British Oak

ruud
3rd January 2007, 15:17
Ahoy,
Another fine shot of the British Oak 16,000 tons from "The British Petroleum Co. Ltd.Photograph"

John_F
3rd January 2007, 16:35
Ruud,
She was launched on 28th May 1953 & completed on 16th October of that year by Smiths Dock Company of Middlesborough, 16,562 dwt. She did 19 years with BP before going for scrap on January 12th 1972 at Vinaroz in Spain. They were a nice class of vessel to serve on with interesting runs (usually!) Thanks for posting.
Kind regards,
John.

Brent Pyburn
4th January 2007, 18:18
I sailed as first trip uncertificated third mate on the British Oak in 1969. It was a great ship. On my first watch after leaving IOG the old man CG Jones gave me a hammer and said if I wanted him to bang on the deck!! I was scared stiff going up the North Sea that night. We went everywhere on that ship even transporting aviation fuel to the US Air Force in Guam from Westernport. I remember vividly on the buoy berth at Guam watching the B52s taking off for Hanoi. They were so heavily loaded that some of them never left the runway. I also remember the US Services radio station which was immortalised in the film Good Morning Vietnam with Robin Williams. We went from there to the West African Coast sailing out of Durban for the Congo, Dahomey and other ports on that coast. Fantastic

gadgee
5th January 2007, 15:40
Hi Brent

Looks like you and I were close compatriots in BP. I joined my first ship the Beacon in October 66 and I left BP in 1971. I do not think we ever met? I remember my first trip as U3/0 on the Kiwi in March 69, scared stiff like you once the old man Peter Waller left me alone. We were all over the North Sea/Denmark/Sweden. One time I wondered why the traffic around the ship had changed orientation so drastically until I realised that the auto pilot had failed in a big way and I had omitted to put the off course alarm on!

paul0510
5th January 2007, 16:10
...and then there's me who went U3M on the Destiny in '69. Somebody at HO had it in for me, cos I did 3 spells on that bugger as Cadet/U3M, 3M and 2M.
Talking of B52s, Brent, reminds me of a thread I wrote way back. I was on the Willow at the time, methinks. Here's a link..it is part of something slightly different but...enjoy!

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=4141&page=2

Brent Pyburn
5th January 2007, 17:01
Hi Brent

Looks like you and I were close compatriots in BP. I joined my first ship the Beacon in October 66 and I left BP in 1971. I do not think we ever met? I remember my first trip as U3/0 on the Kiwi in March 69, scared stiff like you once the old man Peter Waller left me alone. We were all over the North Sea/Denmark/Sweden. One time I wondered why the traffic around the ship had changed orientation so drastically until I realised that the auto pilot had failed in a big way and I had omitted to put the off course alarm on!

Paul you're right we must have been compatriates. I joined my first ship the Queen in IOG on October 18 at the IOG. No sooner had we cleared the Medway when we ran into fog and I was called up to the bridge for the first time. I was put on the telegraph which was electric. Well, I had only ever seen the telegraph operated in 'The Cruel Sea' and 'Sink the Bismark' so when I got the first order I swung it like a true professional from Stop to Full Ahead to Full Astern then to Dead Slow Ahead. The Old Man went bananas especially when the engineers rang up and asked whether we could decide on what movement we wanted in that sarcastic way only the engine room can!

Brent Pyburn
5th January 2007, 17:13
...and then there's me who went U3M on the Destiny in '69. Somebody at HO had it in for me, cos I did 3 spells on that bugger as Cadet/U3M, 3M and 2M.
Talking of B52s, Brent, reminds me of a thread I wrote way back. I was on the Willow at the time, methinks. Here's a link..it is part of something slightly different but...enjoy!

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=4141&page=2


Great stories Paul particularly your Sattahip experiences with the Americans. I went ashore to the Officers Club in Guam and met up with some of the aircrew, we were treated like long lost buddies. We wanted to reciprocate their hospitality so invited them back to the ship the next night but unfortunately because of the intensity of their missions they couldn't do it. However one of them told me "you would never get him on one of those floating bombs called tankers. Far too goddam dangerous" I guess everything is relative!!