Aberthaw Fisher

Bob S
10th November 2004, 13:55
James Fisher’s heavy lift ship ABERTHAW FISHER sailing from Lowestoft (UK) during July 1969.

Bob S
1st October 2005, 19:24
There's an interesting article in the October 2005 edition of "Sea Breezes" about the ABERTHAW FISHER in her last guise as MOONSTAR prior to going for scrap in 2000. Although much altered with the addition of dredging equipment, accommodation block and helipad, the fore section is still recognisable as the ABERTHAW FISHER.

cockerhoop
3rd October 2005, 07:56
Normally based at Barrow during slack times
during the 90s they were linked to a power company what was the name of the sister ship?

david smith
3rd October 2005, 08:27
Sister was the Kingsnorth Fisher, both run by James Fisher for the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB)

Pat McCardle
3rd October 2005, 08:38
Kingsnorth Fisher became New Generation. I was on her for 3 weeks.....Possibly the worst ship I have sailed on.

Andrea Elcombe
15th March 2014, 20:42
I was on the Aberthew Fisher that was the ship I joined after getting my mates ticket before that I was an AB on the Lune Fisher . I left the Lune Fisher on 20/4/73. after I passed my ticket I joined Her on the 19/7/73. at Preston as 2nd mate. After about three or four weeks the mate went on leave. I had to take over his duties as well as my own. then we got orders to go to Floota to pick up so big trucks the was something to do with the oil company works up there . At this time there was only myself and the captain as deck officers this being my maid voyage on the bridge . Apart from that the trip when well. Except that when we got to Floota I found out just what that ship could we back up to what can only be called a mud bank. Lowered the ramp on it the these big trucks just drove on. The thing that did get me cross the week or so before I had the crew paint the road deck it was spotless. Now you got clay inches thick on my deck. From Floota we went to Belfast . I worked out or ETA. It looked like my ETA was going to be spot on until we go the the north channel we had following wind tide right up our stern. Thats when I got to see just how fast that she could go I recorded over 25knots when all said and done for that kind of ship was fast, flat bottom and all. To this day I still but it down to that funny housing up front as someone said. I always say don't knock how a ship looks. or how much she rolls as long as she rolls back upright.

Waighty
18th March 2014, 16:19
Both vessels were considered by the MoD (RMAS) when that organisation was going through its "market test" in 1994-6. The idea was that they would be suitable for use in connection with mooring work as their commercial role had declined/ended. As it turned out they weren't suitable. During their commercial days I seem to recall that they used Granton on the Forth for many years as a load-out berth but for what, I know not.

Barrie Youde
18th March 2014, 18:36
I remember them from the early days of bow-thrust - and as difficult to manoeuvre when going ahead but a piece of cake when going stern first!

Andrea Elcombe
18th March 2014, 18:43
I was lead to believe that the Aberthaw & Kingnorth were used mainly for the Power company to move large unit to power stations both are named after two power stations on the coast. In 1974 she spent most of her time that I was on her in Leith . As with all ship there are times that you have to work hard but that never killed anyone. With years at sea you find you have to roll with the ship and get on with it. I have heard "This is a bad ship or great ship". When it come down to it,it the crew that make a good or bad ship. Saying that a bad ship could come down to just one crew member be it Crew or Officer.

Erimus
18th March 2014, 19:14
Knew both vessels as I was based on Humberside for three years and they were often used for heavy lift project movements....On one occasion I was rung by a client late at night and asked to go into Immingham to check a piece of offshore piping that had been 'damaged' on the Aberthaw.......there was a worry that it may have also damaged the ship....but a quick look showed just how sturdy the ship was and that there wasn't a cat in hells chance that these pipes would have damaged her.........there was a dent or two in the cargo though.

geoff

Andrea Elcombe
18th March 2014, 21:18
If you look at that ship you could say she was all backwards. She worked better that way. Bow thrusters you needed them when docking. without it would have been a bit of a job if you got cross wind. I would go as far as saying she was more like a sailing ship in strong winds. As I have reported before going down in to the Irish sea.

Andrea Elcombe
18th March 2014, 21:57
Erimus When you think about it there no way a few pipes would damage her the road way was made for heavy road transporters of 80 tons+ I can not remember just how much at the moment. It may come back sometime. These pipes that got damage was it bad weather? or bad seamanship? or would you not like to say.

Barrie Youde
18th March 2014, 22:20
#11

Hi Andrea,

Yes, I saw your 25 knots. That must surely have required a huge spring tide behind you as well as a northerly gale?

Erimus
18th March 2014, 22:28
Erimus When you think about it there no way a few pipes would damage her the road way was made for heavy road transporters of 80 tons+ I can not remember just how much at the moment. It may come back sometime. These pipes that got damage was it bad weather? or bad seamanship? or would you not like to say.

I reported that I thought they had been badly slung or secured....

Geoff

lgrania02
18th March 2014, 23:14
Both the Aberthaw Fisher and the Kingsnorth Fisher often visited Manchester until they closed the Pomona Bridge and then it was Ellesmere Port. Either way they were not easy ships to take up and down the Canal, with only a jack staff to steer by, with a small blue light for night passages.

Andrea Elcombe
19th March 2014, 23:07
#11

Hi Andrea,

Yes, I saw your 25 knots. That must surely have required a huge spring tide behind you as well as a northerly gale?

Hi Barrie you got that about right. If you look at at her she was more like a tug . The housing was in a U shape the when the wind was in right place it acted like a sail.

Locking Splice
20th March 2014, 10:15
Hi All, they were an interesting part of the British shipping scene during my time at sea 67 to 90. First saw one at Holyhead unloading a Transformer via its ramp late 60's or early 70's, always remember it was a very interesting operation. There was also a concrete base constructed at Folkestone Harbour for use as a mediterranean mooring which they could use, this berth was first tested by the British Railways ship SS Dover in the late 60's.
Remember they had a couple of heavy of Derrecks as well.
Remember getting an offer for a run job on the Aberthaw from the Pool but warmer climes won me over.
Regards
Yuge

Andrea Elcombe
20th March 2014, 11:18
Hi Geoff. That would never happen on my watch I always check then check again the crew thought I was a bit to fussy over lashing. I always told them its better to be safe then dead. In the end they got to see things my way.

Hi Igrania 02. Its like any thing after a few time you don't think about it the ship become part of you or that how it felt to me. It the same driving car or bus if you can drive them both you just don't thing about it.

Good Morning Locking splice. Shame about you being warm weather man. The Aberthaw was a testing ship at times but the up side is that you got paid and a
lot of time ashore. Just had to watch out for the crew with some of there pranks.
Andrea