Empress of Canada

tonyfin
10th December 2006, 20:22
hi there does anyone have any photos of the empress of canada 1965 onwards.And any crew details.

DMA
11th December 2006, 06:23
Go to Gallery scroll down to search type in ships name click Go..bingo...Empress of Canada.....

neville
7th April 2009, 15:29
I served 3 years on the Canada, and also did trips on the England and britain in the 60,s great ships, I also served on 18 other ships from19 55 to19 65 those were the days

Graham Wallace
7th April 2009, 16:13
I emigrated to Canada in April 1967 on the Empress of Canada ,even had a look down the engine room, quite cramped from those I was used to.

She was the last ship I 'sailed' on, foul weather all the way across and I enjoyed every minute of it ( my wife did not!).One of the questions to the skipper in an evening forum was did she have equipment to prevent the uncomfortable trip,his reply....'We have stabilisers and they ARE in use, Thank God'

Being a Tankerman what are 'stabilisers? (LOL)

However just being on her for those 7 days did make me think I had possibly been years sailing in the wrong company.

Graham

Cutsplice
7th April 2009, 16:55
Done two 17 day trips on the Empress of Canada in 1962, could,nt get off her quick enough. Talk about passenger ship mafia, well she had the lot, plus numerous homosexuals it certainly put me off passenger vessels never went near one again as a crew member.
I remember the old mans name it think it was Bell, bosun Martin Quinn, bosuns mates Terry/Tommy Dolan, Eric Swanvick or similar.
Remember a few others mainly AB,s etc.

Pat Kennedy
7th April 2009, 18:01
Done two 17 day trips on the Empress of Canada in 1962, could,nt get off her quick enough. Talk about passenger ship mafia, well she had the lot, plus numerous homosexuals it certainly put me off passenger vessels never went near one again as a crew member.
I remember the old mans name it think it was Bell, bosun Martin Quinn, bosuns mates Terry/Tommy Dolan, Eric Swanvick or similar.
Remember a few others mainly AB,s etc.

Cutsplice, I agree with you there, they were horrible ships, for the deck crowd.
I was on the Britain, Martin Quinn did one trip bosun on her, I think he was covering for someone while his own ship was in drydock.
I was on the eight to twelve the whole time I was on her, I dont think they ever rotated the watches, and all we ever did was sugi the working alleyway at night, and sugi above deck in the day, plus sugi the funnel, plus paint the bleedin funnel.
There were hundreds of catering crew, most of them were in some racket or other. The crew galley served up inedible 'food', you basically paid a steward for passenger food, or you lived on toast.
And the worst bit?
You had to wear a sailor suit complete with RN style cap when on stations.
I loathed it.
Pat

jmcg
7th April 2009, 22:28
#5

One trip for me was more than enough. I was on 12/4 out and back - always my favourite watch - but not on EoC. PK sums it up. We had two guys locked away in the brig. They were better treated and rewarded than we were. Dougie Virgoe (a Canadian) and Gerry Woodbine (or Woodvine) are names I remember for some reason.

Pat: That "working" alleyway I can now recall - it was as you say like a subway. We sugied it after the 8-12.

Wretched ship!

BW

J

Bill Davies
7th April 2009, 22:36
John & Pat,

What on earth took you to sail in that outfit and under those conditions when you were both ex China Boat men?

Bill

jmcg
7th April 2009, 22:46
#8
The writing was on the wall - but I guess now that I didnt quite wish to read it.

It was only when one experienced the other side of seafaring that one really appreciated the finer elements of AH and no doubt other companies of good repute.

CP (passenger ships) did not inspire me to do more than one trip. Fortunately, I kept my head low and "toughed" it out for one WNA trip. Went back to AH again shortly afterwards.

BW

J

Pat Kennedy
8th April 2009, 07:55
Bill,
More or less the same reason as John, and I too returned to the China after trying several other companies, some good some not so good, but none as bad as CPR.

Regards,
Pat

neville
23rd April 2009, 16:06
You guys were in the wrong department for passenger ships, although they were hard working ships ,10 or 11 hour days we always ate the same as the passengers, and my last job was chief engineers man, with a cabin on the boat deck and all the booze and beer that I wanted, the trips were 17 days and back home in the summer months but 6 months cruising in the winter. the cargo boats that I did were easy work and a good rest after the liners , all in all it was a great time of life.

Sandraintx
30th October 2014, 23:16
stood on the shore in Liverpool and watched the Empress of Canada burn. Very sad.

John Callon
30th October 2014, 23:43
I think the other guys are referring to the later Empress of Canada circa mid to late 50's.
Regards
John

kewl dude
31st October 2014, 00:35
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Empress_of_Canada_(1920)

Quote

RMS Empress of Canada was an ocean liner built in 1920 for the Canadian Pacific Steamships (CP) by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company at Govan on the Clyde in Scotland. This ship -- the first of two CP vessels to be named Empress of Canada -- regularly traversed the trans-Pacific route between the west coast of Canada and the Far East until 1939.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Empress_of_Canada_(1928)

Quote

SS Duchess of Richmond was an ocean liner built in 1928 for Canadian Pacific Steamships by John Brown & Company in Clydebank, Scotland. In 1947 she was renamed SS Empress of Canada.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Empress_of_Canada_(1960)

Quote

RMS Empress of Canada was an ocean liner built in 1961 by Vickers-Armstrongs, Walker-on-Tyne, England for the Canadian Pacific Steamship Company. This ship, the third CP vessel to be named Empress of Canada, regularly traversed the transatlantic route between Liverpool and Canada for the next decade. Although Canadian Pacific was incorporated in Canada, the Atlantic (and pre-war Pacific) liners were always British flagged and manned and therefore Empress of Canada was not, as some people[who?] erroneously thought, the flagship of the Canadian Merchant Marine.

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Greg Hayden