Lagos cement ships

steve d
11th January 2007, 20:15
Does anyone recall the ships all carrying cement to lagos ( suposedly up to 20 million tons of the stuff.) Seem to recall it was just another case of corruption that nigeria was and is famous for.Was on British Security in 1975, paid of in lagos and the sight of hundreds of ships loaded with cement all at anchor still amazes me now .

K urgess
11th January 2007, 20:30
Weren't some of them there for so long that the cement went solid and had to be broken out with windy hammers?
I heard it was the misplacing of a full stop or comma, or the wrong measure of weight that caused the problem.

There were quite a few in '76 which was the last time I was at Lagos.

eldersuk
11th January 2007, 23:03
Have a look at this link, from "Time" 27 October 1975
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,913575,00.html

Derek

Brent Pyburn
11th January 2007, 23:24
The one thing that sticks in my mind was the incessant chatter on channel 16At least on a tanker you berthed relatively quickly (days rather than months)
The downside was you got berthed next to the abbatoir where the smell and noise was indescribable. I remember going ashore with my wife and people were fighting for the offal as it was thrown out of the gates of the abbatoir.
Bit like away supporters coming out of Millwall's football ground after a match!

Hammerfan
12th January 2007, 00:35
REmember it very well like u Brent that abatoir and the soap factory when they perched their rear ends over the rocks and let rip.But the ships at anchor full of cement that had gone off was incredible and yes they had to break it up with windy hammers.Crews out there that didnt know who owned the ships they were in. no wages.If my memory serves me well some were out there for 18 mths.foreign flag

K urgess
12th January 2007, 01:02
The Ch16 chatter I remember 'cos there was one foreign "gentleman" who insisted on playing his records/tapes to us. He must've taped the transmit switch down.

I was on a small tanker with 'er indoors along for the ride and we were advised not to go ashore at that time. I must admit that it didn't look particularly inviting.

We were only at anchor for 24 hours, luckily. All our lass remembers of the place is the severe rolling at anchor and the incredible smell when we got alongside. Luckily we did a few other African ports so she got to see some better places.

Gordon L Smeaton
12th January 2007, 13:16
Spent two trips down Lagos way, first the Dart joined her in Dakar then proceeded to Lagos then Port Harcourt, down to Bonnie to lighten into small coasters before going to Lagos to complete discharge. Second trip the Mokran joined in Lagos, by lifeboat left from Dejection Jetty, summed our mood up precisely, this trip we went from Cotonou where we received cargoes from the vessels coming down from Europe, then off to Lagos a trip of some 40 miles. Spent the whole of the trip doing that run, no mail, no fresh food very low on stores, used to run round the anchorage swopping cabbages for spuds or anything that we could, eventually we were relieved and proceeded to Europoort where I left, but she went straight back down.
Before these two River class I had spent a long time on VLCC's my conclusion was if this is the Rivers you can keep them. Next trip back on the VLCC's Ah well thats life.

steve d
12th January 2007, 16:36
The story i heard at the time was that some nigerian minister took a bribe to order all the cement they needed to rebuild the docks (and it turned up all at once on every dogeared thing that could float). When we arrived in 1975 in looked like the D-Day invasion i have never seen s many ships in my life in one place

mclean
12th January 2007, 18:36
Saudi Arabia, especially Jeddah in the 70,s was not much better for delays. On occasions they would use helicopters to discharge the bagged cement from ships at anchor. Colin

stan mayes
13th February 2007, 19:51
Lagos cement..Similar events to these occurred in 1952..
I was in STARCREST chartered to Elder Dempster .Took on 61 Kroo boys at Takoradi 2nd March and discharged our general cargo at surf ports..Arriving off Lagos we anchored among 40 other ships, some already there for many days..We had 1000 tons general and 2000 tons cement for Lagos..The port was congested and railway system paralysed..10 days at anchor and we entered port to take on fresh water..2 days working cargo then out to anchor again ...Many days later the Kroo boys began discharging the cement into the sea - many other ships were also dumping cement...
We left the anchorage on 13th May..We had been there for 49 days..
Palm Line took STARCREST on charter. At Warri we waited 8 days,then loaded 400 tons palm kernels - then to Calabar, a 5 days wait and then loaded 600 tons ground nuts...Returned to Takoradi to pay off Kroo boys,they had been on the ship for 98 days....
Returned to Liverpool with 1000 tons of cargo only....

Mick Spear
16th February 2007, 04:33
The one thing that sticks in my mind was the incessant chatter on channel 16At least on a tanker you berthed relatively quickly (days rather than months)
The downside was you got berthed next to the abbatoir where the smell and noise was indescribable. I remember going ashore with my wife and people were fighting for the offal as it was thrown out of the gates of the abbatoir.
Bit like away supporters coming out of Millwall's football ground after a match!

I've been to many ports on West Coast of Africa and spent more than a just couple of days. I've never been to Lagos but i have been to Millwall a few times Cold Blow Lane and the New Den following Cardiff City!! Therefore i liked that part of your post very much. No doubt you have been to Millwall too?

Mick S

drynet
4th May 2007, 18:02
Remember being in Lagos on the Cormorant berthed at that abbatoir the locols sold "pets" to the crew several Parrots Sand Monkeys and believe it or not a Babboon which we named Kong and they all came back to Tyneside with us I wnder what became of them?
Drynet

trotterdotpom
5th May 2007, 16:37
There was a lot of pirate activity during those long anchorages and there were a quite a few murders.

One Russian ship allegedly called up on the VHF to say they'd just seen some bodies floating past the ship. They then heaved up their anchor and went home.

Some people don't realise how dangerous it is being a pirate!

John T.

AlexBooth
10th May 2007, 05:00
I heard that they planned to make Nigieria a National Car Park for Africa - Whatever the case and seriously my simpathies to the poor buggers (and ships) that endured that fiasco. If I recall correctly, I think 27 months was the longest time a ship was anchored waiting for disch. I remember very vividly the battle that the MNAOA fought with respect to the sea time to count, where officers spent their whole stint swinging around the pick.
Cheers

sparks69
20th April 2011, 23:24
I was on the Border Falcon doing the Lagos/Okrika run with fuel for the Lagos power station.
Every time we arrived at the Lagos anchorage we would be given "Turn 150" or some silly number by the port control. By evening when the lights of Metropolitan Lagos were starting to go out we would suddenly be given "Turn 1" and in we would go to discharge at the OMO jetty and the lights would start coming on again ! National Oil, ran on the "just in time principal" or something.

Roger Harrison
20th April 2011, 23:42
I was working ashore in Apapa in 1977-78 as GM for Caleb Brett. There was still over a 100 ships there at anchor. We used to do amongst other surveys the annual Radio Survey. Many of the ships were done twice so you can see how long some of them were there. Quite often we took part-payment for the survey in legs of lamb, cases of tinned goods etc. as the range in the local "supermarkets" left a lot to be desired. A lot of the Greek ships quietly removed most of the crew(s) and shared a skeleton crew much to the chagrin of the Port Authority. When they occasionally went out to do a check that each ship was adequately manned, then the RT really got busy. No doubt another excuse for "dash" (baksheesh).

Grandstand view (with the telescope) of the execution area at Bar Beach.

Roger Harrison
Roger Harrison

Julian Calvin
21st April 2011, 09:33
Counted over four hundred ships one time. Interestingly enough, registered births offshore just beat the registered deaths/murders (although am sure there were more unreported).
The day following the Govts cancellation of dumurrage payments six vessels either sank or were 'blown' ashore.

MervynHutton
21st April 2011, 09:48
I remember an incident when the Texaco Brussels was weaving her way through the 400+ ships at anchor during the cement blockade at Lagos to pick up a pilot when she suffered a steering gear failure and collided with a small ship at anchor fully loaded with cement. The cement ship was holed amidships and sank within an hour at her anchor. The 'Brussels' had a small indentation in the bulbous bow. I'm sure the Owners of the cement ship were not displeased that they had got their money for ship and cargo at long last. At the time the wait for cement ships to berth was in the region of 2 years!

blobbybluey
21st April 2011, 10:15
Does anyone recall the ships all carrying cement to lagos ( suposedly up to 20 million tons of the stuff.) Seem to recall it was just another case of corruption that nigeria was and is famous for.Was on British Security in 1975, paid of in lagos and the sight of hundreds of ships loaded with cement all at anchor still amazes me now .

i was on the ikeja palm when that farce was going on we had taken two giant machines that were part of the giant cement mixers required to start the ball rolling so to speak one part was over twenty tons the discharge went ok,and we were in the process of changing the rig steam guys etc when the train that had the load on moved and the lift had not been secured properly and the whole load promptly rolled off the train,and sustained a large fracture i believe another palm boat took the object back to u.k for repair months later rgds(Thumb)

Dickyboy
21st April 2011, 11:45
I was on the Lagos - Okrika run two or three times. The last time I paid off there, on 18.06.75. off the British Trent. Hundreds of ships there, as said. We believed that the cement was for the new motorway system. Public Executions of armed robbers were still going on on the beach around the same time, and the Biafran War was not that long over. The whole country was a mess, probably still is.
I wonder what happened to those ships?

G0SLP
21st April 2011, 13:00
Lagos - what can you say, other than AVOID IF YOU CAN...
<shudders>

It has to be one of the worst places I've ever been to - and Port Harcourt is very similar these days - corrupt and dangerous.

You don't anchor overnight, unless you want an unwanted visitation - you steam out 40-50 miles before dark, & slow steam until just before sunrise, then run back in.

At least you can make some water overnight...

Dickyboy
26th April 2011, 06:35
Lagos - what can you say, other than AVOID IF YOU CAN...
<shudders>

It has to be one of the worst places I've ever been to - and Port Harcourt is very similar these days - corrupt and dangerous.

You don't anchor overnight, unless you want an unwanted visitation - you steam out 40-50 miles before dark, & slow steam until just before sunrise, then run back in.

At least you can make some water overnight...
When anchored off Okrika at night we had the cable washers going full blast, 2 GPs up for'd with an Aldis and a couple of Pick axe type handles. Radar on the shortest range possible, and hand held radio comm's with the bridge. Any boats coming close got the Aldis in their faces, and shown the handles. Also another patrol around the rest of the ship. Only ever anchored off there a couple of times though.

boatmadman
4th September 2011, 06:35
I was on the Lagos Okrika run on a River boat - cant remember which one it was just now - in '79.

That was scary, paid off by lifeboat onto the beach stayed in the Holiday Inn.

Ian

riocullen
4th September 2011, 09:40
Yeah, I joined a river boat there in the seventies and the agents could not supply a boat to get us out to the anchorage. In the end the ship send a lefeboat in to get us. We were all happy to get onboard and did not envy the guys going off the same way.
Happy days!

gordon bryson
4th September 2011, 10:26
Lagos isn't to bad if you get away from the port and the central city area. In 1980 I left the merchant and worked in Lagos for Decca Navigator commissioning the new navigator chain (master, red, green, purple). The people were ok, it was the snakes you had to look out for!

DAVELECKIE
4th September 2011, 11:56
I was on the Lagos Okrika run on a River boat - cant remember which one it was just now - in '79.

That was scary, paid off by lifeboat onto the beach stayed in the Holiday Inn.

Ian

I was Lecky on the Dart and paid off by lifeboat in Aug 78.
We met our reliefs on the "beach" and checked into the Federal palace hotel from memory. We were on the night flight that evening to Gatwick [British Caledonian].
The experience at the airport lives long in the memory, getting through security with hundreds trying to get through a single door! We had a couple of wives with us and to be honest I dont think it was just them terrified!
I am in the process of downloading a lot of photos to the gallery. I think I have a few of the anchorage with us surrounded bu various ships including cement ships.

Dave

boatmadman
4th September 2011, 18:14
I left there to get married. BP told my missus to be I had left the ship 2 weeks earlier than I had, so she was a little worried - thought I had done a bunk.

My overriding memories are signing off a huge hotel bill, and being searched repeatedly for anything of value that could be taken off us.

We had left anything of value back on the ship, rather than let the 'Gents' from Lagos have them!

I must find my discharge book and check on dates and ships etc.

Ian

riocullen
5th September 2011, 08:31
I was sparky on the Dart at the time of joining in Lagos. I will need to check my old discharge book when I get home for the date. We may well have met on the quay-side.
I was back in Nigeria in the 90's but fortunately on that occassion we stayed in a guarded compound when joining and leaving the ship. Same hassle at the airport though.
Top of my list of places to avoid.

boatmadman
5th September 2011, 17:18
Found my old testimonials and I was on the British Laurel when off Nigeria.

I left 15/03/1979 by lifeboat to the beach as previously mentioned.

Does anyone remember the Severn Gorge?

On the jetty in Okrika there was a deep 'V' shaped gouge in the concrete jetty, apparently caused by the bow of British Severn.

Some wag had painted 'Severn Gorge' along it.

Ian

Long gone
7th September 2011, 20:08
I thought that was 'Security Gorge'?

boatmadman
8th September 2011, 08:41
Might be, it was a long time ago and memory cells fade!

JamesM
8th September 2011, 11:28
I thought that was 'Security Gorge'?

Think you may be right ..... sailed on the Severn twice and don't remember any reference to her hav'n taken a bite out of the jetty at Okrika.

twogrumpy
9th September 2011, 20:06
I thought it was Security as well.
While up there I took a picture of the berthing arrangements, the two dugout canoes.
My father had to attend a meeting in Portsmouth where he was responsible for the berthing of RN ships in the Dockyard. He produced my pictures and said this is how BP do it up a river in Africa, think the comment was "not up to our standards".
(Cloud)

Paddy Power
6th October 2011, 12:58
Remember being in Lagos on the Cormorant berthed at that abbatoir the locols sold "pets" to the crew several Parrots Sand Monkeys and believe it or not a Babboon which we named Kong and they all came back to Tyneside with us I wnder what became of them?
Drynet

I must have been on the ship at the same time. We were running from West Africa to Curacao. I remember Kong and the Old Man eventually banished them all to the funnel deck
Mike

xieriftips
11th October 2011, 17:58
Weren't some of them there for so long that the cement went solid and had to be broken out with windy hammers?
I heard it was the misplacing of a full stop or comma, or the wrong measure of weight that caused the problem.

There were quite a few in '76 which was the last time I was at Lagos.

Story I'd heard was that nobody thought it necessary to tell the Nigerians that the stuff had to be mixed with sand and gravel before use.

xieriftips
11th October 2011, 18:01
Found my old testimonials and I was on the British Laurel when off Nigeria.

I left 15/03/1979 by lifeboat to the beach as previously mentioned.

Does anyone remember the Severn Gorge?

On the jetty in Okrika there was a deep 'V' shaped gouge in the concrete jetty, apparently caused by the bow of British Severn.

Some wag had painted 'Severn Gorge' along it.

Ian

The 'Security' put it there long before the 'Severn' was built.

Puffin's skipper
15th November 2011, 18:38
Its a long time ago but we were even taking cement to Nigeria way back in the sixties..and bringing huge Mahogany logs back as deck cargo.

I joined a 'Hungry Hains' tramp steamer "Mv Trecarrell" as an ordinary Seaman in Salford. (Black funnel, huge white 'H' on it) We were told she was bound for West Africa.. It was Dec 62, one of the coldest winters on record and the thought of three months on the African west coast sounded like heaven to us..
I didnt even take a coat or oilskins.. Just a few T shirts, jeans, shorts and my sunglasses.

It wasnt until we noticed on the second nights bridge watch that we were steering N/W and not South after lands end that we were finaly told we were first loading up some Cement to "take" to West Africa in the baltic Port of Gydinia.
That was 62, the year the Baltic froze over and the Poles were escaping from communism by simply walking across the baltic to Sweden.. It was not a happy Xmas that year but at least it was dirt cheap... We managed to smuggle a couple of crates of Vodka aboard.. and a lot of smoked polish sausage/salami to ward off starvation.
Good trip though, Shore gang joined, living on deck after Freetown, off loaded Takoradi, Tema and then Lagos. We offloaded all the bags of cement (by dockers on their shoulders not trucks) and I learned a lot about rigging heavy jumbo Dereks for loading logs up in Sapelle, miles and miles up into the jungle up the fresh water creeks, with (literally) monkeys almost hanging in the rigging. We wern't even insured by Lloyds past a certain point in the river, (or so they said) The pilots came out in canoes (honestly) shouting " I am de one boss, I am de one" This sound like a messroom yarn spin but as swear its not..

We were about a week loading logs in Sapelle and a Norwegian chippy on the next ship to us, was found beheaded ashore after arguing with some locals, it really was just jungle there in the sixties.. Heavy duty shore leave...

I was only on her about three or four months but the deck cargo shifted homeward bound in Biscay and made us list so we had make for a French Port (La Rochelle I think) to off load some dangerous Deck cargo and the main cargo of logs stowed below decks was taken to Antwerp... I took my chance and persuaded them to pay me off there, faking injury to my back from a 'staged' fall off the logs.

Bear in mind this was long before the days of "Injury lawyers for you" all I got above my wages in the ship was the price of the North Sea Ferry fare home and two days subsidence at the Local Seamans mission..

I got a matross job on Norsk coaster "Tobin"at the Rotterdam pool a couple of days later. My back miraculously now"healed"..

All in all a rather "intresting" Nigerian trip but she was a typical tramp.. Hungry as hell but still, I learned more about rigging and "being" an AB on that one trip than a dozen oil tankers.. She didnt even have Iron Mike either, all watches were three man, lookout, wheel man and farmer.. No day workers just three watches, a bosun and a chippy.. There you go... Wooden ships and iron men...

stan mayes
15th November 2011, 19:03
Nice story Paul but why not name the ship.
I was at Sapele first time in 1945 in Dallington Court and we moored to
trees oposite Sapele so it was a canoe ride for a pack of cigarettes..
There again in 1952 in Starcrest ..and it had not changed..
I made a trip in one of Hain's Trevanion in 1948.. Cuba for sugar..
Regards,
Stan

Puffin's skipper
15th November 2011, 19:33
Nice story Paul but why not name the ship.
I was at Sapele first time in 1945 in Dallington Court and we moored to
trees oposite Sapele so it was a canoe ride for a pack of cigarettes..
There again in 1952 in Starcrest ..and it had not changed..
I made a trip in one of Hain's Trevanion in 1948.. Cuba for sugar..
Regards,
Stan

'Trecarrell'.. Sorry Stan, thought I had, been back now and edited it.(Smoke)

If you have been to Sapelle no doubt "flash for gash" may bring back some old memories?
evidently in those days beer cans were highly prized for canoe repairs and those drinking beer over the rail were rallied by the cries of the young ladies in canoes how they would be rewarded for any empties thrown overboard to them. (I've never ever drunk as many McEwan cans since than I did when I sailed up those Nigerian creeks!)

Puffin's skipper
30th July 2012, 00:40
i was on the ikeja palm when that farce was going on we had taken two giant machines that were part of the giant cement mixers required to start the ball rolling so to speak one part was over twenty tons the discharge went ok,and we were in the process of changing the rig steam guys etc when the train that had the load on moved and the lift had not been secured properly and the whole load promptly rolled off the train,and sustained a large fracture i believe another palm boat took the object back to u.k for repair months later rgds(Thumb)

Got a picture of the IKeja Palm berthed in Lagos in 1962. Its in my old scrapbook somewhere if you want it, I'll scan her & post it.

Erimus
30th July 2012, 09:04
Two related tales.......

In 1974/1976 British Steel were involved in what was described as a 'partnership' project with steel for construction purposes as we had our own 'super' on the ground there....one of the HQ staff, was sent there as a replacement on a one way ticket and the first day they tokk him down to Tin Can Island as showed him some people being shot........'for bribery'!
My guess is that they hadn't paid enough!.....Steak was 28 a pound at the time...His wife used to ring up and ask when he was coming home....he did eventually.

I moved up to Immingham and one of my first agencies was loading cement for Lagos..one of many such vessels...this particular cargo had been loaded warm into 1 ton IBC's and had weakend the bottoms so when they did eventually try and discharge them the bottoms fell out.......so she was sent somewhere else after 2 months for grab discharge...

geoff

TIM HUDSON
30th July 2012, 11:09
I was on a Common Bros managed mini bulker called Vastiram loaded with sugar from Antwerp. Anchored 7 miles of Lagos for 6 months in 1978. We had an inflatable boat with outboard and visited many ships at the anchorage and using 'note on owners' purchased supplies especially from the british tankers who had only a short visits. Beer was vital especially as we had a british crew. Visited many ships especially Shell and Mobil tankers and E Ds. A shopping list was left beside the VHF to call up any arriving ships !. No stores were purchased from ashore. Even begged unleaded fuel for outboard !. I paid off after 4 months and in the rubber boat went to a Trinder Anderson ship on Apapa (previous arranged on VHF) for dryout and change before going to immigration. Dreadful nighmare of a city and transport out.

Ron Stringer
30th July 2012, 13:37
I sent a technician via Lagos to carry out some repairs on a rig off Warri. As he exited the arrivals lounge at the airport, he was met by a guy holding up a sign with the technician's name on it. The guy explained that he had come to escort him to the agent's office.

As they walked through the airport the guy suggested that my man should exchange money there because the hotels always offered a rip-off exchange rate. So that was done and as the cash was pushed through the hole in the glass, the guy snatched and ran off, leaving my man standing gob-smacked.

He had only been in the country minutes and had already lost all his money. While he was standing there, the real guy who had been sent by the agents to greet him turned up, having been delayed in traffic.

Nobody at the agents admitted to knowing anything about the original guy.

gdynia
30th July 2012, 14:08
My Last trip to Nigeria i was left waiting outside of airport for 7 hours before my back to back turned up going home. After all the hassle i got there i joined my relief and we both flew home. I remember his words You cannot Do that but i did. There was riots going on at the time near the airport so decided time to do a runner

Julian Calvin
30th July 2012, 15:07
talking of riots in Lagos;
Was once driving through Agege, a suberb of Lagos, during a period of unrest. Suddenly came across a riot with police battling with protestors and tear-gas filling the air. Wasn't too sure what to do.
A passer-by saw my predicament and said "Wait here". Asked him to explain and he replied that it was nearly one O'clock and rioting would then stop.
He was exactly right.
At one they all stopped for 'chop' (lunch), I drove through and at two they started rioting again
Nothing quite like Lagos.

kypros
30th July 2012, 23:07
I was on Palm/ed ships running to the west coast 64/65 a good run then noproblems ashore.Within a few years later I heard of the problems with the cement ships the story I recall was the Powers that be had ordered the cement for the next 10 years building projects for the whole of Nigeria.They had begun a Africanisation project getting shut of the old Empire builders in positions of authority replacing them with inept unqualified Africans.For instance i remember a greaser on a Nigerian national ship being promoted to 2nd engineer in no time at all and we all remember them ships falling apart in no time.The cement was all delivered in 6 months without any consideration of shelf life or storage facilities. reguards Kypros

sparks69
31st July 2012, 20:08
I was on a Common Bros managed mini bulker called Vastiram loaded with sugar from Antwerp. Anchored 7 miles of Lagos for 6 months in 1978. We had an inflatable boat with outboard and visited many ships at the anchorage and using 'note on owners' purchased supplies especially from the british tankers who had only a short visits. Beer was vital especially as we had a british crew. Visited many ships especially Shell and Mobil tankers and E Ds. A shopping list was left beside the VHF to call up any arriving ships !. No stores were purchased from ashore. Even begged unleaded fuel for outboard !. I paid off after 4 months and in the rubber boat went to a Trinder Anderson ship on Apapa (previous arranged on VHF) for dryout and change before going to immigration. Dreadful nighmare of a city and transport out.

You had some beer & stores off us on the Border Falcon and we sent a movie over too I think.

roddy
31st July 2012, 23:05
Engaged by underwriters we salvaged a Greek vessel that appeared to have inadvertently missed a bend in the Bonny river, when outbound from Port Harcourt and was neatly berthed in about six feet of water when she really could have done with tweve or fourteen. The cement cargo had been in the hold for some considerable time and the last several feet had gone solid so was left in the holds forming a perfect cement box. Several days later we refloated the vessel to the obvious displeasure of the owners representative. We had absolutely no bother from the locals, although with a full crew of Hull Tuggies we were probably best left alone!
I do remember big Dennis Pierce calling the Harbour Master Man Friday, whilst telling him where to go, which resulted in another visit to the bond before diplomatic relations were restored. We finished the trip in Abidjan a haven of peace and tranquility in comparison to Nigeria, but perhaps no longer, I will not bother going to find out.

GrahamBurn
11th September 2012, 17:57
I was there on the Tay in 1973 if I remember correctly, joined in Grain, 1st trip cadet with Geoff Ingram, did a spell NW Europe then headed down to Nigeria for about 6 weeks of Lagos Okrika. I seem to remember we were discharging direct into rail tankers so start stop all the time, cargo was gas oil. The deal was we spent 24 hours at Apapa then back to Okrika to load again regardless of how much we'd delivered. The locals nearly cut us adrift one night when they nicked some of our ropes, we posted a better deck watch after that!!
I remember the pets mentioned in an earlier post, Mike Gee had an African Grey which used to walk around the backs of the chairs in the smoke room and could often keep up a better conversation than some of the other occupants!!
Gerry Delaney was the C Stwd, he had a parrot as well, not sure what it was but just used to sit in the cage looking miserable.
Gerry Proctor was the Chief, John Worthington was the 2nd, I think John Walwork was the mate, Ken Norton J/E I think, it was a long time ago!!
Regards
Graham

GrahamWeifang
23rd September 2012, 12:15
I was on the Border Falcon doing the Lagos/Okrika run with fuel for the Lagos power station.
Every time we arrived at the Lagos anchorage we would be given "Turn 150" or some silly number by the port control. By evening when the lights of Metropolitan Lagos were starting to go out we would suddenly be given "Turn 1" and in we would go to discharge at the OMO jetty and the lights would start coming on again ! National Oil, ran on the "just in time principal" or something.
.
I am sure I was also on the border Falcon at some time.
#

Gra.

Stumps
23rd September 2012, 13:19
I could write a book about that bloody place. The Cement fiasco was basically described by Kypros and purely down to the good old Nigerian practic of dash. Some owners, mainly Greeks , made a bomb out of the business as there were a few decent charterers who honoured their charter party and either kept paying the demurrage or the time-charter daily rate. Afew names that come to mind were Oleagine and Utex, both Swiss and behaved well. One Greek superintendent down there told me over a beer hat he had a suitacase stuffed with US Dollars to ensure a smooth stay.I always wonder if he left Lagos alive. Another Greek told me that the freight rate from Europe , the usual source of the bagged Cement (Poland in particular) was imaterial , it was the Demurrage rate that mattered which made a lot of sense. Remembering entering the Lagoon at Abidjan and seeing scores of ships at anchor outside and asked the pilot what was the problem in Abidjan . It transpired they were all waiitng to get into Lagos or another Nigerian port such as Harcourt and had come upto Abidjan for water or spares , stores, whatever. The best story was of the 'Panamax' that required Wimpey and their pneumatics to discharge her after she'd been there over a year . Nobody apparently realsied the weight of the cement bags would crush the bottom tiers. The Greek shipowner who bought mobile cranes from several UK., demolition and building companies and with Lloyd's approval sited them aboardhis ore carriers takes my prize for inventiveness . he made a fortune as those ships were absolutely perfect for bagged Cement. It was like loading in your bath. My hat off to Captain Pothitos of Evpo Shipping for thinking that one through.