Cloud)

cynter
14th January 2006, 02:24
I got engaged to my present wife on Fri 13th just 45 years ago....

Is that lucky or not..??????

Cheers... cynter.

vix
14th January 2006, 02:25
A brother-in-law of mine was a deep-sea fisherman...he used to go crazy if anyone mentioned RABBITS within earshot...had to be referred too as underground pigs!! vIX

oldbosun
14th January 2006, 04:40
I must say that I agree with William Dillon.

As a seaman, the only thing that I knew about Friday the 13th was that it was an unlucky day to sail, and that in the olden days, many ships Captains did not sail that day and that was with the approval of the Owners who were equally as superstitious.

But that was way back, before greed took over and ships sailed regardless.

The mention of the word "Rabbits" I never heard of at sea in any context to cause any problem,and neither did I EVER see anybody wearing white seaboots. White seaboots indeed!!

Of course, superstition prevails in this thing about Friday the 13th, and that's all it is........superstition.

Oz.
14th January 2006, 05:02
It was always an unlucky day, never mind the date, when the third mate had pinched my beers from the fridge!!
Unlucky for him too !!.

Mike O'Rourke
14th January 2006, 06:26
"Aharrrrrr Me Lads.... It'll ne them wot diez that'll be the Lucky ones....every Finger a marlin spike and evert thumb a Fid.....soses to you Jim Lad."

Aye
Mike...... (Applause)

Gulpers
14th January 2006, 06:43
What a load of B******s.

Billy,

Got it! "Bollards" is the word, isn't it?
This new Quiz Forum's great! (Jester)

gerbil
14th January 2006, 12:38
Well i had a maths exam yesterday (Friday 13th) so i'll let you know in a couple of weeks if it was unlucky or not.

benjidog
14th January 2006, 19:33
Vix,

Is there any chance your brother-in-law came from the Isle of Portland in Dorset? They have a thing about the word RABBIT down there and recently there was a campaign to stop the film people putting up adverts for the Wallace and Gromit film "The curse of the Were-rabbit" - the word is banned on Portland. They call the creatures "underground mutton" or other euphemisms.

I know this sounds like complete b******s but check it out at the Times website at this link: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1815040,00.html

william dillon
14th January 2006, 21:30
remember Dakar Bill?? (Ouch)


Ooops !! Forgot about that Jim........................ (EEK)

Mad Landsman
14th January 2006, 21:43
It is supposed to be unlucky to say 'rabbits' on Portland not for any seafaring reason, but by quarrymen. When a rabbit was seen out in the open in the quarrys it often preceeded a rock fall (the rabbits having noticed a problem). The person would call "Rabbits" and everyone went home & lost a days pay - hence unlucky!
The big problem with this is that until about 70 or 80 years ago they used to call them coneys,(a rabbit being a young coney)

MIG.

fredkinghorn
14th January 2006, 21:50
If the new month had an R in it, my old Mother used to say " rabbits " on the first day. On the second day they would come and take her away again !

fred.

Could be the start of a beautiful friendship Louis.

Coastie
14th January 2006, 22:01
Fred.

Your Mother too eh? (Hippy)

trotterdotpom
15th January 2006, 09:27
A brother-in-law of mine was a deep-sea fisherman...he used to go crazy if anyone mentioned RABBITS within earshot...had to be referred too as underground pigs!! vIX

Wash your mouth out Vix! 'Pigs' are unlucky too - "grunters" are Ok. Rabbits were 'underground chicken'.

John T.

R651400
15th January 2006, 10:32
Sky-pilots had to stay indoors when Scottish east coast fishermen put to sea.
If a skipper spotted a man of the cloth on the way to his boat, he would turn round and go home.
Similarly pigs were unmentionable and still referred to as guffies even today.

bsturrell
15th January 2006, 12:23
I believe the myth of Friday 13th dates back to Philippe IV of France when he had a go at the Knights Templars back in 1307.

Quote:-

Philippe set up an operation which would have impressed the Nazi SS or Gestapo. Issuing sealed and secret orders to his seneschals throughout the country and where they were opened simultaneously, all Templars in France were seized and placed under arrest by the King's men, their goods confiscated, and their preceptors placed under royal sequestration. Despite this great surprise at dawn on Friday, October 13, 1307, Philippe's primary interest -- the order's immense wealth -- eluded him. It was never found and what became of the fabulous "treasure of the Templars" remained a mystery

moaf
15th January 2006, 15:27
My wife is from Portland, she refers to rabbits as bunny's. The outlaws still live there, and they've got a pet bunny - securely locked in a cage!

Phill
15th January 2006, 15:46
“RABBITS"
Naval slang name given to articles taken, or intended to be taken, ashore privately. Originally "rabbits" were things taken ashore improperly (i.e. theft or smuggling - the name arose from the ease with which tobacco, etc., could be concealed in the inside of a dead rabbit) but with the passage of time the application of the word has spread to anything taken ashore; an air of impropriety nevertheless still hangs over the use of the word, whether or not this is justified (it seldom is). Hence the phrase "Tuck its ears in", often said to an officer or rating seen going ashore with a parcel.

Honest this info, was taken from the Royal Navy site.

Phill

benjidog
15th January 2006, 17:42
The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea describes a gruesome superstition that is said to go back to classical times. According to the superstition, to be successful, a warship must taste the blood of a live person during its launching. It goes on to say that when a galley was launched, a slave was tied down so that his body was crushed and the blood splashed all over the vessel as it slid down into the sea. The victim's head was later mounted on the vessel's stemhead.

As far as I know we do that any more but, even in these enlightened times, we still offer a libation (in the form of a bottle of champagne) on a ship's launch and this also dates back to classical times - it was a libation to the gods of the sea.

John Rogers
15th January 2006, 18:36
Whistling was also a bad omen while at sea in my day, stems from the old sailing ship days
John.

Tony Crompton
15th January 2006, 18:58
Wash your mouth out Vix! 'Pigs' are unlucky too - "grunters" are Ok.

John T.

On my Pilot Service it was absolutely forbidden to mention that word as it would bring bad luck and terrible weather.

They could be referred to as "Gisseys" or "Dirty four footed animals" but never that word.
-----------------------------
Tony C

Ron Stringer
15th January 2006, 20:48
“RABBITS"
Naval slang name given to articles taken, or intended to be taken, ashore privately. Originally "rabbits" were things taken ashore improperly (i.e. theft or smuggling - the name arose from the ease with which tobacco, etc., could be concealed in the inside of a dead rabbit)....

Phill
Phill,

I know the RN claim to be ingenious and lateral thinkers but, while at sea, where the hell did they get rabbits from in order to enable them to smuggle contraband ashore? They must be even smarter than they think they are.

Ron

Phill
16th January 2006, 18:15
Phill,

I know the RN claim to be ingenious and lateral thinkers but, while at sea, where the hell did they get rabbits from in order to enable them to smuggle contraband ashore? They must be even smarter than they think they are.

Ron I just knew no one would believe me, honestly its from the Royal Navy site, i must admit I would prefer a bit of Beef,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/static/pages/4760.html

Phill

Phill
17th January 2006, 18:22
A little bit more on the Rabbit’s. it seems to have originated from Chatham Dockyard in Kent, a small island nearby was overrun with rabbits; the workers often killed them and took them home as free meat. A rabbit run is a trip to shore to buy gifts. If something ‘has ears on it’, it had been acquired illegally or taken ashore improperly. Any sailor seen carrying a parcel ashore might be advised to ‘tuck its ears in’….Lucky it wasn’t Rat Island Portsmouth………..taken from a book Old salts Wisdom (Read)

Phill

vix
19th January 2006, 05:41
Vix,

Is there any chance your brother-in-law came from the Isle of Portland in Dorset? They have a thing about the word RABBIT down there and recently there was a campaign to stop the film people putting up adverts for the Wallace and Gromit film "The curse of the Were-rabbit" - the word is banned on Portland. They call the creatures "underground mutton" or other euphemisms.

I know this sounds like complete b******s but check it out at the Times website at this link: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1815040,00.html
No, sorry Benjidog, he was a fully paid up Kiwi...one of the best hapuka fishermen around...in his time! Vix

vix
19th January 2006, 05:48
Different strokes for different folks!! The point is, Why were the big seamen afraid of the furry little bunnies? Vix

jim barnes
20th January 2006, 01:26
think lads? what was the name of the long eared one in or on the MAGIC ROUND ABOUT?? thinks he might be lurking on this thread (*))

vix
20th January 2006, 04:35
Vix,

Is there any chance your brother-in-law came from the Isle of Portland in Dorset? They have a thing about the word RABBIT down there and recently there was a campaign to stop the film people putting up adverts for the Wallace and Gromit film "The curse of the Were-rabbit" - the word is banned on Portland. They call the creatures "underground mutton" or other euphemisms.

I know this sounds like complete b******s but check it out at the Times website at this link: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1815040,00.html
Kia ora Benjidog et al, My apologies...I eat humple Pie...it was underground mutton and not the other unmentionable word I unfortunately printed...I will slap my wrist with a wet feather (as long as that isn't forbidden, too?)

vix
20th January 2006, 04:37
think lads? what was the name of the long eared one in or on the MAGIC ROUND ABOUT?? thinks he might be lurking on this thread (*))
Wasn't it Brian? Long time ago! Vix

Ron Stringer
20th January 2006, 07:22
Wasn't it Brian? Long time ago! Vix
No, Vix. Brian was a cheeky and speedy snail. The laid-back, hippy furry one was Dillon.

Ron

trotterdotpom
20th January 2006, 07:49
No, Vix. Brian was a cheeky and speedy snail. The laid-back, hippy furry one was Dillon.

Ron

Alec Gill from Hull has written a book about superstitions. Find him on Google and there is a page of fishermens' superstitions.

"Time for bed" said Zebbidy

jim barnes
20th January 2006, 11:47
No, Vix. Brian was a cheeky and speedy snail. The laid-back, hippy furry one was Dillon.

Ron
Yes you are correct and he is also a senior member?? (egg)

michael james
20th January 2006, 19:08
We do have a Member by the handle of BUGS, and he is from down your way Vix, watch out !

william dillon
20th January 2006, 20:56
No, Vix. Brian was a cheeky and speedy snail. The laid-back, hippy furry one was Dillon.

Ron

Hi, Brian,
Did you mention my name?, I try to be laid back, I used to be furry, but I am definately "Hippy" if that means having a fat A***e !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (Thumb) (Night)

Ron Stringer
20th January 2006, 22:48
Billy,

As I never saw the name written down, the rabbit's name might have been Dylan - that would have fitted with the rabbit's character in the cartoon (at the time a certain Bob Dylan was prominent). Much preferred the rabbit (and the snail .

Boinb, boing, time for bed.

Ron

vix
21st January 2006, 04:33
We do have a Member by the handle of BUGS, and he is from down your way Vix, watch out !
Thanks for the warning, Michael, I take note...on another tack...this is worthy of another Thread...which was the best? When I left the MN I ended up helping to build pylons...everyone used to rush home to watch...Tom & Jerry (the original)...5 minutes of utter madness and mayhem...next day it was the talk of the site...so we have Tom & Jerry, The Magic Roundabout and what about old...Captain Pugwash? Which I believe was taken off because of sexual connotations like...Seaman Jack?? Which was the best of those three? Or, include all of the others, what was/is the funniest cartoon? Vix

Ron Stringer
21st January 2006, 16:18
When I left the MN I ended up helping to build pylons...everyone used to rush home to watch...Tom & Jerry (the original)...5 minutes of utter madness and mayhem...

Vix, clearly we ex-mariners never grew up. In 1966/67 I worked for Marconi in South Shields, finishing at 5:00 pm. I had to get off the ship I was working on, say in Middle Dock, Brigham & Cowans or Readheads, get back to the base office on the Mill Dam to find out whether any overtime or urgent jobs had come up and then if I was clear, get in the car and make it home to our apartment in Gateshead to catch the 5:30 pm showing of Magic Roundabout. Never missed it. My wife said I was completely mad/childish. She still does.

Ron

vix
22nd January 2006, 02:53
Vix, clearly we ex-mariners never grew up. In 1966/67 I worked for Marconi in South Shields, finishing at 5:00 pm. I had to get off the ship I was working on, say in Middle Dock, Brigham & Cowans or Readheads, get back to the base office on the Mill Dam to find out whether any overtime or urgent jobs had come up and then if I was clear, get in the car and make it home to our apartment in Gateshead to catch the 5:30 pm showing of Magic Roundabout. Never missed it. My wife said I was completely mad/childish. She still does.

Ron
My missus still goes balmy when I watch Road Runner...repeat...repeat! Vix

jim barnes
22nd January 2006, 12:49
first time i ever saw the muppets or was it the muppets, the one with BIG BIRD in it? anyway we where in port some where in NZ, day work ? we had a TV in the mess room and the program started about 1640hrs or so but we finished work 1700hrs, bosun used to catch us play hell about him saying when to knock off then joining us. I have been a muppet fan eversince and one of my favourite movies is MUPPET TREASURE ISLAND. HY jimmy jim jim (Hippy) (MV SOMERSET)

vix
23rd January 2006, 09:11
first time i ever saw the muppets or was it the muppets, the one with BIG BIRD in it? anyway we where in port some where in NZ, day work ? we had a TV in the mess room and the program started about 1640hrs or so but we finished work 1700hrs, bosun used to catch us play hell about him saying when to knock off then joining us. I have been a muppet fan eversince and one of my favourite movies is MUPPET TREASURE ISLAND. HY jimmy jim jim (Hippy) (MV SOMERSET)
I am starting a new thread on the best cartoon, this is toooooo goood to miss!! Vix

jimbo35
4th February 2006, 21:02
is a yellow line painted around the hull of a trawler is all I know... is there an old salt around who can tell us more about the superstition ? Did a witches broom work over water ? :confused:

vix
4th February 2006, 21:16
is a yellow line painted around the hull of a trawler is all I know... is there an old salt around who can tell us more about the superstition ? Did a witches broom work over water ? :confused:
I don't know about witches brooms...but...I read once that a Somerset witch reckoned...you should always crush the shell of an egg after using the content...otherwise a witch can use the parts as coracles!!?? And, no I'm not making this up...I did read it but can't remember where or when!! (Cloud) Vix

agentroadrunner
5th February 2006, 08:15
"Ministers on boats is bad luck" - Dougie the mate to Para Handy.

West coast fishermen refer to rabbits as "wee furry fellows"

jim barnes
5th February 2006, 13:53
Iheard white sea boots in Aberdeen, last time i said that certain individualls thought i was kidding, WELL ?? (Night)

Peter4447
5th February 2006, 15:00
Ministers and fishermen is a strange one. I was involved with a fishing boat that lost a crew member overboard some years ago. The local Clergyman thought he would help by sending down his Curate which just happened to be a lady. To a man the crew refused point blank to let her onboard.
Peter4447.
I wonder what the PC Brigade would make of that! :@

tabnab44
28th November 2006, 08:33
Hello ,well its been nearly 25 years since an old hand told me the real story about why we call those furry things with long ears "UNDERGROUND CHICKENS" and dont mention their real name onboard ship .....I've certainly stuck to this ..but can anyone remind me what the story was ..I've forgot !!??

I know on PORTLAND ,Dorset ...you just don't mention their name ...they even had to change the adverts for the last ARDMAN FILM "WALLACE AND GROMIT AND THE CURSE OF THE WIER *******" to "SOMETHING BUNNIES GOING ON" as they are very bad luck on the Isle for good reason...Back in the old days when Portland was covered in working stone quarries if you were in the bottom of the quarry pit and saw an underground chicken it was a warning of unstable ground and the possibility of a landslip ...it did happen on many occassion.

I was always told not to whistle at sea as you were whistling up the wind ...from the days of sail....I used to tell anyone off for this..and infact old habbits die hard as only last year on a Cross Channel Ferry I reminded a fellow passenger of this ...he didn't alf give me a funny look !!(Thumb)

billyboy
28th November 2006, 11:08
my late father an ex aberdeen trawlerman told me of some. you have already told of two of them except we called them long eared things underground mutton.

apparently its unlucky to have a white handled knife aboard, to wish a departing for sea trawler good luck has been known to cause the skipper to remoor till the next day.

Peter4447
28th November 2006, 13:55
This could be a very interesting thread indeed.

I think that thing with a bushy tail that eats the furry things with long ears is also unlucky. I can certainly confirm that the Portlanders still cling very much to their dislike of them little furry things.

For fishermen to see a Vicar whilst heading for their boat is also unlucky and I am sure it is on record that crews have gone back home after such an encounter rather than put to sea.

Taken to extremes I had a case once where a fisherman was lost overboard and when the boat tied up in the nearest port the local Clergyman tried to be helpful and sent his Curate down to the boat to offer assistance. Unfortunately he sent a lady Priest and the crew refused point blank to have her onboard.

Wearing an earring is a long standing superstition that is supposed to stop one from drowning.

Peter4447(Thumb)

Santos
28th November 2006, 14:24
Lighting more than two cigarettes with the same flame. This was allegedly to prevent a U Boat lining up on the light. This practice was still going strong on the ships I sailed on in the 60s.

Bridie
28th November 2006, 15:12
Wearing an earring is a long standing superstition that is supposed to stop one from drowning.
I was told 2 beliefs:

It helped your eyesight - left ear of course (*))
In ancient Greece you needed a piece of gold to pay the ferryman to cross the River Styx before entering the underworld, Hades. Those who died on land were burried with a gold coin, but seamen invariably drowned and so had to have the gold on themselves. Rings etc were too dangerous (catch on ropes) and so a gold earring was worn instead.

Stopped wearing mine when I came ashore in 1972.

Derek Roger
28th November 2006, 15:43
Peeing into the wind can be unluckey

Gulpers
28th November 2006, 16:01
Seamen's Superstitions (tabnab44) and Friday 13th (Jim Barnes)

Two similar threads which I have merged. (Thumb)

Peter4447
28th November 2006, 20:10
Lighting more than two cigarettes with the same flame. This was allegedly to prevent a U Boat lining up on the light. This practice was still going strong on the ships I sailed on in the 60s.

In a similar vein the third light is also supposed to be unlucky. It appears that when lighting cigarettes when using just one match in the 1914-18 trenches a sniper would be alerted by the first, would take aim on the second and fire on the third. I rather think this superstition could well be based on fact.

Peter4447

william dillon
28th November 2006, 22:29
“RABBITS"
Naval slang name given to articles taken, or intended to be taken, ashore privately. Originally "rabbits" were things taken ashore improperly (i.e. theft or smuggling - the name arose from the ease with which tobacco, etc., could be concealed in the inside of a dead rabbit) but with the passage of time the application of the word has spread to anything taken ashore; an air of impropriety nevertheless still hangs over the use of the word, whether or not this is justified (it seldom is). Hence the phrase "Tuck its ears in", often said to an officer or rating seen going ashore with a parcel.

Honest this info, was taken from the Royal Navy site.

Phill

(A) Phil,

Did they carry a stock of Rabbits on warships to assist with the smugglimg operations? LOL......(Jester)

william dillon
28th November 2006, 22:35
No, Vix. Brian was a cheeky and speedy snail. The laid-back, hippy furry one was Dillon.

Ron

(Smoke) I think the spelling is different Ron (Dylan)???[=P], the laid back bit may be true !!!!!!!!!!(Hippy)

Brad
28th November 2006, 23:00
Heres a few superstitions i have come across in my time

1. whistling on the bridge which is kinda funny because in the days of sail, the sailors (evidently) used to whislte to bring the wind when the ship was becalmed. now, in the days of motor, we don't like to whistle on the bridge because you will 'whistle up a wind'

2. saying "fog" on the bridge - i had an old man who used to insist that any reference to fog was spelt out and backwards i.e. G-O-F

3. blowing out a candle - said to kill a seaman every time you do it. should snuff the candle instead. Personally, I ALWAYS obey this one - my wife too

4. Albatrosses are dead seamen reincarnated. thats supposed to be why they follow ships around. i would think that they would have had enough of the slops cooked on board ships when they were at sea, without following them around in the afterlife. sooty albatrosses (the black ones) are meant to be engineers too by the way.

Ron Stringer
29th November 2006, 09:27
(Smoke) I think the spelling is different Ron (Dylan)???[=P], the laid back bit may be true !!!!!!!!!!(Hippy)
And what about the hippy, furry bit? Guess you're right about the spelling, the link to Bob never crossed my mind, even all those years ago! Funny how the brain works (or not, as is appropriate in my case).

ed glover
29th November 2006, 20:15
I signed on the MV Dalla in Tilbury on Fri 13th oppisite number 13. the guy in the office sad i hpe your not supperstitious, i said no I didnt care. 3 hours later i was back signing off and heading to hospital. Pleurisy,bronchitis and malaria. 3 weeks in hospital nearly bloody well died.
Ed Glover
Controlled drifting

stein
30th November 2006, 09:44
When signed on for my first trip in January 65, the Oslo hiring office gave me a little booklet of "dos and don'ts". There I was instructed that under no cicumstances should I bring a suitcase or an umbrella onboard ship. THOSE OBJECTS WERE TABOO. Not unnaturally I turned out to be the only one in the ship to miss those two useful implements. My seamans sack became an object of great mirth.
As for the ban on spoken rabbits, it was usual in the days of sail, I have read of it often. Stein.

ABEE
30th November 2006, 12:51
My old man was born on the 13th, I was married on the 13th and live in house number 13. Perhaps this is why I havn't won the lottery, but apart from that - no complaints. Dad would never ever allow anyone to say p i g in his prescene, always gissy. No whistling in the boat, that was another one. However, I am not superstitious - touch wood!

makko
30th November 2006, 20:33
Sailors would carry a dried "maidenhead" or the sac that the baby develops in to avoid drowning, as the baby "breathes" water.

Richard Green
30th November 2006, 21:08
Didn't the Marie Celeste sail on a Friday 13th?

Bsturrel, you're probably right. But here there's a big push by the lottery people in the run up to any Friday 13th because it's supposed to be super lucky!...Having been a pontoon rat at the first Route du Rhum singelhanded sail race I know that "rabbits" should not be mentioned in the boatie fraternity.

Phill, weren't rabbits also called caperbar?

Mad Landsman
30th November 2006, 21:21
The amazing thing about the word rabbits is that up until early 20th century a rabbit was a young coney, so Portland quarrymen would have seen conies, gone home and lost a day's pay.(unlucky!)
We have to thank butchers for the change, like selling mutton and calling it lamb or even further back calling hogs 'pigs' (a baby hog).
If anyone in interested (I doubt it): Up until they closed the Magistrates Court on Portland in the 1970s the locals would accept the word coney but not rabbit (as in 'Trespass with a gun in search of Conies' etc)

Incidently I think a 'maidenhead' is also known as a Caul.

Gulpers
30th November 2006, 21:49
Bad luck would follow any of these: (EEK)

Breaking a mirror;

Dropping a hatch board into the hold;

Turning a hatch board bottom up.

tabnab44
7th December 2006, 23:30
I was always told if you had an itchy bum hole at sea it was a sure sign there was a Greek ship around .... 9 out of 10 times this was true ... the tenth was normally when I'd upset the cook !

tabnab44
12th January 2007, 21:18
The thing with underground chickens is something from way back in the days of sail ...I'm trying to find out more and will post any bits I can come up with.

kottemann
13th July 2007, 10:55
Ok its Friday the 13th and us mariners are supposedly a superstitious lot so lets hear them. can vaguely remember two, whistling on board brought up the wind and shaving at sea apart from the obvious reason ie: cutting yourself in rough weather I have no idea why it was unlucky to shave at sea

gdynia
13th July 2007, 10:58
Never mentioning a Pigs name onboard

kottemann
13th July 2007, 11:00
what does that mean do you name your pigs in Scotland

gdynia
13th July 2007, 11:11
Aye all the time I thought everyone did

billyboy
13th July 2007, 11:40
cant mention them furry things with big ears! (underground mutton)
i heard also that white handled knife's are a no no on a trawler

peter barc
13th July 2007, 12:05
RABBIT RABBIT RABBIT....
The colour green is also supposed to be unlucky for some...
I Once sailed with a German Capt (Heye-P) who went absolutely crazy when he caught me washing the german Flag, I had to buy a bottle of the best whisky and rebaptise the flag, only then could i put the flag up again,,weird i thought at the time...

gdynia
13th July 2007, 12:13
Peter
Surley you didnt use the full bottle

Pilot mac
13th July 2007, 12:18
Fishermen have to be the most superstitious of seamen. White handled knives, and those furry things with long ears, (known as Bexhill Donkeys in this neck of the woods) which must not be mentioned.

regards
Dave

SEASPANNER
13th July 2007, 12:27
curly tails,long tails,mappies,red fish...all banned

kottemann
13th July 2007, 12:31
RABBIT RABBIT RABBIT....
The colour green is also supposed to be unlucky for some...
I Once sailed with a German Capt (Heye-P) who went absolutely crazy when he caught me washing the german Flag, I had to buy a bottle of the best whisky and rebaptise the flag, only then could i put the flag up again,,weird i thought at the time...

I would use the whole bottle to rebabptise a flag but it would have passed through my kidneys first[=P]

wbeedie
13th July 2007, 21:34
salmon was another not to mention known as red fish, nothing to do with swans aboard the boats, no whistling in case a wind came up are a few that come to mind a vessel that I sailed on was launched on friday 13th sunk less than a year later

notnila
13th July 2007, 22:52
In the '60s I sailed with a tramp Master who refused (officially)to cross the International Date Line for 24 hours because it would mean the next day would be Friday 13th!Still don't know where we were during that time!

raybnz
14th July 2007, 09:18
Yesterday being the 13th I brought a lotto ticket. I haven,t had any luck buying it on other dates so I thought it might be lucky.

If I win I will shout you all a beer. How about the Roundhouse by the docks.

makko
15th July 2007, 19:57
I don't know if it was just BlueFlu, but we were banned from chinking glasses when toasting. It meant that someone would die! I still can't chink glasses to this day, I get a finger in between or just bang hands!

Rgds.

Dave

jaydeeare
1st April 2008, 12:37
It is said that sailors are very superstitious.

Have you any superstitions or come across any odd superstitions?

I believe whistling at sea is one, because sailors believe it is whistling for a storm, or a signal to start a mutiny. I stand ready to be corrected on this.

makko
1st April 2008, 16:02
Johnny,
One I like: You never "chink" glasses when toasting onboard. Someone will die!
Rgds.
Dave

non descript
1st April 2008, 16:39
A traditional Chinese superstition is that it’s bad luck to ever turn a fish over on the plate. Doing so is thought to cause the boats of fishing families to overturn out at sea.

John N MacDonald
1st April 2008, 17:21
There are certainly numerous superstitions concerning the sea.
I've spent many happy days on holiday in Looe in Cornwall and you can't mention rabbits they are floppy ears.
I heard a story that at one time that a pet shop opened on or near the quay and advertised pet rabbits for sale which caused a bit of a stir with the local seafarers one of whom entered the shop and complained.
Also some folks in that part of the world think the colour green unlucky and I believe it was also the case up here in the Highlands and Islands. Maybe it's a Celtic superstition!

Tony D
1st April 2008, 18:57
Sailed with a old timer who went off it if he heard anybody whistling, which was unfortunate because I had a habit of whistling as I went about my work,strangest one I heard was about the fishermen on Holy Island, if anybody used the word "Pig" they would not put to sea that day.

Binnacle
1st April 2008, 20:56
May be particular to Scottish fishermen, it was considered unlucky to meet a minister of religion when heading towards the boat, it was necessary to turn back home to avoid ill luck. If a minister boarded it was necessary to scrub the vessel from stem to stern after his departure. Leaving harbour it was considered unlucky to turn the boat against the sun.

DICK SLOAN
1st April 2008, 21:10
Don't wear somebody elses wellingtons.

Santos
1st April 2008, 21:16
A shark following the ship is a sign of a death on the ship as Sharks are believed to be able to sense those near death.

jaydeeare
1st April 2008, 21:55
At Fleetwood as the trawlers put out to sea, wives/girlfriends/mothers who waved off their loved ones from the shore never shouted "Goodbye!" It was always "See yer!" or "T'rah!" For obvious reasons

geobro
2nd April 2008, 05:21
Heard of all of them; (rabbits were also called map-maps)... Scottish fishermen were particularly superstitious. Lived next door to one; when he left for sea he would never look back, despite wife at window watching him go off down the street.

Worst case I ever came across was a master who would never let a woman on board; nearly went off his brain when the 2nd mate innocently brought a female friend aboard. I thought he was going to kill him!

janathull
2nd April 2008, 06:02
Sailed with a skipper in Newlyn who refused to sail because there were 2 nuns on the quay, called them penguins!. Regards Jan.

mcgurggle
2nd April 2008, 06:06
A traditional Chinese superstition is that it’s bad luck to ever turn a fish over on the plate. Doing so is thought to cause the boats of fishing families to overturn out at sea.

Wot!...And leave half a Dover Sole???
(Jester)
McG

Chouan
2nd April 2008, 07:54
"Lived next door to one; when he left for sea he would never look back, despite wife at window watching him go off down the street."

Perhaps he just didn't like her.

non descript
2nd April 2008, 08:23
Wot!...And leave half a Dover Sole???
(Jester)
McG

McG,
A very valid point, but no; they very cleverly take it all from underneath without turning the bone. It is that process which leads the unsuspecting person to wonder why not turn it over (or even do it oneself) and then all hell breaks loose. A bit like finding a penguin on the quay, waving and saying “good bye” as you are about to sail.
(Thumb)

Steve Woodward
2nd April 2008, 10:11
I have always heard that seamen are superstitious but in 32 years at sea never saw any sign of it, never needed it myself - touch wood.

trotterdotpom
2nd April 2008, 11:21
A virtual cod end full of fishermens' superstitions can be found at:

http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/cetag/5bseadal.htm

I'd forgotten about the taboo colour of green - that was also prevalent in Grimsby. No wonder you never see anyone in green wellies in Freeman Street!

I did have some bad luck with women on board myself, but, what the hell, you can't win 'em all.

John T.

makko
3rd April 2008, 03:39
Steve,
And thanks be to God that you are an atheist!
Rgds.
Dave!!!!!LoLs!!!

Riptide
3rd April 2008, 16:02
is a yellow line painted around the hull of a trawler is all I know... is there an old salt around who can tell us more about the superstition ? Did a witches broom work over water ? :confused:

Did witches broom work over water.I don't know,Ill ask the wife how she does
it,she put a spell on me.Kenny.(Jester)

Peter Fielding
3rd April 2008, 16:19
This could be a very interesting thread indeed.

I think that thing with a bushy tail that eats the furry things with long ears is also unlucky. I can certainly confirm that the Portlanders still cling very much to their dislike of them little furry things.

For fishermen to see a Vicar whilst heading for their boat is also unlucky and I am sure it is on record that crews have gone back home after such an encounter rather than put to sea.

Taken to extremes I had a case once where a fisherman was lost overboard and when the boat tied up in the nearest port the local Clergyman tried to be helpful and sent his Curate down to the boat to offer assistance. Unfortunately he sent a lady Priest and the crew refused point blank to have her onboard.

Wearing an earring is a long standing superstition that is supposed to stop one from drowning.

Peter4447(Thumb)
The earring one is a new one on me. I always understood that the reason for seamen wearing gold earrings was that if the wearer was lost at sea, and his body washed up, the earring in his ear would have sufficient value to give him a decent burial. (But what do I know?)

rickles23
3rd May 2008, 13:30
Perhaps you Learned Gentlemen might be able to help.

Something I have always wanted to know:
My late Father never mentioned 'rabbits' but called them 'Bexhill Donkies'.
Any explanations?.
Regards..(Scribe)