Glomar Explorer

dom
5th January 2007, 14:38
the Glomar Explorer was built to raise the Russian sub,K129 wich had sunk at a depth of 4000m,built at a cost of over 200million$ the CIA is to have been reported investing 550million$ in the project.the fore part of the sub was raised and the bodies of 6 seamen were recovered ,they were given a burial at sea,the Glomar was later converted to a drillship capable of drilling in waters of 7500 ft

gdynia
5th January 2007, 14:48
The Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., at a cost in excess of $200 million. It set sail on June 20, 1974. Hughes told the media that the ship's purpose was to extract manganese nodules from the ocean floor. This marine geology cover story became surprisingly influential, spurring many others to examine the idea.

While the ship did recover a portion of the vessel, a mechanical failure in the grapple caused half of the submarine to break off during recovery. This lost section is said to have held many of the more sought after items, including the code book and nuclear missiles. It was subsequently reported that two nuclear-tipped torpedoes and some cryptographic machines were recovered, along with the bodies of six Soviet submariners, who were subsequently given a formal burial at sea, in a filmed ceremony.

There are credible claims, however, that the material recovered included nuclear missiles and various code books. It has been suggested that, contrary to the official account, the entire submarine was recovered and the CIA released disinformation to give the impression of an unsuccessful mission to the Soviets.

david
6th January 2007, 07:55
Neville.
Do you know what ever happened to her after all these clandestine ops?

David D.

Bearsie
6th January 2007, 10:59
Actually I am surprised she is still afloat, Her particulars are give in the article too.
see below

In 1997, the ship was taken to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard for modifications that converted it to a dynamically-positioned deep sea drilling ship, capable of drilling in waters of 7500 feet and, with some modification, up to 11,500 feet, which is 2,000 feet deeper than any other existing rig. The conversion cost over $180 million and was completed during the first quarter of 1998.

The conversion of the vessel in 1997 was the start of a 30-year lease from the U.S. Navy to Global Marine Drilling. Global Marine merged with Santa Fe International Corporation in 2001 to become GlobalSantaFe Corporation [1], which now operates the vessel.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glomar_Explorer

gdynia
6th January 2007, 12:14
David
Last I heard of her she was laid up States Side

neillrush
18th January 2007, 13:20
She was in Gibraltar last year and I missed her, will try and see if anyone got the pics. She was on the North Mole and because of her size the Airport were actually talking about re-routing flights because of her height.
For some strange reason she never appeared on the Port movements and also she did not register on the Suez canal transits as she came northbound.
The only thing I know is she departed to the west!!!
Rgds Neill

jim heslop
28th March 2008, 09:18
The Glomar Explorer was specially built to raise the soviet sub K129 off the Hawaii Islands and the americans got every last piece of her.
There is a book written about K129 and why it was off Hawaii

non descript
28th March 2008, 09:54
After reading Neville's comment "It has been suggested that, contrary to the official account, the entire submarine was recovered and the CIA released disinformation to give the impression of an unsuccessful mission to the Soviets." in # 2 above, I feel more stupid than I do normally, for it has never dawned on me, until now, that the story about the failure and the submarine falling back was anything but true. It now seems a very logical way to save face.

Orcadian
28th March 2008, 11:42
I remember seeing this vessel in the midle of the North Pacific from a tanker called the Bangkok on a voyage from the P Gulf to San Francisco. It was only years later that I discovered the real mission that she was on. Our third mate at the tme asked them what they were doing and was told that they were looking for the manganese nodules from the ocean floor. We had no reason to disbelieve them at the time.

jim heslop
29th March 2008, 09:09
There is a book called K129 and it tells you all about this sub and what it was up too and were it is now and why it was kept under wraps

Don Matheson
29th March 2008, 10:57
Worked for Global Marine for six years and my boss for almost all that time had sailed on the Explorer. He was ex US Navy P.O. so passed the security clearance required by everyone on board. He thought the rig had the best equipment that money could buy at the time but her derrick was a short one so they could only work stands of 60 ft. not the 90 ft. stands of a normal rig.
He never said much about the submarine except the parts that were general knowledge, just the odd bit to keep me interested. Global magazine at one time published an acount by (I think) on of the executive officers who while not saying exactly what happened finished with the line " the American taxpayer certainly got value for their dollar."
Make of his statement what you will.

Don

Bearsie
30th March 2008, 13:01
one of the executive officers who while not saying exactly what happened finished with the line " the American taxpayer certainly got value for their dollar."
Make of his statement what you will.

Don

That's because she was "spec'ed" by a civilian with a brain.
That's usually the only time tax payers get their money's worth ....

KenLin39
30th March 2008, 15:19
Extensive info via the link below. Ken.

http://mikekemble.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/k129.html

Don Matheson
30th March 2008, 17:36
Bearsie

I think he was talking about Global's efforts on this project and what that cost regarding "American taxpayer getting value for their tax dollar". No one would expect a project like that to make a profit or even come inside a ballpark figure for what it cost. The guys I have talked with about it were all cagey about what they said.
Read the link from Kenlin 39 and the Global Marine guy named, Tom Covellone was Vice President of Engineering when I met and worked with him but never even mentioned any involvement, despite there being other guys working with us who had been on the Explorer.
I also remember that the Explorer was limited to time on site as the Russians were getting suspicious as to what she was doing and they were getting close to the Explorer with some of their "spy ships", in the end forseing her to depart the location.
The tonnage lift has been mentioned but she had the heaviest equipment available which I believe was why she had a short derrick due to handling of the pipe. I also believe the rig floor was gimballed to prevent movement while lifting.
Thanks for the link Kenlin 39 very good. I will try and contact some of the guys who were on her at one time or another and see what they say.

Don

Bearsie
30th March 2008, 21:32
Don, I definitely agree! Since we can all asume that they got the sub and the stuff they were after it was definitely money well spent!
Especially by the standards of the time.
The whole thing was quite "the" project!

Regards, Pete.

randcmackenzie
30th March 2008, 21:52
I remember seeing this vessel in the midle of the North Pacific from a tanker called the Bangkok on a voyage from the P Gulf to San Francisco. It was only years later that I discovered the real mission that she was on. Our third mate at the tme asked them what they were doing and was told that they were looking for the manganese nodules from the ocean floor. We had no reason to disbelieve them at the time.

Yes, I remember that fine, Billy, and like yourself, it was a long time before I read what they were really doing.
They had a Russian supply boat standing by, which they said was on hire to them, but the truth was probably quite different.

We interupted our 37th showing of 'Thoroughly Modern Millie' to go and have a look.

NAUCLER
21st March 2012, 03:26
Actually the loss of this rather old (built 1960 at SevMash) and out-dated diesel-electric driven (not atomic driven) submarine, of Class Project 629A, of the very first generation of missile carriers, with some few nuclear powered torpedoes and some handful missiles with short range, may not been called a "great catch". It was very, VERY lucky for Europe's defence against an American attack or occupation in those days of the Cold War they didn't catch any newer sub with high-tech missiles and equipment.

Slap
7th October 2012, 07:24
Dont forget the Glomar Java Sea....which sank will all aboard ..or were took prisoner by the Vietnamese....same CIA chit, different story...google it. I lost family members on it. regards, SSSlap