South Eastern Gas Board

jaysay
1st December 2006, 13:27
Hi Folks
I am doing some work on the SEGB flatiron colliers that plied the north-east coast of England until about 1971. Does anyone know what the house flag or funnel marking was? From my childhood I recall that it was simply 'SEGB' in a box (no prizes there!) but the colours are in dispute. My father served in these ships and seems to think the lettering was Cambridge Blue; I think it was red; my guess is that it was red lettering and a blue border.
Anyway, all information welcome on this or other aspects of SEGB.

Bob S
1st December 2006, 20:16
According to "Coastal Ships" by D Ridley Chesterton, published 1967, South Eastern Gas Board vessels had a black funnel with a red band with blue SEGB on a white panel between two white and red bands.
I saw a number of these so maybe I have a photo or two.

Bob

ruud
1st December 2006, 23:01
Ahoy,
Here some funnels of the Black Diamond Fleets:
I think your 'ol man is right.

Baltic Wal
2nd December 2006, 13:52
I have photo's of the CEGB ships with both the SEGB in the white panel and alos with the funnel marking just before it, which I suppose represents flames.

notnila
2nd December 2006, 19:58
I have photo's of the CEGB ships with both the SEGB in the white panel and alos with the funnel marking just before it, which I suppose represents flames.
I remember them being described by a South Sheilds collierman as"carrots roon the funnel."

dnobmal
2nd December 2006, 20:26
Served on the Mitcham for a while and it was as Ruud`s funnel marks are shown

dnobmal
2nd December 2006, 22:31
The masters who were on the Mitcham while I was there wasG. Vosper from the Tyne,Develin was like myself a West Country Man ,though he lived in South Shields,Purvis from the Tyne and Stockdale where he was from I cannot remember,I expect it would have been the NE coast as most of the officers and crew were local men me being the odd one out.Do any of these names ring a bell with you or your father.Though saying that they had a few ships well run and smart considering the trade they were in.We used mostly Hartlepool or the Tyne,with the odd trip to South dock Sunderland,and we discharged at Wandsworth,with an odd trip to the Greenhythe berth

baileysan
3rd December 2006, 16:35
My father served some time with SEGB on the Chessington, he retired from that vessel in the early sixties.
My recollection was"blue chip collier company"

A good book published by the WSS "Gas and Electricity Colliers" 1984
ISBN 0 905617 33 9
Wealth of information there

Chief Engineer's Daughter
3rd December 2006, 17:04
Hi there! My Grandad sailed with South Eastern Gas Board for a long number of years. I can ask my Mam what the funnel markings were. She is away jusat now but I will ask her when she gets back.

Cheers
CED

dnobmal
3rd December 2006, 18:48
In the above posting it should read Greenwich for the down river berth which the 3 larger ships in the fleet ran to as they were not flatirons.

jaysay
4th December 2006, 10:27
Many thanks to all of you - I am amazed at the response, and particularly grateful for the book references and extracts. It's good to know that I am not the only one who remembers these ships and I have passed details of the web page to my father who, I hope, can be persuaded to join the forum and - perhaps - find old friends. I have replied individually where appropriate.
Back to my model of mv DULWICH to paint out that wrong funnel marking...

jaysay
4th December 2006, 10:29
Perhaps I should add that I once heard that - in some quarters - SEGB was said to stand for 'Semi Educated Geordie B's.."

NORDICA
12th June 2007, 00:08
my father used to work at wandsworth gas works and used to see these ships everyday. he remembered the whole list of flatties hew saw and told me. he sadly passed on 2 years ago and the names were all from around that area. i still live in wandswoth to this day. (==D)

Peter4447
12th June 2007, 00:29
I remember them being described by a South Sheilds collierman as"carrots roon the funnel."

In many ways the 'carrots round the funnel' was a very clever funnel mark indeed. The 2 black rings on the white band represents the grate of a fire and the 'carrots' are the flames - very distinctive and very appropriate in the era of domestic coal fires!

Peter4447(Thumb)

Mike Davison
6th December 2007, 06:50
Hi Folks
I am doing some work on the SEGB flatiron colliers that plied the north-east coast of England until about 1971. Does anyone know what the house flag or funnel marking was? From my childhood I recall that it was simply 'SEGB' in a box (no prizes there!) but the colours are in dispute. My father served in these ships and seems to think the lettering was Cambridge Blue; I think it was red; my guess is that it was red lettering and a blue border.
Anyway, all information welcome on this or other aspects of SEGB.

Hi Jaysay, Its incredible that I was looking for some history of the above fleet one year later than youself. Having no luck I joined the club and the first message I saw was yours.
Historically my father sailed on those ships as an engineer and my uncle also. Sometime, when i was young I was allowed time off school to sail with him for a voyage to London and back. Now at 61yrs young I still remember all the fleets names, even the SS Redriff which must have been the oldest ship in the fleet. If you know of anyone that has photos or build specifications of the SEGB fleet,then I would be most gratefull.
Once again thank you for your imput.

ruud
6th December 2007, 08:31
Ahoy Mike,
The REDRIFF 1925 was in service untill 1958,but entered the S.E.G.B only in 1949,and broken up in Odense by H.I.Hansen that year.
??? Scan from Gas & Electricity Colliers.

Mike Davison
6th December 2007, 14:56
What a service Ruud, the first response and I get a picture of the old lady from you. Many thanks. Just to confirm, will I find more photographs of the fleet on a web site or only in books as you mentioned (Gas and electricity colliers)! Ships that I remember are the Redriff,Ewell,Sydenham,Effra,Southwark,Chessington ,Mitcham,Dulwich,Wandsworth,Brixton to mention a few.

ruud
7th December 2007, 10:05
Ahoy Mike,
As far as I know,and that ain't so much,there isn't a website of colliers/flatirons,but I do have collect a lot of them as piccies bought on several occasions at auctions.
There are a few books,included with piccies,but rare to find these days.[If you're looking for used books,try this link,they are the best] http://used.addall.com/Used/ (http://used.addall.com/Used/)
I'd just posted the EFFRA & SYDENHAM for you,in another thread,where you requested these.
Will have to dig in my files to see,if I'll find the others you mentioned,but probably will have all.

Shipbuilder
8th December 2007, 20:20
I think your question has already been answered, but if it hasn't please come back & I will dig out the funnel colours. I sailed in WANDSWORTH in the bad winter of 1962. Captain Vosper, chief mate Mr. Sanderson, 2nd mate Mr Paterson, chief engineer Mr. Ditchburn. Wasn't particularly happy there. I was itching to go "deep sea" again and and felt that the WANDSWORTH was little more than a barge with an engine in it. (I was radio officer). Have fond memories of the officers & crew though & we had more than a few laughs (remember when we bust the bridge window whilst anchored off Southend Pier [in ice]?)
SEGB colliers hardly had funnels in the true sense of the word. WANDSWORTH had two next to each other, each about half the size of a dustbin & virtually invisible from outside. Funny, although I later sailed in some of the finest passenger liners in the world, but my only "two stacker" was a collier!
Here is the WANDSWORTH leaving South Shields in 1964. I took the photograph from the iron ore carrier SAGAMORE (My next ship after WANDSWORTH). I had visited them during the afternoon and reminisced about "old times" (All of 2 years before!).
http://img70.imageshack.us/img70/6549/wandsworthmediumgc8.jpg

london_lighterman
30th October 2008, 00:14
hi there! like your self i am an avidmodel maker and am planing a new model, as i work at what was the old wandsworth gasworks site i thought i would have a go at a collier.
i have a copy of the book british steam collier fleets and it has some GA plans but what i would like is some hull lines. i was wondering where did you get the plans if any for the motor colliers of the south eastern? when i came afloat the last of the gas board boats had gone and the electric colliers where on the last knockings.hope to see some pictures of your models. regards Martin

Shipbuilder
30th October 2008, 08:51
Hi Martin,
Click on Miniature Merchant Ships (below) to see some pictures.
I also have the C V Waine books & they are very good for plans, but also have a lot in old journals, Shipbuilding & Shipping Record, Shipbuilder, Shipbuilder & Marine Engine Builder, The Motorship etc. Very few lines plans though. As I only build miniatures & am very familiar with the shape of ships, so I don't really need a lines plan. The collier hulls were very simple in shape anyway.
Bob

london_lighterman
30th October 2008, 18:12
Hi Bob thanks for the lead, i have looked at your page and am very impressed! i mainly build tugs and barges (lighters) in scales from 1:48th up to 1:12th. and fancied having a bash at some smaller ships. i have photo copied some GA plans of flatirons and will make a start after i have finished a 1:32nd model of Everard's tug the S A EVERARD. talking of which was it a minature you made a while back that i saw some pictures of?

Shipbuilder
30th October 2008, 21:29
Yes, it probably was. Some time ago, I wrote an article on a miniature of S.A. EVERARD for Model Shipwright. There were plans in the article. My wife also had article on painting the seas in the same issue.
Bob

Shipbuilder
30th October 2008, 21:38
Here it is:

london_lighterman
30th October 2008, 23:39
thats the one Bob.. very nice indeed!

RMM
29th December 2008, 01:26
This is a photograph of the Chessington at Derwenthaugh staiths taken in the 1950s. The staiths closed in 1960. We are looking east along the River Tyne with Raines 'Delta' Works indicated by the smoking chimney. The River Derwent flows into the Tyne to the right of these works. Newcastle is on the left bank of the river. There was a massive fire in June 1951 and the staiths were closed for over a year before re-opening in January 1953. The remains of the base of the staiths still exist, though all the upper parts were dismantled.

Mike_W
15th February 2009, 19:17
I'm writing a book on the sailing barge matches and I'll be including the role the tugs played in their histories. I've come across S. A. Everard as one tug that was involved in the Thames & Medway matches in the 1950's and 1960's. However, I've not been able to find a photo of her.

I'm wondering if you have - as part of your scale model project of her?

Regards,

Mike
www.thamesbargeracing.co.uk
thamesmatch@yahoo.co.uk



Hi Bob thanks for the lead, i have looked at your page and am very impressed! i mainly build tugs and barges (lighters) in scales from 1:48th up to 1:12th. and fancied having a bash at some smaller ships. i have photo copied some GA plans of flatirons and will make a start after i have finished a 1:32nd model of Everard's tug the S A EVERARD. talking of which was it a minature you made a while back that i saw some pictures of?

Shipbuilder
15th February 2009, 20:28
Hello Mike,
I built the S.A. EVERARD some time ago from a plan in THE MOTOR SHIP. There was also a picture of the vessel, probably on trials. The magazine was a loose copy and I sold it on shortly after completing the model. I was in the FREDERICK T. EVERARD for a few months in 1962. Everard's would probably have a picture somewhere, but I don't know if they are still in business. In any case, I wrote to them some time ago asking for information & they simply ignored the letter!
There is a good photograph on page 222 of the book EVERARD OF GREENHITHE. It is credited to T. Rayner. You could probably find a copy of the book by going to www.bookfinder.com The book was written by K S Garrett.