Mahout

Derek Roger
12th December 2006, 17:00
I must say that every time I sign in I am so happy to see Mahout on the forum cover page . I have some more pictures of life on board her which I shall post soon .
I was saddened to see that she after being reflagged / renamed EVAGELIA S she was sunk in September of 1982 .
She was bombed by Iraqis Aircraft of Bandar Khomeini.
I am trying to get more information on the incident.

Derek

Tony Sprigings
13th December 2006, 09:52
Thanks for that bit of information Roger. I didn't realise she had become a casualty of War, so to speak. I was very fond of her and can honestly say that I knew her from a beam!

Derek Roger
13th December 2006, 17:33
Im trying to get more information on her Tony but having difficulty . Perhaps some of our accomplished sleuths can help . You could pass this on to Sam Baxter if you still keep in touch .

Don A.Macleod
13th December 2006, 18:00
Met you once Derek on handover either MAIHAR or MAHSUD also sailed with your brother "Cammy" when he was an apprentice
The MAHOUT was a lovely ship and without doubt the happiest I ever sailed on and a pic. of her hangs in my hallway(courtesy Druba Paul).
She was so good that after leaving her in Cal. we arranged a re-union at Jim Worts and we were all there bar Jimmy Grant.

Regards
Don

Tony Sprigings
13th December 2006, 19:46
Since my last I have looked her up in the 'Ships in Focus' book by Clarkson and it states that she was bombed by Iraqi aircraft near Bandar Khormeini in Sept. '82. Her sister was just broken up in China in 1984. I think I like the fact that at least she went down fighting rather than being broken up.

john g
13th December 2006, 21:56
I think it may be the the Markhor on the forum cover, I did make a point of thanks to the burra sahib of this sight when the picture first appeared and asked which vessel it was he said he picked it at random as it was a "nice looking" ship......well we all agree. Don I really must make a point of getting in touch ,sure we joined the Mahout in Kobe when she came off charter I was app eng at the time , you mentioned Jim Wort ...what happened to him ?...we can catch up on that one...I will have a little time over Christmas but I' m still working believe it or not. It's sad to think of the loss of the Mahout and the "Pink Elephant " bar but time moves on ....cheers john g

Tony Selman
13th December 2006, 22:09
The photo on the front page is definitely Markhor. It is part of the Gallery of one of the Brock's stalwarts on this site, Stuart Smith, and you can find the original in the Gallery section and type in Markhor in the search box.

Derek Roger
13th December 2006, 23:04
Don I'll pass on Salaams to Cammy .
I sailed as 3rd Eng on Markhor Jan to August 69 it was also a very happy ship . We joined in Calcutta and were relieved in Dakar . Cant for the life of me remember where we traded during that time other than South Africa and the States .

Derek Roger
14th December 2006, 01:21
Sorry its not the Mahout ! But I will get over it .

It is of interest that the data I found was on a site " Clyde-Built Data base " and she was described as a Cargo Passenger Liner ??

We did have an owners suite which was from time to time used around the coast for friends of the Owners but more usually for visiting Supers if they had to stay on board ( Drydockings and the like ) Certainly no passenger accomodation as such .
Also shows the Engines as 2SA 7 Cyl Sulzer ? She was in fact 7 RD 760 Sulzer and was the first to have bridge control to my knowledge ;
" The Mahout System of Control "
Markhor had the same system of control .

Marcus Cardew
16th December 2006, 14:48
Don I'll pass on Salaams to Cammy .
I sailed as 3rd Eng on Markhor Jan to August 69 it was also a very happy ship . We joined in Calcutta and were relieved in Dakar . Cant for the life of me remember where we traded during that time other than South Africa and the States .

Hi Derek,
From my Dis.A I flew out to Cal to Join the Mahout as 4/O 2nd May '69, and flew back from Dakar 9th November '69... I remember Cliff the 2/E, Ian Seery (Elec), Bill Myers 1/O, CP Margeson Master, Jan Rietdyk 2/O(Aus), Dick White 3/O, Dennis the Sparks, John Willians Apprentice, Norman ? Engineer Apprentice, Tommy 2nd Elec(First Trip, out of Belfast), Jimmy (Ch. Stwd).. and a skinny brit passenger from Cal to USA, Richard Guest..

From memory (Can't be bothered to check my sight book, it's back at home.. excuse any senior moments..) We discharged Sulphur in Calcutta, thence Chittagong and Chalna to load Jute, Gunnies and Carpet Backing.. Then Columbo, Durban, East London & Port Elizabeth to top off with Masonite (Hardboard, in English) Charleston, Houston(for more Sulphur), Galveston, New Orleans(Stevedores strike), Lake Charles(for Rice), back to New Orleans(tally clerks strike), Biloxi, Gulfport, Pensacola, Back to Capetown(for Bunkers), Port Elizabeth, East London(?), Durban to pick up stores from Maipura(?), Columbo, Calcutta, Chalna, Chittagong. Columbo, South Africa again, then Dakar, Buckets of Shrimps for supper, then fly back on a Dan Air Comet 4B into Airwick Gatport...

There's a picture of Ian, Jan & I in here somewhere....

Apart from that, can't remember much else.

Was this the same trip?

Derek Roger
16th December 2006, 17:44
No Marcus
The trip I referred to was Markhor ; joined in Calcutta 30th January and signed off Dakar 6 th August .

Don A.Macleod
17th December 2006, 01:00
You're correct Marcus, we signed off 3/5/69 in Cal. and yes you had nearly a full cargo of Sulphur. What a messy cargo, probably caused Ian Seery a headache cleaning the fans in the winches,happy days!

Portred
26th December 2006, 04:27
I was with Port Line for the majority of my sea career.

However, one day at home at the end of my leave, I received a 'Brownie', to join this most unfamiliar ship, well, to me, anyway.

It didn't have the prefix 'Port', just the words 'MV Mahout'!

It was also in a most unfamiliar port because I was used to southern ports but in this instance I was to join the vessel in Dundee!

This was the beginning of a nine month trip of a most interesting and enjoyable nature. It was 1974.

New ports, new crew, new cargo, all most interesting to say the least.

I can see my fellow crew members in my minds eye but their names, I'm afraid I have forgotten, maybe, only one or two first names I can recall.

There were a few 'Brocklebank old timers', who resented a 'new kid on the block', like me, from what they said was a 'Posh' company like Port Line!

One name and character I can recall was a lad from Byker or is it Biker in Newcastle. He was a Senior Third Engineer called Ken Rutter.

The one 'bad' element about that Brocklebank trip on the 'Mahout', was that the ship was run by a committee comprising of the Chief Steward, Chief Officer and Chief Engineer, in that order. The Captain was rarely ever seen and was basicially only a figurehead, a rubber stamp for the ''Committee''.

I hadn't come across that in Port line before.

I did a few months coasting with a great Chief Engineer, his name escapes me but he wore leg calipers because of a childhood illness.

One of the 'mates', devoted a great deal of time to stoking, decoking, refilling and firing-up his pipe during the trip.
It was almost as if the pipe was the main man and the 'mate' was the assistant to it!

There are many more stories about that eventful trip I could tell you, but next time, maybe.

My next trip was on the ''MV Maihar'', another interesting trip and my last with Brocklebank before yet another last, my last trip with Port Line on the then 20 year old ''MV Port Auckland".

I ended my sea going career in 1976 on a Moss Tanker laid-up on the River Fal. I'd had enough!

Derek Roger
27th December 2006, 20:16
Mahout was also somewhat unique in that she was a "Weather Ship " and data of conditions were radioed back to UK somewhere ?

Can any of the Brock Captains / Mates or Sparks remember more details ?

When I was on her in67/68 I was told she had recorded the lowest ever barometric pressure at sea level . Recorded in the Bay of Bengal if I am correct during a typhoon .
Derek

R798780
27th December 2006, 21:50
Mahout was also somewhat unique in that she was a "Weather Ship " and data of conditions were radioed back to UK somewhere ?

Can any of the Brock Captains / Mates or Sparks remember more details ?

When I was on her in67/68 I was told she had recorded the lowest ever barometric pressure at sea level . Recorded in the Bay of Bengal if I am correct during a typhoon .
Derek

Mahout was indeed a weather reporting ship. Derek Evans taught me the trade there. Malakand was not, but I think every other Brocks ship I sailed on, and certainly the Moss Tankers and Energos (ex Mobil Refiner which Cunard managed) were. I'm not certain about Oloibiri though. A met log book was filled in every six hours (more often in extreme conditions) with specific data - wind, waves, pressure, pressure tendancy, temperature and clouds and the results coded up and transmitted.

Ron Stringer
27th December 2006, 22:37
Mahout was indeed a weather reporting ship. Many MN vessels were weather reporting ships. They were provided with a set of measuring instruments by the Meteorological Office in Bracknell. The set included a Stephenson screen that was mounted on the Monkey island (or similar) and contained wet and dry bulb thermometers. There was also a thermometer with a "sea-water bucket" for collecting samples of the water so that its temperature could be measured. A book of pictures of the various types of cloud was complemented by a similar book linking sea states to Beaufort wind scale speeds. There was a mercury barometer that normally hung in the chart room. Finally there was a book in which all the readings obtained could be recorded every 6 hours starting at 0000GMT each day. On request from a suitable meteorological authority readings were taken more frequently. This normally occurred when the ship was close to a tropical revolving storm.
A copy of the records (in coded form) was written out by the observing officer (normally one of the mates) in the form of a telegram, and handed to the radio officer for transmission ashore, addressed to the met. authority responsible for producing forecasts for the sea area concerned. This type of telegram carried the prefix "OBS" (observation) so was known as an "OBS message". Since "Sparks" kept GMT watches, 2 hours on, 2 hours off, this meant that just as you were coming off watch at 0600 GMT or 1800 GMT, you would be handed a bloody OBS message to be sent at once. In the middle of the ocean this could take up to a couple of hours if you were unlucky.
The UK Met Office employed people to visit MN ships and promote and monitor the recording and reporting of weather conditions. There were annual awards to the ships performing the best. During the 1970s and 80s, the person in charge of this service was a Scotsman, Captain Gordon Mackie. He was a great ambassador for the service but when I was a "Sparks" at sea in the 1960s, there were times when I wished that his predecessors had been less successful in persuading shipowners to take part.

Derek Roger
27th December 2006, 22:58
Thanks for that Ron ;
Dont ever remember the water temp bucket but do remember the bridge always calling down to the Engine Room for the sea water temp .

Ron Stringer
27th December 2006, 23:07
Thanks for that Ron ;
Dont ever remember the water temp bucket but do remember the bridge always calling down to the Engine Room for the sea water temp .
It resembled a 2-foot length of 2.5-inch diameter black rubber pipe, closed at one end and with a shackle through the open end, to which a line was attached. Usually the apprentice on watch got the job of swinging it over the wall (for'ard of any discharges) to collect the sample for measuring.

Dave Edge
27th December 2006, 23:19
To return to the original thread, from 'Modern Shipping Disasters' by Norman Hooke:- "The Greek motor vessel "Evagelia S" ran aground in the Khor Musa channel 25 miles from Bandar Khomeini on September 11, 1982 after being struck by bombs or missiles fired by Iraqi warplanes. The 21 crew members were safely taken off the wrecked vessel, which was subsequently reported to have been refloated and towed to Bushire in 1983. She was then abandoned as a war constructive total loss."

Derek Roger
28th December 2006, 00:01
Thanks for that David .
She was not then sunk but abandoned at Bushire in 1983 . Where is Bushire exactly and would she still be there or scrapped do you think ???
Derek

Marcus Cardew
6th January 2007, 14:17
Thanks for that David .
She was not then sunk but abandoned at Bushire in 1983 . Where is Bushire exactly and would she still be there or scrapped do you think ???
Derek

Bushire is on the South West Iranian Coast..
Cheers, Marcus

Don Matheson
17th March 2007, 00:05
First post but mostly addressed to Derek Roger.
Not a Brocklebank man but served my time in Stephens of Linthouse who built Mahout and Markhor. These were in my opinion the two nicest looking ships I was ever involved with.
My question was about the Mahout controls system which I helped build (as much as an apprentice is allowed to help), after building the engines and yes they were 7RD760 Sulzer. How did the Mahout system perform in working conditions. I know we had it working well in the yard but often wondered how it turned out.
Would be obliged for any information anyone has.
Don

Tony Sprigings
17th March 2007, 13:55
As Chief Officer, who stood by the building and finally sailed for the first two voyages of the Mahout I can confirm that the gear worked exceedingly well and gave us no trouble. Pilots were a bit suspicious but never the less impressed.

Derek Roger
17th March 2007, 15:59
System worked well Don although it tended to use a lot of strating air compared to when on manual control as the starting air sequence with the air "on " was contolled by a timing volume to ensure revs were up high enough before the fuel was put "on " . On manual control the familiar engineer could put the air fuel on a lot earlier and thus save starting air .
If you look in my Gallery you will see a diagram of the system which the Chief Engineer had me trace out !!( I was apprentice at the time ) I transcribed it on the back of an old chart.

I will comment on it and it should come up in the forum to save you searching .
In later years when I rejoined the Markor everything was on " manual " and I was told it didnt work ?? I checked it out and put it on line and it worked well after some govenor control adjustments .
There was a tendancy for some of the Captains and Chief engineers not to use it as they considered it some kind of Voodoo / Chicken Bones etc . Hence they would gladly say it didnt work to suit their pupose .

I did hear of an occurrance where the starting air " stuck on " and the vessel ( Markor I think ) moved a considerable distance up Kidderpore Dock Calcutta on Starting Air draining the bottle in the process ! This as it turned out was not a failure of the control system but a sticky contol valve in the Sulzer system ie It would have done the same thing on Manual ! This however had the effect of making some people a bit "Gun Shy " of the system .

Regards Derek
Derek

Don Matheson
17th March 2007, 18:09
Tony and Derek
Thank you both very much, been after that information for a lot of years. Always though it would be a good system but I dont think anyone else wanted one. Possibly ahead of their time, which would explain why some people tended not to use them as you say Derek. Have to admit I would have taken bridge control off some skippers in later years when I was chief and given it to some others who would have gained from it. No word spoken against anyones driving, but some skippers just didnt do too well with it and others (well most) were great.
Mahout and her sister have always been my favourite ships but I also did some work on the Maskeliya during repairs. The time she sailed from Glasgow and knocked down the bouy off Greenock and had to come back to the yard so I worked on her twice. Thinking about it I did more work with Brocklebanks than anyone else during my apprenticeship, always had nice ships and good engineers.
Don

john g
22nd March 2007, 23:37
Don interesting stuff I sailed on the Mahout as an apprentice and as a junior. Yes the system was fine after the end of he Japanese charter (1968) but there was always a degree of miss trust as has been metioned the air consumption was huge. Can you remember who designed the system , was it Westinghouse ? It was years ahead of its time but so crude by todays standards.On a later trip the system was redundant. Another question you may be able to answer , was the "mahout system " fitted to any other vessels apart from Brocks ?

Don A.Macleod
23rd March 2007, 01:18
Trying to remember John! Mahout was fitted with the system and it became known as the "Mahout System".Markhor was fitted with it later.The PORT CHALMERS and PORT CAROLINE(also out of Stephens)were fitted with it.As far as the design authority was concerned I'm not sure but do know that Geoff. Guest was involved in the design aspects as we discussed on occassions.When I last coasted the MAHOUT in 73 the system was still fully functional and used very compentently up top.Don.

Derek Roger
23rd March 2007, 02:20
Ill be in Scotland in a week and will be fishing with Alan Atack who did his Motor Time on Mahout . We will be calling Geoff Guest and will get as much information as possible .
The system was not at all primative ; and worked very well . The fact that it was not electronic made it possible to trouble shoot and adjust for most engineers who could read a manual or read a skematic !!!
The only problem that I see in retrospect was that there was not a very good air drier system in the design . It still worked nevertheless for many years in the most testing of humid and hot environments .
A refrigerated Air Drier system would have been a big Plus .
Derek

john g
23rd March 2007, 20:46
And so the saga goes on, remember the clunking sound as the bridge opened the air valve prior to movements. A great ship with very happy memories. Don can you remember the names of the engineering guys .....Jimmy Grant ...Jimmy Wort ....Paddy Clark....Arthur Charnock ?? Steve ?? Myself....who was the 3rd ? Errol Jackson was involved for a short time as 3rd but went home from Cal. Ken ??....maybe you can remember

Don A.Macleod
23rd March 2007, 23:16
Ken Owen,he joined in Cal.Was down at his place in Bolton (he had a pub there).This was in the early 80's when Jim Wort was with SSM and living in Glasgow.Duncan Campbell was the "old man" Erin Jackson c/o,who the devil was 2/o? Dave Tracey was 3/o,Charlie Clarke pc/o, Bryn Tinton R/o.As I've stated before the happiest ship I was ever on and and the only one framed and hung up in the house.A great team, with many happy memories.Don.

Don Matheson
24th March 2007, 12:45
John
Sorry I dont know who designed the system but from what I remember the system was fitted to two Port line ships Chalmers and Caroline but they were about the last ships from the yard and I was at sea by then, so dont know if anyone else took them up. I am pretty sure it was Westinghouse but could be wrong.
Perhaps it was apprentices pride but I thought it would be good and am very pleased to hear such good things about it.
Must have been a good system as my knowledge of air control systems later kept a tug out in Indonesia running for months (we were a long way from spares) repaired mostly by the sole of an old engine room shoe. Plastic valve seat gave way and careful thought went into which shoe to use, worked though, boy was I pleased. Know it worked for 1200 miles till we got back to Singapore and spares.
Don

john g
27th March 2007, 16:13
Don the memories are rolling back I'm stumped on the question of 2nd mate , was there a guy called Norman ?? on the deck side ? maybe that was another trip. The chippy was Dennis Taggart .....any idea what happened to Steve the other app with me. I think Erin Jackson became a master on one of the container ships...saw him at the reunion in Bootle many years ago. I must go to a dark corner and rack my brains over this one it was as you say a unique trip....cheers John

Derek Roger
27th March 2007, 16:23
And so the saga goes on, remember the clunking sound as the bridge opened the air valve prior to movements. A great ship with very happy memories. Don can you remember the names of the engineering guys .....Jimmy Grant ...Jimmy Wort ....Paddy Clark....Arthur Charnock ?? Steve ?? Myself....who was the 3rd ? Errol Jackson was involved for a short time as 3rd but went home from Cal. Ken ??....maybe you can remember

I was at Riversdale and Stow with Paddy Clark . We did our first and second

trips on Maipura and Mahout then I lost track of him . Derek

allinrob
25th April 2007, 05:56
Tony and Derek
Thank you both very much, been after that information for a lot of years. Always though it would be a good system but I dont think anyone else wanted one. Possibly ahead of their time, which would explain why some people tended not to use them as you say Derek. Have to admit I would have taken bridge control off some skippers in later years when I was chief and given it to some others who would have gained from it. No word spoken against anyones driving, but some skippers just didnt do too well with it and others (well most) were great.
Mahout and her sister have always been my favourite ships but I also did some work on the Maskeliya during repairs. The time she sailed from Glasgow and knocked down the bouy off Greenock and had to come back to the yard so I worked on her twice. Thinking about it I did more work with Brocklebanks than anyone else during my apprenticeship, always had nice ships and good engineers.
Don
I beleive both the port caroline & chalmers had the mahout system installed

John Ringrose
5th June 2008, 13:51
Must be me - I wasn't aware Mahout had been sunk.

That makes three I sailed on. Atlantic Conveyor - Maihar 2 & Mahout.

Marcus Cardew
17th November 2011, 11:24
Well, Actually it was the other way around.. John Williams, who sailed as apprentice, when I was 4/0 in '68 tracked me down last month, and over a lunch, we managed to exchange twice the number of stories in the timescale, by both talking at once.. Nothing New..

donandgina
21st November 2011, 03:07
Read a lot of threads re Mahout, mostly good. However not everthing was rosy. Sailed maiden voyage, what a nightmare. If anyone has experience of a maiden voyage maybe they will understand. Shake down trials, down the Clyde with what seemed like hundreds of shore marine experts, 24 hour runs of different lengths with different revs, recording every darn thing.
Exhaust valve problems, fires etc., piston changes in mid ocean, cocktail parties every port and doing gangway duty whilst mosquitoes ate you alive. Only thing as engineer apprentices that kept us with Brocks, the people we sailed with. Just the greatest.
Don Kelly

Gulpers
21st November 2011, 03:21
Read a lot of threads re Mahout, mostly good. However not everthing was rosy. Sailed maiden voyage, what a nightmare. If anyone has experience of a maiden voyage maybe they will understand. Shake down trials, down the Clyde with what seemed like hundreds of shore marine experts, 24 hour runs of different lengths with different revs, recording every darn thing.
Exhaust valve problems, fires etc., piston changes in mid ocean, cocktail parties every port and doing gangway duty whilst mosquitoes ate you alive. Only thing as engineer apprentices that kept us with Brocks, the people we sailed with. Just the greatest.
Don Kelly
Don,

Stuart Smith has a maiden voyage photograph of MAHOUT in our Gallery.
You will find it here (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/35948/title/brocklebank-27s-mv-mahout/cat/510). (Thumb)

donandgina
21st November 2011, 03:42
Thank you, Sir for the photo, she was pretty, can't believe she was sunk.
You have a Scottish flag up, can you not sleep? It's 9.30 pm here in the US.
Just read, as recently joined, that Geoff Guest died posted by his son. I was on board when Geoff Guest's father died, he retired to his cabin for 24 hours to grieve, he could have been flown home but he decided to stay and help us all through a difficult trip. This is what Brocklebank people did, that's what makes them special.
Don

Gulpers
21st November 2011, 04:06
Hi Don,

Sorry I don't know the people you are referring to.
I wasn't with Brocklebank but J&J Denholm.
One of my fellow Moderators, Derek Roger, is the man to ask if you have queries about Brocklebank ships, particularly MAHOUT which was one of his favourites.
Hope you keep enjoying the site. (Thumb)

donandgina
21st November 2011, 04:14
Thanks anyway Gulpers, after reading about five years of past posts, I've already enjoyed this site more than you can imagine.
Don

Tony Selman
21st November 2011, 09:48
Don, and you will continue to enjoy it. The site becomes addictive and I have no doubt you will find old shipmates. Just this very morning I have replied to a post from a C/O I sailed with in 1969. I have made some excellent contacts with former shipmates on the board.

Don A.Macleod
21st November 2011, 17:56
Hello there donandgina or just Don really I suppose! You've got the grey cells activated a bit and I could be way out. It's the name you see so I must ask were you on the Lucigen or the old Manipur on her last voyage as apprentice/engineer? Anyway it's good to see another Brocks man on board, you'll enjoy the reading. Don.

donandgina
22nd November 2011, 15:13
Hello there donandgina or just Don really I suppose! You've got the grey cells activated a bit and I could be way out. It's the name you see so I must ask were you on the Lucigen or the old Manipur on her last voyage as apprentice/engineer? Anyway it's good to see another Brocks man on board, you'll enjoy the reading. Don.

Hi Don,
Yes, just Don at present, wife Gina won't talk to me at the moment,she's fed up that I've become addicted to the site.
No, never sailed on the Lucigen, by the reports I've read I didn't miss a lot. Sailed on the Manipur, first trip as apprentice, other engineer apprentice was Kevin Ross, after we both finished at Birkenhead Tech in 62. Trip was nine months Red Sea ports, Columbo, Calcutta, US east coast, Gulf Ports, Houston Ship Canal finally finishing up the other canal in Manchester. Forget who the Chief or Skipper was, on purpose, as they kept all the apprentices on board for an extra week because the apprentices cabins weren't clean enough on final inspection. We were told we could not go ashore so we mutinied and refused to go and get the milk or newspapers for the Officers. When the coasting crew came on board they said we could get the newspapers or swim in the dock. We didn't fancy a swim.
Apparently some things stick in your mind more than others,names are not one for me but I do remember an Engineer on board called Mike Duggan. If my memory is correct, one of the deck apprentices had his back broken in the US. He got hit by a carpet roll as he was coming up the ladder out of the hold and we left him in the US to recover . I think we had a group on board called Dene Kay and the Pirates and we played at the Scherazade in Calcutta but that's another story and I'll have to go, wife's started talking to me again.
Don Kelly

JTC
23rd February 2013, 16:34
I was with Port Line for the majority of my sea career.

However, one day at home at the end of my leave, I received a 'Brownie', to join this most unfamiliar ship, well, to me, anyway.

It didn't have the prefix 'Port', just the words 'MV Mahout'!

It was also in a most unfamiliar port because I was used to southern ports but in this instance I was to join the vessel in Dundee!

This was the beginning of a nine month trip of a most interesting and enjoyable nature. It was 1974.

New ports, new crew, new cargo, all most interesting to say the least.

I can see my fellow crew members in my minds eye but their names, I'm afraid I have forgotten, maybe, only one or two first names I can recall.

There were a few 'Brocklebank old timers', who resented a 'new kid on the block', like me, from what they said was a 'Posh' company like Port Line!

One name and character I can recall was a lad from Byker or is it Biker in Newcastle. He was a Senior Third Engineer called Ken Rutter.

The one 'bad' element about that Brocklebank trip on the 'Mahout', was that the ship was run by a committee comprising of the Chief Steward, Chief Officer and Chief Engineer, in that order. The Captain was rarely ever seen and was basicially only a figurehead, a rubber stamp for the ''Committee''.

I hadn't come across that in Port line before.

I did a few months coasting with a great Chief Engineer, his name escapes me but he wore leg calipers because of a childhood illness.

One of the 'mates', devoted a great deal of time to stoking, decoking, refilling and firing-up his pipe during the trip.
It was almost as if the pipe was the main man and the 'mate' was the assistant to it!

There are many more stories about that eventful trip I could tell you, but next time, maybe.

My next trip was on the ''MV Maihar'', another interesting trip and my last with Brocklebank before yet another last, my last trip with Port Line on the then 20 year old ''MV Port Auckland".

I ended my sea going career in 1976 on a Moss Tanker laid-up on the River Fal. I'd had enough!

The Chief was probably Douglas Ruddick?, I was second on the Markhor, Dougie was the Chief, it was 1972, I remember it well, because we were in Colombo when the BEA Trident crashed on take off (Staines) on June 18th, a good friend of mine died in that crash.
The Electrician was Kenny Muir (ex Q.Mary). I also knew Ken Rutter as I worked on the Mickey Mouse ships at Huskisson? Dock in Liverpool for about 6 months, "the gang" stayed at the seamans mission in New Strand, Bootle. I sailed with Cunard Brocks for 9 years, joined them in 1968 from Irish Shipping Ltd, sailed on the Andania, Saxonia, Mahout (3rd Eng). Markhor (2nd) Luminous (2nd), Lumiere (2nd&chief)) and finished my sea going career as chief on the Luminous, I was the last company chief on the Luminous as I left her in Valletta in, I think, March 1977, when she was sold to the Greeks?, she certainly had Greek Engineers as I was made a very generous offer to go to Ras Tanura, I declined. My last view of her was of the "Luminous" being painted out as we were going ashore (for me, the last time) in Valletta Harbour.
I have very happy memories of all the ships I sailed on, (both ISL & Cunard Brocks), Some names that come to mind....Ray Waring (chief on Mahout), George Black (chief, coasting on Markhor), Freddy Painter?? (chief on Andania) TV?? Brown, (chief on Saxonia), Tommy Lacey (2nd on Scotia?), think I did one trip on her as well, and numerous others that will spring to mind after I sign off.
JTC (John Carroll)

Waddie
4th August 2014, 09:32
System worked well Don although it tended to use a lot of strating air compared to when on manual control as the starting air sequence with the air "on " was contolled by a timing volume to ensure revs were up high enough before the fuel was put "on " . On manual control the familiar engineer could put the air fuel on a lot earlier and thus save starting air .
If you look in my Gallery you will see a diagram of the system which the Chief Engineer had me trace out !!( I was apprentice at the time ) I transcribed it on the back of an old chart.


I did hear of an occurrance where the starting air " stuck on " and the vessel ( Markor I think ) moved a considerable distance up Kidderpore Dock Calcutta on Starting Air draining the bottle in the process ! This as it turned out was not a failure of the control system but a sticky contol valve in the Sulzer system ie It would have done the same thing on Manual ! This however had the effect of making some people a bit "Gun Shy " of the system .

Regards Derek
Derek

My first trip to sea in 1976 was on the Mahout. Joined in Tilbury, must have visited every country in the Gulf, and finally a full cargo of tea from Calcutta to Newport.

Christmas day (and dinner) in the Bay of Biscay.

I do remember one incident whilst we were manoeuvring. I was off duty and looking over the stern as we got closer and closer to a small coaster. We eventually 'kissed' it and one on the bigggest balckest guys I've ever seen came running out (from the galley I assume) with a meat cleaver in his hand and started shaking it at me. I just pointed to the bridge!!

I believe that it was in fact a lack of control air. The engine was turning but there wasn't enough control air to put the fuel lever on.

I remember another standby where I was on duty and a deck cadet came down for his engine room time. Although he had been down the engine room plenty of times this time he managed to give his head a big whack on the starting air valve wheel! The valve was opened by an extended spindle just above the manoeuvring station on the bottom plates. With the valve open (for standby) the handwheel was lower by a good few inches. He was a tall lad, and the inevitable happened!