Mahseer

R798780
11th November 2004, 16:44
Built 1948, scrapped mid '70s. At 67 ft beam, along with Maipurah and sister ships Matra and Manaar, was too wide for the Manchester Ship Canal. Regular Brocklebanks were 63 ft 4˝ in beam. Three cargo derricks at cargo hatch 1, three sampson posts and three cargo derricks at No 6 hatch - to work barges lying between ships moored together.
Name "an Indian river fish".

noel grayson
23rd August 2006, 15:46
I was very interested in the photo which shows the Mahseer on her maiden voyage going through the Cape Cod Canal.
I was on my first trip and if you look very closely at the photo you will see me at the for'd end of the boat deck on the starboard side. I had gone there to see us go under the bridge.
The Old Man was L.T.Owen,Mate Tommy Wardle 2nd Mate Dennis Keller, though I suppose there will very few now who will remember those names

skymaster
23rd August 2006, 15:55
Great photos of two of Brocklebanks finest!!

Mike [keep em coming]

noel grayson
23rd August 2006, 16:28
I'm very intrigued as to who "Mike" is!!

skymaster
23rd August 2006, 16:45
Ex Brocklebanks deck apprentice 1955-1958 Mathura,Maihar,Magdapur,Mahanada.See my posts and photos under skymaster.Lived in Canada since 1968.
Cheers

Mike

Marcus Cardew
23rd August 2006, 19:53
Were not the 'Mighty Mipe' and her 3 sisters known as the 'Black Four'?

gwzm
23rd August 2006, 22:08
I'll always remember my first trip to sea. I joined the Mahseer in 1963 as a very rookie 19 year old Chota Marconi-Sahib (2nd R/O) under the wing of Harry Jefferson who was the Burrah Marconi-Sahib (1st R/O). Our departure from Royal Albert Dock, London, was delayed because a railway waggon flap was dropped on the mate's head while he was walking along the dock to check the draughts. I think his name was ???? Jackson and he wasn't able to sail. By the time a replacement was found it was the dead of night by the time we got going. Harry put me on the key to send the opening TR to Northforeland radio (GNF) and, as you can imagine, my hand was somewhat shaky! I'd just got hold of GNF and transferred to the working frequency to send the TR when the transmitter stopped transmitting. Quick as a flash, Harry hit the quick start button on the Marconi Reliance emergency transmitter and I used that to send the TR. Afterwards we fixed the IMR 39 transmitter (aka the meatsafe, 'cos that's what it looked like) - a lead had detached itself from the keying relay and turned in.
Next morning Harry got me started on the first watch and left me to it. I'd only been there a few minutes trying to unscramble the unholy cacophony that was 500 kc/s in those days when there was an SOS. I nearly fainted! However the casualty was in the Baltic so we didn't need to get involved. Phewwwwwww.
Harry was good tutor and taught me a lot, especially how to stay out of the way of the "Old Man", John (aka Gobby) Nuttall who seemed to have a down on inferior life-forms like first-trip 2nd R/Os, but that's another story.
Looking back on it now, what a great privilege it was to be at sea in what was to be the Indian summer of the British Merchant Navy.

All the best,

gwzm

Tony Selman
23rd August 2006, 22:35
I was on the coast with Gobby Nuttall and don't recall him liking Burrah Marconi Sahibs that much either!

R798780
23rd August 2006, 22:36
Were not the 'Mighty Mipe' and her 3 sisters known as the 'Black Four'?
No sisters for the Mighty Mipe (Maipura). Black four, regulation beam, were Magdapur, Mahronda, Manipur and Maidan.

noel grayson
23rd August 2006, 22:46
I'll always remember my first trip to sea. I joined the Mahseer in 1963 as a very rookie 19 year old Chota Marconi-Sahib (2nd R/O) under the wing of Harry Jefferson who was the Burrah Marconi-Sahib (1st R/O). Our departure from Royal Albert Dock, London, was delayed because a railway waggon flap was dropped on the mate's head while he was walking along the dock to check the draughts. I think his name was ???? Jackson and he wasn't able to sail. By the time a replacement was found it was the dead of night by the time we got going. Harry put me on the key to send the opening TR to Northforeland radio (GNF) and, as you can imagine, my hand was somewhat shaky! I'd just got hold of GNF and transferred to the working frequency to send the TR when the transmitter stopped transmitting. Quick as a flash, Harry hit the quick start button on the Marconi Reliance emergency transmitter and I used that to send the TR. Afterwards we fixed the IMR 39 transmitter (aka the meatsafe, 'cos that's what it looked like) - a lead had detached itself from the keying relay and turned in.
Next morning Harry got me started on the first watch and left me to it. I'd only been there a few minutes trying to unscramble the unholy cacophony that was 500 kc/s in those days when there was an SOS. I nearly fainted! However the casualty was in the Baltic so we didn't need to get involved. Phewwwwwww.
Harry was good tutor and taught me a lot, especially how to stay out of the way of the "Old Man", John (aka Gobby) Nuttall who seemed to have a down on inferior life-forms like first-trip 2nd R/Os, but that's another story.
Looking back on it now, what a great privilege it was to be at sea in what was to be the Indian summer of the British Merchant Navy.

All the best,

gwzm
In reply to GWZM, the Mate who was injured was Peter Slade, who's father was Sid Slade, Marine Super in Middlesbrough

R798780
23rd August 2006, 22:48
The Old Man was L.T.Owen,Mate Tommy Wardle 2nd Mate Dennis Keller, though I suppose there will very few now who will remember those names
In Columbo on Malakand in '64 the 2nd mate Colin Kingston was at pains to ensure all flags and ensigns were struck simultaneously at sunset. His explanation was that Dennis Keller was master of Maidan immediately ahead of us on the quay.

As 2nd mate myself on Mahseer in '72 I came across Dennis Keller's immaculate script in the stability record book on the maiden voyage.

I note Noel's 6 inch GM on Maskeliya - thought 6 inches was almost the norm there, might have been less heading for Djibouti for bunkers, she listed and hung there for a while when we altered course. Mahseer left UK with 12' 6". Rolling in Biscay was something else, got sore ears from the pillow.

Tony Crompton
24th August 2006, 10:25
I was on the coast with Gobby Nuttall and don't recall him liking Burrah Marconi Sahibs that much either!

I did my first trip with him on "Malancha".

I do not think Gob Nutall liked anybody apart from Gob Nutall. Did anybody ever like him?
-----------------------------
Tony C

John Leary
24th August 2006, 20:16
Captain Nutall was the master of the Mahseer for the outward leg of my first voyage deep sea as a Junior R/O in the latter part of 1963. At that time I had nothing to judge by so assumed that his manner towards his officers was the norm. He was a very large man with a barrel shaped body mounted on strangely thin legs. He had a prodigious capacity for alcohol and at Gan on the way to Colombo after an extremely intense session in the saloon slipped into unconsciousness whilst sitting on the edge of one of the settees. There he lay, dead to the world lying prone along the length of the settee with his legs hanging in free space over the padded arms. As he was far too heavy to lift he was covered with a blanket and left for time and nature to work its recuperative magic.

The next part I always thought was very sad because on “recovering” and before we left Gan he insisted that the Chief R/O send a long, melancholic telegram to head office. I never saw it but I know that the Chief R/O, the Chief Officer and the Chief Engineer did their best to dissuade him from sending it, but being the Master, he insisted so off it went.

After we left Gan and before we arrived at Colombo he sent a further message cancelling the first one but it was too late because when we arrived at Colombo he was met by his wife and his replacement. I never saw him after that so do not know if he ever took command again.

japottinger
23rd September 2006, 19:54
Did one foreign trip on Manipur with Nuttall 10/7/59-9/11/59, heard a lot about him previously, all in all was quite friendly and basically left us Engineers alone and kept well out of our way, possibly because CE Johhny MacCallum was able for anyone.

Derek Roger
24th September 2006, 02:24
Talking of GM .
The Maipura on its trip from Colombo to Cal ( 1965) had a very low GM ! some inches .The vessel was very tender and fortunatley we had no weather or problems . We rolled our way to Cal in perfect weather. !
The Mahsud on its Maidan voyage sailed from Colombo to Cal with a negative GM as we later found out having left Colombo !
Panic struck and we ( engineers spent a lot of time pressing up the double botttoms ( Fuel tanks ) to lessen the effect. The ship had a permanent list to port !!! Again fortunatley there was no bad weather and we were all very Happy to make Cal. The source of the problem was the addition of cargo in the " Transporter Space " which was a space through which Fridge cargo was normally used during Fridge loading ( not a normal cargospace )

noel grayson
24th September 2006, 15:16
Built 1948, scrapped mid '70s. At 67 ft beam, along with Maipurah and sister ships Matra and Manaar, was too wide for the Manchester Ship Canal. Regular Brocklebanks were 63 ft 4˝ in beam. Three cargo derricks at cargo hatch 1, three sampson posts and three cargo derricks at No 6 hatch - to work barges lying between ships moored together.
Name "an Indian river fish".

Mahseer and Matra were sisters, not Manaar, which was a one off.

Nobby Grayson

gwzm
24th September 2006, 15:27
As has been mentioned previously, Captain Nuttall like a sherbet or two. He had an enormous gut, according to the Calcutta tailors: "eeh biggest gut in all de Brocklibank - 54 inches!" The rule on board was uniform or proper dress in the bar at all times. However, Captain Nuttall used to sit drinking in his cabin on his lonesome of an evening. When he got morose he used to come down to the bar in his singlet and shorts with his gut hanging over the corset he used to wear to try and hold it in - not a pretty sight. Everyone usually disappeared sharpish when he came into the bar.