BP Culinary Triumphs

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Geoff_E
4th December 2006, 08:48
There's a thread running on the Brocklebank forum titled "spam fritters". It then goes on to list some "universal" ? MN dishes.

My abiding memory is the "cheese beano", what about the rest of you? We managed bacon for breakfast every day during my time (1970 - 86) but I believe curry and kedgeree featured on the breakfast menu not long before that.

Food's generally pretty good on the offshore vessels I go to these days, but obviously a bit limited by local supplies - I don't think there's too much choice in the Luanda branch of Asda!

John_F
4th December 2006, 09:39
Geoff,
The curry or kedgeree options for breakfast were regularly served up on Indian crewed BP tankers. In fact they were also an option for lunch & dinner if I remember correctly.
Kind regards,
John.

Geoff_E
4th December 2006, 10:20
John,
The curry lunch was still a standard until I left the tankers in '82 to go into the N. Sea ships. I spent the majority of my time on Indian-crewed ships and my wife still has fond memories of them from the five years she spent sailing with me.
It's always been a point of humorous debate in our house as to whether we should have a "proper" Sunday lunch, chicken curry, (and beer of course) or something ethnic like roast beef!

john shaw
4th December 2006, 14:07
Geoff

I well recall the "ham and cheese beano"-- I referred to it in an earlier thread re MN food which ran for weeks and dozens of replies-- it may be of interest to you! Mouth watering (or not,as the case may be......)

Hamish Mackintosh
4th December 2006, 17:37
Geoff,
The curry or kedgeree options for breakfast were regularly served up on Indian crewed BP tankers. In fact they were also an option for lunch & dinner if I remember correctly.
Kind regards,
John.

Greetings John. Curry was regular breakfast fare on the "Reliance" in the 50's with a white crew from Falmouth, Dam good too!!

James_C
4th December 2006, 19:41
Geoff,
You remember a Cat Off by the name of Dave Fothergill? Only retired the other year. That man must have made the best tabnabs in the fleet, always a joy to have him onboard as the standard of food went right up.
That was, provided the Officers bar kept him topped up with lager.
LOL

Geoff_E
4th December 2006, 20:09
Geoff,
You remember a Cat Off by the name of Dave Fothergill? Only retired the other year. That man must have made the best tabnabs in the fleet, always a joy to have him onboard as the standard of food went right up.
That was, provided the Officers bar kept him topped up with lager.
LOL
Hello Jim,
The name doesn't sound totally unfamiliar, but which ship and when I couldn't say. My last tanker was the "Hawthorn" which I left in '82 to go to the "Sulair" in the N. Sea. Not really had anything to do with them since '86 and almost totally lost touch apart from a couple of ex BPTC guys who used to work in the Dyce office.
I think I was lucky, never on a bad feeder, though inevitably some were better than others. "Her indoors" can still turn out a mean cheese beano, if required!!

Trevorw
6th December 2006, 23:52
British Endurance, 1958. We had a Goanese catering staff and the most brilliant breakfast I ever tasted was curried sardines! I've tried hundreds of times to replicate it at home, but without success!

RonF
7th December 2006, 13:31
I also have very fond memories of the Cheese Beano.

Another dish I liked at the time was kidneys on toast(!)
Unlike the cheese beano, I can't even start to recreate this dish (there was some sort of gravy/sauce involved IIRC).
Any recipes or clues welcome!

Ron

norman stitt
9th December 2006, 12:45
British Endurance, 1958. We had a Goanese catering staff and the most brilliant breakfast I ever tasted was curried sardines! I've tried hundreds of times to replicate it at home, but without success!

Hi Trevor.
Sounds like the dish Fresh Sardines Masala.
Try this : (Recipe for 12)
3. Kg Fresh Sardines. 10 grms Ajinimoto, 28 Grms Chilli powder, 28 Grms Tumeric,,28 Grms White Pepper 14. Grms Salt, 2 Fluid Oz Malt Vinegar, 3 Nos Garlic Gloves, ( Finely chopped) 1 Nos Egg.( Beaten)

Wash Sardines and place in a dish with the Salt and Ajinimoto. Mix the chopped Garlic with the remaining dry ingredients and moisten with the vinegar until a smooth past is obtained.
Evenly coat each Sardine with the paste and allow to marinade for at least 30 minutes.
Just before cooking mix in the egg.
Lay on an oiled tray and Grill or fry in a pan which contains a little oil.

Norman( Grocer)

KIWI
9th December 2006, 20:06
Stanvac Canberra when I joined had a skipper who obviously did not milk the catering budget.Whatever you liked for breakfast including grills,pantry fridge filled with cold cuts cheeses etc for those about at night.Regular meals were more often than not a pleasant surprise.The standard surpassed P&O first class but unfortunately a change of skipper brought drastic changes in the menu. Kiwi

dnobmal
13th December 2006, 22:30
Most ships I sailed on in the fifties in the BTC/BP fleet curry and kedgeree was regular fare on the menu with European crews onboard.Back in those days the fleet never had a very good reputation for feeding,and blame used to be laid at the door of the company.But one of the trips I did, a period of 12 months on the Gulf-Eva Peron run[that dates me] in a T2 with Ken Mitchell from the Whitely Bay area,and the Steward from Belfast was very good.Wether it was the run with nights in Capetown or Durban each way which helped with the quality of stores,or the Master or Chief-steward { no pursers in those days on working ships] were honest men, because I found Ken Mitchell to be one very straight man in manner and speech.Because that was another rumour that used to prevail with regard to the quality of stores which came onboard vessels in the fleet,but I never remained with the company for promotion so I could find out.Also the Master had his wife with him all the time and the main man of the day the Chief-cook was very good,that all helps

Split
15th December 2006, 05:49
What's a beano? Sorry, not to be a good cook!

Split

GeorgeM13
16th December 2006, 03:02
So far nobody has mentioned rissoles and that other saviour of leftovers bubble and squeak. These were two favourites on BP menus along with that other stand-by welsh rarebit.
Cheers

jerrywg
16th December 2006, 11:15
How about the Chile Chapatis from the Indian galley after the 12-4 shift, washed down with a few beers?[=P]

Ivor Mackay
16th December 2006, 19:02
Ah the good old cheese beano,heaven.What about lamb,lamb and more lamb.Nightmare,can't eat the stuff now

notnila
16th December 2006, 21:46
I joined my first ship the British Earl 1960,could't understand why anyone would want to eat Kedgeree or Curry for BREAKFAST!!!

David Davies
16th December 2006, 22:33
Sailing in tramps in the early 50s nothing went to waste. Redundant lifeboat biscuits (formerly known as Liverpool pantiles in the sailing ship days) were mashed up with salt beef (known as salt junk by our predecessors) and made into a sort of hash served up for high tea at 1700hrs or should I say 2 bells in the first dog being a traditionalist who was deprived of driving a 4 stick Limejuice barqe around the bloody Horn in 1948.

RonF
18th December 2006, 00:22
What's a beano? Sorry, not to be a good cook!

Unless I've accidentally amended it over the years it's (from bottom to top)

Toast
Spam (or Chopped Ham and Pork?)
Beans
Topped off with grilled cheese

Ron

kjweetman
21st January 2007, 22:53
Still eat the cheese beano and agree with RonF, ours was bacon rather than the Spam.

The first ship I joined was the Forth in 1979. The grocer used to run a card school in his cabin and served "Sasparelli" from a large china tea pot. Ingredients being one bottle of Four Bells and one can of lemonade!

"Time for another cup gadget? What was your bet?"

JoK
22nd January 2007, 00:21
This is the only place I've ever heard 4 Bells mentioned. Why do you not hear of it other then on ships?
Sorry a bit off topic..

K urgess
22nd January 2007, 01:34
Commonly known as "fira klanger". 4 bells in Scowegian.(LOL)

I'm sure I saw it in an off licence many years ago. Was it made by Lambs?
Or was it leftover RN issue?

Geoff_E
22nd January 2007, 01:54
Used to be under the Whyte & Mackay label, my in-laws bought it on the cross-channel ferries and kept me supplied for may years. I can't remember when I last saw it on the optic in a bar.

My wife acquired the "taste" for 4B when I was Mate and we issued the stuff (It was never for sale in the bond on BP ships I think). I also remember the Serangs and Pumpmen used to appreciate a tot regularly too!

paul0510
22nd January 2007, 09:16
Four Bells..standard issue after tank-cleaning.

JoK
22nd January 2007, 12:35
Or working on deck in the middle of the night in -28*C weather

Gordon L Smeaton
23rd January 2007, 18:02
All
How about the other two favourites from long past. Kromenski a la Rouse, and mock goose. Going back Kedgiree was still on the menu up until the early 70's don't remember it much past that. Or the other delight mostly on the Indian crew ships, fresh flying fish for breakfast.

Regards
Gordon

steve d
23rd January 2007, 20:25
I was catering staff in mid 70's and BP where famous for curries every meal, Fish kedgeree with every breakfast menu, ordinary curry with all dinner and evening menus. Christ even had curries with sunday Buffets.

stevecz
23rd January 2007, 22:52
Commonly known as "fira klanger". 4 bells in Scowegian.(LOL)

I'm sure I saw it in an off licence many years ago. Was it made by Lambs?
Or was it leftover RN issue?

It's still available, I got my last 3 bottles on Brittany Ferries of all places.
I only use it for medicinal purposes, as I suffer from a lot of colds and flu.(A)
Imported by:
The Four Bell Fine Navy Rum Co., Glasgow, G2 5RG.
Here's a scan of the Bottle, the label has changed, the contents haven't, still as smooth as ever.
I think I'll have a large one now, as I feel a cold comming on, CHEERS.

Steve

johnb8219
1st May 2007, 17:29
Fothers a very good friend of mine, will hopefully be having a pint with him next week, one of the best.

Remember Fred Campbell or Tommy "the mince" Smith

Steve Hodges
2nd May 2007, 22:04
It's still available, I got my last 3 bottles on Brittany Ferries of all places.
I only use it for medicinal purposes, as I suffer from a lot of colds and flu.(A)
Imported by:
The Four Bell Fine Navy Rum Co., Glasgow, G2 5RG.
Here's a scan of the Bottle, the label has changed, the contents haven't, still as smooth as ever.
I think I'll have a large one now, as I feel a cold comming on, CHEERS.

Steve

As I recall, there was Four Bells "dark", which was superb, and Four Bells "white" which resembled paintstripper and was only resorted to in dire emergencies. On the Destiny once we produced a lethal "fruit punch" based on Cape Verde port from the scrap man and a couple of bottles of 4B "white" -it was put on the bar top in a galvanised bucket, tastefully adorned with a slice of orange, and we helped ourselves with half-pint mugs. Beyond that, my memory is a blank....(POP)

Steve H

GeorgeM13
3rd May 2007, 01:08
Was given it once, Four Bells that is, by a C/O after a particularly dirty job whilst a deck cadet it finished up down the plughole. It was vile even a can of coke could not kill it and have not drank it since that day. I like rum and it has been my drink of choice for the past few years. Best I had was from my Dad who was a deep-sea trawl skipper who brought it home. All the label said was 'Fine Old Navy Rum'.
Speaking of drink; how about van Der Hum??? Remember getting that onboard in South Africa?. And crayfish tails since we are talking about cuisine.
P.S. saw Four Bells recently in a Duty Free either Manchester or Fuerteventura airports.
George

wtaylor
3rd May 2007, 12:12
OK guys, lets get to the main course. Who has the secret of making Goanese Dhall Curry. Always a favourite on Indian crew ships.
Wilt

barnsey
3rd May 2007, 13:44
Good grief you lot .... what a load of culinary misfits .... bloody Cheese beanos is all you can remember??? Cuh!!!

The best curries were Lamb and Dhall then, Chicken Pillau with Dhall .....oh boy I could kill for a taste of them on an Indian Crew once more.

Then there was an extraordinary delight, for me anyway.... "Oxford Sausage".
The catering pack of tinned sausage beloved by BP Tanker Chief Stewards ... the one on British Sergeant, my first trip ... 14 months of trying to outtwit him to get at any food we could was one Mr Cunnliffe.... produced a triangular shaped sausage. The sausage meat was "injected" into the tins through a cross of wire mesh so when they were extracted they came out triangular shape. Weird and distinctive but nice taste. The finished "Oxford Sausage a la BP Tankers was simply one coated in batter with a dollop of Tomato sauce ..... well I liked them anyway.

You can still buy 4 Bells rum these days ... made in Guyana too, the very best.

Barnsey

trotterdotpom
3rd May 2007, 15:31
As far as I know, Four Bells was only sold duty free in the UK. The only place I ever saw it on the optics in a pub was in Falmouth. What can I say - "Watch the wall my darling while the gentlemen go by". Smuggling seems to be genetic in Cornwall.

GeorgeM13, maybe you got your first drink before your taste buds were destroyed, but I actually thought Four Bells was rather smooooooth.

I remember Van Der Hum - tangerine liqueur from Jaapeland. You had to drink it quick smart before it evaporated. Super high alcohol content - rohipnol, kid's stuff!

I see kedgeree has had a few mentions. It cropped up on another thread and, in the spirit of nostalgia, I knocked up Delia Smith's recipe. It was great, so good in fact I took the leftovers to work and warmed them up. I was accused of damaging the ozone layer. Philistines!

John T.

Hague
3rd May 2007, 17:21
As far as I know, Four Bells was only sold duty free in the UK. The only place I ever saw it on the optics in a pub was in Falmouth. What can I say - "Watch the wall my darling while the gentlemen go by". Smuggling seems to be genetic in Cornwall.

GeorgeM13, maybe you got your first drink before your taste buds were destroyed, but I actually thought Four Bells was rather smooooooth.

I remember Van Der Hum - tangerine liqueur from Jaapeland. You had to drink it quick smart before it evaporated. Super high alcohol content - rohipnol, kid's stuff!

I see kedgeree has had a few mentions. It cropped up on another thread and, in the spirit of nostalgia, I knocked up Delia Smith's recipe. It was great, so good in fact I took the leftovers to work and warmed them up. I was accused of damaging the ozone layer. Philistines!

John T.

John T,

You have not experienced smoothness until you have experienced ' Jamesons Red Breast' referred to around the 'Emerald Isle' as ' Jamesans Russian Tit'.

trotterdotpom
4th May 2007, 01:54
John T,

You have not experienced smoothness until you have experienced ' Jamesons Red Breast' referred to around the 'Emerald Isle' as ' Jamesans Russian Tit'.

Thanks Hague, I'll keep an eye out for it. Not sure but I may have already tried the original in Archangel!

John T.

barnsey
4th May 2007, 02:07
Gordon ... that rang the memory .."two favourites from long past. Kromenski a la Rouse, and Mock Goose." but what in the hell were they????

van Der Hum??? yup remember that tooo ..... only before I drank it not aftwerwards...

OK so who has the Dhall recipe .. come on come on .. its already been asked for yesterday ... talk about SLOW>

barnsey

Cap'n Pete
4th May 2007, 10:23
I always take a red pen to Spam when requested in the provisions list submitted by the Chief Cook as it's so expensive compared to it's equivalents - however, I do it to the tune of "Spam, spam, spam".

Currently my catering budget is $5.75 per man per day, which is not enough to feed a rabbit when storing in Europe, particularly when you consider the rip-off prices charged by most ship chandlers these days.

That said, we no longer have to allow for the Chief Steward's "cut" when deciding on what to put on the menu. Cheese beanos are a favourite even with my Filipino, Russian and Ukrainian seafarers so should not be sneered at. However, that is not true for such "Pursers' favourites" as toad-in-the-hole and compote of fruit, two dishes of which have sunk without trace in today's Merchant Navy.

trotterdotpom
4th May 2007, 11:07
If you look at www.spam.com you'll find that 2007 is the 70th anniversary of Spam. There are commemorative tins of Spam available and even a Spam T-shirt that I'd give my eye teeth for (if I had some), but, sadly, they're only available in the US. The website seems to want to avoid mentioning the origin of the name, i.e. "Steam Pressed Animal Meat".

Some time ago I found a tin of Halal Spam in a supermarket and was so amazed I took a snap of it with my mobile phone escalator snatch cam attachment. Unfortunately, I seem to have lost the photo. If I see it again. I'll pass it on for your edification.

Sorry to hear of your Spam Ban, Pete, I'm quite fond of the stuff - the real McCoy that is, not that pink lint we used to get in a curly sandwich in the bridge box. I'm also disappointed to hear of the demise of "toad-in'the-hole" - covered in gravy, yum yum. Everybody says it's not the same at sea these days, sounds like they're right.

John T.

RonF
13th May 2007, 00:54
Another memory I've just had is chilli con carne. Would I be right in thinking it was made back then with baked (or haricot) beans, rather than kidney beans?

offcumdum sanddancer
14th May 2007, 15:22
BP DAHL CURRY

Dahl curry. This was a favourite for Sunday lunch menu during the mid seventies, if I remember correctly. Sunday lunch for us dayworkers (and 4-8 watchkeepers) then was followed by a study of the deckhead followed by a closer study of the back of the eyelids. I had not seen it or heard of it for many years and, when real spices were available here in sunny South Shields I decided to have a go at recreating it. If you have had a search for it on google or the like you will only find recipies for the dahl bit, rather than the BP creation or 'made up BP only' recipe, as a whole.

First on the plate is a bed of plain white boiled rice, I find that basmatti rice gives the best results.

Next is the dhal or dal or dahl is the lentil puree bit next on the heap, and can be made from either one, or a mixture of various dahls. You can experiment to get the best result. Try standard red lentils, or any of these. Toor, chana, kala, mung, urad, masoor or rajma dahls. See here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dal

Third up was the dry fried minced meat. Try either beef, lamb, or even turkey. I think that beef would be most authentic, if authentic is the correct description for what I think was a wholy contrived dish, devised at sea school?

Topped of with crispy fried onion or battered fried onions.

Now for the recipe which is my latest try:

Rice. You don't want me to tell you how to cook rice, do you? T'will be directions for sucking eggs next!


Dahl.
6 to 8 ounces of dahls
1 large onion chopped up finely
couple cloves garlic
spices - teaspoon each of ground cummin, coriander, tumeric, chilli, black pepper and garam masala. If these are not readily available try buying a packet of Shan dal curry mix, (available from Ahmed's food supermarket, near the mosque in Laygate) If not living 'on Tyne', try a couple of tablespoons of mild curry paste mix such as Nazir's or Patak's.
1 -2 tablespoons concentrated tomato puree.


Clean and soak desired dahls for minimum of an hour. Drain. Cover with water to about twice their volume, and bring to the boil. Cook until the water is absorbed by the lentils and they are quite soft. Add boiling water if necessary to keep from becoming too thick and burning on the bottom. Not too much water either, don't want it too runny. Meanwhile, cook the onion and garlic in a little oil or ghee and when transparent add the curry paste or powder. After a few minutes, when the spices are infused, tip the lot into the boiling dahl. Stir in the tomato puree. You may also want to add a very small pinch of MSG (I do) The dahl is done when it becomes a smooth puree. This is assisted by using one of those high speed mini food mixers such as the Moulinex turbomix, whilst still in the pan.

Curried minced meat.
10 to 15 oz minced meat
Large onion chopped fine
Curry paste, hot, 2 - tablespoons.
Oil or ghee

Fry the onion in the oil until transparent, add curry paste, cook for a few minutes and then add the minced meat. Cook on low for a few minutes until the mince is cooked, stiring it to stop it sticking. Add a little oil if required. Try to keep it not too oily though.

Fried onions.
I buy mine ready cooked, from speciality asian foodstores.

Build the meal. Spoon a bed of fluffy white boiled rice onto a plate, spoon over a layer of dahl puree. Next, an ample helping of fried mince. Sprinkle over the top a little (ha ha) layer of fried onions. Eat, drink lager, and proceed to ones scratcher for a little shuteye.

Enjoy, Keith Perriman

john fraser
14th May 2007, 16:54
Spam Fritters are now readily available in the supermarkets,complete with the batter coating.Here on this DSV in the Gulf of Mexico,the cook and I,both British,always talk about Cheese Beanos.Kromeskis.Semolina Jam Sauce,Poor Mans Doughnut ,Toad in the Hole.etc.Wonder what the American crew would say if they saw them on the menu. All they want to eat comes from the Fryer which we don,t use often.The other day the cook put on a Chilli con Carne which they loved.it was done the British way but they don,t eat the American cooks version (dried up mince)

paul0510
14th May 2007, 17:58
Keith, you just made my day! But don't forget the trimmings the Goanese steward offered on his silver platter...sultanas, chopped tomatoes, chopped apple and the likes....mmmmmm yummy!!

offcumdum sanddancer
14th May 2007, 18:06
Keith, you just made my day! But don't forget the trimmings the Goanese steward offered on his silver platter...sultanas, chopped tomatoes, chopped apple and the likes....mmmmmm yummy!!

I have been cooking this dish since I posted, just to verify my recipe of course. I had completely forgotten about the 'tray of tit-bits'. The likes included coconut, raw onion (ugh), mango chutney, lime pickle and papadoms of course.

barnsey
15th May 2007, 10:02
I'll second and third that remark Paul (Applause) .......OK Keith next up please ....

Chicken Pilau BP Tanker style ....

Barnsey(Pint)

HENNEGANOL
15th May 2007, 11:25
For those who like Dhal, I can recommend this soup.

Dhal (Lentil) Soup

Serves 2

4 oz red split lentils.
1 medium onion chopped
1 tblsp. medium curry powder.
1 pint chicken stock
1 oz butter.
1 tblsp. plain flour.
Salt and pepper.


Soak the lentils in cold water for an hour.
Sauté the onion in the butter, then sprinkle in the flour and curry powder and cook for a minute or so- otherwise the soup will taste floury.
Add the drained lentils and stock, bring to the boil and simmer for half an hour.
Add seasoning and serve.

Gerry

offcumdum sanddancer
15th May 2007, 23:46
Kromenski a la Rouse is coming up next

barnsey
16th May 2007, 11:27
Keith,

Yer rotten bugger .... Oh! my Dhal curry tonight from your recipe was delicious and Ive eaten far too much ... or not enough actually.!!!(==D)

A couple of variations I did ..... Squeezed a lemon and half the juice went in the Dhal and half in the mince.

I used about 350 grams of LAMB mince .. which we can get easily down here .... I wonder why? its just that much more tasty in curry than beef mince.

I chucked a tablespoonfull of Sultanas in the mince along with 1/4 cupfull of water and a Lamb OXO cube.

The Lentils soaked all afternoon and really swelled up and sopped the water up .... they needed no electric mixer I can tell you.

Thanks very much for a memory trip .... and more to come. (Pint)

Barnsey

offcumdum sanddancer
16th May 2007, 12:29
Thanks Barnsy, variations sound good. Yes, lentils don't really need a good soaking and can be cooked from the packet, and, as you show, they break up very readily if you do so.

As an aside, when my good lady wife was cooking mince in the days we were poorer and the kids were small, she usually added a small quantity of lentils to the meat to extend them. Our daughter Rachel always found the undercooked single lentil and gave us an accusing look, as she liked her meat, and WAS NOT used to being done out of her FAIR SHARE!

Geoff_E
16th May 2007, 14:10
Well Guys,

I kicked this thread off, very much tongue-in-cheek, but I think the contributions have done it proud!

Copyright aside, (can you copyright a kromesi?), there's a good bit here to fill an "alternative" cookery book. Keep it coming!

GeorgeM13
17th May 2007, 02:33
Hi Geoff
Good to see you back.
Curried mince and Dhall was about my favourite followed by Kopta curry and Singapore curry though if you could get stuff out the (Indian/Pakistani) crew galley it was even better.
How about Nansi Goreng (excuse spelling I've seen it spelt many ways) not seen often certainly not as often as Boston Baked Beans.
George

barnsey
18th May 2007, 11:08
yeah Geof ... bloody brilliant thread, enjoying it immensly. What about "Shaky Milk" in the bridge box and for cereals in the morning ... Goodness there were some wild variations ... all YUK !! The Old man used to get Carnation milk unwatered down .... ours was watered down condensed milk ...

However I did used to make a delicious cup of Coffee ... did we really get powdered coffee??? first spoon in your sugar and coffee ( or Cocoa, maybe we didnt get coffee and it was Cocoa?? ) then pour in a sufficient amount of Connie Onnie ... about 3/4" in a lovely BP Tanker china mug. Now you stir the lot together thoroughly ... sticky goooey mess!! Pour in a little boiling water and stir mixture rapidly .. a little less goooey and beginning to froth ....continue until mug is full, frothy and yummy.....not for those who do not like sweet things !!!

..... and then along came "Coffeemate" ... bloody delicious ...never looked back.

Barnsey

barnsey
27th May 2007, 10:06
Hey up .... have we all got disastrous gastronomic problems after this feast???

On the "Fulmar" we had one of the worst cooks in BP Tankers, God he was THE PITS. I did tea relief and my mate Nick Hunt came down with me for his tea .... well we had something or other and picked at it and sent it back asking for some more Bread and Jam .... a few minutes later the Cook stuck his head through the pantry hatch .... He said "Hi lads tea alright then?" to which Nick replied ... quite reasonably I though .... "Well Doc at least yer bread and Jam was ok" .... well that was it ... a load of expletives whistled out of the pantry closely followed by the Cook .... too late Nick had gone but was chased all the way up to the "Owners Cabin" where the extra Mate was ensconsed ... Nick had slammed the door shut and locked it. The Cook arrived outside and carved on the door with the knife he had carried with him !!! I arrived with reinforcements and we calmed the cook down and sent him on his way ... but it was an amzing incident .... if the foods off now I am sorely tempted to let the cook know ... "At least yer bread and jam was ok"

There was some awfull stodgy and tasteless bread cooked, smelt ok but Nelson could have used some of it as ammo !!

Such days ...

Barnsey

Steve Hodges
29th May 2007, 00:01
Any of you out there who used to indulge in raiding the grocer's fridge rooms on the 12-4 at night? Access on the old steamers was via boiler room and steering flat. Fridge rooms were padlocked, but you could push the hinge pins out of the doors and obtain some cold fresh fruit and the odd sausage, etc. for a fry-up in the workshop with the blowlamp. Also remember brewing up powdered soup in a polished paint tin on the HP turbine nozzle box. Why did we do it? its not as if we were badly fed. It just seemed to taste better if we'd nicked it.

fishcake
29th May 2007, 01:11
Remember it well - the 12-4 on the Loyalty. We had access to the fridges as we had to log the temperatures each watch (no Decca ) . However we didn't need to to take anything from the main fridges as the galley fridge was always full of bacon, eggs and tomatoes (usually the big beef type). We used the biggest frying pan we could find, I used to love that meal .

HENNEGANOL
29th May 2007, 23:11
[QUOTE= Why did we do it? its not as if we were badly fed. It just seemed to taste better if we'd nicked it.[/QUOTE]

My first trip to sea in 1960 at the age of twenty, 6’ 3” tall and 10.1/2 stone and with all that sea air, I must confess that I was always hungry. I wouldn’t claim that I was starving, but I could manage to eat my way through every course at breakfast, lunch and dinner. If you dared to go into the crews’ messroom of an evening you would always find bread, butter and various fillings to make a sandwich.

Sadly the amidships pantry would be completely empty apart from milk, tea and sugar and even that was rationed. However, the evening’s snack could be found in a greaseproof paper bag in one’s cabin, this usually consisted of two slices of bread, I can’t remember if it was buttered, enclosing whatever the Chief Steward decided he had too much of. In variably, particularly if you were on the 12/4 by the time you came to eat it, the bread had curled up and the filling had suffered yet another death.

Bearing in mind that in those days, we stored for six months leaving drydock and invariably we joined and left in drydock, many of the old time Chief Stewards would allow the fruit etc. to rot rather than exceed issuing two pieces of fruit a week. On Indian or Pakistani crewed ships in the days when we carried a Butler and the 3/O acted as Chief Steward, under the control of the Master. The system was wide open to abuse, we suffered whilst the Master lined his pockets at our expense and when it was the Old Man’s bond, we paid yet again. Although I always refused to pay more than a £1.00 for a case of beer, the Company price at that time was 16/s.

I remember complaining to P.G (PIG) Lowry (Master) on the Robin in 1963 about the standard of the food, his retort was “if your stomach can’t take it, hard luck” and yet all the fresh milk which had been obtained in Port Elizabeth, ended up in his cabin.

In my early days at sea, I always joined a ship with a 1.1/2 lb tin of Nescafe and several bars of Lifebouy toilet soap, knowing that if I wanted more than one cup of coffee a day or sufficient soap to last me a week, I would have to provide my own. We were as I recall, issued with bars of “Anchor” dhobi soap, which at a pinch could be used as toilet soap.

In fact it wasn’t only the victuals that suffered, the Company Regulations also stipulated the amount and frequency of linen changes. Invariably you would find that you received the bare min’m in order that the Hierarchy could send their personal linen ashore, to be laundered at the Company’s expense

So in answer to the question why did we do it, I think as much as anything it was to get one over on the B’s who were screwing us, or perhaps I should say depriving us of our entitlement. However, I must confess that I do wonder, am I now suffering from diverticulitis as a consequence of boiling eggs in the engine room kettle?

However there were a number of more enlightened Chief Stewards, who did all that they could to ensure that we were well fed and that we received what we were entitled to. One of the factors, which influenced the biggest changes in the standards of feeding was I think, when the Company sent the prospective cooks to train at Llandarcy and they eventually became Catering Officers. The other factor was the Officers’ Bar and the introduction of buffet lunches, which meant you could enjoy a can of beer along with a bar snack, very civilised.

There have been claims that curry was served at both breakfast and lunch times, I couldn’t remember this being the case but, then in my latter years at sea I never ate in the saloon at breakfast or lunchtime!

If you think that this is the ranting of a bitter old man, I can assure you that isn’t the case, these are the facts as I remember them, when as a young man I suffered as a result of the abuse of the system by those who were in fact employed to preserve it. Indeed what a difference in the early seventies when all the so-called characters suddenly disappeared never to be heard of again!

Gerry.

coley70
30th May 2007, 20:04
Any of you out there who used to indulge in raiding the grocer's fridge rooms on the 12-4 at night? Access on the old steamers was via boiler room and steering flat. Fridge rooms were padlocked, but you could push the hinge pins out of the doors and obtain some cold fresh fruit and the odd sausage, etc. for a fry-up in the workshop with the blowlamp. Also remember brewing up powdered soup in a polished paint tin on the HP turbine nozzle box. Why did we do it? its not as if we were badly fed. It just seemed to taste better if we'd nicked it.

The Grocer on British Pride took the hump because things kept going missing from the fridges overnight. He asked us Engineers to put a padlock and hasp on. We did as was asked but put the nuts on the outside so a shifter was all that was needed.

Indie Boy
1st June 2007, 17:51
I also have very fond memories of the Cheese Beano.

Another dish I liked at the time was kidneys on toast(!)
Unlike the cheese beano, I can't even start to recreate this dish (there was some sort of gravy/sauce involved IIRC).
Any recipes or clues welcome!

Ron
Devilled Kidneys, very good.

Indie Boy
1st June 2007, 17:55
Most ships I sailed on in the fifties in the BTC/BP fleet curry and kedgeree was regular fare on the menu with European crews onboard.Back in those days the fleet never had a very good reputation for feeding,and blame used to be laid at the door of the company.But one of the trips I did, a period of 12 months on the Gulf-Eva Peron run[that dates me] in a T2 with Ken Mitchell from the Whitely Bay area,and the Steward from Belfast was very good.Wether it was the run with nights in Capetown or Durban each way which helped with the quality of stores,or the Master or Chief-steward { no pursers in those days on working ships] were honest men, because I found Ken Mitchell to be one very straight man in manner and speech.Because that was another rumour that used to prevail with regard to the quality of stores which came onboard vessels in the fleet,but I never remained with the company for promotion so I could find out.Also the Master had his wife with him all the time and the main man of the day the Chief-cook was very good,that all helps

K.M.Mitchell, what a man! I was fortunate to sail with him on the SMOKY HILL in 1951.

Indie Boy
1st June 2007, 17:58
I joined my first ship the British Earl 1960,could't understand why anyone would want to eat Kedgeree or Curry for BREAKFAST!!!

It's wot POSH people do! Also smoked Haddock with a poached egg.

RonF
2nd June 2007, 00:03
Devilled Kidneys, very good.

Devilled kidneys! Of course! Why has it taken all these years to find this out? :D

Thank you

derekhore
23rd October 2007, 18:56
Van de Hum can be found here:

http://www.drinkon.com/detail.asp?ProductID=SP0145&Category=Spirit


....but they don't seem to do "Quatre ding-dong" rum anymore, though they did 2 years ago when I purchased 5 bottles!

I remember being given a half pint glass of the stuff as a Deck cadet aboard the Br Captain, by the mate, Graham Hunt, after a mega tank clean around the Cape.

Duncan112
23rd October 2007, 21:46
Try this site for four bells...

http://www.thedrinkshop.com/products/nlpdetail.php?prodid=3324

Off to Portugal on Friday so will report on the contents of the airport shops at both ends but pretty sure it was in Faro at Easter.

Used to get VDH on off Capetown with the mail on the two cape run with P&OCL. about £2 a bottle as I remember Hic....

Duncan

derekhore
23rd October 2007, 22:53
Cheers for that mate....will be ordering a bottle or two in the morning.....just in time for a Christmas tank clean!!

I remember the VDH well coming aboard off Cape Town .. I reckon BP had a standing order with the chandlers!

G0SLP
24th October 2007, 00:32
Bloody hell; just seen the price for the 4 Ding Dongs at thedrinkshop

Up until 2 years ago, when our new owners changed our ships to beer & wine only, we used to get 4 Bells at under £3/bottle



Regarding the scran being described, kidneys on toast (aka sh*t on a raft) is always good. Kromeskis a la Russe are fondly remembered.

I recall sailing with one PCO over 20 years ago who was, shall we say, 'careful'. His ultimate offering was "Cauliflower Fritters" - I kid you not. The cauli was BLACK before it was cooked... lovely...

Still, it kept the feeding rate down (EEK)

Sarky Cut
24th October 2007, 00:34
Cheers for that mate....will be ordering a bottle or two in the morning.....just in time for a Christmas tank clean!!

I remember the VDH well coming aboard off Cape Town .. I reckon BP had a standing order with the chandlers!

Van der hum, story is that its name came about because it was so popular in RSA that is was asked for as, and some of that "wots its name"

Workin class Cotro.

Burned Toast
24th October 2007, 20:32
A favourite besides the Beano was (Kromeski a la Russe) !!!

Ray

Sarky Cut
24th October 2007, 21:05
In my extensive experience of catering in BP the food depended on the Catering Officer but ultimately the Master was the arbitor. In many cases he deferred to the side of the Catering Officer. The comments about the fresh fruit were valid as well. It appeared on many occasions that it would go over the wall rotten before it was issued.
It was the duty of the people who had access to the fridge to liberate same before it went rotten.
I left BP and joined Dart Line and the food on those ships was four star at all times, same allowance as well. Something was wrong in the way BP dealt with this subject.
It was surpriseing how the food improved in menu and standard alongside in the IOG. You can draw yuor own conclusions from this.

Vital Sparks
25th October 2007, 10:25
I seem to remember a hot spicy dish called "China Chillo". The best curry was to be had on Indian crewed ships and especially if you could get the real stuff from the Bhandari's galley.

notnila
26th October 2007, 23:45
I seem to remember a hot spicy dish called "China Chillo". The best curry was to be had on Indian crewed ships and especially if you could get the real stuff from the Bhandari's galley.

Was told in the early 60s(in the Jungle N.Shields)by the cook of an Indian crewed BPtanker,at the time in drydock,that the captain who had just joined had chucked every bit of curry powder and chilli over the side!I leave it to his peers to judge him!!!!

jAdUwallah
27th October 2007, 09:39
On the British Fern, 1980, we called them "Cheesiehammyeggybeano's"
Yes ,we had an egg on top...obviously the class I'd brought from my days on the passenger-ships.
Food of the Gods it was, and ever shall be. Did anyone here ever sail with Charlie(baa-baa)Hunt as grocer? He managed to get lamb on every menu between IOG and Fremantle, even on Christmas day. The Bestest chrissy dinner on a ship I ever had that was.Where he got those cheeses from, I'll never know?

derekhore
27th October 2007, 10:25
Talking of midnight feasts etc....I remember on the Br Admiral the engineers used to work an 8 on....16 off routine.

They used to stock up with eggs, bacon, black pud etc during the day and about midnight have a fry-up on the steam pipes. (egg)
They would then put a large offering into the lift and send it up to the bar deck....in return we would send back ice-cold cans of Coke or 7-Up!

As somebody said .. we were not starved for food, it was just that it tasted so much better cooked/served this way!!


btw....As a Deck Cadet then, I really enjoyed doing my weeks engine-room familiarisation time on the Admiral......I reckon I gained a stone in weight

Sarky Cut
27th October 2007, 11:33
Potatoes, ali- foil and Steam v/v's, bit of buhtar, nectar of the god's.

The only thing steamships were good for!!!!!!

Rob.Norrie
4th November 2007, 17:34
Four Bell,s Great stuff,I remember bying it at £1.00 a bottle in Rotterdam, long time past sinc then, though did not stay long at that price. Now and then still see it in few Airport sales counters. At one time the only place in the U.K. was Challis Stern, London, supplied to ships.
Often wondered how the fridges need to be sorted out so often, ch.cook got a tot or two each time. and his helpers, say no more.
You lot got me a notion to hunt for it now.
Thanks for the memories.
Rob.

James_C
4th November 2007, 17:40
You can still get it in Tescos, at least up here.

Ron Stringer
4th November 2007, 19:42
You can still get it in Tescos, at least up here.
Where is "up here" James? Down in deepest Essex Tescos have never heard of it. Get mine off the internet but the delivery charges vary between GBP 4.50 and GBP 6.00. Bit steep when the rum is only GBP 14.00 a bottle.

James_C
4th November 2007, 19:46
Ron - the tropical paradise that is Scotland. LOL
Even saw it in Lerwick the other weekend!

lakercapt
4th November 2007, 23:45
Although it was not with B.P. but Ropners.
The second steward lost his keys and could not get into the pantry nor store rooms to give the cook his foodstufs to prepare for the day.
Approached we apprentices to help him out as he figured that we had been getting into the storerooms, we had, but there was no way we were going to help that sod out as he treated us with disdain. He never did find out how we got in and there was no way we were going to enlighten him. Kept us going.
Bill

trotterdotpom
5th November 2007, 11:43
I thought that the aforementioned "van der Hum" was rotgut. A google search hints that it may have been named after a Dutch Admiral who was part of the Dutch East India Company and didn't mind a snort of orange flavoured hooch.

I also found that "van der Hum", was the horse which won the 1976 Melbourne Cup. Coincidentally, the "Race Which Stops the Nation" is on again tomorrow, the first Tuesday in November. Good luck.

John T.

Indie Boy
5th November 2007, 17:10
Most ships I sailed on in the fifties in the BTC/BP fleet curry and kedgeree was regular fare on the menu with European crews onboard.Back in those days the fleet never had a very good reputation for feeding,and blame used to be laid at the door of the company.But one of the trips I did, a period of 12 months on the Gulf-Eva Peron run[that dates me] in a T2 with Ken Mitchell from the Whitely Bay area,and the Steward from Belfast was very good.Wether it was the run with nights in Capetown or Durban each way which helped with the quality of stores,or the Master or Chief-steward { no pursers in those days on working ships] were honest men, because I found Ken Mitchell to be one very straight man in manner and speech.Because that was another rumour that used to prevail with regard to the quality of stores which came onboard vessels in the fleet,but I never remained with the company for promotion so I could find out.Also the Master had his wife with him all the time and the main man of the day the Chief-cook was very good,that all helps

Which T2 was that?
I was on the Smoky Hill with Ken Mitchell, on the Persian Gulf- Cape Town- River Plate run. 1950/1951. K. M Mitchell was one of the best .

jAdUwallah
6th November 2007, 22:32
We dropped the pig in Saudi waters Christmas Eve, whoopee!
Customs came aboard an did their bit ,leaving us with a small allowance pp.
10mins later...we went into action...we had no booze left.
Luckily ,the bond had a 'back-door'. By use of gas-axe, we cleared a way
in. A skinny cadet was lowered in through a 'modified' ventilation system,
and the rest is history......not that I can remember it.

Phil Williams
10th December 2007, 03:14
On my first couple of trips as an apprentice with BP in the mid fifties, breakfast was a standard bacon and egg (singular) with either fried bread or hotcake; I've always wondered what a hotcake was made of--never seen them since.

Phil

connie
11th December 2007, 02:07
hi phil. always made my hotcakes with flour, water and baking powder,then fried in a little oil, on both sides regards con

Phil Williams
11th December 2007, 02:30
Hi, Connie,
Thanks for the reply, you've solved a mystery for me, after all these years!
Hotcakes seemed to go out of fashion, I did not see them at all in my later years with BP--up until the late sixties.
Phil.

Raz Jones
11th December 2007, 03:15
Challis Stern's Four Bells Rum, nectar of the God's,could get it in some pubs in UK tanker ports mostly, hardly anywhere else, I suppose it wasn't very well known elsewhere outside the Tanker men community, I used to be able to order it through my local off licence, but sadly he closed down a couple of years ago, oh my the good old days.
Cheers All
Ray Jones

connie
13th December 2007, 21:27
hi lads all this talk of 4 bells, ive still got half a bottle of the original, as i was one of the last to go in 86 shows how old it is!!as i had it long before then, used to syringe it into my xmas cakes whilst at sea, does the modern label still say challis stern &co. ltd london, as i dont drink spirits it will eventually end up in the bin, any 1 in the ne want it lol.? regards connie

offcumdum sanddancer
18th December 2007, 18:02
I have just made a variation of the Dahl curry I posted about awhile back, I used mutton mince from the local halal supermarket. It was just superb and well worth the trial. Mutton mince does not need the long slow cooking that diced mutton does and can simply be substituted for lamb or beef. I have even tried turkey mince. I also made the dahl bit just using channa dahl. Just as good.

Re the last post, I have not had any 4 bells since I kept some for giving for dirty work tots. Did not drink spirits then? Where in the NE Connie?

Keith (of Soudi Shields)

trotterdotpom
18th December 2007, 19:29
I have just made a variation of the Dahl curry I posted about awhile back, I used mutton mince from the local halal supermarket. It was just superb and well worth the trial. Mutton mince does not need the long slow cooking that diced mutton does and can simply be substituted for lamb or beef. I have even tried turkey mince. I also made the dahl bit just using channa dahl. Just as good.

Re the last post, I have not had any 4 bells since I kept some for giving for dirty work tots. Did not drink spirits then? Where in the NE Connie?

Keith (of Soudi Shields)

Sounds great, Keith - what's it like on stotty cakes?

Did you know you can also make Roald Dahl out of Giant Peaches?

John T.

offcumdum sanddancer
20th December 2007, 15:52
Sounds great, Keith - what's it like on stotty cakes?

Did you know you can also make Roald Dahl out of Giant Peaches?

John T.

Never tried it yet, if fact I had never even imagined it - yet. But stotty cakes are readily available from all local branches of Greggs of Gosforth. Now a nationwide chain, but only sells local goods in local areas, as my daughter discovered when she saw a Greggs wrapper on a bus in Manchester when she went to uni. Was she disappointed when, previously all excited, she went in a branch to purchase some expected comestibles and found there were none!, well, no stotty cakes or other North East goodies. Just tripe butties or black pudding barm cakes or somesuch Lancastrian fare, possibly? Back to the point, if I ever had one, I may try it, I suppose that dahl will be a passable facsimile to pease pudding and would go well with boiled ham?
As to a giant peach, I would not like to take it away from James though, even to make any sort of dahl out of, even Roald.
Keith.
PS What a rotting spel cheker this is, I have had to teach it Greggs, Gosforth, stotty, butties, barm and even dahl, Roald or otherwise.

offcumdum sanddancer
20th December 2007, 23:00
hi phil. always made my hotcakes with flour, water and baking powder,then fried in a little oil, on both sides regards con

Sorry to be awkward connie, but as an engineer and not a professional caterer or chef, just how much flour, water and baking powder is that? or is it a bit, enough, and a pinch?
Stupid question though I suppose, but I leave it for any clarification!
KKeith

Tony D
20th December 2007, 23:33
I must be some kind of grub perv I used to love British Tanker Bubble and Squeak,also loved those tinned sausages that everybody else seemed to hate,alway had plenty available because nobody else wanted them.(Thumb)

connie
21st December 2007, 02:05
Sorry to be awkward connie, but as an engineer and not a professional caterer or chef, just how much flour, water and baking powder is that? or is it a bit, enough, and a pinch?
Stupid question though I suppose, but I leave it for any clarification!
KKeith

hi keith, just dug this recipe out of my dog eared tatty bp recipe book i used whilst at sea for hotcakes. 8ooz flour(200g)
1oz(25g) baking powder
4oz(100g)milkor water (or bit of both)
i also used to add 2oz(50g) of sultanas/cheese and onion/cooked rice as the mood took me, c. u .r .a sandancer, alas i am a mackem lol. spend a morning last boxing day taking a walk along the pier at s. shields froze the proverbials off, on coming ashore i took my city and guilds and am now employed as a proffesional chef at a well known north east venue. regards con.

offcumdum sanddancer
21st December 2007, 13:20
hi keith, just dug this recipe out of my dog eared tatty bp recipe book i used whilst at sea for hotcakes. 8ooz flour(200g)
1oz(25g) baking powder
4oz(100g)milkor water (or bit of both)
i also used to add 2oz(50g) of sultanas/cheese and onion/cooked rice as the mood took me, c. u .r .a sandancer, alas i am a mackem lol. spend a morning last boxing day taking a walk along the pier at s. shields froze the proverbials off, on coming ashore i took my city and guilds and am now employed as a proffesional chef at a well known north east venue. regards con.

Thanks for that connie, I think it very important to get real, tried recipes on this board before we all disappear. Or is that either rather worthy or just sad? Looking forward to seeing the other original recipes that you have. Is the recipe book your personal hand written book, or a real BP supplied book?
Keith

offcumdum sanddancer
21st December 2007, 13:25
I must be some kind of grub perv I used to love British Tanker Bubble and Squeak,also loved those tinned sausages that everybody else seemed to hate,alway had plenty available because nobody else wanted them.(Thumb)

Tony, I must be 'strange' also, as I also loved the tinned sausages. Square-ish in cross section were they not? ( I must be strange as I have always liked airline food)
Keith

trotterdotpom
21st December 2007, 13:59
Keith, you're talking my language - square sausages covered in tinned tomatoes. You don't get that kind of nosh on the Champs Elysses.

Get your daughter home quick before she starves on that Lancashire muck - unless she can hop over to Liverpool and get a plate of Scouse (poor man's Panackelty).

John T.

Phil Williams
3rd March 2008, 03:50
The one dish that was unfailingly good, no matter how indifferent the rest of the catering, was pea and ham soup! Another treat which always appeared at Christmas was Melton Mowbray pork pie. Happy Days!!

Phil.

trotterdotpom
3rd March 2008, 04:28
Phil, if you look in Wikipedia, it tells you how they get the 29 foot long egg into a Melton Mowbay pie, thereby ensuring there is a bit of egg in the middle of every slice.

Don't forget the sippets in the pea soup.

John T.

offcumdum sanddancer
3rd March 2008, 20:54
Phil, if you look in Wikipedia, it tells you how they get the 29 foot long egg into a Melton Mowbay pie, thereby ensuring there is a bit of egg in the middle of every slice.

Don't forget the sippets in the pea soup.

John T.

But why were they called sippets, I now would call them croutons! Or was that something different?

Keith

trotterdotpom
4th March 2008, 00:15
Don't know, Keith, they just were! Croutons are the same thing as far as I can see. It's a bit like they call pancakes crepe but they're quite nice really.

John T.

Frankal
4th March 2008, 11:14
From Google
In the most general sense, sippets are simply cubes of bread that have been crisped up to provide a textural contrast to a dish, usually a soup or salad. As always however, there are sippets and there are good sippets. The latter are those that you make yourself.

Once made sippets will keep for a week or two in an airtight container to scatter at will. If you choose good quality, stale bread and flavour the oil with garlic and herbs, the sippets will not only add textural interest, but extra flavour at the same time.

These tasty morsels differ from other crisp bread treats such as croutons and bruschetta. The former are thin discs of bread that are dried in the oven, the latter a delicious Italian snack of garlic rubbed slices of ciabatta (Italian country loaf), grilled and topped with a flavorsome tomato and basil mixture.

beverlonian
9th March 2008, 20:46
My recollection is that sippets were sliced-up squares of toast whilst croutons were fried bread.

Cream was always conny-onny!

JamesM
10th March 2008, 23:31
It was the "Cheese Beano" that did it.I have only just joined this site, but have been reading the various comments on BP Catering for the last few days.
I can remember the"CB" and other exotic concoctions, but does anybody remember " Kromesky a la Ruse "(already mentioned), "Sealed Orders" and "Ox tail Jardinere".
The last always came with a layer of grease floating on the top.(No wonder I had trouble with my arteries a few years later.)
JamesM.

benjidog
11th March 2008, 00:26
James,

There is already a thread with a near-identical title so I am merging your new thread with it.

Regards,

Brian

JamesM
9th April 2008, 17:49
Has anyone come across " Tinned Pickled Brussel Sprouts"?? Remember seeing these on the menu when I was on the Br.Maple, Nigerian Coast. Don't think there were many takers, maybe just a "gannet" Eng/Cadet.

derekhore
9th April 2008, 18:49
That has to be a first!!

You hadn't been on the Van Der Hum by any chance? :D

JamesM
10th April 2008, 10:29
No, did'nt like the stuff, too sweet. Bear in mind that we were on the Nigerian coast running Lagos/Okrika. We had trouble getting water never mind decent stores.
Only thing that there were plenty of was " Jungle Bunnies ".( No personal experience, I hasten to add - had the missus with me)

derekhore
11th April 2008, 16:41
Bet they went down a treat!! .. casseroled....with a tin of brussel sprouts and a dollop of Smash (Jester) !!

JamesM
15th April 2008, 00:11
They were'nt for eating------- they were for treating, if you get my drift!!

I believe that a few of the crew treated themselves, and were treated in turn, to a visit to the Docs when we eventually got to Durban.

derekhore
15th April 2008, 18:34
They were'nt for eating------- they were for treating, if you get my drift!!



Often wondered where the expression.... "trick or treat" came from!!! (Jester)

JamesM
16th April 2008, 14:10
It was more like " trick and treatment".

There was a rumour that the 4/E found a "Jungle Bunny" in his cabin when he came off watch.( This was the lad who was on the Crusader when she had the incident with an Acoustic Mine off the Indian Coast-----see my posting under British Crusader 1954).But he unfortunately could'nt "Rise to the occasion", so there were no "bangs" that night.

Sorry, could'nt resist that pun.

Steve Hodges
24th April 2008, 17:49
Anyone remember those big catering toasters that were installed in the officers pantry, stainless steel things with horizontal sliding trays?
One time when anchored up the top of the Gulf, we had seen the Indian crew fishing with some success, so me and my mate decided to have ago at midnight when we came up from down the pit. We caught a couple of catfish, and having had a few beers, decided to fillet them and cook them in the pantry toaster. We put them on the trays, with pepper and salt and lots of butter, and shoved them in. Unfortunately the fillets curled up and touched the elements, setting fire to the butter and the fish and making an awful stink. We had a helluva job getting them out and cleaning up the "evidence", all the time thinking that the smell and smoke was bound to wake up half the midships sleepers. Hardly a "culinary triumph" I know, but I still remember it after thirty-odd years!

peter83
24th April 2008, 18:05
Does anyone remember "Beef A la Mode" with BP - Beef stuffed with carrots. My wife dosn't believe me. Also I havn't set eyes on "Garfield" potatos since my MN days

Peter

JamesM
15th May 2008, 17:51
peter83,
Yes I remember "Beef a la Mode", interesting and usually quite nice.For a change.
One cook told me that a first trip Galley-Boy asked how they got the carrots into the meat, and was told that it was done by a special gun that the Engineers had made.Apparently he was most impressed.

Well, he was a first tripper!!

And "Garfield Potatoes", I used to love them.Nobody whom I've asked shoreside has ever heard of them.

Just a lot of Culinary Heathens.(Eat)

JamesM

freddythefrog
15th May 2008, 18:43
I missed out there!! I did not get any after being up the radar mast in the middle of the night up the skaggerak with icicles hanging off the rails
and hands turning blue with cold on the "Crusader", the things we used to do
to stop em getting lost!!HEE-HEE. the good old days----great times.ftf

twogrumpy
15th May 2008, 21:00
Ah, the mention of Van Der Hum.
We would have a dash of it in the coffee at morning smoko on one of
the 50's.
twogrumpy

beatlesfab4
15th May 2008, 23:19
China chillo and kromeski a la rouse did it for me every time with shell.(Jester)

albert.s.i
16th May 2008, 10:42
i joined the british drummer in 1951 and had for breakfast bergu bacon and egg curried salmon and rice all the time i was on her left 1953 then british bulldog the same thing for 12 months then british soldier british crown it seemed to me a standing order and not forgetting regular servings of kedgery at tea time there were no complaints and i thrived on it cheers albert .s.i

jAdUwallah
17th May 2008, 20:15
I can't remember where we were now, but we strung a fishing line out ,and attached to an electric capstain. YEY, we caught a shark, about 12ft long. SO the sharks is thrashing around on deck, we all **** out and legged it one way as Indian crew came the other way....armed with hammers and knives. It was a great curry that night.

david freeman
17th May 2008, 20:30
There's a thread running on the Brocklebank forum titled "spam fritters". It then goes on to list some "universal" ? MN dishes.

My abiding memory is the "cheese beano", what about the rest of you? We managed bacon for breakfast every day during my time (1970 - 86) but I believe curry and kedgeree featured on the breakfast menu not long before that.

Food's generally pretty good on the offshore vessels I go to these days, but obviously a bit limited by local supplies - I don't think there's too much choice in the Luanda branch of Asda!

(==D) Mutton Al mode, boiled mutton, roast mutton, and old lamb, Curried lamb, plus past your eyes Mutton if you can guess how it was cooked? It has ruined my taste buds for any lamd dish

Burned Toast
17th May 2008, 20:59
That's a new one on me pickled sprouts, learn every day

DAVELECKIE
27th May 2008, 21:53
Hi Trevor.
Sounds like the dish Fresh Sardines Masala.
Try this : (Recipe for 12)
3. Kg Fresh Sardines. 10 grms Ajinimoto, 28 Grms Chilli powder, 28 Grms Tumeric,,28 Grms White Pepper 14. Grms Salt, 2 Fluid Oz Malt Vinegar, 3 Nos Garlic Gloves, ( Finely chopped) 1 Nos Egg.( Beaten)

Wash Sardines and place in a dish with the Salt and Ajinimoto. Mix the chopped Garlic with the remaining dry ingredients and moisten with the vinegar until a smooth past is obtained.
Evenly coat each Sardine with the paste and allow to marinade for at least 30 minutes.
Just before cooking mix in the egg.
Lay on an oiled tray and Grill or fry in a pan which contains a little oil.

Norman( Grocer)

Only just registered on this forum but seeing the "legend" Norman Stitts name, also Dave Fothergill in this thread forced me to post.
Sailed with both these gentleman, never did me any harm!
Hope you are both keeping well.

Dave Edworthy

kevjacko
15th June 2008, 21:13
I left BP as a chief cook in 1988 last ship was Br Security, First was Br Dragoon in 1981, great times they were. The cheese beano was the bane of my life because of the ribbing I got off the pool lads while doing my cooks tickets at South shields college. I vowed when I went 2nd cook I would never make them, chief cook (Mick Winter and chief steward Alan Brown) put them on the menu one day. I flatly refused to comply and make them resulting in a scrambled menu change at the last minute. Oh how I laughed as cookie lost his temper. I have just joined this forum and would love to hear from anyone who rembers or knows me. KEV JACKSON

EBenarty
15th June 2008, 21:26
Four Bells is widely available in Shetland and a fine dram it is !!!

john fraser
15th June 2008, 21:52
Four Bells is widely available in Shetland and a fine dram it is !!!
Hi Billy.
In the early sixties Watsons 15.u.p with a Black Label on the bottle was the favoured rum then of the North boat crews.Don,t know if it is still available.

secondcook
10th September 2008, 09:25
I also have very fond memories of the Cheese Beano.

Another dish I liked at the time was kidneys on toast(!)
Unlike the cheese beano, I can't even start to recreate this dish (there was some sort of gravy/sauce involved IIRC).
Any recipes or clues welcome!

Ron

secondcook knows-Ox or pig kidney 1/2 inch dice /sweat down with fine chopped onion with a little oil/add 2oz plain flour to make a roux/add 1 pint of water slowly to aviod lumps/add salt /pepper/6 drips tobasco/good shake of wostersauce/simmer for 10 /15 minutes/few drops of gavey browning .Thats it ,oh dont forget the toast.ps if you carnt get gravey browning use a little bisto or granules but mind the thickness. Good luck(Thumb)

secondcook
10th September 2008, 10:29
Does anyone remember "Beef A la Mode" with BP - Beef stuffed with carrots. My wife dosn't believe me. Also I havn't set eyes on "Garfield" potatos since my MN days

Peter

secondcook knows-Beef-al-a-mode-you need one large silerside beef joint/carrots/whole onions. With a sharpening steel make some holes in the beef /push in the whole carrots[preped of cource]/braise in beef stock for 20mins per pound wieght, plus 20mins.The idea was that when the joint is sliced for service it looks very pretty with the carrots running through it (Thumb)

trotterdotpom
10th September 2008, 12:39
I always thought the cow was killed by being shot with carrots - another memory shot to bits.

John T.

kevjacko
27th September 2008, 10:33
secondcook knows-Beef-al-a-mode-you need one large silerside beef joint/carrots/whole onions. With a sharpening steel make some holes in the beef /push in the whole carrots[preped of cource]/braise in beef stock for 20mins per pound wieght, plus 20mins.The idea was that when the joint is sliced for service it looks very pretty with the carrots running through it (Thumb)

Ah Garfield potatoes (square chips) what fun I had as a galley boy cooking them. Along with Duchess potatoes, marquise potatoes, creamed potatoes, lyonnaise potatoes, sauted potatoes, champed potatoes, roast potatoes, spanish potatoes, jacket potatoes, swiss jacket potatoes, parsley boiled potatoes...... I could go on, BP chief stewards were masters of the potato dish and I was convinced it took them longer to think up what spuds to put on the menu than it did to compile the whole bloody thing put together. Until that is I went chief cook and realised it was only an excuse for chief steward and cookie to crack open another beer whilst discussing the job.

connie
27th September 2008, 12:25
you forgot parissiane, kev (Litte marbles) aways remember as a 1st trip bp galley boy neil heaviside grocer, torturing me with them.as i had no electric spud peeler, and the spuds were the size of peas, deep fried steamed boiled etc, and he would put them on every other day,((funny how you remember the name of your tormenter, and forget the g8 guys lol ) still havnt managed to escape from the humble spud, we do a lot of weddings where the meal is plated and the meal regened, and im for ever doing fondant, and dauphoine (spelling) regards, regards con.

kevjacko
27th September 2008, 20:01
Just when I thought I'd managed to blank them things psychologicaly to the dustbin of my mind, Why oh why were they always on the bloody Christmas menu. First chief cook I sailed with on the Br Dragoon (Hugh Duggan) would'nt let me use the electric peeler and chips had to be cut by hand. Your right on that score you always remember the tormentors. It was a bloody relief when he paid off and the next cook looked at me as if I was insane when I started peeling spuds by hand when there was a perfectly usable rumbler there. KEV

BigNick
16th October 2008, 12:17
My first trip was British Hawthorn, July 77-Jan 78. The Indian crew were pulling cod out of Rejkavik harbour just months after the Cod War, brilliant. We also feasted on fresh yellowtail tuna that they fished with trailing lines from the stern rail as we crossed the line down to Pointe Noire. Was the Chiefy Steward you Rob Norrie?

Also sailed with a Chief Stewrad with a sense of humour, whenever we had rabbit it was always 'fresh spring bunny', wonderfully non-PC.

Kevjacko, may have sailed with you on the Dragoon, if not must have just missed.

Off to cook myself a Beano, how could i have forgotten such a delight!

kevjacko
17th October 2008, 21:26
Hi Big Nick. Joined her as galley boy 22nd Oct 81 paid off 16TH f

kevjacko
17th October 2008, 21:32
BLOODY COMPUTER

Meant to say paid off 16th Feb 82. Skippers were R Towel & T marrs. Got logged first day on board for going ashore in Hamburg and neglecting to return in time to serve evening meal ( a penance well worth paying). Not many of have such a cracking start to their sea going career. Funny old ship the Dragoon but my memories are fond. There were some real old characters on there, many who will still be around. Would be interesting to find out where they all ended up.

tankerman2
23rd October 2008, 16:06
Speaking of BP food.
Anyone remember tinned sausages.
You could always tell these from standard ones that seamed to run out a week after leaving port. They where shaped like a Toblerone so they could all fit in the tin.

tankerman2
23rd October 2008, 16:08
Sailed on the Drgoon as 3rd engineer during 1973 lightering up and down the Channel

kevjacko
25th October 2008, 12:30
I remember tinned sausages, or Oxford sausage some Chief Stewards used to call them to give them a posh name. God knows what was in them, however in those days 'cholesterol' was something you did your dobbying in and hang the consequences from the yard arm haha. Anybody remember the disgusting baked beans you used to take on board in Hamburg which for some quaint reason had a lump of pork fat floating at the top of the tin when opened them.

Roy Fox
26th October 2008, 13:04
I spent 3 years on Indian crew BT ships '48 to 52. Curry was certainly on the menu for every meal. In fact I don't remember any alternatives!
Roy

fishcake
9th November 2008, 11:41
Paid off in Lagos, Spent two nights in a crappy hotel waiting for the agent to bribe the officials to arannge a flight home. First night tried the Mock Chicken. It turned out to be a lump of sausage meat or something with a chicken bone sticking out of it to look like a chicken drummer. Ate the veg and lived on tomato soup until i got on a flight. Loved the meal on the B Cal flight home.

OllieUK
15th December 2008, 22:07
All seamen will have their own memories & stories of the ships, places, and of who they sailed with. Some of these stories will be told over and over with pride that they had served in that particular ship, others will be jogged back into memory when they read through forums such as this. After reading through this thread, I have been taken back to 1966 when I first sailed out of Milford Haven ( Pembroke ) on the British Mariner. at the time British Argosy was the largest ship in the fleet although British Admiral was the flag ship. I can see in my minds eye the crew I sailed with although their names have long faded, and instead of going on a 3 week trip we ended up going through the Suez to the gulf, and back round the cape making it a 8 week trip.
Cheese Beano's, Kromeski's, Durham Cutlets, Kidney Tobago, Boston Baked Beans, Square Sausage (Lifeboat rations) Kedgeree, Nasi Goering, Coni Oni, and Shaky Milk, have all long since evaporated from my menu cycle as I've carried on producing culinary delights chefing into the 21st century shore side working environment. (egg)
BP Ships I sailed on
British Mariner - 1966 - 1967
British Signal - 1968
British Cavalier -1969
British Patrol - 1970
British Kestrel - 1971
British Patrol - 1972
British Kestrel - 1972
British Tay - 1973

Steve Hodges
21st December 2008, 23:30
Kidney tobago!! I'd forgotten that! Anyone remember the recipe, I really enjoyed kidney tobago.

kevjacko
22nd December 2008, 23:19
There was a variety of ways to make kidney tobago Steve. The main thing to know however is that the spiced flavour came from either mustard, tobasco, chilli, and worcester sauce to tase. Knock youself a gravy up, sautee some kidneys (fry them in a bit of butter) with a chopped onion. add the spicey bits that tickle yer fancy and a bit of tomato puree, then stick the gravy in. Allow to simmer a tadge before serving on toast, or with rice, or chips, or mash, or jacket spud, or....... well you get the drift

Good luck

KEV

Lksimcoe
23rd December 2008, 15:48
Can I ask what Kedgeree is?

kevjacko
23rd December 2008, 19:54
Smoked fish mainly, in rice. Again done to a variety of ways. Quite often served at breakfast. I think it's origins were from the days of the indian empire but could be wrong on that one. Spice up a bit of fried rice with curry powder, add a couple of roughly chopped boiled eggs, and fresh tomatoes. Add your cooked fish and thats it basically. Feel free to expand by adding onions or peppers fry them first in a bit of oil, add a bit of curry powder then the rice and fish.

Sarky Cut
23rd December 2008, 20:26
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kedgeree

All you will ever need to know about kedgeree.

Steve Hodges
28th December 2008, 19:48
There was a variety of ways to make kidney tobago Steve. The main thing to know however is that the spiced flavour came from either mustard, tobasco, chilli, and worcester sauce to tase. Knock youself a gravy up, sautee some kidneys (fry them in a bit of butter) with a chopped onion. add the spicey bits that tickle yer fancy and a bit of tomato puree, then stick the gravy in. Allow to simmer a tadge before serving on toast, or with rice, or chips, or mash, or jacket spud, or....... well you get the drift

Good luck

KEV

Cheers, Kev! Next time the missus is away and I have to do me own scran, I'll be having a go!(Thumb)

Minto
29th December 2008, 10:52
When I was on BP tankers in the late 60's it was available in one pub in Pembroke I think it was called the York & one pub in Garelochhead. On board it was issued for reward after nasty jobs.Deck crew received it after tank cleaning. Engine room got it after boiler shutdowns & scavenger cleaning. I still have my ironstone mug with houseflag on.

Minto
29th December 2008, 11:30
Ollie UK. We must have sailed together!! I joined the Mariner for my first trip on 9th December 1966. As you said,we were told three weeks to either Banyas or Tripoli. Change of orders Minah-Al-Ahmadi. Arrived in Mina new years day 1967 my 17th birthday.My name is Les.Minchella I was engine room boy. What is your name & what was your job? Catering boys were Archie from Cumbernauld & Laurie from Port Talbot.

OllieUK
29th December 2008, 19:29
I was the galley boy. it was on that ship that my name got changed from Lawrie to Ollie. Most of the crew were scotsmen and took delight in poking their heads through the galley door, scratching their heads and repeating the phrase "That's another fine mess you got me into - Ollie" a name which has stuck to me, too this day. [=P]

rodhaigh
14th January 2009, 14:49
Read this thread through and I'm amazed at the memories of some of the contributors. I thought I only remembered the poor tack that was served up in many of the vessels I served in.
My first ship (Br. Caution 1956) had a Pakistani crew with Goanese caterers and I learned to love curries (never heard of them in blackest Yorkshire as a lad) for breakfast, dinner and tea.
The 'european' tucker was plentiful but mostly not v. nice. I sort of twigged when I was helping the 3rd mate with the stores and saw that much of the food aboard had the re-assuring Board of Trade certification "Certified fit for consumption in HM Prisons and Merchant Vessels" or somesuch.
I don't recall the standard of the fare improving in ships with British crews, in fact it could have been worse as the curries weren't as good.
Sailed from Hamburg on the "Curlew" and the first night out there was some wonderful german jam on the table instead of the usual B.o.T port and starboard jam. It was never seen again. The reason I was given..you're eating too much of it!
Arrived in Kwinana on the "Corporal" after several months on the Indian coast, looking forward to some good fresh food. It lasted about 4 days and we were back to the stuff from India. Rumour had it that the stores which arrived in the morning, left again that evening under cover of darkness.
My first Australian ship was a revelation. The fridge was unlocked, you could eat whatever you wanted, whenever you wanted it (if you cooked it yourself), what a change from having a corned beef sandwich in greasproof paper left out for supper.
I haven't griped about BP food for 40 yrs and here I am like grumpy old men.
The thread has also brought some good memories of some of the culinary delights, that wonderful dhal curry. Got the recipe and will try to make some shortly. Kedgeree for b'fast and devilled kidneys, good stuff.
What happened to that breed of chicken, served for Sunday lunch, which had one breast and 17 legs?:sweat:
Met an ex Bank boat guy the other week and we were discussing how the carrots got into the Beef a la Mode. Now I know.
Never heard of a 'cheese beano' but I'm going to have one on Sat. morning.
It couldn't all have been bad could it?
Best regards to you all
Rod H(Frogger)

Geoff_E
14th January 2009, 16:23
I haven't griped about BP food for 40 yrs and here I am like grumpy old men.
(Frogger)

You're in the right place here Rod, this is definitely a forum for "Grumpy Old Men", some of us practise in our spare time!(Thumb)

JohnBP
14th January 2009, 16:29
While on the 4 to 8 am watch in the enginroom I always looked forward to my "curry breakfast" wraped in a chapiti.... The Indian cook's assistant would bring it down about 7am right to the control station..... mmmm curry

trucker
14th January 2009, 17:45
While on the 4 to 8 am watch in the enginroom I always looked forward to my "curry breakfast" wraped in a chapiti.... The Indian cook's assistant would bring it down about 7am right to the control station..... mmmm curry
i t hought the 4-8 watch at sea meant a full 4 hour watch.not 4-8 watch including breakfast.(EEK) sure it wasn,t a mc donalds sail through.2/E should have been showing an example.

fishcake
14th January 2009, 19:06
As a first trip cadet I was put on the 8 - 12 watch with the 4th Eng. I could never get up in time for breakfast and about 8.15 am the 2nd Eng would appear in the control room awaiting me to make him coffee whilst he was eating a bacon toastie. I've never wished for a bacon toastie as much as in those mornings.

derekhore
15th January 2009, 19:36
As a Deck Cadet I did my engine room time on the 'Admiral'. They used to do 8 hours on...16 hours off, and I did the 20.00 - 04.00 with the 2nd Eng.
Every night was jacket potatoes done on the steam pipes...along with anything else we could find to steam heat!!
If there were enough, we would send them up in the lift to the bar .. and in return some cold softies were sent back down!!

JohnBP
15th January 2009, 19:44
Being from Glasgow I was already in love with curry, I had never heard of McDonalds other than the sond "Old McDonals had a cow........."

Steve Hodges
18th January 2009, 23:26
As a Deck Cadet I did my engine room time on the 'Admiral'. They used to do 8 hours on...16 hours off, and I did the 20.00 - 04.00 with the 2nd Eng.
Every night was jacket potatoes done on the steam pipes...along with anything else we could find to steam heat!!
If there were enough, we would send them up in the lift to the bar .. and in return some cold softies were sent back down!!

20:00-0400 - best ER watch ever! Used to do it as 3E on the "P" boats when they were running manned. Never saw the Chief or Second, nobody bothered you, plod away with your own PMs all night in the cool, and around midnight a big fry up in the workshop using the big blowtorch. Straight into the scratcher at 0415, sleep through till lunch, bit of bronzy in the afternoon, a beer before dinner, turn in with a full stomach for an hour's kip before watch again. Marvellous watch as long as you were not a "social animal". I loved it, never wanted to go back onto UMS.

Satanic Mechanic
23rd February 2009, 16:44
Don't ever attempt to make cheese beanos at home - they just don't work. Neither do 'Swiss slices' . I haven't seen the mysterious Board of trade Standard breakfast 'hotcake' for years which leads me to suspect they have finally been outlawed.

Thankfully the old ways have not totally gone with pantries still being supplied with a festering cloth and an 8 year old jar of roll mop herrings as standard.

Can I also just take this moment to make a special and tear filled mention of Norman 'bring em back alive but only just' Stitts' famous chicken giblet soup.

Ingredients water and giblets. Hell of a nice guy Norman but terrible at soup - did a mean bread and better pudding though

tsell
24th February 2009, 10:00
While on the 4 to 8 am watch in the enginroom I always looked forward to my "curry breakfast" wraped in a chapiti.... The Indian cook's assistant would bring it down about 7am right to the control station..... mmmm curry


Lot's of curry memories from this thread John!
The best curry I have ever tasted was made by a Cornishman on the 'British Caution' early 50's. As a starving young EDH I would garner an extra plate or two from other crew at breakfast! Hence the nickname BLOODY PIG!
Never having eaten curry at home I found I couldn't get enough of this new taste. So much so that on my next ship I would go below with the Lascar stokers who when off watch made their own on a little stove. The crew thought I was bloody nuts and said I should watch my a*se down there. But they, the Lascars, were pleased see me enjoy their fantastic curries and we became great shipmates, much to the annoyance of the deck crew who didn't mix with them, sadly.

Taffy R556959[=P]

ernhelenbarrett
25th February 2009, 11:43
On the British Gratitude/MAGQ we had Curry and Rice for Breakfast and what was left we had for lunch the next day. If you wanted any more you were told to bring back what you've got left !!That was in 1954. We were on the Scandinavian run up to North Cape, Tromso Trondheim etc or round to Sundsvaal in Sweden so varied our meals by catching lots of herring !!
Salaams Ern Barrett

kevjacko
1st March 2009, 10:46
Anyone remember 'Canadian Minced beef pie' essentialy mince pie with baked beans in it. I have a Canadian friend who looked at me as if I had done a couple of cape crawls to many when I asked him if there was such a thing. Tell you what though the kids love it, and never mind food being a way to a mans heart, it guarantees a promise off the missus when I make it.

Lets not forget the Forfar bridies, Mince pastie's with peas in, I have heard a rumour these are native to Forfar but I've never had the pleasure of visiting Forfar so I don't know for sure, Dundee's the nearest I got, and Dammned if I was going to spend a fortune in a taxi just to find out whether they put pea's in their pasties or not.

Tara for now I'm away to knock up a batch of Canadian minced beef aphrodisiacs for my easy pleased missus.

LOL

Dickyboy
21st May 2009, 22:52
Four Bells..standard issue after tank-cleaning.

Our issue of Four Bells after the tank cleaning was about half a tumbler full, which had to be knocked straight back, and the tumbler handed back to the Bosun, then a quick "Thank's Bose" before the croak in the throat developed. The mickey was taken if one croaked/gasped or spluttered the "Thanks Bose" :o

Dickyboy
21st May 2009, 23:13
Paid off in Lagos, Spent two nights in a crappy hotel waiting for the agent to bribe the officials to arannge a flight home. First night tried the Mock Chicken. It turned out to be a lump of sausage meat or something with a chicken bone sticking out of it to look like a chicken drummer. Ate the veg and lived on tomato soup until i got on a flight. Loved the meal on the B Cal flight home.


I paid off in Lagos on 18/06/75 off the Trent. Stayed in a lousy hotel that seemed to be in the jungle. Manager wanted me to sleep in a bed with another bloke. Laughed when we refused. Girls offering Gig a Gig through the windows all night, and a local dish to eat, goat stew I think, but very hot with chilli or curry. Foul stuff. Also heavy penalties for taking currency out of the country, even our own hard earned dosh.

Dickyboy
21st May 2009, 23:21
Anyone remember Kahdoomah??? Curry & Rice? As I recall it contained sausage.
On one trip I had the curry every day. A tradition on all BP tankers, a daily curry I believe.

fishcake
25th May 2009, 00:50
Just watched a woman cook poached eggs on TV. Reminded me that in the saloon at breakfast, if you asked for poached eggs, it seemed to make the catering staff have tantrums, so much so that it was deemed taboo to ask for such a delicacy. Did anyone else notice this occurance, and if anyone reading this were catering staff could they explain this?

Old Janner
26th May 2009, 08:32
No problems on the BP tankers I sailed on, apart from bad weather. Poached eggs were normally done in an old omelette pan, small amount of water a wee touch of Vinegar to help them hold then just wait for 4 / 5 minutes to let them set, However I requested poached egg pans with plastic cups and got them no problem, these turned out good poached eggs every time.

Fried eggs, poached eggs, boiled eggs,(boiled eggs depended on how you wanted them, soft, semi soft or hard) omelettes all very easy to cook, just depended on who the cook was!!!

Old Janner
26th May 2009, 08:59
Don't ever attempt to make cheese beanos at home - they just don't work. Neither do 'Swiss slices' . I haven't seen the mysterious Board of trade Standard breakfast 'hotcake' for years which leads me to suspect they have finally been outlawed.

Thankfully the old ways have not totally gone with pantries still being supplied with a festering cloth and an 8 year old jar of roll mop herrings as standard.

Can I also just take this moment to make a special and tear filled mention of Norman 'bring em back alive but only just' Stitts' famous chicken giblet soup.

Ingredients water and giblets. Hell of a nice guy Norman but terrible at soup - did a mean bread and better pudding though

'Hot Cakes' brings back memmories, we made them with plain flour and baking powder, just to make them different we added yellow colouring and a follow on to that was add cooked rice and callled it rice cake.
One old chief steward I sailed with (Reggie Brown) had a big thing about us cooks using eggs for any type of cooking, all we got was Baking powder!! I used to make omellets for 47 Crew only using his recipe and 22 eggs, hard times (stupid times).
One of his BOT recipies was a "Spanish Pastie" plain pastry made with flour and water, cut out into rounds, then add cooked rice, small chopped onions and tomatoes, seal up like a pastie, then deep fry it!
Curry's, nothing nicer than a day old curry for breakfast up in Tromso in the Winter, we used more curry than we did cooked eggs.

bplegs
26th May 2009, 17:16
Geoff,
You remember a Cat Off by the name of Dave Fothergill? Only retired the other year. That man must have made the best tabnabs in the fleet, always a joy to have him onboard as the standard of food went right up.
That was, provided the Officers bar kept him topped up with lager.
LOL

Jim,

Dave was the catering Officer on the British Wye when I joined her late 1989. I later served with him again on the Northwest Shearwater, If anything his food had improved beyond imagination! I always felt sorry for any Catering Officer following Dave, his standards was so amazingly high. Makes me hungry just to think of the food he served!

Regards
Em

i.cossey
26th May 2009, 18:04
How come a Cat. Off. was making tab nabs, all my time at sea we had a chief cook and a 2nd cook and baker, I've never seen a Cat Off do much at all leaving it all to the 2nd Stwd. (puts on tin hat and ducks down behind the sandbags)

Satanic Mechanic
27th May 2009, 10:59
It was just Dave's thing.

There were two Cat/Os kept on in sea going positions Dave Fothergill and Ian Macintosh - both brilliant but different. Ian had 'opinions' on tab nabs (Jester) but his food was also ace and in huge quantities.

James_C
27th May 2009, 11:17
SM,
'Papa Dave' had quite an impressive recipe book. Wasn't there some story about a Filipino C/Cook opening a pizza shop or suchlike which he called 'Papa Daves' and used some of his recipes?
Last time I sailed with Dave was on the Skill, with his partner in crime being Terry Lowe (Tel)!

Satanic Mechanic
27th May 2009, 11:43
SM,
'Papa Dave' had quite an impressive recipe book. Wasn't there some story about a Filipino C/Cook opening a pizza shop or suchlike which he called 'Papa Daves' and used some of his recipes?
Last time I sailed with Dave was on the Skill, with his partner in crime being Terry Lowe (Tel)!

I used to have a copy of his book - well his CD Rom - only problem was all the quantities were for 10 or 20 people.

As far I know he was last working on the ferries out of hull - i'll have to check with the scouse mafia.

Ian apparently got married and has a hotel up fraserburgh way

James_C
27th May 2009, 11:56
I think he managed to break his leg in Singapore in 2006 after bringing an Ity boat down from Korea, that was his last trip before 'retirement' from BP.
As I remember he would appear on the bridge just before 10 every morning with a fresh plate of tabnabs, sometimes in the afternoon too.

tom roberts
27th May 2009, 12:06
As deck boy on British Supremacey April 1954 ate every thing put before me after Indefatigable and 3 weeks on a Savages coaster every meal was a banquet and the joy of having whole tins of melon jam to myself as no one else seemed to care for it pure heaven. The chief cook was Polish called every one billy made wonderfull meals out of Port Said potatoes that were like marbles and frankfurters the second cook and baker I think his name was Mc Cabe made the best bread I have ever tasted, after all these years I have finally found melon jam again in France Im off there tomorrow for 6 weeks and besides stocking up on my wines I will make sure of replenishing the larder with melon jam.The wife thinks Im nuts but at my time of life who cares when I have my melon jam butties Im 16 again still dreaming of one more trip.

derekhore
28th May 2009, 12:10
Only Cat/Off I remember going into the galley was called Dougie Black, on the Unity .. and that was because he had a 'thing' going with the 2nd Steward ... a certain TB Walls (Thomas Beverly) - call me 'mother' !!

Dickyboy
2nd June 2009, 13:48
I remember being on a jetty somewhere, and on the other side of the jetty was a Shell tanker of a similar type to us.
A friendly banter ensued between the crews of the two ships as to which company was best. Both crews thought their company was best of course, but the argument was finally won when we asked the Shell ship how many eggs they could have at breakfast. There answer was a singular "Egg To Order" on the menu, ours menu stated a plural "Eggs to Order"
Obviously BP had the better fleet. Argument over!(==D)

SAB
2nd June 2009, 14:35
Does anyone remember the "Cape Dinners" on BPs VLCCs sailing at slow speed around the Cape during the Suez closure to the gulf ? Some of these were spectacular events as was the after dinner party in the bar.

johnb8219
2nd June 2009, 14:49
And that was obviously the start of BPs problems, when the (egg)Shell heads started to come across to BP, thats when the exodus started.

They all left Shell because it wasn't that good, then started to implement their Shell ways on us.

And keeping with the culinary theme of this thread, Arecipe for disaster(Cloud)

K urgess
2nd June 2009, 14:57
Try this link, SAB.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=26644
A whole thread about cape dinners.

Pat Thompson
2nd June 2009, 15:24
Greetings,

Call me an old cynic but I always got the impression that if a dish had a place name attached it was probably something from the bottom of the deep freeze. e.g Living all my life in County Durham (except when I was at sea) I had never heard of a "Durham Cutlet", curry, be it Madras, Bombay or Tricomalee was always exactly the same....ie Brown. Dutch apple pie, apple pie with sultanas, the nearest it ever got to Holland being the flour from the Rotterdam Ship "Swindler". Welsh Rarebit....Cardiff Virgins now you probably never find one of those in South Wales.

However we did thrive on it, some of us a little more than was good for us.

kevjacko
3rd June 2009, 01:05
Just watched a woman cook poached eggs on TV. Reminded me that in the saloon at breakfast, if you asked for poached eggs, it seemed to make the catering staff have tantrums, so much so that it was deemed taboo to ask for such a delicacy. Did anyone else notice this occurance, and if anyone reading this were catering staff could they explain this?

Nah fishcake. Did poached eggs every day, unless it was rolling badly then the dam things ended up on the stove top. Never had a problem doing any egg for breakfast unless someone asked for a bloody omelete. Then it was monkey see monkey bloody want. Now that boiled my piss......LOL

The thing with being in the Galley was that you were on show 3 times a day. Breakfast, Lunch, Evening meal. No other department was under that sort of scrutiny to their fellow shipmates. Yes I know The engines had to stop and start and the ship had to steer in the right direction, but let's put things into perspective here, nobody starved if a wee bollock was dropped down below (unless of course it turned into a bigger bollock and was'nt put right until the ER cadet noticed), or if the ship deviated from her prefered course for a short while. Yes it was tough being a cook.

hughesy
3rd June 2009, 01:30
Well put Kev

all the best
Hughesy

Dickyboy
3rd June 2009, 09:50
Nah fishcake. Did poached eggs every day, unless it was rolling badly then the dam things ended up on the stove top. Never had a problem doing any egg for breakfast unless someone asked for a bloody omelete. Then it was monkey see monkey bloody want. Now that boiled my piss......LOL

The thing with being in the Galley was that you were on show 3 times a day. Breakfast, Lunch, Evening meal. No other department was under that sort of scrutiny to their fellow shipmates. Yes I know The engines had to stop and start and the ship had to steer in the right direction, but let's put things into perspective here, nobody starved if a wee bollock was dropped down below (unless of course it turned into a bigger bollock and was'nt put right until the ER cadet noticed), or if the ship deviated from her prefered course for a short while. Yes it was tough being a cook.

O300, alarms ringing, accomodation full of smoke, legged it to my emergancy station (On the wheel) firefighters deployed with CABA to the galley. Fire extinguished. Some bright spark, no pun intended, had left some bread to dry out on top of an oven or something. The bread caught light and set the deckhead smouldering. A lot of smoke but no real fire, just damage to the deckhead and the cooks ego :o
Who called the Cook a C***? Who called that C*** A Cook? :o
Just Kidding
I always had great respect for the cooks. No air conditioned bridges or engine control rooms for them!

Old Janner
3rd June 2009, 10:21
Does anybody remember the famous BOT pickle barrel ???
Excellent for Cows tongues, belly pork, pork legs and siverside of beef.
I even experimented with shoulder of mutton, but not a big improvement on that.
I remember one time asking in a butchers shop for some mutton chops, to receive a cold stare and was told we don't sell mutton, yet the leg joints looked big to me.

Nick Balls
3rd June 2009, 11:34
Im delighted to hear how you BP chaps eat! I love references to that amazing job . Ships Cook .....................................
Old man (Master)(Father) Old Women ( Mate )(Mother) Cook (Still the Cook)
Oh yes the Chief de cuisine has a difficult job!!! You can't please all the people all the time. No thanks when he gets it right , Total mayhem when he gets it wrong. He does not have the status of Dad or Mum ( Old man, & Mate) ............. But the great ones have the chance to create their own status. Its a very powerful position. !!!
Of all the stories that are written about the sea the best ones include the cook.
A crew can have a Pathalogical Hatred bordering on Murder towards this job .Or a reverence verging on hero worship to the man who can hold the job down.

Old Janner
3rd June 2009, 14:13
No Nick, in my early days as Chief and Ships cook, I was refered to as "Doc" that name has eventually died out. The Chief steward was often known as the Grocer as well as other names that refered to lining of pockets.

Dickyboy
3rd June 2009, 14:28
On one of the BP tankers I was on, complaints (Genuine) about the food were rife. The Chief Cook was truly aweful. There were very many complaints from all departments, via heads of dep't to the Captain about the food. He must have known about it himself of course, as he also had to eat the muck.
Eventually the Captain, on his rounds, visited the galley and as usual tasted the food. The only comment he made to the cook was "This Soup isn't to your usual high standard Chef" The Cook flew home from the next port.
I reckon that was one of the most diplomatic rollockings anyone ever got. I guess that even Captains don't want to rub the cook up the wrong way, even when they are getting rid of him. :o

kevjacko
3rd June 2009, 16:07
O300, alarms ringing, accomodation full of smoke, legged it to my emergancy station (On the wheel) firefighters deployed with CABA to the galley. Fire extinguished. Some bright spark, no pun intended, had left some bread to dry out on top of an oven or something. The bread caught light and set the deckhead smouldering. A lot of smoke but no real fire, just damage to the deckhead and the cooks ego :o
Who called the Cook a C***? Who called that C*** A Cook? :o
Just Kidding
I always had great respect for the cooks. No air conditioned bridges or engine control rooms for them!

Aww now dickyboy, how else were we supposed to dry the breadcrumbs out for your savoury rissoles nd onion gravy. LOL. Bright spark would have been a fleet full of 2nd cooks and bakers, we all did the same thing ha ha

John Cassels
3rd June 2009, 19:23
Ah Kev ; savoury rissoles and onion gravy , the memories come flooding back.
You would'nt care to give us the recipe , would you ..........please .

Dickyboy
3rd June 2009, 20:10
Aww now dickyboy, how else were we supposed to dry the breadcrumbs out for your savoury rissoles nd onion gravy. LOL. Bright spark would have been a fleet full of 2nd cooks and bakers, we all did the same thing ha ha
I forgot to say that the oven had been left on. :o
PS
Me to for the onion gravy, I can never get it right.
I'm divorced and live alone, so some of the old BP recipes would suit me fine, just so long as I didn't have to cook 30+ of everything of course.

kevjacko
5th June 2009, 19:31
I forgot to say that the oven had been left on. :o
PS
Me to for the onion gravy, I can never get it right.
I'm divorced and live alone, so some of the old BP recipes would suit me fine, just so long as I didn't have to cook 30+ of everything of course.


Gents,

Onion gravy ala BP

Fry an onion off in oil (about 3 table spoons) & a knob of butter until they go golden brown.
Add plain flour so the mixture is binding together and just leaving the side of the pan (the roux).
cook this through slowly stirring frequently until it starts to brown slightly.
crumble an oxo into boiling water (about a pint) and add to the roux about a third at a time stirring well and allowing to come back to the boil and thicken between each addition.
Season to taste with salt / pepper and a dash of worcester sauce.
Allow to simmer a short while before serving.

You might have to mess about with the quantities, not used to measuring things out much these days and I was used to doing it as Dickybird rightly said for 30 odd people

John Cassels
6th June 2009, 08:13
Kev , any chance for the savoury rissole reciepe ?.

Dickyboy
6th June 2009, 08:14
Gents,

Onion gravy ala BP

Fry an onion off in oil (about 3 table spoons) & a knob of butter until they go golden brown.
Add plain flour so the mixture is binding together and just leaving the side of the pan (the roux).
cook this through slowly stirring frequently until it starts to brown slightly.
crumble an oxo into boiling water (about a pint) and add to the roux about a third at a time stirring well and allowing to come back to the boil and thicken between each addition.
Season to taste with salt / pepper and a dash of worcester sauce.
Allow to simmer a short while before serving.
You might have to mess about with the quantities, not used to measuring things out much these days and I was used to doing it as Dickybird rightly said for 30 odd people

That sounds really good, I'll give it a go. Got to be much better than gravy granules. Knowing me, I'll probably end up having to carve it. "Two sausages, mash and a slice of onion gravy please" :o

kevjacko
6th June 2009, 10:54
Kev , any chance for the savoury rissole reciepe ?.

Everyone did them slightly differently dicky but give this a go.


INGREDIENTS

cold mashed potato
minced beef
onion

roughly about 2/3rds mince to potato

Finely chop your onion and fry off with the mince in a frying pan.
Crumble a beef stock cube in. season with salt pepper and worcester. Add some herbs if your feeling adventurous. You can add anything that takes your fancy at this stage, garlic / chili etc. Once mince is well cooked drain out any excess liquid that has'nt boiled away (keep for gravy)

Allow to cool then add the mixture to your mashed potato. you need a stiff mix of potato so avoid putting in any milk when mashing. season to taste if needed. If when you've mixed your mince & potato together the mixture is to loose use some powdered potato granuals to bind together.

mould into any shape you nostalgicaly wish and allow to cool.

to breadcrumb

dust and coat rissoles well with plain flour
beat together an egg and a little milk wash the rissoles through until coated all over
get yourself some packet bread crumbs from the supermarket, it's much less clart on. (in the interests of safety do not attempt to dry your own out on top of the oven)
coat the eggwashed rissoles all over with crumbs

deep fry rissoles at about 180 or brush with oil and bake in hot oven until golden. (baking could be preferable if your mixture is loose)

serve with onion gravy

tip make up the rissoles a good few hours or a day before breadcrumbing and allow to stand in fridge. this tightens them up and makes them easier to breadcrumb

Nick Balls
6th June 2009, 11:06
No Nick, in my early days as Chief and Ships cook, I was refered to as "Doc" that name has eventually died out. The Chief steward was often known as the Grocer as well as other names that refered to lining of pockets.

Now Grocer is still in use ....Doc , well that is interesting I never herd that one. When I was deepsea the Chief Steward had the job of looking after the Medical Locker. Is that where it came from? On my last job this medical locker duty was the Chief Officers job.
With cooks I love the nicknames and stories associated with them.
Look at :www.shipsandoil.com/Features/Homemade%20Pizza.htm

Another: The Cook always wrote up on the board " Soup of the day" "Love by a stream" eventually somebody plucked up courage and asked why the soup was called that. "Well" said the cook "Its near water"

kevjacko
6th June 2009, 11:54
Now Grocer is still in use ....Doc , well that is interesting I never herd that one. When I was deepsea the Chief Steward had the job of looking after the Medical Locker. Is that where it came from? On my last job this medical locker duty was the Chief Officers job.
With cooks I love the nicknames and stories associated with them.
Look at :www.shipsandoil.com/Features/Homemade%20Pizza.htm

Another: The Cook always wrote up on the board " Soup of the day" "Love by a stream" eventually somebody plucked up courage and asked why the soup was called that. "Well" said the cook "Its near water"

What a brilliant story Nick and I think it typifies life at sea, reading this takes me back to conversations that seamen have as a matter of fact everyday and consider perfectly run of the mill and ordinary. No wonder your ordinary Jo soap does'nt understand the seamans sense of wit. Reading this they never will either because they've never been there.

Nick Balls
6th June 2009, 18:18
Thanks for that comment! Whoever has got the talent to relate these tales should do it! A million stories must be locked up in the Catering department alone.
As you say people ashore just can't relate to this kind of thing.
The great late Arthur Jenner on this site showed how it should be done.

Dickyboy
6th June 2009, 21:48
Everyone did them slightly differently dicky but give this a go.


INGREDIENTS

cold mashed potato
minced beef
onion

roughly about 2/3rds mince to potato

Finely chop your onion and fry off with the mince in a frying pan.
Crumble a beef stock cube in. season with salt pepper and worcester. Add some herbs if your feeling adventurous. You can add anything that takes your fancy at this stage, garlic / chili etc. Once mince is well cooked drain out any excess liquid that has'nt boiled away (keep for gravy)

Allow to cool then add the mixture to your mashed potato. you need a stiff mix of potato so avoid putting in any milk when mashing. season to taste if needed. If when you've mixed your mince & potato together the mixture is to loose use some powdered potato granuals to bind together.

mould into any shape you nostalgicaly wish and allow to cool.

to breadcrumb

dust and coat rissoles well with plain flour
beat together an egg and a little milk wash the rissoles through until coated all over
get yourself some packet bread crumbs from the supermarket, it's much less clart on. (in the interests of safety do not attempt to dry your own out on top of the oven)
coat the eggwashed rissoles all over with crumbs

deep fry rissoles at about 180 or brush with oil and bake in hot oven until golden. (baking could be preferable if your mixture is loose)

serve with onion gravy

tip make up the rissoles a good few hours or a day before breadcrumbing and allow to stand in fridge. this tightens them up and makes them easier to breadcrumb
Thanks for those two recipeis Kevjacko.
I will now transcribe them, and give them a go on Monday.
I don't have Plain flour, so I'll take a gamble and use my SR instead.

Satanic Mechanic
6th June 2009, 21:55
What a brilliant story Nick and I think it typifies life at sea, reading this takes me back to conversations that seamen have as a matter of fact everyday and consider perfectly run of the mill and ordinary. No wonder your ordinary Jo soap does'nt understand the seamans sense of wit. Reading this they never will either because they've never been there.

There is a variation on it about american beer, what you do is take a mouthful and describe it as

"Like making love in a canoe"
"How so"

"Well" you reply " Its ******g close to water"

Dickyboy
6th June 2009, 22:05
No Nick, in my early days as Chief and Ships cook, I was refered to as "Doc" that name has eventually died out. The Chief steward was often known as the Grocer as well as other names that refered to lining of pockets.
I'm quite new to S N, and this thread puzzled me for some reason. The References to, and me using the terms "Ships Cook" and "Chef" didn't sound quite right to me, and I couldn't make out why. With your mention of "Doc" I'm pretty sure, though not certain after all these years, that "Doc" is what we always called the Cook. As in "Hey Doc! What's for dinner?"
Is my memory correct?
Dickyboy

kevjacko
7th June 2009, 10:11
Thanks for those two recipeis Kevjacko.
I will now transcribe them, and give them a go on Monday.
I don't have Plain flour, so I'll take a gamble and use my SR instead.

No can do dickyboy, if you use SR flour the coating will probably split. Any corner shop or spar will have Plain flour in.

Good luck

kevjacko
7th June 2009, 10:41
I'm quite new to S N, and this thread puzzled me for some reason. The References to, and me using the terms "Ships Cook" and "Chef" didn't sound quite right to me, and I couldn't make out why. With your mention of "Doc" I'm pretty sure, though not certain after all these years, that "Doc" is what we always called the Cook. As in "Hey Doc! What's for dinner?"
Is my memory correct?
Dickyboy

Yeah Dickyboy your right. The term Doc was commonly used when addressing the cook. The origins of using the term are a bit clouded with the popular consensus being that at one time the cook was traditionaly the ships first aider. I don't know whether it's one of the traditions that are sadly dying out but it was usually the older hands who used this name for the cook.

Dickyboy
7th June 2009, 10:50
No can do dickyboy, if you use SR flour the coating will probably split. Any corner shop or spar will have Plain flour in.

Good luck
I'll get some plain then, my SR probably has weevils in it by now anyway :o)
Just looked, no weevils, but the use by date is Jan.........04!
Do you know of any uses for 5.5 year old flour?? :o

Nick Balls
7th June 2009, 11:15
Satanic ........your " love in a canoe" is priceless..I'm still laughing !!
Dicky Boy .....we used to called one truly awful cook (Who everybody liked!)
as "The Chief de cuisine" along with many other cooks it was a nickname.
Two pan sam....... Cyinide Sid..........Poison Pete..........
One of the finest cooks
I ever sailed with was a Cape Verde Islander to whom the crew (Portuguese) referred to with great reverence by his first name.
Another British cook who was also a great chief had no nickname. He had in his younger days been a hard man and quite simply I think the whole crew including the Master were scared of him !!! But hell he could produce brilliant food.

James_C
7th June 2009, 12:02
Sailed with one Cook known to one and all as 'Liquid Les'.
His food was superb for the first few days of the trip, then he'd 'top up' and be permanently smashed for the next few months, by which point we were generally on our own!
Normally he was drinking at least a case of beer a day, often more.

kevjacko
7th June 2009, 12:50
Sailed with one Cook known to one and all as 'Liquid Les'.
His food was superb for the first few days of the trip, then he'd 'top up' and be permanently smashed for the next few months, by which point we were generally on our own!
Normally he was drinking at least a case of beer a day, often more.

If this is the guy I'm thinking of, would'nt be a big Geordie fella would it ? sailed with him twice if it is.

James_C
7th June 2009, 13:02
Kev,
To be honest I can't remember where he was from, but I don't think he was a Geordie. Quite a skinny bloke (didn't eat much!) of average height.
Last time I sailed with him he was onboard less than 48 hours. He was medically paid off with an unstoppable nose bleed and blood pressure so high that by rights he should have been close to being in a coma!
After consulting the crew bar chits the Bosun mentioned to me that he'd drank at least 49 tins of beer, plus of course those that the other lads had bought him. This all in less than two days!
Funny thing was that he never seemed that pissed, although it has to be said that his first beer of the day was at 0600 just after he'd been put on the shake and he'd never be far away from a tin between then and about 2200 (when he turned in).

kevjacko
7th June 2009, 13:22
Kev,
To be honest I can't remember where he was from, but I don't think he was a Geordie. Quite a skinny bloke (didn't eat much!) of average height.
Last time I sailed with him he was onboard less than 48 hours. He was medically paid off with an unstoppable nose bleed and blood pressure so high that by rights he should have been close to being in a coma!
After consulting the crew bar chits the Bosun mentioned to me that he'd drank at least 49 tins of beer, plus of course those that the other lads had bought him. This all in less than two days!
Funny thing was that he never seemed that pissed, although it has to be said that his first beer of the day was at 0600 just after he'd been put on the shake and he'd never be far away from a tin between then and about 2200 (when he turned in).

Nah not him then James.
Tell you what though, I sailed with a fair few cooks who were big drinkers. Some of them were good cooks though who still turned to and did their job, but some were'nt. Sailed with a notable one who was bloody atrocious and he had a habit of putting breadcrumbs on everything as decoration. Had to be carried through the trip when he should have been sacked at the first opportunity.

Old Janner
8th June 2009, 09:14
I'm quite new to S N, and this thread puzzled me for some reason. The References to, and me using the terms "Ships Cook" and "Chef" didn't sound quite right to me, and I couldn't make out why. With your mention of "Doc" I'm pretty sure, though not certain after all these years, that "Doc" is what we always called the Cook. As in "Hey Doc! What's for dinner?"
Is my memory correct?
Dickyboy
Yes Dickyboy, "Doc" was the expression used, how the crew used it depended on the Cook!! I remember being a young cook with a Geordie crew on the British Aviator, 4 - 8 wach coming in for breakfast, deck and Engine, only to be given Streaky Bacon, that was all the messman had left. Shouts from the Mess room, where is the f -g cook, we are entitled to one lean and one streaky, a very shaky me to the mess room to confront the tribe, shouting back the messman got enough for all hands, he did not do his job in dishing the bacon out, messman did a runner down to his cabin. Crew looked at me and it was a stand off, Next breakfast no Problem I stood and watch the bacon being dished out, same 4 - 8 watch men came past and said thanks "Doc"
They always bought me a beer when we met ashore.

Dickyboy
8th June 2009, 12:31
Yes Dickyboy, "Doc" was the expression used, how the crew used it depended on the Cook!! I remember being a young cook with a Geordie crew on the British Aviator, 4 - 8 wach coming in for breakfast, deck and Engine, only to be given Streaky Bacon, that was all the messman had left. Shouts from the Mess room, where is the f -g cook, we are entitled to one lean and one streaky, a very shaky me to the mess room to confront the tribe, shouting back the messman got enough for all hands, he did not do his job in dishing the bacon out, messman did a runner down to his cabin. Crew looked at me and it was a stand off, Next breakfast no Problem I stood and watch the bacon being dished out, same 4 - 8 watch men came past and said thanks "Doc"
They always bought me a beer when we met ashore.
A bit like with Offal, "Go to have some meat with the liver. Not allowed to serve it alone, must have bacon at least with it. No bacon! Aint eatin' that!" I was never sure that Offal HAD to be served with some sort of meat or not, but as I recall it always was.
Anyone remember what Ships Articles said about food requirements? Had to be butter as I recall. Though no doubt there was a loophole that stated "Where Available" or something. Never did read the Articles I was signing. I'm pretty sure that what we got fed was far better than what the Articles would have stated anyway.
The old saying "Eee, it's a grand life, Sunday dinner every day" comes to mind. :o

Dickyboy
8th June 2009, 12:54
Gents,

Onion gravy ala BP

Fry an onion off in oil (about 3 table spoons) & a knob of butter until they go golden brown.
Add plain flour so the mixture is binding together and just leaving the side of the pan (the roux).
cook this through slowly stirring frequently until it starts to brown slightly.
crumble an oxo into boiling water (about a pint) and add to the roux about a third at a time stirring well and allowing to come back to the boil and thicken between each addition.
Season to taste with salt / pepper and a dash of worcester sauce.
Allow to simmer a short while before serving.

You might have to mess about with the quantities, not used to measuring things out much these days and I was used to doing it as Dickybird rightly said for 30 odd people
I'm going to attempt to make the rissoles with onion gravy today.
So far spuds on the boil and breadcrumbs prepared. No worscester sauce, but I'll think of something else to add in its place. I invested in a new packet of plain flour. The only things that will be missing from the meal will be the all pervading smell of oil fumes, hot engine rooms, whitty banter and good shipmates to share it with.
Reading that, I think it might be a rather sad meal, which isn't what I intended. (Sad)

Dickyboy
8th June 2009, 15:45
Satanic ........your " love in a canoe" is priceless..I'm still laughing !!
Dicky Boy .....we used to called one truly awful cook (Who everybody liked!)
as "The Chief de cuisine" along with many other cooks it was a nickname.
Two pan sam....... Cyinide Sid..........Poison Pete..........
One of the finest cooks
I ever sailed with was a Cape Verde Islander to whom the crew (Portuguese) referred to with great reverence by his first name.
Another British cook who was also a great chief had no nickname. He had in his younger days been a hard man and quite simply I think the whole crew including the Master were scared of him !!! But hell he could produce brilliant food.
Good for the cook to have a front I guess. Whose going to face up to a "Hard" cook with a galley full of cleavers? :o)
I was always told that the one person on a ship that should never, ever be upset was the cook. It was usually a case on any ship, that had a well fed crew was much happier in a scow, than a poorley fed crew in the pride of the fleet.
The only complaint I had on BP was the shortage of cold stuff in the fridge in the evenings. Or perhaps I just wasn't quick enough to get there first. :o

Satanic Mechanic
8th June 2009, 17:19
Good for the cook to have a front I guess. Whose going to face up to a "Hard" cook with a galley full of cleavers? :o)
I was always told that the one person on a ship that should never, ever be upset was the cook. It was usually a case on any ship, that had a well fed crew was much happier in a scow, than a poorley fed crew in the pride of the fleet.
The only complaint I had on BP was the shortage of cold stuff in the fridge in the evenings. Or perhaps I just wasn't quick enough to get there first. :o

You should see it now(Cloud) (Cloud)

stewart4866
8th June 2009, 17:46
When the eng and nav cadets had finished their dinner, by 7pm they were tucking into the food that was left in the pantry fridge for the 8/12 and 12/4 watch keepers..... not a crumb left.

Dickyboy
8th June 2009, 17:55
You should see it now(Cloud) (Cloud)

Why? Please Elaborate.

Satanic Mechanic
8th June 2009, 17:59
Why? Please Elaborate.

Restricted amount of beer with captains counting the empties just to make sure etc etc - I could go on but I am sure you get the picture

Dickyboy
8th June 2009, 18:51
Restricted amount of beer with captains counting the empties just to make sure etc etc - I could go on but I am sure you get the picture
I thought BP were totally dry now anyway.
We had a captain who joined just after me, he issued Plain poker chips as shipboard currency. Red, white and blue ones, each with a different value of course. As I recall his intent was to restrict the consumption on his ship, and prevent the ships currency going ashore.
I wonder if anyone else remembers that? Not the most popular Captain as I recall.

Satanic Mechanic
8th June 2009, 21:43
I thought BP were totally dry now anyway.
We had a captain who joined just after me, he issued Plain poker chips as shipboard currency. Red, white and blue ones, each with a different value of course. As I recall his intent was to restrict the consumption on his ship, and prevent the ships currency going ashore.
I wonder if anyone else remembers that? Not the most popular Captain as I recall.

They may well be - I don't know. To be honest they could go bust tomorrow and I would laugh an intimate part of my body off such is my dislike of what was once a smashing company. That Captain you are talking about would have gone far in todays organisation!!!!!!!

Dickyboy
8th June 2009, 22:51
They may well be - I don't know. To be honest they could go bust tomorrow and I would laugh an intimate part of my body off such is my dislike of what was once a smashing company. That Captain you are talking about would have gone far in todays organisation!!!!!!!
Yeah, It was a great company. I think, when I joined in 1967 they had around 180 ships, when I left 10 years later there was only about a quarter of that I think.
One way to tell if it's a good company is to see how many came back trip after trip, year after year, also the numbers of people on this forum show that it was a good company to work for.
I was a GP1 for virtually all my time with BP, with no real ambition to "Better myself" as it were. I found a good, secure job and a slot that I fitted into.
Except for high work, there wasn't a single job I didn't enjoy. The normal engine room work, deck work, bridge watch keeping were all good. and the jobs within those departments I enjoyed as well. From the back breaking tank cleaning with its Butterworth hoses, saddles and plates, to steering the ship up the Bonny River or the Congo, to scrubbing Nirex Plates, wiping down, and the Job and finish scavenger cleans. Hand grinding a B W valve was a bit of a chore though :o
Yeah, it was a good life, and it was a good company to work for.
It was an exciting company as well. There was the "Fleet News" where one could keep in touch with events on the ships and old shipmates. There was also the "BP Shield" Where I read about the development of the North Sea fields. Prudoe Bay and the Alaska pipeline, the Purchase of Standard Oil (California) ??? and the opening up of new big markets in the US. The purchase of hundreds of filling stations and so on. All of it intresting and exciting.
I was aware though that with the advent of GP manning, UMS and so on that things were changing. The Object of all the modernisation was to reduce crew numbers, and when they'd done that, they turned to Agency crews to save even more money, and when they did that I suspect the company ethos went out of the window.
I left in 1977, the writing was on the wall even then, faint, but there, and it wasn't the reason I left the Company. I swallowed the anchor and that was the worst thing I ever did. Low grade civil service UGH!
That Captain probably did go far in todays company :o
Cheers!
Dickyboy (A)

Old Janner
9th June 2009, 04:56
Restricted amount of beer with captains counting the empties just to make sure etc etc - I could go on but I am sure you get the picture

Yeah I remember the early days in BP, two cans on a wednesday and three on a Saturday, if the Old Man was an a-hole, the chief stwd had to serve the cans open, so you could not save them.
Then they wondered why the crew went ashore and got p----d for two days when in a good port.
The introduction of bars was a good thing, providing the Bar comittee kept a reasonable control.

Old Janner.

Old Janner
9th June 2009, 05:08
A bit like with Offal, "Go to have some meat with the liver. Not allowed to serve it alone, must have bacon at least with it. No bacon! Aint eatin' that!" I was never sure that Offal HAD to be served with some sort of meat or not, but as I recall it always was.
Anyone remember what Ships Articles said about food requirements? Had to be butter as I recall. Though no doubt there was a loophole that stated "Where Available" or something. Never did read the Articles I was signing. I'm pretty sure that what we got fed was far better than what the Articles would have stated anyway.
The old saying "Eee, it's a grand life, Sunday dinner every day" comes to mind. :o

Ships articles, BOT ration guideline, was known as "your Whack" normally threatned by the crew to the Ch/steward when they got greengage jam instead of Strawberry, I actually witnessed this on the Br Sailor, the rest of the food was OK, just somebody got the bee in his bonnet about the officers getting all the good jam and the crew only had Greengage or Gooseberry.
As in most cases to long at sea and nothing better to do than gossip, No Bars, No Videos and we had probably seen the (3 movies) about three times each.
But spent many hours playing crib, I realy miss that now, I tried teaching my Ukraine wife to play, but was not the same as being with the lads.
Dickyboy. Offal, I remeber it well all BP tankers had a listed stock, issued to all ships, Ox Tail, Ox Heart, Sheeps Heart, Tripe, Ox Liver (occaisionally lamb Liver) and Ox Kidneys, if on the Australian Coast we would also take, Brains and Sweetbreads. Out of all that lot the only thing I liked was Ox Tail.
I think somebody metioned it early in the thread 'Ox tail Jardinere' with harricot beans, or Butter beans, good dose of that with brussel sprouts and you needed a cabin on your own.

Dickyboy
9th June 2009, 09:38
Ships articles, BOT ration guideline, was known as "your Whack" normally threatned by the crew to the Ch/steward when they got greengage jam instead of Strawberry, I actually witnessed this on the Br Sailor, the rest of the food was OK, just somebody got the bee in his bonnet about the officers getting all the good jam and the crew only had Greengage or Gooseberry.
As in most cases to long at sea and nothing better to do than gossip, No Bars, No Videos and we had probably seen the (3 movies) about three times each.
But spent many hours playing crib, I realy miss that now, I tried teaching my Ukraine wife to play, but was not the same as being with the lads.
Dickyboy. Offal, I remeber it well all BP tankers had a listed stock, issued to all ships, Ox Tail, Ox Heart, Sheeps Heart, Tripe, Ox Liver (occaisionally lamb Liver) and Ox Kidneys, if on the Australian Coast we would also take, Brains and Sweetbreads. Out of all that lot the only thing I liked was Ox Tail.
I think somebody metioned it early in the thread 'Ox tail Jardinere' with harricot beans, or Butter beans, good dose of that with brussel sprouts and you needed a cabin on your own.

I didn't realise that there was a "Listed Stock" A standardised food system for all ships. I thought that the Chief Steward just ordered stores as we went along, and he got what was available where and when he could, within a budget set by the company. I live and Learn!
I don't recall ever eating brains or sweetbreads, though no doubt they were called something else on the menu. I remember the Oxtail Jardinere, lovely grub! not a lot of meat but the gravy was wonderful.
I was always on BP ships with single cabins, and the later ones even had either their own Shower/Toilet or a shared one with the cabin next door. Great if the guts played up a bit :o

derekhore
9th June 2009, 17:53
Remember when 'Bar Hours' were brought in .. mainly I beleive to try and alleviate the excess drinking caused by slow steaming and UMS engine rooms!

Shutters fitted to the bar, padlock on the fridge etc .. then a special book to sign the bar key in and out of the Old Mans cabin.
Bar only allowed to be open for so many hours a day (was it 8?).

Ways and means round it though, especially for the 8-12 and 12-4 at night!!

Satanic Mechanic
9th June 2009, 17:57
Remember when 'Bar Hours' were brought in .. mainly I beleive to try and alleviate the excess drinking caused by slow steaming and UMS engine rooms!

Shutters fitted to the bar, padlock on the fridge etc .. then a special book to sign the bar key in and out of the Old Mans cabin.
Bar only allowed to be open for so many hours a day (was it 8?).

Ways and means round it though, especially for the 8-12 and 12-4 at night!!

Always ways and means round it some very complicated some very easy. I personally taught myself to pick locks - which actually ended up being a hobby of mine, I do locks the same as I do crosswords!!!!!!

Dickyboy
9th June 2009, 19:57
Gents,

Onion gravy ala BP

Fry an onion off in oil (about 3 table spoons) & a knob of butter until they go golden brown.
Add plain flour so the mixture is binding together and just leaving the side of the pan (the roux).
cook this through slowly stirring frequently until it starts to brown slightly.
crumble an oxo into boiling water (about a pint) and add to the roux about a third at a time stirring well and allowing to come back to the boil and thicken between each addition.
Season to taste with salt / pepper and a dash of worcester sauce.
Allow to simmer a short while before serving.

You might have to mess about with the quantities, not used to measuring things out much these days and I was used to doing it as Dickybird rightly said for 30 odd people
The end result of a home cooked Rissoles & Onion gravy as posted on this thread.
It wasn't easy for me to do, I'm no cook, but I followed the instructions to the letter, and the result was good. The Rissoles were just as I remembered them, the texture was the same, and the onion gravy, the same delish! I do have about a quart of gravy left if anyone want it. I rounded off the meal with Duff & Cuatard, well...... Rich fruit cake & Instant Custard, same thing really :o

Dickyboy
9th June 2009, 20:01
Yum! :o

kevjacko
9th June 2009, 23:01
Whoa Dickyboy,

You were in the wrong department, these look ok.

Old Janner
10th June 2009, 04:56
Kevjacko, I agree Dickyboy should have been a caterer.
Steam puddings, remeber the long metal sleeves we used in BP for making duffs, I used to make, Chocolate duff, Sultans, Mixed fruit, famous spotted dick'Just Currants', plain sponge with Jam on top, Golden Syrup duff, famous black fruit duff which was a poor Xmas pudding but came out OK, Apple duff, and The other famous BP one was Marmalade duff with Seville Sauce. Nearly forgot Suet duff with syrup, Also Ginger pudding also with Syrup. Did I miss any out ?? Yes Cherry duff made with Glace cherries with Almond sauce.

billyboy
10th June 2009, 05:08
making my mouth water reading this

Dickyboy
10th June 2009, 07:59
Whoa Dickyboy,

You were in the wrong department, these look ok.
Yes, I was quite pleased with the end result, I shouldn't have covered the rissoles with the gravy though, you can't see them. The gravy was just right, I'd forgotton the texture, a lot of oil and butter in it and the rather flourey taste and texture due to virtually frying the.. roux? I've never heard or seen gravy made that way before. My mum and my ex never mase it quite like that.
As I ate it my flat took on a gentle roll and began to vibrate. I ate it quickly, I was half expecting someone to shout "Right oh lads, turn to!" :o

Dickyboy
10th June 2009, 08:30
Kevjacko, I agree Dickyboy should have been a caterer.
Steam puddings, remeber the long metal sleeves we used in BP for making duffs, I used to make, Chocolate duff, Sultans, Mixed fruit, famous spotted dick'Just Currants', plain sponge with Jam on top, Golden Syrup duff, famous black fruit duff which was a poor Xmas pudding but came out OK, Apple duff, and The other famous BP one was Marmalade duff with Seville Sauce. Nearly forgot Suet duff with syrup, Also Ginger pudding also with Syrup. Did I miss any out ?? Yes Cherry duff made with Glace cherries with Almond sauce.
I remember all of those. Duff's made by the fathom :o
The one I remember really well, though not may favourite, was the square plain duff, or was it cake? with red jam on the top then a sprinkling of coconut on top of that. Very handy for filling a void if the mess fridge had been blitzed earlier in the evening, and great for water retention if eaten with a big mug of tea.
I remember, on the Capetown Castle, that the "Breakfast Rolls" were made in similar tins to the duff ones, but they were shaped so that individual bread rolls, shaped a bit like mini loaves, were produced. We were provided with rolls and bread from the ships bakery, and were the first to be supplied with the bread and rolls, still hot from the oven, and with a big knob of butter melting into them those rolls, especially the brown ones, were delicious.
The BP tankers were by far better feeders than the passenger boats were though. (Thumb)

Dickyboy
10th June 2009, 09:31
It's still available, I got my last 3 bottles on Brittany Ferries of all places.
I only use it for medicinal purposes, as I suffer from a lot of colds and flu.(A)
Imported by:
The Four Bell Fine Navy Rum Co., Glasgow, G2 5RG.
Here's a scan of the Bottle, the label has changed, the contents haven't, still as smooth as ever.
I think I'll have a large one now, as I feel a cold comming on, CHEERS.

Steve

Hi Steve
As you say the Four Bells label has changed, It used to be a lightish brown colour, rather plain looking. I did come across it a couple of times in pubs, but that was only 70% proof. The stuff we got on the ships was 99% proof. It was imported by a firm called "Challis? Stern and Co Ltd" Why I should remember that I'll never know.
We had a GP1 killed on one boat I was on, in the engine room, and after doing the business with the poor bloke, getting him up to and laying him out in the hospital, and cleaning up the bottom plates, we were issued with a tumbler FULL! of four bells each, via the Bosun. Shortly after the "Tot" was issued, those involved were asked to report outside the C/Engineers cabin, as was the Chief Steward. The C/E thanked us for what we had done and told the C/S to issue us all with a tot of Four Bells. The C/S informed him that we had already been issued with a tot, and he refused to issue another. The C/E went ballistic, he really did! We just stood back and watched, the two of 'em virtually nose to nose with each other arguing as to whether we should have another tot or not. Us, with about half a pint of rum inside us already found the scene quite amusing. The C/E won the argument in a very short time, and we were issued begrudgingly with another, smaller, tot by the C/S.
One rather distasteful thing, and I suspect why the C/E got so angry so quickly was the fact that the catering staff had refused to assist in this incident in any way, even though they were supposed to be the emergency medical team. The C/S did attend of course, and it was him that decided, after a few minutes, that it was no good, and that we could move him. So the C/S would have been as rattled as the rest of us, and the spark that ignited the row was due to the stresses of the incident as much as anything, and the C/S just went into Default Mode, ie Issue Nothing!.
The only time I'd have preferred not to have had tots.

connie
10th June 2009, 19:02
dickyboy,
just uploaded a photo of a bottle of 4 bells rum, its still 3/4s full, gawd knows what it will taste like after all these years! still happy memories. lol. its posted in life onboard.regards con

Dickyboy
10th June 2009, 20:38
dickyboy,
just uploaded a photo of a bottle of 4 bells rum, its still 3/4s full, gawd knows what it will taste like after all these years! still happy memories. lol. its posted in life onboard.regards con
Not Connie Onnie by any chance? :o
Let me know what it was like, when you get up off the deck :o

kevjacko
10th June 2009, 22:58
Kevjacko, I agree Dickyboy should have been a caterer.
Steam puddings, remeber the long metal sleeves we used in BP for making duffs, I used to make, Chocolate duff, Sultans, Mixed fruit, famous spotted dick'Just Currants', plain sponge with Jam on top, Golden Syrup duff, famous black fruit duff which was a poor Xmas pudding but came out OK, Apple duff, and The other famous BP one was Marmalade duff with Seville Sauce. Nearly forgot Suet duff with syrup, Also Ginger pudding also with Syrup. Did I miss any out ?? Yes Cherry duff made with Glace cherries with Almond sauce.

Hi Old Janner,

Do you remember using those pudding sleeves for cumberland Roll.. Steamed suet roll with a savoury corned beef or mince filling inside served with onion gravy?, and it could be sliced cold for tabnabs the next day. Go to cumberland and they'll never heard of it. Bit like the Canadian minced beef pie the Canadians have never heard of. Good food great memories.

kevjacko
10th June 2009, 23:00
Yes, I was quite pleased with the end result, I shouldn't have covered the rissoles with the gravy though, you can't see them. The gravy was just right, I'd forgotton the texture, a lot of oil and butter in it and the rather flourey taste and texture due to virtually frying the.. roux? I've never heard or seen gravy made that way before. My mum and my ex never mase it quite like that.
As I ate it my flat took on a gentle roll and began to vibrate. I ate it quickly, I was half expecting someone to shout "Right oh lads, turn to!" :o

Wake up Dicky seven Bells has just went.......

Dickyboy
11th June 2009, 01:06
Wake up Dicky seven Bells has just went.......
Um? Oh.....Right oh! On my way......... Hang on just a minute, I don't have to these days :o

Dickyboy
11th June 2009, 01:16
dickyboy,
just uploaded a photo of a bottle of 4 bells rum, its still 3/4s full, gawd knows what it will taste like after all these years! still happy memories. lol. its posted in life onboard.regards con
Can't find it (Sad)

Old Janner
11th June 2009, 04:37
Hi Old Janner,

Do you remember using those pudding sleeves for cumberland Roll.. Steamed suet roll with a savoury corned beef or mince filling inside served with onion gravy?, and it could be sliced cold for tabnabs the next day. Go to cumberland and they'll never heard of it. Bit like the Canadian minced beef pie the Canadians have never heard of. Good food great memories.

I forgot the Cumberland roll that was the minced beef! which reminded me,we did another one with corned beef and chopped onion, in the suet pastry then into the round sleve, that used to come out well and was liked by most crews.
Ah yes memmories coming back, how about the steamed leek pudding we used to put with the roast beef, when we had leeks of course.

Good old "Rota Pans" when no steam, we used the big stock pot with a empty tins supporting the wire tray and steam it off in that, OK if you kept remembering to check the water level.

I also used to bake bread in the pudding sleeves used to make a differnce to the bread selection, round sliced bread!

Any bakers remember making "BOT marzipan" with Ground rice, Almond essence and egg yolks, done a few Xmas cakes with that.

Spence.

kevjacko
11th June 2009, 04:51
I forgot the Cumberland roll that was the minced beef! which reminded me,we did another one with corned beef and chopped onion, in the suet pastry then into the round sleve, that used to come out well and was liked by most crews.
Ah yes memmories coming back, how about the steamed leek pudding we used to put with the roast beef, when we had leeks of course.

Good old "Rota Pans" when no steam, we used the big stock pot with a empty tins supporting the wire tray and steam it off in that, OK if you kept remembering to check the water level.

I also used to bake bread in the pudding sleeves used to make a differnce to the bread selection, round sliced bread!

Any bakers remember making "BOT marzipan" with Ground rice, Almond essence and egg yolks, done a few Xmas cakes with that.

Spence.

Steak & Kidney puddings (baby's heads) steamed in the derrier moulds were always popular. I remember putting ale in mine long before the gastro pubs thoughts of it.
And what was most popular, steamed jam roll or baked jam roll ?

kevjacko
11th June 2009, 04:56
Um? Oh.....Right oh! On my way......... Hang on just a minute, I don't have to these days :o

Lucky you Dickyboy. I am on emergency call out this week in and have spent the last hour fielding ridiculous phone calls. Hence the stupid time I'm typing this and a bad case of insomnia, and I've Still got to turn to in the morning.
Mind you there was a time I could do it standing on my head with a hangover. Now though I'll suffer chronic fatigue syndrom for the next 2 days. Sign of the times eh?

Old Janner
11th June 2009, 13:01
Steak & Kidney puddings (baby's heads) steamed in the derrier moulds were always popular. I remember putting ale in mine long before the gastro pubs thoughts of it.
And what was most popular, steamed jam roll or baked jam roll ?

Kevjacko, easy one, Baked Jam roll was easier to make!!!! and only had one failure (it could be burned)

Dickyboy
11th June 2009, 13:29
Lucky you Dickyboy. I am on emergency call out this week in and have spent the last hour fielding ridiculous phone calls. Hence the stupid time I'm typing this and a bad case of insomnia, and I've Still got to turn to in the morning.
Mind you there was a time I could do it standing on my head with a hangover. Now though I'll suffer chronic fatigue syndrom for the next 2 days. Sign of the times eh?
Actually I still work on the water, on a Solent ferry. I get home every night, but I work some very hard shifts, longer than I worked at sea. About half my shifts ar 12 hrs + an hours travel each way. Some other shifts start at 05.00, others at 15.15, and Nights are 12 hours as well. I work an eight week roster in which all hours on the clock are worked several times. I've been on leave for the last week, so had plenty of time to visit this site, but tomorrow It's back to the grindstone again with 3 x 12 hour shifts coming up. Not too bad when the weathers good, but still very tireing for me now that I'm knocking on a bit. I miss the shipboard 4 on 8 off routines. There's quite a bit of time off, but when I'm working some sets of shifts can be killers. Nothing but work, travel home, sleep, travel to work and work again.
3 years, I could go earlier, to go, then it's retirement for me :o
No standbyes for me though, that's one good thing.
Chronic fatigue syndrome? I just get knackered :o
Hope you have a good break soon.
Cheers!
Dickyboy

kevjacko
11th June 2009, 21:14
Kevjacko, easy one, Baked Jam roll was easier to make!!!! and only had one failure (it could be burned)

Yeah

I'd go with that Old Janner, it was a better seller too.

Graham Wallace
2nd July 2009, 19:14
I recently received these, thought they might be of interest

Hussar menus 28th November 1968

Graham

Graham Wallace
3rd July 2009, 00:08
And yet another menu.

Destiny Xmas 1959, Evidently they cut up an Xmas card to produce the bowl of flowers, typed in " Xmas 1959 British Destiny" mated it with the actual menu and formed a more interesting one.

Somebody ( the Chief Steward?) must have been under the weather as he wrote the menu upside down.

Graham

Sarky Cut
3rd July 2009, 01:01
Hi Graham, what is really sad is that somebody still kept it after all these years(*))

Graham Wallace
3rd July 2009, 01:34
Hi Graham, what is really sad is that somebody still kept it after all these years(*))

Hell no, I collect all this sort of 'Stuff'. I'm a sort of unofficial repository for 'them old days'. Ex crewmebers and old Engineering Apprentices/ Cadets are also included in under the term 'Stuff' !

Actually they still have it I only get a copy.

Graham

Old Janner
3rd July 2009, 04:46
Hell no, I collect all this sort of 'Stuff'. I'm a sort of unofficial repository for 'them old days'. Ex crewmebers and old Engineering Apprentices/ Cadets are also included in under the term 'Stuff' !

Actually they still have it I only get a copy.

Graham
Thanks for posting the Menus Graham, for me they are old nostalgia, I have written and typed many BP menus, but never one upside down!
In my early days in the Galley, I used to write my days menus in a book, I still have three of them.
Some of the on board type writers were old to say the least, I remember the ribbons were always old and you had to change them around a lot just to get a reasonable print, got to the stage where I used to carry my own typewriter, along with the other gear including the Pye Cambridge! Does anybody remeber the old calculators that were on board in the early 60's, a monstrosity called a 'Facit' I think they were Italian ? A rotary gadget that threw out various numbers that took me ages to decipher.

Graham don't forget to update me with your ships and crew lists.
THanks

Spence.

OllieUK
3rd July 2009, 14:14
Whats the difference between luncheon meat and spam? and I cant beleive that the chief steward was drunk enough to type the xmas menu out upside down. or can I? [=P]

Satanic Mechanic
3rd July 2009, 14:41
AAAAAAARRRRGGGHHHH - Giblet Soup for Christmas Dinner

My old nemesis has found me