Brocklebank Cadet Ships

tom e kelso
6th January 2007, 07:35
Some time back I came across a photo of a large group of cadets on a vessel with a Brocklebank name, which I have forgotten. The pic looked as if it was taken in the 1920-30's and there must have been about 20 cadets (in uniform) with the Master and officers shown.

I would appreciate if anyone give me any information about any Brocklebank "cadetships" .

(I can find no mention of Brocklebank in David Thomas' splendid book "The Right Kind of Boy")

Tom

Tony Sprigings
6th January 2007, 10:02
Yes. At one time between the first and second WW. we had four ships which each carried 30 cadets officers. I only have the names of 3 of them and they were the Makalla built 1918. Malakand built 1919 and the Matheran built 1919.
Details can be found in Duncn Haws book Merchant Fleets (Thos & Jno. Brocklebank)
Tony Sprigings

Tony Crompton
6th January 2007, 10:15
Yes. At one time between the first and second WW. we had four ships which each carried 30 cadets officers. I only have the names of 3 of them and they were the Makalla built 1918. Malakand built 1919 and the Matheran built 1919.
Details can be found in Duncn Haws book Merchant Fleets (Thos & Jno. Brocklebank)
Tony Sprigings

Hi Tony,

The fourth one was "Anchoria" (Brocks 1770-1950 Vol 2)

Best wishes for 2007,
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Tony C

Tony Crompton
6th January 2007, 10:30
Quote from Brock's History,

"The four masted barques had carried as many as 12 cadets and the first steamers were also fitted out so that a small number of apprentices could be trained at sea. In 1918 the directors decided to concentrate the cadets on four ships which were specially fitted out for the purpose. Thirty cadets were to act as deck crews on each of 4 vessels, a schoolmaster and a surgeon being added to the complement. Makalla, Anchoria ,Malakand & Matheran were altered and the scheme was a great success, but later, when the economic situaton became acute it had to be abandoned. There was a reversion to the old system af a small number of apprenticec on each ship."

It does not say when the scheme actually ended but presumably in the mid 1920's.
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Tony C

Tony Sprigings
6th January 2007, 10:50
Hi Tony,
Thanks for the addition to mine. I think the cadet ships continued into the 30's because some of the 'old timers' I sailed with talked a lot about them.
Happy New Year to you both.
Tony

Tony Selman
6th January 2007, 11:07
There are a couple of photo's taken on these cadet ships in the gallery of Stuart Smith (I think). Stuart has a wonderful library of both Brocklebank and many other ships so it might take a bit of finding. I'm doing this from memory but I think they are from the archive of a gentleman called Dashwood-Howard or some similar sounding name and were taken in the twenties and thirties, again from memory.

Tony Selman
6th January 2007, 11:19
Right, I have checked it out now and there are photos of the ships and in a couple of cases photos of cadets on those ships. They are actually in Stuart Smith's gallery and the gentleman's archive is Jo Dashwood-Howard.

If you are not particularly familiar with finding images in the Gallery this is the easiest way.

Go to the home page. Click on "Gallery", just beneath the photo of the United States. When the Gallery page opens up with lots of photos of ships with comments etc. scroll down the page and about 1/3 of the way down on the right hand side you will find a blue bar with a blank box in it labelled "Search". Type in the name of the ship you are looking for in the box, click "Go" and and all photos of that ship will appear. Repeat the process for the next ship etc.

Derek Roger
6th January 2007, 16:42
If you go to my gallery you will find pictures of the Makalla and some of my late father and his friends ( apprentices ) of that time .
Derek

tom e kelso
7th January 2007, 07:30
Many thanks for these replies.

Tom

Roger Bentley
7th January 2007, 16:55
In 1953 Brocklebanks commissioned a two volume history. This was written by John Fredric (sic) Gibson and published by Henry Young and Sons Ltd in Liverpool and I make due acknowledgement to them. On page 45 of Volume 2 the following is written about cadet ships ..."In 1918 the directors decided to concentrate the cadets on four ships which were to be specially fitted for this purpose. Thirty cadets were to act as deck crews on each of the four vessels, a schoolmaster and surgeon being added to the complement. MAKALLA, ANCHORIA, MALAKAND, and MATHERAN were altered, and the scheme was a great success, but later when the economic situation became acute, it had to be abandoned owing to the amount of space taken up. There was a reversion to the old system of a small number of apprentices to each ship." Hope this helps. Regards, Roger Bentley

Tony Crompton
7th January 2007, 17:34
In 1953 Brocklebanks commissioned a two volume history. This was written by John Fredic (sic) Gibson and published by Henry Young and Sons Ltd in Liverpool and I make due acknowledgement to them. On page 45 of Volume 2 the following is written about cadet ships ..."In 1918 the directors decided to concentrate the cadets on four ships which were to be specially fitted for this purpose. Thirty cadets were to act as deck crews on each of the four vessels, a schoolmaster and surgeon being added to the complement. MAKALLA, ANCHORIA, MALAKAND, and MATHERAN were altered, and the scheme was a great success, but later when the economic situation became acute, it had to be abandoned owing to the amount of space taken up. There was a reversion to the old system of a small number of apprentices to each ship." Hope this helps. Regards, Roger Bentley


SNAP!!
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Tony C