British Flag 1953

ruud
4th January 2007, 17:53
Ahoy,
Can't remember who requested her, but knew someone did:
Here the "FLAG"
Note: Forgot to mention the ©, so courtesy to DAVID GALLICHAN.

Geoff_E
4th January 2007, 18:06
Another one Ruud!

I can't remember requesting it but very grateful anyway. It was my first ship as Cadet in January 1971. A bit of a wreck but "character forming", as they say.
BTW can any BP readers remember counting the double strokes per minute of the steam recip. cargo pumps?

alastairjs
5th January 2007, 12:34
Geoff, remember it well and the vibrations & thumps that travelled right through the midships accommodation when they were working hard. Rudd, British Flag was one of 20 16,000 tonners ordered by the company after WWII and delivered over an 8 year period. She was one of 3 built by R. & W. Hawthorne Leslie & Co. Ltd., Hebburn, Yard No. 716, O.N.185934. Launched on 12.12.1952 and completed in July 1953 she was 16,750 DWT, 547' 0¼" LOA, Breadth of 62' 9¾", Summer draught 30' 9½". She was powered by a 6cyl 2 S.C.S.A Doxford type oil engine, built by the shipbuilder, which developed 6,400 bhp @ 115 rpm giving a service speed of 13¾ knots. Tank layout 9C & 18W with 2 pump rooms housing 4 steam recip. cargo pumps. Max discharge rate 2,000 t.w./hr. She had Butterworth portable tank cleaning equipment and was fitted with a 12" Stern Discharge Line. After 18 years service she arrived at Burriani on the 19th July 1971 for demolition by Ciqualar y Peris. Work commenced on 2.8.1971. I sailed on two of this class, British Chancellor & British Sportsman.
Regards,
Alastair

John_F
5th January 2007, 14:11
Another one Ruud!


BTW can any BP readers remember counting the double strokes per minute of the steam recip. cargo pumps?

Geoff,
Like Alastair, remember it well. At least you could always tell when the tank was almost empty when the pumps started racing. Then you started the listing & draining.
I remember once taking a cargo of ATG to Montreal on the Birch. The back pressure was so high that the discharge rate was no more than 100 tons per hour. Those pumps really had to work hard & we certainly knew about it midships. Still, it meant a week or so in a civilised port & plenty of time for everyone to get ashore.
Kind regards,
John.

ruud
5th January 2007, 14:20
Ahoy Mateys,
Thanks for the splendid explanations,hereby will add a bonus for Alastair!(Thumb)

alastairjs
5th January 2007, 14:23
John, I remember another port like that, somewhere in the north of Norway I think. The storage tanks, for whatever reason, were built into the side of a small mountain. I can recall being there on the Clyde Pioneer for ten days and we only had a part cargo of diesel to discharge. The C/O suggested that if we set up a bucket chain using all the crew we might get finished sooner! Can you remember the name of this place? Lovely people but a bit lacking in night life.
Regards,
Alastair

graham
5th January 2007, 18:16
i think if i remember right the photo of the flag was on the pack of playing cards regards graham

ruud
5th January 2007, 18:25
Ahoy Graham,
Possible they've been used on several occasions/items, but this one was send to me on a Cd-r made by David Gallachan.Don't know where he got his from, made by himself or dispatched to him.

paul0510
5th January 2007, 22:29
Alastair,

maybe you are referring to Kjopsvik in a side fjord near Narvik?

wa002f0328
7th January 2007, 17:30
could it be Svolvaer?

ernhelenbarrett
8th January 2007, 11:51
Re those tanks built into the side of the mountain , we visited that place on the British Gratitude, think it was either Tromso or Trondheim and they were built there by the Germans to make them impossible to be bombed by the RAF.
We spent about a week there discharging and there was a restaurant/Bar at the very top of the hill and I downed a great many Norwegian very weak beers there in April or May 1955.
Rgds Ern Barrett

John_F
8th January 2007, 18:31
Re those tanks built into the side of the mountain , we visited that place on the British Gratitude, think it was either Tromso or Trondheim and they were built there by the Germans to make them impossible to be bombed by the RAF.
We spent about a week there discharging and there was a restaurant/Bar at the very top of the hill and I downed a great many Norwegian very weak beers there in April or May 1955.
Rgds Ern Barrett
Ern,
It could be Trondheim. I went there once on the Patriot & recorded in my Journal at the time that it seemed to take a long time to discharge. Also recorded that we had a bloody good night ashore there as well, in spite of only imbibing many litres of the 1.5% proof beers!
Kind regards,
John F.

alastairjs
9th January 2007, 19:40
Thanks, gentlemen, it was Trondheim, Ern many thanks for the explanation as to how the tanks came to be buried in the mountain side, I always wondered but hadn't the wit to ask. wa002f0328 thanks for your contribution but not Svolvaer, the tank farm was built normally there. I have good reason to remember having been very smitten by one of the young ladies who lived there! I even paid to go back while on leave, a long and expensive journey but worth the effort as I recall.
Regards,
Alastair

wa002f0328
9th January 2007, 22:47
Hello Alistair, we went up to Svolvaer on British Patrol in May 1963 nice little place, remember the snow the snow being about 10 feet high and very cold.

alastairjs
10th January 2007, 11:00
wa002f0328, yep, that's the place alright, very very cold in the winter. As I remember it, the route to the tanker berth involved a bit of twisting and turning. On my first visit, after being out all night, I was put on the wheel for leaving port and was having difficulty concentrating. Got a sharp word from the old man as a result which did the trick so far as staying awake was concerned. He had a word later, something about candles & both ends!
Alastair

ruud
16th February 2007, 17:41
Ahoy,
This saves me to start another new thread,because she was already posted here, but another shot of her will give another view.
The BRITISH FLAG

GeorgeM13
17th February 2007, 03:15
Ah but, there were two berths in Svolvaer as we found out on the Sergeant in '69. They also told lies, no night sailings they said, slowing the pumps down proved to be a waste of time. Oh for the days before the Port Log sheets and optimum pumping rates.
Cheers George

John Rogers
17th February 2007, 04:03
f my memory serves me right the bar was named the Bristol Hotel.
John.