spam.....fritters

john g
2nd December 2006, 16:10
I cannot believe they are marketing "spam fritters" on the TV. The last time I came across these was 30+ years ago on a Brocks boat.....Please don't remind me.... the next will be "beef a la mode" to be sure. Can any ex Brocks remember the odd things that appeared on the menus and does anyone remember the never forgotten "sandwhich box" the function of which still baffles me to this day.

benjidog
2nd December 2006, 16:28
John,

They were selling spam fritters in an expensive restaurant in Brighouse Yorkshire when I was working there last year. Why anyone would want to eat that crap I really don't know - we had to have it at home when I was a kid and I hated it - but there wasn't much else just after the war!

As to paying about £20 for it in a restaurant - you must need your brains tested!

Brian

Tony Sprigings
2nd December 2006, 17:28
Anyone remember 'Cromeskies a la Russe' another of the delicasies of yesteryear.

PollY Anna
2nd December 2006, 18:55
My mum used to serve it up when we were kids to make the money go that bit further it was tough after the war and I don't mean the 1st as I'm not that old. I believe it was an American Idea!!! no doubt someone out there will tell me if I am wrong.

benjidog
2nd December 2006, 19:41
It certainly was from the land of Uncle Sam. In fact they had adverts on the telly for it when I was over there a few weeks ago. At least they are not just dumping it on the UK. ;)

Brian

David Byrne
2nd December 2006, 20:41
In response to John G, I believe the primary purpose of the sandwich box was to provide light entertainment for the cockroaches.

Particularly on the Maipura (which I loved dearly) the abundance of cockroaches meant that they were everywhere, including the tupperware-type box of sandwiches left on the bridge for the hungry third/second mates on their night watches. It was not advisable to reach for them in the dark and simply consume the contents ........ on the other hand, they were probably full of protein (the cockroaches, not the sandwiches).

David Byrne

non descript
2nd December 2006, 20:51
Oh my goodness, I had totally forgotten The Sandwich Box. The first page of “How to be a Chief Steward” had the basic instruction that under no circumstances would the contents of The Sandwich Box be anything edible; to do otherwise would run the risk of raised hopes and mutiney. As a result we all knew that the box could be safely ignored, or used as a weight to keep the chart down in rough weather. I believe that in keeping with the first commandment of the aforementioned book, the slices of stale bread were usually kept apart with a small layer of something vile called “sandwich spread”, good manners and the need to keep our readers from bad dreams and/or throwing up, forbids me to remind you of what it looked like.

But, all’s well that ends well, we used (allegedly) to break into the holds and remove for testing, some of the cargo of corned beef and make corned beef on toast....

A.G.Greenwood
2nd December 2006, 21:07
In addition to the cockroaches I seem to remember the inevitable sandwich spread in the sandwiches.

gwzm
2nd December 2006, 21:16
It's a long time ago so now the story can be told: 'Twas on one of Brocklebank's finest ships in the year 1963. The dinner main course had been particularly tough brisket of beef, in fact it could have been used as a direct replacement for chobham armour, as used on tanks. As usual, the left over had been sliced up and put on the sandwiches in the supper boxes and they were basically inedible. Another junior officer, who shall remain nameless to protect his guilt, and I collected all the supper boxes we could find and removed the meat from the sanwiches and pinned it to the PC/S's cabin door with drawing pins so that the bottom part looked like the hide of an armadillo. Needless to say, there was hell to pay but there was no more brisket of beef on that voyage.

Apart from that the food was pretty good on all Brocklebank ships that I had the pleasure to sail on and certainly better than the Cunard cargo ships Alaunia and Andania.

Happy days,

John/gwzm

wa002f0328
2nd December 2006, 21:26
Spam Fritters & Pom anyone? Pom what is that?

Derek Roger
3rd December 2006, 00:43
In Dundee in the 60s " Spam Fritters " were maketed in the chip shops as
" Mock Chops "
Deep fried with the lard dripping out of the batter and a "Poke " of chips all wrapped up in a newspaper with vinigar and salt .

All for one shilling and tuppence ( Just under 6 pence)

Preference was for a "Pie Supper " in Dundee or A "Puddding Supper " ( Black ;white or Red ) Fish was an option too but usually the Pie won the day.

Regarding Brocks the food was generally good and sometimes very good depending on the Chief Steward .
" Sweetbreads " was one of my favorites although not too often on the menu .
I remember the Cromeskies A La Russe being on the menue Tony but cant remember what the hell they were .

Re the sandwich box ! That was a giant leap forward in technology ! On Maipura in 1965 we ( Appentices ) got our sanwiches on a plate covered with a dampened cloth ! If you didnt eat them within the hour they would dry out and curl up at the corners and be quite disgusting .
Mahsud was the first ship I was on with a Duty Mess fridge where all the Bread / butter cold meats etc was left so we could make our own as required . ( Had to be quick though if we had appentices as they would clean the lot within an hour or two of dinner .)

Oh Happy Days
Derek

Tony Sprigings
3rd December 2006, 12:54
Derek,
I seem to remember that they were sort of sausage shaped covered with breadcrumbs and full of something they got 'when the gratings were up' in the handling room. The other lasting memory was the 'individual duffs' that the travesty of a cook used to produce on the Old Masirah. They were so hard that we used to take them and through them at each other becasue they bounced!

Tony Sprigings
3rd December 2006, 12:55
Sorry that was supposed to be throw!

JoK
3rd December 2006, 13:02
Octagnal balony slices.
It was octagnal because the cook sliced all the green edges off before putting it out.
The first ship I was on, if it wasn't for Spam, I would have starved. If you were late to supper, you were usually SOL.
I was lucky-all the shipsI was on and not a cockroach to be seen. However another of ours was chemical bombed a couple of times and still had them, when she was cut up for razor blades, I'm sure them and the mice scurried out.

John Cassels
3rd December 2006, 13:47
Kromeskie a la russe , as far as I can remember was a sausage with a
piece of very streaky bacon wrapped round , dipped in batter and deep fried.

JC

jim barnes
3rd December 2006, 14:34
I dont realy mean to be awkward but i love spam fritters, i can get them in a chippy in Skegness and a steel works canteen in Rotherham but the wife refuses to do them she considers them to be disgusting....well?

Roger Bentley
3rd December 2006, 14:35
I remember that the brawn was always listed as Ormskirk Brawn, and the bacon was always Grilled Wiltshire bacon. Why did we always get salmon sandwiches when in transit in the Suez Canal. The curries had good names as well remember Country Kaptan. Happy days, Roger Bentley

Derek Roger
3rd December 2006, 15:24
I do remember the salmon sandwiches in the Suez Canal ; it must have been to impress the pilot .

John Rogers
3rd December 2006, 16:09
After the end of the war Spam Fritters were sold in the Fish & Chips shops,fish was still hard to get, so they took the SPAM which was plentiful and used that. They made them by cutting a large potato into slices,take one slice of spam and place it between the two pieces of spud,dip it in batter, then deep fry it just like they would fry the Cod if they had any. After the slim war years they were great to eat believe me. Have you priced a can of Spam lately,you will be surprised at the price.
John

john shaw
3rd December 2006, 20:22
Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam,Spaaaam, wonderful SPAM--- Monty Python-- it must be good cos there's an Eric Idle West End show called SPAMALOT.

Don't you know that it is now held in such high regard that, according to the ads, you can give it as a meal for an anniversary. I can just imagine the reception this offering would get from my nearest and dearest if I presented it on a special occasion.!

Am I right in remembering that this is an acronym for Spiced Pork and Ham?

John Rogers
3rd December 2006, 20:50
I think you are right John,thats what it is. try a sliced fried.
John.
P.S. This thread is making me hungry, think I will go and make me a spam fritter, I like them to Jim.

Geoff_E
3rd December 2006, 21:01
Hope you Brock's guys don't mind. I saw the reference to "spam fritters" and the memories came flooding back. Then it went on to Kromeskie, beef a la mode; a litany of the BP Chief Steward's culinary range.

Did you have "cheese beano's" too?

James_C
3rd December 2006, 21:16
They might have had Cheese Beano, but we could claim ours was the 'original'.
Staple diet on some ships.

LOL

mahseer1
3rd December 2006, 22:37
I cannot believe they are marketing "spam fritters" on the TV. The last time I came across these was 30+ years ago on a Brocks boat.....Please don't remind me.... the next will be "beef a la mode" to be sure. Can any ex Brocks remember the odd things that appeared on the menus and does anyone remember the never forgotten "sandwhich box" the function of which still baffles me to this day.


Lamb Cutlets - the only time in 10 years that I had an upset tummy in Brocks and we had just dockd in Calcutta. I didn't like to admit to the fact that I could only keep down chilled tonic water and tried to do the night shift for several days without eating anything solid. After the third day someone noticed I wasn't appearing for dinner and was questioned at length by the Marine Super who was convinced I'd been out on the town (I hadn't even been ashore) and refused to believe that I could still taste the cutlets. It turned out that two or three others had been affected and a doctor eventually cured us with five large white tablets each. On the whole Brocklebank food was excellent though I could tell a story about prawn cocktail which would put you off them for life.

Jim S
10th December 2006, 19:34
Did anyone else notice the unerring ability of some Chief Stewards to forecast bad weather. On seeing roast pork on the menu it was a guarantee that bad weather was imminent. The fatty content of the pork made it come up as easily as it went down.

wa002f0328
10th December 2006, 19:40
nothing wrong with spam flitters, if they are cooked properly, sadly in this day & age not many cooks about, L.O.L.s

DerekT
14th December 2006, 17:05
Hi,

Remember Kromeski al a Rouse, not sure that is the way to spell it, also a nice kofta curry.

DerekT

Chief Engineer's Daughter
14th December 2006, 17:47
Spam Fritters....... YEUK! I feel ill just thinking about them. We used to get them at school, say no more.

Coastie
14th December 2006, 18:23
My uncle, ex R.A.F, used to LOVE them and would cook them and feed them to us at every opportunity. I'm with CED on this one, YEUK!

Gulpers
14th December 2006, 18:30
Spam Fritters....... YEUK! I feel ill just thinking about them. We used to get them at school, say no more.


Was that just after the War, when times were tough CED? (Jester)

Derek Roger
14th December 2006, 22:08
I recollect a story my late father told us kids about a time during the war ( Must have been the 1st ) when a vessel foundered on the bar of the River Tay during a storm .
Not quite whiskey Galore but there was a lot of Flotsam and Jetson found on the sands off Tentsmuir .
They included crates of Spam / Hams and other tinned meat / fruits . It was a bonanza for the gentlefolk of Tayport ( Including dads family ) who cleared the lot in jig time and it was rumored that there were caches of the stuff burried all over the place . ( I guess it was illegale to take such items )
It as a treat I suppose during war years however Dad said they never were in risk of starving as the place was "Polluted " with rabbits and other game which was harvested as required . Also good fishing in the Tay esturary at that time for ' Flukes " and codling and "partans "( edible crab ) and sea trout . During nesting season they would collect duck and seagulls eggs in large quantities which my grandmother would preserve .

Chief Engineer's Daughter
14th December 2006, 23:02
Was that just after the War, when times were tough CED? (Jester)


Aye Ray, du'll mind hit weel!!!

Gulpers
14th December 2006, 23:20
Aye Ray, du'll mind hit weel!!!

Indeed Alex - sadly yes!http://emoticons4u.com/cartoon/1403.gif

peter lewis
15th December 2006, 00:47
an old chief steward with texaco would put them on the menu at least once a week but they were always called jailhouse steaks no matter what they were called not many people ate them(Hippy)

rgrenville
15th December 2006, 01:02
My kids told me that they figured out what was in spam from the name, Squirrel,Possum, Armadillo & Mouse. Must have been from all those long car trips playing name that road kill.

benjidog
15th December 2006, 18:04
There is another explanation for the name which of course couldn't possibly be true - Sh1t Posing As Meat. ;)

And no - I didn't just make that up - it was in the International Financial Times this morning. (it was the only English paper they had on the plane I hasten to add!).

Regards,

Brian

pete
15th December 2006, 18:46
In the late 1940's my Uncle used to call it Just that Brian, S##t posing as Meat. He said it came from WW1 but I don't think so. Funny thing is I LIKE Spam Fritters and make them at least a couple of times every year. So I'm weird and on Christmas Day my Wife and I are having "Aromatic Crispy Duck" all home cooked and Yum Yum.......................pete

rgrenville
15th December 2006, 20:35
My kids told me they know whats in spam from the name, Squirrel, Possum, Armadillo & mouse! Must have figured it out from all the long car trips in South USA playing whats that road kill.

When I was sailing with Port line I seem to rember that the Chief Steward called it a "Windsor Fritter", I guess they were trying to infur that the Royal family eat the stuff.

Derek Roger
16th December 2006, 00:12
In a pevious thread I called them " Mock Chop " ( Dundee Chip Shop Variety ) and really they were not at all bad . The batter and deep frying seemed to get rid of the fat out of the Spam and they really were quite good .
The ones in Brocks were I am afraid a bit of a challenge ( OK when I was an apprentice but somewhat lacking as one moved up the ranks and to be able to give an opinion )

Some other Brocklebank specials were the " Mixed Grill " This could be excellent in the UK but later in the trip ( After Calcutta ; when all the good English / Scottish meat seemed to disappear )
The mixed grill then consisted of a piece of Indian Buffalo steak ( Dry and as tough as an engine room boot ) a piece of overcooked liver ( of unknown origin ) a piece of fried heart ( which the Indians I am afraid had no idea how to tenderise or cook ) and a couple of rashers of bacon .

The whole mess was served with a braised oinion ; a broiled tomato and chips .
It was still quite acceptable ( If eating in the duty mess ) as we would make take the bacon ; oinions and chips and make a large " Chip Buttie " and have the Broiled tomatoe as an appetiser . The rest went to Davy Jones Locker .

Coastie
16th December 2006, 01:10
Fried in batter, maybe they may not be too bad, my Uncle just used to deep fry them in the chip pan as they were, so they were really fatty! (Possibly no wonder I suffered a stroke!!)

John Rogers
16th December 2006, 01:28
I dont think SPAM was a product of the first war,but for sure WW2. Seems a lot of you old sea dogs have never been hungry, or the young ones for that matter,SPAM cooked and served right is a wholesome meal,just have the right batter,some big spuds, and a good deep fryer.
John The SPAM Lover.

RCHARLTON
16th December 2006, 01:44
Spam was first introduced in 1937 and became very popular during WWII as it was the only meat available in a lot of countries. It is perhaps most popular in Hawaii which possibly explains why there are so many 25 stone Hawaiians on the islands. Everything you ever wanted to know about it can be found here:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPAM

Coastie
16th December 2006, 02:12
Spam is nice, sliced, on a buttie with tomato sauce!

RCHARLTON
16th December 2006, 03:09
Spam is nice, sliced, on a buttie with tomato sauce!

That's exactly how I like it, or fried with a couple of eggs.
Regards,
Ray

Coastie
16th December 2006, 03:19
That's exactly how I like it, or fried with a couple of eggs.
Regards,
Ray

Yes, with a couple of fried eggs, but not the Spam fried though!

Nick Jones
16th December 2006, 04:10
Spam Fritters, I'm afraid I'm one of the guilty ones who loved them. Still do in fact, although after one heart attack I'm limited to "Spam Lite" here in the States, which is almost the same as the "leaded" version we used to eat.
Cheers,
Nick Jones.
PS. I'm starving, whats that I can smell,MMMM.

benjidog
16th December 2006, 14:03
Did you have deep-fried Mars bars for afters Coastie?

Brian

John Rogers
16th December 2006, 14:19
Nice to see the SPAM lovers coming out of the closet. I'm starting a petition for a SPAM lovers day,a day off from work and eat spam and drink all day. Spammers Lovers Forever.
John.

benjidog
16th December 2006, 14:29
Here's a toast to spam lovers everywhere - "May your arteries never clog!". (Pint) (Pint)

Brian

John Rogers
16th December 2006, 16:04
Brian, I would rather eat spam than Blood sausage or Black Pudding as it was once known,yes I have eaten it when there was nothing else, but given a choice I say you can have my share of it.
John

Coastie
16th December 2006, 21:17
Did you have deep-fried Mars bars for afters Coastie?

Brian

As yet, Brian, I've not had that experience. My Mother used to do everything on a Breville (ever had brevilled soup?), once she'd discovered it Maybe one day!

PollY Anna
3rd January 2007, 11:45
As a matter of interest how much was swallowed by Davey Jones locker

gus warner
4th January 2007, 01:42
I think a lot of you people have been spoiled. As a kid during the war I was given spam and got a taste for it. A good cook could do wonders in the war. When I went to sea on Everards in 1951 and we did our own cooking quite often we would buy a tin of spam and make a decent meal.
Last week out shopping with the missus she spotted spam on the shelf, Lite Spam, Turkey Spam, Chilli Spam etc and said she could not remember eating it. We bought the Lite and she made a light batter and fried it with pineapple rings. It brought back happy memories and she enjoyed it too.

Nick Jones
4th January 2007, 07:11
Never mind Spam Fritters, what about "Mince Collops". Commonly refered to as "Sh*t on a Shingle",

Nick Jones

cluffyone
11th January 2013, 18:44
Anyone remember 'Cromeskies a la Russe' another of the delicasies of yesteryear.

cromeskie a la russe...... sausages wrapped in bacon fried in batter with usually tomato sauce . Usually a starter . Ah the memories . My kids think i am taking the p**s when i get on about cromeskies .

Derek Roger
11th January 2013, 19:31
Just read the whole thread again . Memories .

I tried to get some Black Pudding / Blood Pudding recently and could not find any having checked 3 supermarkets and 5 local butchers ( one who make all sorts of excellent sausages )
Apparantly no demand so have been discontinued .

Dont think I will go shopping for Spam ! , however did buy a tin of Corned Beef recently ; Fray Bentos .
Since I bought it it seems the Argies are playing up again so it ( the Corned dog ) will prob stay on the shelf until She who must be obeyed chucks it out after its " best bye day ".

So for today just back to basics ; smoked salmon / fresh scallops / fresh prawns .
Gave the live lobster a miss today at $ 8.60 / lb ; thats over 5 quid a pound for lobster ; a terrible price .

Derek

John Rogers
11th January 2013, 19:58
I do remember the salmon sandwiches in the Suez Canal ; it must have been to impress the pilot .

It was of the Pork,forbidden in Arab lands.

Keltic Star
12th January 2013, 05:00
Just read the whole thread again . Memories .

I tried to get some Black Pudding / Blood Pudding recently and could not find any having checked 3 supermarkets and 5 local butchers ( one who make all sorts of excellent sausages )
Apparantly no demand so have been discontinued .

Dont think I will go shopping for Spam ! , however did buy a tin of Corned Beef recently ; Fray Bentos .
Since I bought it it seems the Argies are playing up again so it ( the Corned dog ) will prob stay on the shelf until She who must be obeyed chucks it out after its " best bye day ".

So for today just back to basics ; smoked salmon / fresh scallops / fresh prawns .
Gave the live lobster a miss today at $ 8.60 / lb ; thats over 5 quid a pound for lobster ; a terrible price .

Derek

What's up in NB Derek? Live lobster is $4.50 per lb here in NS.
Cheers
Bob

Philthechill
12th January 2013, 10:20
Just read the whole thread again . Memories .

I tried to get some Black Pudding / Blood Pudding recently and could not find any having checked 3 supermarkets and 5 local butchers ( one who make all sorts of excellent sausages )
Apparantly no demand so have been discontinued .

Dont think I will go shopping for Spam ! , however did buy a tin of Corned Beef recently ; Fray Bentos .
Since I bought it it seems the Argies are playing up again so it ( the Corned dog ) will prob stay on the shelf until She who must be obeyed chucks it out after its " best bye day ".

So for today just back to basics ; smoked salmon / fresh scallops / fresh prawns .
Gave the live lobster a miss today at $ 8.60 / lb ; thats over 5 quid a pound for lobster ; a terrible price .

Derek"BEST BY DATE!" What the f**k are you talking-about, Derek?

Spam etc. is TINNED! Unless the end-of-the-tin is "bellied-out", (meaning the produce inside is "off"), it's perfectly Ok!

I've got tinned stuff in MY cupboard three/four years past their "use by" dates and will happily use them.

There's been a recent furore about the colossal amounts, (millions of TONS!), of perfectly good produce being given "the deep six" because the modern, brain-washed, blindely obey these idiotic "use by" dates.

I can well-remember my Mum, during the War, scraping fly-eggs and bits of green off bacon stored in the pantry (no fridges in those days, just a big stone slab!), because bacon was rationed and to dump it meant you went hungry!

I get stuff from my eldest daughter because its reached the "Use by" date.

One thing I will NOT take a chance with is fresh-chicken! The slightest "whiff" means it's "on-the-turn" and must NOT be used-------too dangerous!

Like I say to my daughter, "The finest use-by indicator is stuck on the front of your face!". I.e. if stuff smells "off" give it the deep six!!! Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

Roger Bentley
12th January 2013, 12:21
Just read the whole thread again . Memories .

I tried to get some Black Pudding / Blood Pudding recently and could not find any having checked 3 supermarkets and 5 local butchers ( one who make all sorts of excellent sausages )
Apparantly no demand so have been discontinued .

Dont think I will go shopping for Spam ! , however did buy a tin of Corned Beef recently ; Fray Bentos .
Since I bought it it seems the Argies are playing up again so it ( the Corned dog ) will prob stay on the shelf until She who must be obeyed chucks it out after its " best bye day ".

So for today just back to basics ; smoked salmon / fresh scallops / fresh prawns .
Gave the live lobster a miss today at $ 8.60 / lb ; thats over 5 quid a pound for lobster ; a terrible price .

Derek

Derek, Waitrose in Harrogate sell Bury Black Pudding in a four slice selection pack and also at the meat counter sell Bury Black PUdding complete. At least three other butchers in this area sell Black Pudding. Cheers, Roger

R396040
12th January 2013, 15:50
Derek, ------ Black Pudding
Regularly on my menu here in deepest France, sold in all supermarkets and smaller places too/ Really good tasting and have had arguments whether British or French is best. Like both actually, cant EVER recall having it ar sea though.
Stuart H

John Rogers
12th January 2013, 16:37
There was a Gal in Liverpool that I knew, she kept a piece under her pillow.

Donald McGhee
12th January 2013, 22:02
Spam, this is a regular item in our pantry, as I just love the stuff. Fried with a couple of eggs and a few rashers of bacon, with sausages and tomato it is a feast.
Sod what the dieticians say, sod the weight, sod the calories. I love my cooked brekkies on a weekend and will continue to indulge as long as I am able.
Tinned spam and tinned corned beef are delicacies not to be sneered at.
AND, while we're at it I agree wholeheartedly with the scorn and well deserved contempt that the "use by date" brigade is subjected to. What a waste of food that is, just to enable the supermarket chains to make more profit, no other reason.

Vive le Spam.

Derek Roger
12th January 2013, 22:26
What's up in NB Derek? Live lobster is $4.50 per lb here in NS.
Cheers
Bob

Found a place today with live lobster at $ 5 / lb . Not too bad . They had one big beast at 16 lbs . Gave it a miss at $ 80 and no doubt it would be as tough as old boots . Had barnacles all over its back and claws . Good crop of fresh prawns at $ 4. 80 / lb so had a wee snack before dinner .

Derek Roger
12th January 2013, 22:32
Derek, Waitrose in Harrogate sell Bury Black Pudding in a four slice selection pack and also at the meat counter sell Bury Black PUdding complete. At least three other butchers in this area sell Black Pudding. Cheers, Roger

Thanks for that Roger but a flight costing $ 1500 makes them a bit expensive . My favorite is in Inverness AI butchers ; top of the line . I was never to fond of the English variety which tended to have big chunks of white fat in them ?? Not even sure what it was .
When in Harrogate stick to the fish ; it used to be great .

Salamms Derek

Derek Roger
12th January 2013, 22:35
"BEST BY DATE!" What the f**k are you talking-about, Derek?

Spam etc. is TINNED! Unless the end-of-the-tin is "bellied-out", (meaning the produce inside is "off"), it's perfectly Ok!

I've got tinned stuff in MY cupboard three/four years past their "use by" dates and will happily use them.

There's been a recent furore about the colossal amounts, (millions of TONS!), of perfectly good produce being given "the deep six" because the modern, brain-washed, blindely obey these idiotic "use by" dates.

I can well-remember my Mum, during the War, scraping fly-eggs and bits of green off bacon stored in the pantry (no fridges in those days, just a big stone slab!), because bacon was rationed and to dump it meant you went hungry!

I get stuff from my eldest daughter because its reached the "Use by" date.

One thing I will NOT take a chance with is fresh-chicken! The slightest "whiff" means it's "on-the-turn" and must NOT be used-------too dangerous!

Like I say to my daughter, "The finest use-by indicator is stuck on the front of your face!". I.e. if stuff smells "off" give it the deep six!!! Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

I agree Phil 100% . I will leave it to you to try and convince my other half . I gave up years ago ; about the same time Basil Fawltey retired a beaten man .

Derek

Keltic Star
13th January 2013, 06:24
Found a place today with live lobster at $ 5 / lb . Not too bad . They had one big beast at 16 lbs . Gave it a miss at $ 80 and no doubt it would be as tough as old boots . Had barnacles all over its back and claws . Good crop of fresh prawns at $ 4. 80 / lb so had a wee snack before dinner .

As you say, $5 a lb isn't bad. There was a record catch at the beginning of the season in December and with 1,700 boats operating between Digby and Halifax there's a glut around these days. Apparently due to the recession in the States, the restaurant trade is down but Belgium, Gernany, Japan and S. Korea are picking up the slack so our poor fishermen can still buy a new 4x4 pickup every second year, get all their kids the latest I-Pads for Christmas and pay my (most reasonable) insurance survey fees so no complaints about the economy.

Roger Bentley
13th January 2013, 12:20
Thanks for that Roger but a flight costing $ 1500 makes them a bit expensive . My favorite is in Inverness AI butchers ; top of the line . I was never to fond of the English variety which tended to have big chunks of white fat in them ?? Not even sure what it was .
When in Harrogate stick to the fish ; it used to be great .

Salamms Derek

Derek, Yes the ones with the white fat are no good. Being a Lancastrian the Bury type is best no lumps just good oats and blood! If you mean Ramus for fish in Harrogate then they are still going strong and the Drum and Monkey fish restaurant still enjoys a high grading. Best wishes, Roger

Philthechill
13th January 2013, 13:47
There was a Gal in Liverpool that I knew, she kept a piece under her pillow."-------she kept a piece under her pillow".

Wow! And I thought the population of Britain were pretty good concerning non-ownership of artillery!!!

What calibre "piece" was it, John, .45, .38 or a more lady-like .22?(*)) Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

alan ward
13th January 2013, 14:03
What's up in NB Derek? Live lobster is $4.50 per lb here in NS.
Cheers
Bob

We pay pence for frozen USA/Canadian lobster in Aldi one and a half pounders are 3.00 each at the moment.I`ve got 2 for tonights starters.

John Rogers
13th January 2013, 15:47
"-------she kept a piece under her pillow".

Wow! And I thought the population of Britain were pretty good concerning non-ownership of artillery!!!

What calibre "piece" was it, John, .45, .38 or a more lady-like .22?(*)) Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

All I know Phil she called it her "Long Dong John"[=D]

Keltic Star
13th January 2013, 18:20
We pay pence for frozen USA/Canadian lobster in Aldi one and a half pounders are 3.00 each at the moment.I`ve got 2 for tonights starters.

Understood Alan but with due respect, what's your price on live lobsters?
I see Estuary Seafoods
http://www.buy-fish-online.co.uk/buy-fresh-shellfish/#shellfish
are selling cooked fresh one and a half pound lobsters at 16 pounds each and 2 pounders at 25 pounds ea.
l
Frozen are usually culled soft shells = less meat and freezing degrades the taste just as in canned lobster.

trotterdotpom
13th January 2013, 18:27
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Rogers
There was a Gal in Liverpool that I knew, she kept a piece under her pillow.

A piece of lobster?

John T

chadburn
13th January 2013, 18:34
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Rogers
There was a Gal in Liverpool that I knew, she kept a piece under her pillow.

A piece of lobster?

John T

Could it be a Cod piece(*))?. Not a full English ( a breakfast was usually included-------------- I understand) without a slice of black pudding.

trotterdotpom
13th January 2013, 18:45
Could it be a Cod piece(*))?. Not a full English ( a breakfast was usually included-------------- I understand) without a slice of black pudding.

....that's true and, despite what someone else said, all the taste is hidden in those big globs of fat!

John T

Philthechill
14th January 2013, 16:53
All I know Phil she called it her "Long Dong John"[=D]----called that because it was a .36 calibre, long-barrelled, "Navy Colt".(*))

On a serious note about those particular guns! I actually owned one!!!

Post WW2 Britain was awash with all kinds of guns, "which Dad had brought-back from the War".

I was absloutely "gun-daft" and owned all kinds of guns, (even a Japanese copy of a Luger!), which I'd got from various pals for a variety of "swaps".

I had a Smith & Wesson revolver and another lad wanted it but the only gun he had was the "Navy Colt".

I well-remember it as it was in "as new" condition with beautiful mahogany hand-grips and, (incredibly long), blued-steel, barrel. There were scenes of sailing-ships engraved on the top of the barrel. All together an absolutely marvellous gun.

I swapped it for something which I cannot now remember.

That same gun would probably sell for about 2,000 now!!!! (MAD). Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

John Rogers
14th January 2013, 18:51
They were some nice guns Phil. I had a collection once upon a time but got rid of them,gave my son a couple and my daughter a PPK 32 that she liked. The best hand gun I owned was a German P-38 which was picked up the battle of the Bulge by a friend,very accurate with no kick,dumbo me traded it for a colt 45 auto because I was being shipped to Alaska and needed a larger cal gun. But this chat don't sell any Spam or Black Pudding,so we better keep on thread or be banned without any Black Pudding,or shaky pudding for that matter.

Derek Roger
14th January 2013, 18:57
We pay pence for frozen USA/Canadian lobster in Aldi one and a half pounders are 3.00 each at the moment.I`ve got 2 for tonights starters.

That is an excellent price anywhere Alan . Is that the weight of the thawed lobster or is it the weight including water etc .

How did they taste ??

Roger Bentley
15th January 2013, 11:13
....that's true and, despite what someone else said, all the taste is hidden in those big globs of fat!

John T

John T, As I am the someone else, I still maintain if those big cubes of white fat don't melt during cooking and remain as rubbery lumps that are indigestible they add nothing to the taste. It depends on the butcher and if they use cheap ingredients the taste is always a disappointment. I'll stick to the Bury type! Cheers, Roger

nav
15th January 2013, 11:43
I only realised recently that I eat things I don't like. As a kid food was put on the table and if you didn't eat it you got it later. It went back to the war years and our folks were glad to have anything to eat at all and we were brought up in the same way. I also eat things now that I am sure I wouldn't normally have liked because it is variety.

Every now and then I have to have a spam fritter fix and then realise why I haven't had one for so long - but? I still enjoy it. There's some form of perverse humorous high in it.

rgrenville
15th January 2013, 14:22
While living in Tampa Florida I was able to procure some Argentinian black pudding, although not as tasty as the British, (as I remember?) it was not to bad. I remember that when I sailed with Port Line we had a thing called "Windsor Fritter" on the menu as I tried it I said this is blooming SPAM! Brocks never did try and fool the crew and always called it as it was!

chadburn
15th January 2013, 14:56
I only realised recently that I eat things I don't like. As a kid food was put on the table and if you didn't eat it you got it later. It went back to the war years and our folks were glad to have anything to eat at all and we were brought up in the same way. I also eat things now that I am sure I wouldn't normally have liked because it is variety.

Every now and then I have to have a spam fritter fix and then realise why I haven't had one for so long - but? I still enjoy it. There's some form of perverse humorous high in it.

Can anyone remember eating Fadge during the last War, I cannot remember it although I most probably will have eaten it but not known what it was called on the same basis as Nav's comment, "eat it now or have it later"

oldseamerchant
15th January 2013, 15:00
While living in Tampa Florida I was able to procure some Argentinian black pudding, although not as tasty as the British, (as I remember?) it was not to bad. I remember that when I sailed with Port Line we had a thing called "Windsor Fritter" on the menu as I tried it I said this is blooming SPAM! Brocks never did try and fool the crew and always called it as it was!

Never liked Black Pudding much (probably aesthetics). Have you tried White Pudding? Keep an eye open for 'Clonakilty' although I doubt if you can get them in the States

Derek Roger
15th January 2013, 23:58
Can anyone remember eating Fadge during the last War, I cannot remember it although I most probably will have eaten it but not known what it was called on the same basis as Nav's comment, "eat it now or have it later"

Fadge is the name used in Ireland ( the North anyway ) for potatoe scones .. Fry them up with the bacon and eggs ; black pudding and the rest .

trotterdotpom
16th January 2013, 10:18
John T, As I am the someone else, I still maintain if those big cubes of white fat don't melt during cooking and remain as rubbery lumps that are indigestible they add nothing to the taste. It depends on the butcher and if they use cheap ingredients the taste is always a disappointment. I'll stick to the Bury type! Cheers, Roger

Roger, the globs of fat do melt during the cooking and I reckon the flavour comes from it, as it does in bacon - who eats fatless bacon?
However, it is all a matter of taste. In Spain they have delicious black pudding which doesn't have the fat in it (not showing anyway).

John T

billyboy
16th January 2013, 11:03
Hendersons of Dundee used to make the best. The fat would be ground up and mixed in. you wouldnt see it but it was there. Delicious! (wonder if the business is still going?)

japottinger
16th January 2013, 11:32
I had just spent five years in lodgings at Greenock during my eng. apprenticeship (good digs actually) and faced with such largesse on SS Maihar I ate the lot! Jim Sunners was C/S and did his best.

alan ward
16th January 2013, 12:09
Check out Westport our fresh fish guys in Stoke on Trent

jim.child
16th January 2013, 15:35
gone are the days when sunday lunch time in the pub on the counter were plates of black pudding, tripe and pickled onions put on by the landlord all free to get the punters in. happy memories from a past time.

David Williams
16th January 2013, 16:19
People can say what they like,I still get
Spam Fritters or even fried spam with
eggs for beakfast and really enjoy eating it.
Dave Williams

dick burrow
16th January 2013, 17:12
totally agree mate, can,t beat a bit of spam, and as for black puddings or "niggers knees" as me mum used to call em, absolute heaven.

nav
16th January 2013, 18:26
totally agree mate, can,t beat a bit of spam, and as for black puddings or "niggers knees" as me mum used to call em, absolute heaven.

God's was having a good day when he decreed that "The Scots shall have white pudding."

White sweet dough with dried fruit through it. Friesd and slightly burned on the outside with a little runny yoke on top - yum!

John Rogers
16th January 2013, 19:03
Roger, the globs of fat do melt during the cooking and I reckon the flavour comes from it, as it does in bacon - who eats fatless bacon?
However, it is all a matter of taste. In Spain they have delicious black pudding which doesn't have the fat in it (not showing anyway).

John T

Cholesterol Heaven John,not only does the fat stick to your ribs it flows in your blood.(Ouch)

Roger Bentley
17th January 2013, 14:34
Roger, the globs of fat do melt during the cooking and I reckon the flavour comes from it, as it does in bacon - who eats fatless bacon?
However, it is all a matter of taste. In Spain they have delicious black pudding which doesn't have the fat in it (not showing anyway).

John T

Okay, John, Will give one of the local versions another go. The Bury type do not show the fat but it must be mixed in as they taste great.
Cheers, Roger

dab
17th January 2013, 18:58
I know this is a bit late in this discussion, but I have always believed that Spam stood for "Specially Prepared American Meat". I am now in my 73rd year and have always remembered "Spam" as such!
Cheers,
Dave.

nav
17th January 2013, 19:17
At least they're healthier than beefburgers!

rab.m.
17th January 2013, 19:43
God's was having a good day when he decreed that "The Scots shall have white pudding."

White sweet dough with dried fruit through it. Friesd and slightly burned on the outside with a little runny yoke on top - yum!

That's not white puddin' Nav,it's fried fruit pudding.White or Mealie puddins are sausage shaped and are made from a mixture not unlike haggis.
Cheers Rab.(Pint)

japottinger
17th January 2013, 20:19
Newly arrived in Holland for a four year stay we sayashed into a likely butcher shop in Dordrecht and bought some nice looking steaks. Tasted OK but not quite same as at home but put it down to the local breed. Cut to month later and a bit more familiar with the lingo, walking in same street behold the name above the same shop PARD, pony!
Best now knowing what we eat as probably would surprise.

Don A.Macleod
17th January 2013, 21:48
Don't think I've had spam fritters since coming ashore.Didn't we usually have them at teatime on the coast? as we sometimes had horrendous menus at such times depending on the PCS on board!!

As for black pudding I've got to promote "Stornoway black pudding" as being the best, very upmarket and favoured by Her Majesty and Prince Philip. Available online.

Derek Roger
17th January 2013, 22:26
Don't think I've had spam fritters since coming ashore.Didn't we usually have them at teatime on the coast? as we sometimes had horrendous menus at such times depending on the PCS on board!!

As for black pudding I've got to promote "Stornoway black pudding" as being the best, very upmarket and favoured by Her Majesty and Prince Philip. Available online.

They sell it in Inverness too . As well as their cheese and oatcakes .
I find the best is local with the exception of the cheese .

Derek
Didnt have such a choice in Brocks . Evening sarnies all curled up at the edges ( placed on a plate with a moist clouth to keep them somewhat fresh ) I can not remember what went into them ?
With the newer ships with duty mess and fridge all was OK as long as you got there before the apprenticles .

stevie burgess
17th January 2013, 23:09
Don't think I've had spam fritters since coming ashore.Didn't we usually have them at teatime on the coast? as we sometimes had horrendous menus at such times depending on the PCS on board!!

As for black pudding I've got to promote "Stornoway black pudding" as being the best, very upmarket and favoured by Her Majesty and Prince Philip. Available online.

I agree with you Don "Stornoway black pudding" as being the best,nothing wrong with some of the English pudding that i've tasted over the years but i used to pick the bits of white fat out of it first as it put me off a bit. Going back to the spam fritter,i also loved them aboard the ships i was on and also remembered them called "Windsor"also with some cooks.One of my local butcher's does a great white pudding with plenty onions and it's not dry and hard like some others...lovely! The spam fritters that we can buy in a pack of 4 i think are rubbish...one has to make their own!!

Don A.Macleod
17th January 2013, 23:11
Newly arrived in Holland for a four year stay we sayashed into a likely butcher shop in Dordrecht and bought some nice looking steaks. Tasted OK but not quite same as at home but put it down to the local breed. Cut to month later and a bit more familiar with the lingo, walking in same street behold the name above the same shop PARD, pony!
Best now knowing what we eat as probably would surprise.

When we took the Manipur(one of your old ships Jim)to Whampoa in Jan.67, we had a banquet on our first night in the hotel for all of us including the crew of course. It was 10 courses and one of these as we found out later was "dog" which is a delicacy in that part of the world and yes! I wonder what we've had not knowing what it actually was. We were there for three days( not allowed out of the hotel in those chairman Mao days) and never tried chinese food for years after that.

John Dryden
17th January 2013, 23:18
Spam fritters,black or white pudding..eaten every day in large quantities will probably kill you faster than a speeding bullet..treat is as a delicacy and you will live for ever!

John Rogers
18th January 2013, 02:11
How about some Spam Fritters with some Yorkshire pudding.

tunatownshipwreck
18th January 2013, 07:19
According to the Hormel company, the originators of Spam, the name stood for Shoulder pork and ham.

Hugh Wilson
18th January 2013, 07:58
I don't care what anyone else says, I like spam fritters.

Stephen J. Card
18th January 2013, 09:22
Plain old spam sandwich or a bit of fried spam with mash and good 'Texas strawberries' (Heinz baked beans). Once in a while .... of course!

rgrenville
19th January 2013, 17:03
According to the Hormel company, the originators of Spam, the name stood for Shoulder pork and ham.

My youngest son Andrew, when he was about 6 years old, told me that he had figured out what SPAM stood for. When I asked he told me Dad, it is for the ingredients;
Squirrel, Possum, Armadillo and Mice!

tunatownshipwreck
19th January 2013, 17:43
My youngest son Andrew, when he was about 6 years old, told me that he had figured out what SPAM stood for. When I asked he told me Dad, it is for the ingredients;
Squirrel, Possum, Armadillo and Mice!

No hunting license needed.

nav
19th January 2013, 18:23
That's not white puddin' Nav,it's fried fruit pudding.White or Mealie puddins are sausage shaped and are made from a mixture not unlike haggis.
Cheers Rab.(Pint)

Local dialect - it.s definitely white pudding down Ayrshire way!

Mealie puddins - Oh yes!! Great!

Love fried oatmeal and onions too!

trotterdotpom
19th January 2013, 21:48
I used to think it stood for "steam pressed animal meat" but apparently it's short for "spiced ham".

It turns out that Spam was introduced to Hawaii by Captain Cook and it is still massively popular there.

John T