The oldest ship still in service

Trevorw
13th January 2007, 00:03
The lifespan of todays ships appears to be about 20 years maximum. I personally have served on vessels almost twice that age. Does anyone know of any "Old timers", still running?

flyer682
13th January 2007, 00:20
There are many preserved vessels of course.
But for a merchant ship still in regular revenue service, we have on the NZ coast a cement carrier named WESTPORT which is 31 this year. It's a while since I last saw her, but generally she seems to be in pretty good condition.

logan007
13th January 2007, 00:40
merchant vessel kathryn spirit will be 40 in 2007. she`s used to be menominee.

Bearsie
13th January 2007, 00:58
The lifespan of todays ships appears to be about 20 years maximum. I personally have served on vessels almost twice that age. Does anyone know of any "Old timers", still running?
Yes the Egerland was built in 1939 and lasted until 1980 something.
The Marika was built in 1947 and scrapped in 1986
Actually I do know a few older ones yet, would have to dig them out first...

But the Winner is: Ta Ta !!!

The MS Sydfart (southdrive) from Sweden, she is 128 years old and still in commercial service today !!! A coaster of course (Thumb)

Link with pictures : http://www.windpowerphotos.com/wpw-w/sidor/ysend152.htm


A very pretty little ship :)

tunatownshipwreck
13th January 2007, 03:32
It seems to me the Great Lakes fleet has a lot of old ships still working.

Keith Adams
13th January 2007, 05:02
The "Empress Of Britain" blt. 1950, has been in continuuous service under
various names and flags and currently as the "TOPAZ" and must hold some kind of record for actual sea miles logged. 57 years and still going! Snowy.

Keltic Star
13th January 2007, 08:15
It seems to me the Great Lakes fleet has a lot of old ships still working.

There's a few McKeil Towing tugs operating in the Great Lakes that are over a 100 years old. Seems fresh water is far more kindly on steel.

non descript
13th January 2007, 09:27
Ruud has kindly provided with an excellent image and comments here:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/30413/si/Sydfart/what/title

exsailor
13th January 2007, 10:06
Ninetysix years old, still coal fired and still in its original location - New Zealand's most photographed vessel, TSS 'Earnslaw' on Lake Wakatipu.
Keel laid 4/6/11 in Dunedin, and hull built. Hull dismantled and railed to Kingston, at south end of lake. Hull re-assembled, engines fitted. Vessel launched, fitted out as a passenger/cargo ship, and commissioned 18/10/12. After a couple of owners, she is still in service today, although now as a passenger only vessel. Full story and some good pictures on http://www.nzmaritime.co.nz/earnslaw.htm

Regards, Dennis.

reklaw
13th January 2007, 10:13
Don't forget the venerable Doulos, she was also built yonks ago.... 1914 if I remember correctly, she is still afloat believe it or not.
http://www.mvdoulos.org

karbine
13th January 2007, 12:29
Im not sure what the oldest passenger boat still in service is but the oldest still operating on the River Thames is the MV Henley ,She is 111 years old! (1896) and looks great

http://coppermine.galacnet.com/riverthames/albums/userpics/10001/normal_322339462_9a78a9b54f_o.jpg

Bearsie
13th January 2007, 13:01
It seems to me the Great Lakes fleet has a lot of old ships still working.

Freshwater helps, also the economics in the great lakes are slightly different.
Where many sea going ships (coasters or otherwise) were scrapped due to changed economics. shipe like the A. Ford. S.T. Crapo and others are still going.
The Alpena (2) was built in 1942 and rebuilt as a selfunloader/cement carrier in 1990 and is in service now

Alpena (1) was built in 1909 and lasted 65 years

link: http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/fleet/alpena.htm

Bearsie
13th January 2007, 13:12
Ruud has kindly provided with an excellent image and comments here:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/30413/si/Sydfart/what/title

Cool Beans :)

Of course she is busy in my coaster version of the game "Ports of Call" making money.

As is : MS Unterelbe year 1939, now 68 years old and going strong in Finland.
link: http://www.unterelbe.com/

She was like the Egerland (which was later enlarged) a member of the large class of River-Sea vessels.
A few pictures of the Egerland and her history are here: http://mysite.verizon.net/ress3y0n/id5.html

jimmys
13th January 2007, 15:56
Sir Walter Scott on Loch Katrine, 1899, built elsewhere and transported in bits.
Loch Katrine is a reservoir for Glasgow and landlocked.
Steam up and downer, coal fired boilers a magnificent vessel and a full Passenger Certificate.

best regards
jimmys

Derek Roger
13th January 2007, 16:22
Oldest vessel afloat is / was the HMS Unicorn ( HMS Cressey ) @ Dundee .Hardly in service but used for Sea Cadet parades etc.

Doug
13th January 2007, 18:25
Of course, there are a few ships around owned by preservation trusts and the like - "Shieldhall", for instance. 51 years old and still in pretty good nick.

Bearsie
13th January 2007, 19:14
Of course, there are a few ships around owned by preservation trusts and the like - "Shieldhall", for instance. 51 years old and still in pretty good nick.
And the coasters: Kustvaarder "Anda" (dutch), Iris Jorg, Greundiek, Jan-Dirk (all german) and at least 2 Vic's (uk) and 1 Vic under a new name (norway)
she was still beiing used commercially last I knew, all the others are functional but museum ships.

Pat McCardle
13th January 2007, 19:31
Donnington class of Stephenson-Clarkes. All aproaching 30years old & still trading. Quite a few 70's built SD14's still to be found tading around the South China Sea / Far East. Cruise ship Monteray must be in Her 50's?

fred henderson
13th January 2007, 19:43
The oldest ocean going cruise ship is Sea Cloud, built by Krupp's in 1931. Sail and diesel powered. Operates in the Caribbean in the winter and the Mediterranean in the summer.

Fred

jimmys
13th January 2007, 21:07
hi Doug
We had a vessel in Glasgow called the Shieldhall which carried sludge as it was poshly called. In engineering we called it "S--t". This vessel was scrapped approx. 2000 due to European Rules. Your Shieldhall may be its predecessor I am not sure.

best regards
jimmys

notnila
13th January 2007, 22:03
hi Doug
We had a vessel in Glasgow called the Shieldhall which carried sludge as it was poshly called. In engineering we called it "S--t". This vessel was scrapped approx. 2000 due to European Rules. Your Shieldhall may be its predecessor I am not sure.

best regards
jimmys
Same Same jimmys regards, notnila

NAUCLER
14th January 2007, 05:00
OLDEST MERCHANT SHIP, built 1866, and still in service is the Swedish passenger ship "ENK÷PING" (former steamer) often between Stockholm and Uppsala until some (recent) years ago. She was before a coal-burner but has nowadays as I remember a diesel due to the heavy costs for the coal or oil to the turbines.
JOHAN de NAUCL…R
Maritime author, shipping company&shipyard historian&researcher Uppsala, (university in Sweden since 1477).
ENDS

tugger
14th January 2007, 07:42
Tugger.
South Steyne, former Sydney to Manly Ferry. built 1934, in Leith. largest steam Ferry still in running order. Now a floating restaurant in Darling Harbour. Worked on her from 94 to 2005

hawkey01
14th January 2007, 13:55
Here is another one for the list. She works on Lake Vattern in Sweden.
Motala Express -
Built 1895 by FG Sandwalls Mekaniska Verkstad Munksjon Sweden.
L 35.67M
B - 6.63m
Draught - 3m
249Gt
Speed 14 knots - three cylinder triple expansion.
Known locally as "Vatterns Fauge" - The prisoner of the Lake Vattern, as she is 4m longer than the locks in the canal leading out of the lake.
Picture attached.

Hawkey01(==D)

Bearsie
14th January 2007, 15:19
Isn't there an old steamer in Norway? Sleipnir?
Can't remember if she is still hauling passengers commercially or run by a museum club...
If I could just find the info again ...

feistein
14th January 2007, 15:27
Isn't there an old steamer in Norway? Sleipnir?
Can't remember if she is still hauling passengers commercially or run by a museum club...
If I could just find the info again ...


SKIBLADNER

http://www.skibladner.no/engelsk/index.htm

and

RISKAFJORD II

http://www.riskafjord.no/


regards
feistein

Bearsie
14th January 2007, 17:43
Tusen takk Feistein :)

Skibladner was the one I was thinking of.
Thanks for setting me straight and digging out the links (Thumb)

Bearsie
17th January 2007, 02:33
And here another one (coaster of course)
MS Visnis 1906 now in Bremerhaven, german and norwegian past
website (german only) 2 pictures

http://werften.fischtown.de/archiv/visnis.html

aadje
18th January 2007, 23:35
There is a swedish coaser " Sydfart ", built 1879 and still service.
Understood Owner still on board and 80 years.
Will check website/forum and revert asap.

aadje

ruud
19th January 2007, 06:59
There is a swedish coaser " Sydfart ", built 1879 and still service.
Understood Owner still on board and 80 years.
Will check website/forum and revert asap.

aadje

Ahoy aadje,
This one was already mentioned by TONGA, first page #8:(Read)

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/30413/si/Sydfart/what/title (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/30413/si/Sydfart/what/title)

Waterways
7th February 2007, 15:48
It seems to me the Great Lakes fleet has a lot of old ships still working.

Inglehart on Lake Superior. A converted tanker built 1936:
http://www.duluthshippingnews.com/pictures580/jawiglehart251027-2-059.jpg

eyrebrush
1st March 2007, 07:38
If your quest for oldest vessels still in operation includes floating cranes, the Mammoth is still going! Was delivered new to the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board in 1920, did stalwart work on the Mersey till 1983, when she was bought and taken to Oxelosund in Sweden. Is now in Stockholm. Has been fitted with new diesel electric propulsion engines, and fitted out with diving equipment. So, she's 87 years old, and still has a new life ahead of her!

Ronnie.

jhluxton
1st March 2007, 09:10
The lifespan of todays ships appears to be about 20 years maximum. I personally have served on vessels almost twice that age. Does anyone know of any "Old timers", still running?

Still operating a daily service throughout the year (except Christmas Holidays) are the two original vessels of the Ullswater Transit and Navigation Company in the English Lake District.

LADY OF THE LAKE - 1877 and RAVEN of 1889. Both iron steamships built by Seath of Rutherglen

They were re-engined mid 20th century and still going strong and are maintained in superb condition.

you can find out more at www.ullswater-steamers.co.uk


John H. Luxton
www.irishseashipping.com

jhluxton
1st March 2007, 09:11
"They were re-engined mid 20th century and still going strong and are maintained in superb condition."

Sorry I should have made it clear that when they were re-engined the steam plant was removed and they are now powered by diesels.

John

Syd young
1st March 2007, 12:54
There is a swedish coaser " Sydfart ", built 1879 and still service.
Understood Owner still on board and 80 years.
Will check website/forum and revert asap.

aadje

I beg your pardon,what was the name of that ship again ????? SYDFART How rude!!!

Bearsie
1st March 2007, 13:33
I beg your pardon,what was the name of that ship again ?????How rude!!!

Southern Trip

lakercapt
1st March 2007, 15:19
St.Mary's Challenger will start her 101 years of service on the Great lakes this spring.
Still has the same stean recip engine.
It is a cement boat i.e. carries bulk cement , its built of very thick steel plates.

robbeale
13th October 2010, 00:39
Don't forget on Windermere the TERN (1891), the DOLLY (1850), Raven (1871), ESPERANCE (1859), TEAL (1936), SWAN (1938), MURIEL (1937), SUNFLOWER (1949), PRINCESS (1950), QUEEN (1951), and many private launches from the 1860s onwards.....

Bob Flett
15th October 2010, 08:44
As far as I know the Michael M is still trading comercially, but now known as Princess Fatimah registered in Cyprus, built in 1955.Still mentioned in Equasis in Jan 2010.

Pilot mac
15th October 2010, 14:10
A lot of the above ships are either 'fresh water ships' or museum pieces, however for a real salt water trading ship how about Cementina, 1096 gt built 1960, Still going strong.

Dave

Ian J. Huckin
15th October 2010, 20:55
If somebody could check out m.v. Reynolds. A 1974 geared bulk carrier of about 30,000 ton built in Belgium. She was still trading in 2006 I believe. Never knew her final fate. But considering she was Great Lakes trade i.e. North Atlantic and the bruising taken in the locks up to Duluth/Superior/Thunder Bay even 32 years seems to be phenominal.

She had an MAN 8KZ/120E main engine. 11,200hp @ 136rpm...bloody dirty old beast with unit overhauls every 4000hrs.

I know the Officers Bar was totally worn out when I last left her (Jester)

duquesa
15th October 2010, 21:57
The MV Liemba built in 1913 in Germany as the Graf von Gotzen I think is still in service on Lake Tanganyika having been dismantled,transported and rebuilt. Registered in Kigoma, it trades the full length of the lake.

blacklord
25th October 2010, 13:30
Tugger.
South Steyne, former Sydney to Manly Ferry. built 1934, in Leith. largest steam Ferry still in running order. Now a floating restaurant in Darling Harbour. Worked on her from 94 to 2005

A youngster - Baragoola launched in 1922 at Balmain , laid up at Waverton (afloat) undergoing restoration. Her older sister North Head, ex Barrenjoey is in Cairns - she was launched in 1914 at Woolwich.

Ron Dean
8th November 2010, 17:26
OLDEST MERCHANT SHIP, built 1866, and still in service is the Swedish passenger ship "ENK÷PING" (former steamer) often between Stockholm and Uppsala until some (recent) years ago. She was before a coal-burner but has nowadays as I remember a diesel due to the heavy costs for the coal or oil to the turbines.
JOHAN de NAUCL…R
Maritime author, shipping company&shipyard historian&researcher Uppsala, (university in Sweden since 1477).
ENDS
I believe "ENKOPING" also has the distinction of being the oldest passenger ship listed in Lloyds Register.

Regards, Ron Dean.

david_crosby
8th November 2010, 21:39
I'll toss in Vigsnes. Originally built for TNT as "Iron Sturt" in 1979 she was b/b chartered to BHP for 10 years under a finance lease. I arranged the sale of her to BHP in 1989 (via a so called auction in a darkened room). Eventually BHP sold her to Jebsens. She's still working around SE Australia and at the moment I can see her (from my verandah) anchored in the River Derwent waiting to go alongside at Risdon (Hobart) zinc works.

spongebob
8th November 2010, 21:55
TSS Earnslaw built in 1912 and still steaming daily from Queenstown on NZ's Lake Wakatipu is claimed to be the oldest coal fired steamship in the southern hemisphere.

Bob

Dickyboy
8th November 2010, 22:43
Isn't there a very old steamer on one of the mountain lakes in South America?

Nick Batstone
8th November 2010, 22:54
If somebody could check out m.v. Reynolds. A 1974 geared bulk carrier of about 30,000 ton built in Belgium. She was still trading in 2006 I believe. Never knew her final fate. But considering she was Great Lakes trade i.e. North Atlantic and the bruising taken in the locks up to Duluth/Superior/Thunder Bay even 32 years seems to be phenominal.

She had an MAN 8KZ/120E main engine. 11,200hp @ 136rpm...bloody dirty old beast with unit overhauls every 4000hrs.

I know the Officers Bar was totally worn out when I last left her (Jester)

I did a couple of trips on her in 84 and 87 when we handed her over to become Sea Duty in Gib. I was very fond of the old girl and thrilled to hear she might be still chugging along.

GEORDIE LAD
8th November 2010, 23:01
St.Mary's Challenger is still going strong 104 years into her career,and still steam powered.Very remarkable even for a laker.A lot of hulls from the 60's have left the lakes for the scrappers this year.Cheers....Doug

kewl dude
8th November 2010, 23:21
http://bayviewcompass.com/archives/5353

http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/fleet/stmaryschallenger.htm

Quote:

St. Marys Challenger

October 1, 2010

Story & Photos by Daniel Gray

The big gray hull looms up from the narrow channel of the Kinnickinnic River, dwarfing the drawbridge and the trees on the north bank.

What is this ship doing here, nosed up against the KK bridge, docked just a few feet from the road? How did it manage to squeeze its way up the tiniest of Milwaukeeís rivers? How will it ever get back out?

The St. Marys Challenger, under the direction of Captain Al Tielke, delivers powdered cement to the St. Marys Cement Company distribution silo located on the south bank of the Kinnickinnic River, just east of Kinnickinnic Avenue. Cement is then picked up by trucks and delivered to construction sites throughout the region.

This reliable workhorse has performed similar duty for a number of cement companies since the 1960s, but, believe it or not, the vessel itself has plied the waters for over a century, outlasting all others to earn it the title of the oldest lake boat operating on the Great Lakes.

Built in 1906 and put into service as the William P. Snyder, the steam-powered Challenger hauled iron ore on the Great Lakes for about 50 years. By the mid-1960s, the ship appeared to be headed to the scrap yard due to its small size relative to the newer freighters.

More ...........

Unquote

Greg Hayden

Dickyboy
9th November 2010, 08:25
Kewel Dude.....
Going off subject here, but some years ago I saw a photo of the bow and wheelhouse of a Laker. It had been cut off, and somehow mounted on the side of a cliff. It looked as though the ship was bursting out of the cliff. Very cleverly done, and a very unusual sight. Very eye catching. Any idea where this is? Perhaps it wasn't on the lakes, unfortunately I never downloaded the picture, which I'm sure would be of intrest on this site.

spongebob
9th November 2010, 09:13
Kewel Dude.....
Going off subject here, but some years ago I saw a photo of the bow and wheelhouse of a Laker. It had been cut off, and somehow mounted on the side of a cliff. It looked as though the ship was bursting out of the cliff. Very cleverly done, and a very unusual sight. Very eye catching. Any idea where this is? Perhaps it wasn't on the lakes, unfortunately I never downloaded the picture, which I'm sure would be of interest on this site.

Dickyboy, the ship Star of Canada, 7280 tons gross and built in Belfast 1909, went agound in 1912 on a reef off Gisborne Harbour NZ.
This harbour was first discovered by a James Cook and is in the area where he named many local landmarks such as "Young Nick's Head", "Cape Runaway" and "Poverty Bay," the latter for the lack of provisions offered by hostile Maoris, compared with the next stop north which he named "Bay of Plenty" due to its abundance.
Back to the Star of Canada, they managed to salvage some of the ship's superstructure including the captain's cabin and the bridge and that ended up as a private house but is now sited on a river's edge where it forms part of the local museum.
I recall seeing it many years ago and it was an eye catcher sitting there among the houses

Bob

Dickyboy
9th November 2010, 10:46
Dickyboy, the ship Star of Canada, 7280 tons gross and built in Belfast 1909, went agound in 1912 on a reef off Gisborne Harbour NZ.
This harbour was first discovered by a James Cook and is in the area where he named many local landmarks such as "Young Nick's Head", "Cape Runaway" and "Poverty Bay," the latter for the lack of provisions offered by hostile Maoris, compared with the next stop north which he named "Bay of Plenty" due to its abundance.
Back to the Star of Canada, they managed to salvage some of the ship's superstructure including the captain's cabin and the bridge and that ended up as a private house but is now sited on a river's edge where it forms part of the local museum.
I recall seeing it many years ago and it was an eye catcher sitting there among the houses

Bob
Thanks Spongebob, I can imagine that catching the eye. I don't think that that's the one I was thinking of though. Just tried googling pictures for such ships, and only came up with one, in China or Japan I think. An apparent liner on top of a headland. Looked most odd up there. :o

Billieboy
9th November 2010, 10:53
Thanks Spongebob, I can imagine that catching the eye. I don't think that that's the one I was thinking of though. Just tried googling pictures for such ships, and only came up with one, in China or Japan I think. An apparent liner on top of a headland. Looked most odd up there. :o

Korea Dickyboy, it was a question on Sparkies quiz last weekend.

duquesa
9th November 2010, 11:38
Originally built for TNT as "Iron Sturt" in 1979????
Oldest ship???

Dickyboy
9th November 2010, 22:01
Korea Dickyboy, it was a question on Sparkies quiz last weekend.
Korea! Thanks Billieboy :o

david_crosby
10th November 2010, 02:02
Originally built for TNT as "Iron Sturt" in 1979????
Oldest ship???

How about being constructive for once.

Name an older deep-sea working bulker/acid carrier/general cargo ship. I'm not talking about nautical curiosities chuffing around fresh water lakes or on two mile ferry runs.

I suspect that Vigsnes may not be the oldest but, at 31, she's doing pretty well :-)

paulm
10th November 2010, 02:24
Hi All,

How about the grab dredger "Hebble Sand" - p.o.r. Dundalk Ireland, built 1964 which makes it 46 years old.
In fabulous condition and currently on charter and working in Belfast Hbr.

Regards,
Paulm.

Dickyboy
10th November 2010, 07:09
How about being constructive for once.

Name an older deep-sea working bulker/acid carrier/general cargo ship. I'm not talking about nautical curiosities chuffing around fresh water lakes or on two mile ferry runs.

I suspect that Vigsnes may not be the oldest but, at 31, she's doing pretty well :-)

Sorry David, We'll all learn to be more ''Constructive''. I for one packed up the deep sea about seven years before the Vigsnes was built, so to me she seems like a NEW ship. An OLD ship, in my book, is one that's older than me! :o

duquesa
10th November 2010, 07:24
Posted by David Crosby:

How about being constructive for once.

Name an older deep-sea working bulker/acid carrier/general cargo ship. I'm not talking about nautical curiosities chuffing around fresh water lakes or on two mile ferry runs.

I suspect that Vigsnes may not be the oldest but, at 31, she's doing pretty well :-)

David, Your response is uncalled for. Please read the thread title - "The oldest ship in service" - not "Name an older deep-sea working bulker/acid carrier/general cargo ship." There are dozens of worthy contenders for the title -as written- worldwide that are certainly not "Nautical Curiosities".

wharferat
13th November 2010, 10:22
Here's another contender, 41 years old & still working in July this year.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/258116/title/canal-trader/cat/500

fred henderson
13th November 2010, 18:19
She is a mere youngster compared with the specialist cruise ship Sea Cloud which was completed in 1931. Sea Cloud has just arrived in Bremerhaven to be refurbished to meet SOLAS 2010 requirements and will return to passenger service next year, when she will be 80 years old. By far the oldest ocean-going passenger vessel in revenue-earning service.

There are a number of photographs of this beautiful ship in the SN Galleries, including: -

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/124110/title/sea-cloud/cat/520

reefrat
20th November 2010, 04:07
Talking of old ships, I have a question, what are the oldest photos of sailing ships

kewl dude
1st December 2010, 23:24
RE: Post #51
Dickyboy Said:
Kewel Dude.....
Going off subject here, but some years ago I saw a photo of the bow and wheelhouse of a Laker.

This one?

http://www.aerialpics.com/H/lewis-harriman.html

Ran across it quite by accident today Dec. 01, 2010. Armed with the ships name I found:

http://www.boatnerd.com/news/newsthumbs/newsthumbs_harriman-3.htm

6. 2. Failed museum attempts, Ships scrapped - scroll down:

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Lake_freighter?t=6.

Quote: Lewis G Harriman - a 1923 purpose-built cement carrier, the first of her kind, that sailed from her launch until 1980. Used as a storage barge until 2003, a group tried to save her but bad communications within the company saw the ship sold for scrap in 2004 and destroyed in Sault Ste. Marie by Purvis Marine, a scrapper of the Lake's dwindling supply of historic steamers. The majority of the hull was fed to the Algoma Steel Mill but the fo'c'sle was saved as a summer cottage at Detour, Michigan. Unquote.

http://www.boatnerd.com/news/newsthumbs/newsthumbs_harriman.htm

Pictures of the vessel demise and removal of bow.

Attached collage Lewis G Harriman1.jpg top left the windlass room after the windlass was removed top right and lower left two views of the pilot house inside, bottom right the cut line that was salvaged from the bow.

There are other retired ships pilot houses around the great lakes.

http://www.inlandseas.org/

480 Main Street
Vermilion, Ohio 44089

InlandSeasMaritimeMuseum.jpg collage of six. It is hard to see but in the top left picture to the left of the lighthouse there is a pilot house pasted on the side of the building facing the lake. I was there August 27, 2002 and took these pictures.

There was so much light streaming into the front of the pilot house with no light behind. I lightened up a couple of these in PhotoShop so you can see some detail. The bulkheads and overhead are dark shiny wood, while the deck too is dark brown just not so shiny.

The Joseph H Thompson pilot house:

http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/fleet/thumb/ThompsonPilot.jpg

http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/fleet/thumb/thompson-pilothouse-escanaba-rb.jpg

has been sitting here in Escanaba MI since 1990 when the vessel was converted to an integrated tug barge. Online research today I read a few blogs that say the pilot house has been rotated 90 degrees but is still there.

I sailed the Joe T OS the first part of 1961, F/WT 1962 & 63 then the Joe T was my first licensed 3 A/E job until August 1966 when I left to ship offshore.

Greg Hayden

kewl dude
1st December 2010, 23:45
Darned if I know what happened. Both attachments WERE there but only one made it?

Greg Hayden

Dickyboy
2nd December 2010, 20:33
RE: Post #51
Dickyboy Said:
Kewel Dude.....
Going off subject here, but some years ago I saw a photo of the bow and wheelhouse of a Laker.

This one?

http://www.aerialpics.com/H/lewis-harriman.html

Ran across it quite by accident today Dec. 01, 2010. Armed with the ships name I found:

http://www.boatnerd.com/news/newsthumbs/newsthumbs_harriman-3.htm

6. 2. Failed museum attempts, Ships scrapped - scroll down:

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Lake_freighter?t=6.

Quote: Lewis G Harriman - a 1923 purpose-built cement carrier, the first of her kind, that sailed from her launch until 1980. Used as a storage barge until 2003, a group tried to save her but bad communications within the company saw the ship sold for scrap in 2004 and destroyed in Sault Ste. Marie by Purvis Marine, a scrapper of the Lake's dwindling supply of historic steamers. The majority of the hull was fed to the Algoma Steel Mill but the fo'c'sle was saved as a summer cottage at Detour, Michigan. Unquote.

http://www.boatnerd.com/news/newsthumbs/newsthumbs_harriman.htm

Pictures of the vessel demise and removal of bow.

Attached collage Lewis G Harriman1.jpg top left the windlass room after the windlass was removed top right and lower left two views of the pilot house inside, bottom right the cut line that was salvaged from the bow.

There are other retired ships pilot houses around the great lakes.

http://www.inlandseas.org/

480 Main Street
Vermilion, Ohio 44089

InlandSeasMaritimeMuseum.jpg collage of six. It is hard to see but in the top left picture to the left of the lighthouse there is a pilot house pasted on the side of the building facing the lake. I was there August 27, 2002 and took these pictures.

There was so much light streaming into the front of the pilot house with no light behind. I lightened up a couple of these in PhotoShop so you can see some detail. The bulkheads and overhead are dark shiny wood, while the deck too is dark brown just not so shiny.

The Joseph H Thompson pilot house:

http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/fleet/thumb/ThompsonPilot.jpg

http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/fleet/thumb/thompson-pilothouse-escanaba-rb.jpg

has been sitting here in Escanaba MI since 1990 when the vessel was converted to an integrated tug barge. Online research today I read a few blogs that say the pilot house has been rotated 90 degrees but is still there.

I sailed the Joe T OS the first part of 1961, F/WT 1962 & 63 then the Joe T was my first licensed 3 A/E job until August 1966 when I left to ship offshore.

Greg Hayden
Thanks for the pictures K D The first link could well be the one I was thinking of, but I'm not sure about it. I seem to recall that the one I saw, ages ago, appeared to be coming out of the face of a cliff.
Good pictures though, it's amazing how inventive some people can be isn't it.
Thank's for the e-mail :o (Thumb)

THE CAPE CRUSADER
3rd December 2010, 19:46
The MV Cape Rodney a Cardiff class geared bulker built in Glasgow 1976 is still going strong under the guise of the CHL Innovator some 34 years later.

Fairlane500
6th December 2010, 05:38
Another notable old-timer still out there doing work on the open oceans is the ex-President Wilson, ex-President Kennedy, ex-Oregon Mail, a C4 class cargo vessel built in san Diego, CA in 1964, and now still in service at 46 years of age as the fish processor Ocean Phoenix (http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/photo.php?lid=788595), (IMO: 6413924).

allanc
6th December 2010, 09:17
I think the restored barque James Craig would be a worthy contender. Built in 1874 as Clan McLeod, she has been magnificently restored by the Sydney Heritage Fleet, and regularly cruises with passengers out of Sydney, with occasional voyages to Hobart and Melbourne. Have a look at my postings in the Gallery. Not just a museum piece, but an active sailing ship which is in constant use.

Fairlane500
6th December 2010, 15:30
One of the contenders for oldest container vessel still in active service may be the Horizon Challenger (http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/photo.php?lid=1006746)(IMO: 6812211), built as the American Legion in 1968.

Horizon has several other old-timers still sailing, including the Horizon Consumer (1973), Horizon Navigator (1972), Horizon Producer (1974), and Horizon Trader (1973).

Billieboy
6th December 2010, 21:05
One of the contenders for oldest container vessel still in active service may be the Horizon Challenger (http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/photo.php?lid=1006746)(IMO: 6812211), built as the American Legion in 1968.

That would be the last of the First generation container ships. The Bremen Express class were the first of the Second generation, (in Europe), but they weren't as fast as the Sea Land 7s.

Bighenners
6th August 2011, 02:38
My son who lives in Queenstown.NZ. has informed me that the TSS Earnslaw,which ferries passengers across Lake Wakatipu is the only working coal fired steamship on the Lloyds register. I have been on her a few times and viewed her amazing triple expansion engines. The stokers keep her immaculate and she has regular refits. She is one hundred years old in 2012. I think she is good for a few more years yet.

Alex Salmond
6th August 2011, 04:26
Here you go Bighenners the good ship Earnslaw still chuffing away on Lake Wakatipu here in Aotearoa.Para Handy and his offsider McPhail would be right at home here Eh!

John Briggs
6th August 2011, 04:52
What a great looking vessel.
Wonder how confident they really are about her condition - lifeboat permanently swung out?

steamer659
6th August 2011, 05:55
The Southdown Challenger on the US Great Lakes is 105 years old and still in cargo service...

loganevh
29th August 2011, 04:09
The Aleksandr Suvorov is still in service, and she is 32 years old. She can be tracked by marinetraffic.com

borderreiver
29th August 2011, 09:26
Just seen this on the BBC
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14677418

Chris Isaac
29th August 2011, 09:57
MV Chauncy Maples built 1899
An old lady in need of some help.
A lady in which I have sailed as Master.
http://www.chauncymaples.org/

GWB
29th August 2011, 11:01
During recent visit to Boston Naval Yard was advised that the USS Constitution is the oldest commissioned and floating war ship in the world. Sails out every year for the Independence Day celebrations and fires a gun salute. Built 1779 and in very good condition.

James_C
29th August 2011, 11:18
She is indeed the oldest commissioned warship in the world afloat, wit the title of oldest commissioned warship belonging to HMS Victory (built 1765), which now lies in drydock in Portsmouth.

GWB
29th August 2011, 11:40
Jim you are correct as they kept saying afloat to justify the statement. Interesting they tell you how the cannons are USA made etc, but when asked why they have british symbols crown etc. on the barrel 'O' that was a mistake by the pattern maker, later in tour they advise a lot of cannon was captured from HMS ships. Still its a good visit and very interesting.

sydney heads
1st September 2011, 10:55
Norwegian veteran MS Sandnes, built 1949-50, is another with many years of continuous servce, although I'm not sure of her current charter.
Cheers John

Scousekiwi
26th September 2011, 12:04
But for a merchant ship still in regular revenue service, we have on the NZ coast a cement carrier named WESTPORT which is 31 this year. It's a while since I last saw her, but generally she seems to be in pretty good condition.


And "La Grand Dame" of NZ shipping is still going strong in 2011, having been built in 1976. The "Westport" just arrived in her home port from Lyttelton this evening, and sails tomorrow for Onehunga.

Herewith a recent shot of her in port at Onehunga, with the coastal trader "Spirit of Resolution" in the background.

ALAN TYLER
26th September 2011, 17:55
Recently saw the mussel dredger B927 Drie Gebroeders in the River Wyre Fleetwood did some research and she was built in 1922. With the B prefix presume thats Belfast although she was built on the Continent still going strong!!

Chris Kisch
31st October 2011, 16:11
Ahaaaa. Think Smiths have one......The Prince Rupert City- IMO 7014309. Built 1970 (Sailed on her Feb 1972 to August. Good ship, so that must now put her at 41 (think the knackers yard is calling- last info March this year). Now Run Tong 6. Rest of fleet scrapped......more's the pity.

todd
31st October 2011, 17:44
I know she cannot be classed as a 'Ship' but it is this Old Lady's 100birthday this year. Elsewhere on SN---Tugs Dredgers Harbour Craft .
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/304438/title/happy-birthday/cat/516

Jim

Svein1
19th December 2012, 12:01
In Norway we have the Riskafjord 2 dating back to 1864. She is still in operation as a fjord cruise/partyboat.
http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_%C2%ABRiskafjord_II%C2%BB_(1864)

Rob Pithers
22nd December 2012, 21:47
Here's one to throw in the pot. Dredger Bowprince IMO 6413235 built Ailsa 1964. She was a rustbucket when I was on her in the mid '80s, but sold, renamed Bom Principe and last heard of working out of Madiera for Portugese interests. I can't find any sign of her being scrapped, and some websites still have her as 'active', so maybe still in Madiera? Would love to know for sure.

DaiSparks
9th May 2014, 19:18
Last record for RUN TONG 6 (ex Prince Rupert City) was Dec 2013, but in an earlier posting in May stated 'Not a great ship'.
Strongly suspect vessel now scrapped or in the process off

Robert Hilton
9th May 2014, 19:40
Single crane bucket dredger Hebble Sand, formerly Hessle Sand when she worked the Humber. About 50 years old this year and still working to the best of my knowledge.

askjohn57
13th May 2014, 20:07
Shieldhall is still running, oil fired triple expansion as built, runs out of Southampton by preservation society. Currently in Falmouth dry dock for hull repairs but will be back in service from the end of May 2014. This is the same ship that used to run 'sludge' out of Glasgow.

Barrie Youde
13th May 2014, 20:30
Likewise the present Mersey ferries.

There are (I think) three still in service, diesel-electric and built early 1960s - Philips of Dartmouth - originally named Mountwood, Woodchurch and Overchurch - but with several subsequent variations in name.

Barrie Youde
13th May 2014, 21:04
The garland surely goes to USS Constitution - but likewise we need to know what is meant by "in commission".

If it means "in everyday service" (as are the Mersey ferries), then fifty years is surely a pretty good record?

Boatman25
13th May 2014, 21:07
How about Balmoral and Waverly both built in the late 40s and still carrying passengers

billmaca
14th May 2014, 10:24
There is some good footage of the EARNSLAW'S engine room on youtube

ben27
15th May 2014, 01:22
good day gwb.sm,august.2011.19:01.#79.re:the oldest ship still in service.i have been reading the old tread.and your post of the uss constitution showing some excellent photo's of the interior and the ship in all its glory.thanks for posting.regards ben27