Brunei Bay Lay Up

ChiefCharles
15th January 2007, 22:42
Attached picture is of the Brunei Bay Lay Up mother ship, British Gull 15,500 DWT, alongside (if I remember correctly) the 265,000 DWT British Ranger. Quite a size difference! The Gull was taking on fresh water, HFO and diesel fuel from the Ranger which was placed in lay up after leaving the builders yard at Nagasaki. Captain Sainty was the Gull Master who deftly brought the Gull alongside to the admiration of this Engineer. The fuel and water were discharged from the Ranger with her own pumps powered by her Diesel Alternator. Sometime in 1976 I believe - Roger

John_F
16th January 2007, 17:58
Roger,
Was that A.E.Sainty? I sailed with him on the Gannet & Guardian when he was Mate & I was uncertificated 3/0 - nice man & very helpful. Did he ever marry?
Kind regards,
John F.

ChiefCharles
17th January 2007, 01:32
John, Yes it was A. E. (Tony) Sainty. He was rotating Master of the Gull throughout her time as the mother ship in Brunei Bay with another very good BP Master, H. Brown. As far as I know he was not married as he never talked about a wife or family. He was a great organizer and well liked by ship staff.
Have not heard of him since 78/79.
Regards - Roger

jonsea
18th January 2007, 19:55
I too served on the Gull as 3/O under Tony Sainty in '81 when he repeated the excercise by taking her alongside the Purpose (I think) prior to its departure to its final resting place. A fascinating piece of seamanship!

Jon

trevflstn
17th May 2007, 12:35
I was 2/0 on the Gull / Purpose as we transfered the operating base from one ship to the other in 1981. Tony Sainty was the captain and there was a rumour that he had been offered an job by the Sultan of Brunei when he retired. No idea whether it was true

kevjacko
9th November 2008, 12:15
Hi gents,

My Uncle Tony Lesley was Catering officer on the Gull during this time I'm pretty sure. I am ex BP and heard during my time (1981 thro 1989) that he was a hard taskmaster to say the least. He sadly crossed the bar a few years back now.

red devil
11th November 2008, 19:20
I sailed on the British Gull as 3/0 in 1973, a short while before she was converted.I enjoyed my six month stint on her, everybody got along well and the Indian crew and food was super!All of our time was spent in Australian and N.Z. waters with the exception of two weeks in Singapore drydock! Very different to my time on various crude carriers.
I also sailed with Capt H. Brown as second trip apprentice on the "Splendour" he was such a nice guy and looked after us like a father. He liked nothing more than the chance to do a bit of shiphandling and took every opportunity to lower a lifeboat and go ashore!

clarkie59
25th November 2008, 23:25
I spent 5 months on the Trident in Brunai Bay. I was telling my son in law all about what fun we had and described the "Terible Conditions we had to put up with" being paid an additional sum for it and the fact we had to spend Sundays on an Island in the sun lazing on a beach drinking just so we could face the next week! I was remeniscing in my mind when I thought about the way things were and for the life of me I could not remember how we heated the domestic hot water! Everything else is still very clear in my memory but not that. Can someone remind me.



Age and over consumption of alcohol does terrible things to the memory!

JAO25
26th November 2008, 07:41
Hi, I am new to the site so I hope this posts. I was on the Gull in 1980. Tony Sainty was still there. When he retired from BP he set up a rival lay-up unit backed by local interests.

kevinmurphy
4th December 2008, 04:40
I am not ex BP, but I worked for Labuan Shipcare, which was set up by Tony Sainty, I did a year there 85-86, the company was set up i think about '83, local business man & others who got sainty to run things. Sainty was the MD of the company, there were a couple of ex BP lads there Andy Smithers lecky being one. We lived ashore.
Sainty suffered some ill health having a couple of heart attacks I beleive. He definitely never married.
"Lassa" had a max 10 ships in there care compared to BP 40 or so, I beleive that the Lassa operation was taken over by BP in about 88 as the whole layup scene was a lot smaller.
Kev

John_F
4th December 2008, 12:47
Kevin,
Thanks for that info on Tony Sainty. Sorry to hear about his health problems but not surprised. He was a very conscientious, hard working man but always had time to help junior officers. I wonder if he is still alive?
There is a link to the BP site here:
http://www.bp.com/liveassets/bp_internet/shipping/STAGING/home_assets/downloads_pdfs/b/bp_shipcare.pdf
Kind regards,
John.

trevflstn
15th January 2009, 13:39
I was in Brunei as 2/O on the Gull and the Purpose base ships from November 81 to March 82. Turned out to be my last trip with BP and to sea.
I was talking recently about that time and tried to find some pictures of the laid up ships, especially the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Cedros (aka the black pig). I have searched the gallery with no success but computers and me are not aways entirely compatible. Can anybody help please.

twogrumpy
16th January 2009, 16:06
I was in Brunei as 2/O on the Gull and the Purpose base ships from November 81 to March 82. Turned out to be my last trip with BP and to sea.
I was talking recently about that time and tried to find some pictures of the laid up ships, especially the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Cedros (aka the black pig). I have searched the gallery with no success but computers and me are not aways entirely compatible. Can anybody help please.

Remember all three, but sorry no pix.
Spent most of my time on base, but did get to Cedros once, what a wreck, remember the long drop down to the emergency firepumps on the UST boats?
(Cloud)

trevflstn
16th January 2009, 21:32
Indeed the Cedros was a bit of a wreck but we were told that the hull was of very good quality steel for use as a salt carrier hence she was kept and not scrapped. Spent many days doing the 3 monthly anchor lift by compressed air power alone.
Gave plenty of time to read the incident and accident books that had been left on board. They made interesting reading with some amusing incidents recorded of how crew members managed to injure themselves.
The emergency fire pump inspection on the UST boats was also an interesting experience, I can safely say that they are the longest vertical ladders I have ever seen let alone climbed, we guessed at about 100 to 120 foot. Okay going down but bl***dy hard work climbing back up.

gadgee
17th January 2009, 17:42
Thumbnail of Cedros attached. Think it is the right ship?

twogrumpy
17th January 2009, 18:49
Thumbnail of Cedros attached. Think it is the right ship?

Don't think so, looks a little flash for the Cedros, and a little larger, could well be wrong though.
(Cloud)

trevflstn
17th January 2009, 20:48
Not sure if it the right ship or not. Time plays strange tricks on the memory and as mentioned it was a bit of a wreck in Brunei.
Thanks anyway

gadgee
17th January 2009, 20:55
Phil

Thumbnail a bit small but she was built in 1966 for National Bulk Carriers. 173152dwt, length 304m, beam 43m, steam turbines 15kts, listed as bulk/oil carrier. Black funnel and black hull. Makes her over 16 years old when you saw her.

twogrumpy
18th January 2009, 15:48
You must be right, certainly went down hill quickly!!
Is it allowed to have two ships of the same name?

gadgee
18th January 2009, 21:13
Mention is made here of Cedros being a salt carrier. National Bulk Carriers were operated by Daniel Ludwig who had interests in the Cedros Island salt trade. I am pretty sure that this is the ship in question.

twogrumpy
19th January 2009, 05:47
Quite right Paul, with that further info. must be the right one.

ChiefCharles
22nd February 2009, 22:01
Does anyone remember "Super" - my Cockatoo on the Gull at Brunei. Photo attached. I often wonder what happened to him (maybe her). Used to get teased terribly - Joe Parkinson one of the Second Engineers during my tenure being his worst tormentor. Joe had the scratches to prove it too. His perch was placed outside the Officers Bar and covered at night with a sack to shut him up. Super was on the Gull from 1975 - ????

Roger

ChiefCharles
22nd February 2009, 22:18
In 1976 George King came to visit the British Gull at Brunei and toured the Resource and Ranger which had been placed in lay up in late 75 and early 76.
Not a very good photo and I cannot remember many of the names.
Seated - George King, Capt. Harry Brown and myself. Behind me to the right is Les Scott, Electrician ex British Reliance. Behind Capt. Brown is I believe Third Engineer ... Slater? and behind him to the right is Colin Hyman, Catering Officer. Happy times - great bunch of staff. Anybody else recognize themself?

Roger

Ralphb
6th March 2009, 13:28
I was an engineer on "Resource" "Reliance" & "Ranger".
Commisioned each ship in Nagasaki, then brought them to Brunei for lay up.
Next trip I joined "Gull" for 5 month tour in Brunei.
We looked after another VLCC as well, I think she was called "Jamara"

2LongGone
15th March 2009, 18:42
I was out there as 2/0 from Feb 1983 till June 83. By then Purpose and Norness were base ships with over 6o laid up vessels. Only got photos of the base ships and the tenders. I hung around until the last batch of redundencies when the first set of crewing agencies were set up. Decided to come ashors at that juncture.

stevie-w
18th March 2009, 21:23
Hi there! I went out to Brunei as 3/O in August 1985 expecting to be there for four months. The Trident was mother ship at that time. Had a fantastic time out there . I was in team 4 which was responsible for the ESSO OKINAWA/ESSO KAGOSHIMA/RUDOLPH PETERSON (CHEVRON)/ALEXANDER S. ONASSIS (OLYMPIC)/CHAMBORD(FRENCH BP)/ AND UST ATLANTIC.Great days out but so spooky in the accommodation doing dehumidifying etc. I remember the workboats and speedboats were all named after cats-purdie,felix,sylvester,top cat,cheetah,jaguar and panther.
A great place to be and a great social life too- 9-5; sat afternoon off for footie matches, bbq's at the local beach on sundays. somehow too good to be true and in October quite a few of us were transferred over to the Norness for re-activation- so actually got to sail out of Brunei Bay. Went to Singapore for a very pleasant four week drydock/repair and then paid off when the ship got to the Gulf. All in all - one of my best trips..

Andrew147
23rd March 2009, 18:54
Ah "The Black Pig", what a wonderful ship the Cedros wasn't. She was one of mine for a period. The chief engineer (not BP) that laid her up drained all water tanks to bilge overflowing the turbine sump sounding pipe so that when the lub oil pumps ran he pumped water all round the turbine and gearbox bearings and gearing. The bilges had been pumped, oil renewed, at which point I arrived and we continued cleaning gearing nozzles, bearings etc for days. She had been on charter to Shell for 25 years from the original oil crisis having done one cargo of salt from Mexico to Japan. She was therefore finishing her charter in layup. Definately a ship where you only walked on the deck / hatchs etc as the grating had all rusted away.
Great place ashore as well as on the Gull. I lived in the Bishops house, catering done in the old radio station/house.
Arthur Salmon was C/E and Sainty the old man.

rog37
25th May 2009, 18:48
Good Day gents I am present still serving with BP and last year I was base manager for BP Shipcare at present they have a total of 35 ships layed up
I also remeber the days we had on the island which is now a nature reserve but still you can visit and have a BBQ
the work boats which there were five of only one still remains Felix, Purdey I had to sadly scrap due to many holes and patches on the hull I will try and post some pics when I locate them

Roger

Satanic Mechanic
26th May 2009, 08:55
To say the lay up unit has had a fraught few years is an understatement what with the embezzlement, fraud and of course the near fatal stabbing of a Chief Engineer (EEK)

ChiefCharles
26th May 2009, 17:07
To say the lay up unit has had a fraught few years is an understatement what with the embezzlement, fraud and of course the near fatal stabbing of a Chief Engineer (EEK)

I was the Chief Engineer on the Gull four times between 75 and 77 and then served as the Lay Up Superintendent through 78 before transferring to Products Fleet and then the US. I have no clue as to any of the items you refer to but am very interested to learn more details. Near fatal stabbing of C/Eng? Wow! In the early days it was a very happy place to be. I did here an Apprentice (I beileve) was drowned on a run ashore - anyone else heard that?
Thanks - Roger

Graham Wallace
26th May 2009, 18:10
I was the Chief Engineer on the Gull four times between 75 and 77 and then served as the Lay Up Superintendent through 78 before transferring to Products Fleet and then the US. I have no clue as to any of the items you refer to but am very interested to learn more details. Near fatal stabbing of C/Eng? Wow! In the early days it was a very happy place to be. I did here an Apprentice (I beileve) was drowned on a run ashore - anyone else heard that?
Thanks - Roger

Hi Roger

The manager was A.C. ex1958 E/A from Bolton Tech, It happened in 2002, he was medivaced to Singapore and spent 10 weeks in Hospital, is fully recovered and retired. I never did get from him the precise circumstances.

Never heard anything about an apprentice.

Graham

rog37
26th May 2009, 18:18
you are right a young geordie lad drowned in 1974 his grave is in Labuan and is tended to by shipcare and a guy called marcel deleaga a french man from a company called 2MC
never did understan why his parenta did not want to take him home?????

Dickyboy
26th May 2009, 21:30
I've been trying to attach a picture of the Gull approaching the Resource when she was laid up in July 1975, onto this thread. The picture also gives an idea of the scale.
If you want to use the picture, it's available from my pictures.
Dickyboy

K urgess
26th May 2009, 21:32
You have to use the green "Post Reply" button in order to add pictures to your post, Dickyboy.
Once you click on it you will find a button marked "manage attachments" below the main text entry window.
Cheers
Kris

Satanic Mechanic
27th May 2009, 09:54
Hi Roger

The manager was A.C. ex1958 E/A from Bolton Tech, It happened in 2002, he was medivaced to Singapore and spent 10 weeks in Hospital, is fully recovered and retired. I never did get from him the precise circumstances.

Never heard anything about an apprentice.

Graham

Thats the fella - good guy. He was asked to go out after the previous incumbent was caught with his fingers in just about everything except actually looking after the vessels. To the best of my knowledge he was stabbed by a local boatman on his first day!!!!!

Dickyboy
27th May 2009, 13:33
I joined the British Resource in Nagasaki on 30/07/1975. A brand new ship going directly to layup.
We had about a week in Nagasaki, with some good chances to have a look around the place.
We sailed out of Nagasaki straight into the teeth of a typhoon and slow steamed down to Brunei Bay and took a couple of weeks to lay her up.
I believe the Resource was the first BP tanker in Brunei Bay, or the first to be laid up directly from the builders. Mitsubishi. The dehumidifying process had to be learned as we went along, and everything, including tanks was done. The funnel was capped as well.
We paid off on 03/09/1975. I, and others flew home, but as I recall some returned to Nagasaki to pick up another one. I might be wrong on that though.
I don't recall the Gull coming alongside, but she was about, and we knew she was there to tend to the laid up ships. I think the idea was for her to put personnel on board the laid up vessels to re dehumidify when required.
I do recall how small the Gull looked though.
Thanks for the advice on how to download pictures by the way. I had tried that, but the file was too big, so I e-mailed the picture to myself using a smaller picture option, then downloaded that to this post.

Dickyboy
27th May 2009, 13:57
Last look at the Resource as we departed Brunei Bay.
Big Bugger innit?

Hiram
27th May 2009, 18:34
I believe it was a 4th Engineer who fell off the jetty whilst climbing down the piles onto a workboat whilst preparing it for service in the Port Victoria harbour. He hit his head on the boat and was trapped under water and drowned.
I completed two tours of duty in the lay up unit in 1977 & 1986 also on Resource for reactivation and re-engining in Nagasaki

rog37
27th May 2009, 18:35
The boats all but one still remain in Labaun felix Purdy was scrapped in June last year to terminal rot and 19 patches on the hull will post some pics of felix taken when she was out of the water for her anual docking she is still going strong was an ex thames water authority boat???? anyone know how old they were when they went to Labaun

Hiram
27th May 2009, 18:43
Ah "The Black Pig", what a wonderful ship the Cedros wasn't. She was one of mine for a period. The chief engineer (not BP) that laid her up drained all water tanks to bilge overflowing the turbine sump sounding pipe so that when the lub oil pumps ran he pumped water all round the turbine and gearbox bearings and gearing. The bilges had been pumped, oil renewed, at which point I arrived and we continued cleaning gearing nozzles, bearings etc for days. She had been on charter to Shell for 25 years from the original oil crisis having done one cargo of salt from Mexico to Japan. She was therefore finishing her charter in layup. Definately a ship where you only walked on the deck / hatchs etc as the grating had all rusted away.
Great place ashore as well as on the Gull. I lived in the Bishops house, catering done in the old radio station/house.
Arthur Salmon was C/E and Sainty the old man.
Sainty towers and Halviston hall!! was there with Arthur in'77 sailed with him a few time after that. After he retired he had a job a security Guard at a local firm in Bury.

rog37
27th May 2009, 18:54
note you can see Purdey in the background just before she was cut up for scrap her hull is grey from being shot blasted for thickness testing(==D) (==D)

rog37
27th May 2009, 19:23
see quote earlier his grave is in Labaun never understood why he never went home when I go there it always leaves me puzzled

Santos
27th May 2009, 19:25
Colour pic of the Cedros HERE (http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old%20Ships%20C/slides/Cedros-01.html) hope it helps.

Chris

Dickyboy
27th May 2009, 23:33
Hi there! I went out to Brunei as 3/O in August 1985 expecting to be there for four months. The Trident was mother ship at that time. Had a fantastic time out there . I was in team 4 which was responsible for the ESSO OKINAWA/ESSO KAGOSHIMA/RUDOLPH PETERSON (CHEVRON)/ALEXANDER S. ONASSIS (OLYMPIC)/CHAMBORD(FRENCH BP)/ AND UST ATLANTIC.Great days out but so spooky in the accommodation doing dehumidifying etc. I remember the workboats and speedboats were all named after cats-purdie,felix,sylvester,top cat,cheetah,jaguar and panther.
A great place to be and a great social life too- 9-5; sat afternoon off for footie matches, bbq's at the local beach on sundays. somehow too good to be true and in October quite a few of us were transferred over to the Norness for re-activation- so actually got to sail out of Brunei Bay. Went to Singapore for a very pleasant four week drydock/repair and then paid off when the ship got to the Gulf. All in all - one of my best trips..
Hiys Steve
Can you describe the roll of the Gull and the teams in more detail?
What was the routine for each ship that was tended to. Was there a watchman or anyone left aboard. Was there power on the ships?
I left the Resource there and often wondered how she would be looked after.

sparks69
24th January 2010, 22:58
I believe it was a 4th Engineer who fell off the jetty whilst climbing down the piles onto a workboat whilst preparing it for service in the Port Victoria harbour. He hit his head on the boat and was trapped under water and drowned.
I completed two tours of duty in the lay up unit in 1977 & 1986 also on Resource for reactivation and re-engining in Nagasaki

I think his dad was a BP Lecky.

sparks69
24th January 2010, 23:45
Remember all three, but sorry no pix.
Spent most of my time on base, but did get to Cedros once, what a wreck, remember the long drop down to the emergency firepumps on the UST boats?
(Cloud)

I did 4 trips as R/O in the Bay. The entrance door to the Cedros had the words "Hello Darkness My Old Friend, I've Come To Turn Your Pumps Again" Written by one of the Engineers.

twogrumpy
25th January 2010, 09:56
I did 4 trips as R/O in the Bay. The entrance door to the Cedros had the words "Hello Darkness My Old Friend, I've Come To Turn Your Pumps Again" Written by one of the Engineers.
I recall that the sick book on the Cedros was well worth a read, plenty of injuries and many mentions of visits to the clap clinic.
(Cloud)

Better Times Coming
29th January 2010, 05:22
Is anyone around who saw the famous balloon dancers - Christmas 1983 ?

sparks69
27th September 2010, 21:19
The boats all but one still remain in Labaun felix Purdy was scrapped in June last year to terminal rot and 19 patches on the hull will post some pics of felix taken when she was out of the water for her anual docking she is still going strong was an ex thames water authority boat???? anyone know how old they were when they went to Labaun

Felix & Sylvester were brand spanking new when they arrived in Labuan - I know I fitted the radios one Sunday with R/O Geoff Hammond directing me from the mother ship ! The mate (Warner ? Morgan fanatic) named them.

derekhore
29th September 2010, 09:17
Geoff Hammond ...was his Welsh wife Noelene with him?
He was R/O on the Admiral with me.

Satanic Mechanic
29th September 2010, 09:30
The mate (Warner ? Morgan fanatic) named them.


Ian Warner - morgan and indeed all classic cars fanatic - his Bentley is something to behold - real Brooklands era stuff absolutely beautifully turned out.

One of the nicest guys around, now doing consultancy/ contracting work mostly with LNG.

Stunned everyone a few years ago by getting married - all became clear though - she loves Morgans as well(Jester)

sparks69
11th December 2010, 21:36
Geoff Hammond ...was his Welsh wife Noelene with him?
He was R/O on the Admiral with me.

No, Noelene was not with him on that occasion.
Geoff died a couple of years ago, he had MS. He bore it with great courage and stoicism supported by his Mum and Noelene. We met periodically after we both left the sea. Lovely chap. I helped carry his coffin - only piece of wood to be associated with Geoff without his trade mark cigarette burn on it.

derekhore
13th December 2010, 10:35
No, Noelene was not with him on that occasion.
Geoff died a couple of years ago, he had MS. He bore it with great courage and stoicism supported by his Mum and Noelene. We met periodically after we both left the sea. Lovely chap. I helped carry his coffin - only piece of wood to be associated with Geoff without his trade mark cigarette burn on it.


That is very sad news to hear.

If you should ever have the chance to speak to Noelene, please pass my best wishes onto her.

I am sure she would remember me from the Admiral, she organised my 21st birthday party for me; I was senior Deck Cadet at the time, highlight of the eve was my own band.."Derek & the Dominoes".....she would remember it for sure.

Thanks.

gra_am
14th January 2011, 21:12
Hello All,
The Gull, was the mothership, and she moved her mooring to stay in the middle of the ever expanding fleet of 'laidup' ships. As the station grew more personell were needed so Sainty Towers and Halveston Hall were rented.
We were an engineering station as the C/E used to tell Capt Sainty every evening, in the bar of the Gull. A 2/E was ic ashore but was weak and we used to run rings around him.
We had groups of four ships looked after by a 3/E. 4/E and a deck officer, mine were, British Purpose, TGB-Texaco Great Britain, FRD-FR Davies and Carnegie. These we had to keep the humidity down on and once sealed they could last a week and we and pm to do including turning the turbines.
Where does Purdie lie in the name of the cats? She doesn't she was Joanna Lumley's character in the 'New Avengers'. She drove like a bus and her saving grace was twin engines.

Graham

stevie-w
15th January 2011, 08:38
Where does Purdie lie in the name of the cats? She doesn't she was Joanna Lumley's character in the 'New Avengers'. She drove like a bus and her saving grace was twin engines.

Graham

(@)Surely Purdie was named after pussy.........(==D)

sparks69
16th January 2011, 21:10
Ref Purdy's name - I was told it was because she had two big engines. Apparently to an engineer that translated as "two big ones" ie breasts ..................................
Hence Purdy.
But there again I was only the sparks .........................

Campbell47
5th September 2012, 19:07
No, Noelene was not with him on that occasion.
Geoff died a couple of years ago, he had MS. He bore it with great courage and stoicism supported by his Mum and Noelene. We met periodically after we both left the sea. Lovely chap. I helped carry his coffin - only piece of wood to be associated with Geoff without his trade mark cigarette burn on it.

Sorry to hear about Geoff as I sailed with them on one of the R. Boats I think as she made me a soft toy snoopy I think that started my love of teddy bears which I started collecting now have over 150.

stevekelly10
5th September 2012, 21:11
Does anyone remember "Super" - my Cockatoo on the Gull at Brunei. Photo attached. I often wonder what happened to him (maybe her). Used to get teased terribly - Joe Parkinson one of the Second Engineers during my tenure being his worst tormentor. Joe had the scratches to prove it too. His perch was placed outside the Officers Bar and covered at night with a sack to shut him up. Super was on the Gull from 1975 - ????

Roger

I have just come across this post and can now tell you what happened to "Super" It was a flaming menace and prone to attacking anyone who went near him! He eventually attacked the electrician and took a chunk out of him, In defending himself the lecky took a swipe at "Super" who bounced off the bulkhead and ended up with a broken leg! Both were sent ashore in the launch for medical treatment ashore. Much to the Leckies annoyance he had to walk from the jetty to the doctor, whilst there was a taxi waiting to take the bird to the vets! :) On the release from the vets, Super resided at "Sainty Towers" were he continued to attack everyone! I can remember coming out the house one morning to find he had turned pink! this was a result of him attacking someone else, the pink being blood from his victim washing off in the rain! Enough was enough, so I found him a home with one of the locals! For those who were out in Labuan, will remember who I gave him to was Shirley, the barmaid from the Labuan golf club, that we were all members of courtesy of BP :)

twogrumpy
6th September 2012, 16:53
I spent 5 months on the Trident in Brunai Bay. I was telling my son in law all about what fun we had and described the "Terible Conditions we had to put up with" being paid an additional sum for it and the fact we had to spend Sundays on an Island in the sun lazing on a beach drinking just so we could face the next week! I was remeniscing in my mind when I thought about the way things were and for the life of me I could not remember how we heated the domestic hot water! Everything else is still very clear in my memory but not that. Can someone remind me.



Age and over consumption of alcohol does terrible things to the memory!

"Being paid an additional sum"
Did they bring this in? as I recall in 83 we were just on normal seagoing salary.

2G

sparks69
7th September 2012, 22:09
Hey Have I missed something ?

twogrumpy
8th September 2012, 16:00
Hey Have I missed something ?

I don't believe so.

If the old brain cells serve me right, when I went out first time to prepare for the rafting, there must have been something going on as there was a big meeting, the Bay Boys versus the supers. At the time being a newcomer I was not fully aware of their gripes.
I seem to recall there was talk of a bonus from the Boys, due to the dangers and conditions they had to tolerate, but HQ said that there could be no compensation for dangerous working conditions, any dangers must be removed.

2G
(Cloud)

clarkie59
10th September 2012, 19:37
"Being paid an additional sum"
Did they bring this in? as I recall in 83 we were just on normal seagoing salary.

2G

I may be mistaken, as I said too much cider does terrible things to the memory, but I vagually receiving an additional payment. Any one going to answer my question about the hot water?(Pint)

stevekelly10
10th September 2012, 20:03
I may be mistaken, as I said too much cider does terrible things to the memory, but I vagually receiving an additional payment. Any one going to answer my question about the hot water?(Pint)

Electric calorifier ! :)

Jim Mclaughlin
10th September 2012, 20:38
Did anyone see the texaco norway there 1977? It was either brunei or borneo when I left her after discharge in the med. Memorys gone!

stevekelly10
10th September 2012, 21:10
Did anyone see the texaco norway there 1977? It was either brunei or borneo when I left her after discharge in the med. Memorys gone!

I was there late 1978, don't remember the "Norway" being there. I had the misfortune to have the "Great Britain" as one of my ships and the dubious pleasure of re-activating her! That was good for a laugh :)

John Campbell
11th September 2012, 08:36
I was there late 1978, don't remember the "Norway" being there. I had the misfortune to have the "Great Britain" as one of my ships and the dubious pleasure of re-activating her! That was good for a laugh :)

I was Master on "Great Britain" when she was laid up and she was a full of problems. We ran out of fresh water days after arrival and were lucky to save enough to get by by cementing up the scuppers and diverting the daily downpours into the swimming pool. The GB had many leaking vaves and I wondered how long it would take before the ballast stayed where it was intended to stay.

We also had a near disaster when the Agents launch sent out to carry some of the offgoing Indian crew plus baggage sank about twenty feet from the accom ladder. They all made it back but lost a pile of gear and a paying off Indian crew had a pile of gear in those days.
I visited a few other laid up tankers while there and it was always fascinating to see the thousands of dead cockroaches all dehumified.
We visited one of the laid up one of the Tower tankers the" GATX...." I had always wanted to see what the accommodation and general arrangement was like on those vessels. It did not catch on.

I remember the British Gull and the good service and cooperation we had from BP during that experience. Thanks for your post it is good reading.
JC

stevekelly10
11th September 2012, 15:06
I was Master on "Great Britain" when she was laid up and she was a full of problems. We ran out of fresh water days after arrival and were lucky to save enough to get by by cementing up the scuppers and diverting the daily downpours into the swimming pool. The GB had many leaking vaves and I wondered how long it would take before the ballast stayed where it was intended to stay.

We also had a near disaster when the Agents launch sent out to carry some of the offgoing Indian crew plus baggage sank about twenty feet from the accom ladder. They all made it back but lost a pile of gear and a paying off Indian crew had a pile of gear in those days.
I visited a few other laid up tankers while there and it was always fascinating to see the thousands of dead cockroaches all dehumified.
We visited one of the laid up one of the Tower tankers the" GATX...." I had always wanted to see what the accommodation and general arrangement was like on those vessels. It did not catch on.

I remember the British Gull and the good service and cooperation we had from BP during that experience. Thanks for your post it is good reading.
JC

Thanks John, your reply has awakened my "grey matter" somewhat from the dim and distant past. I can recall the incident with the launch now! so I was actually involved in laying the ship up not re-activating as I previously stated. The launch in question I seem to recall was not much better than a large dugout canoe, it hit the bottom of the gangway and virtually split in two! I think it was one of our launches that eventually ferried your crew ashore.
The GATX vessels you refer to were the Carnegie and the Casterbridge. Again both these ships were looked after by my team. The Casterbridge made the GB look good, she had been towed in as she had, had a serious boiler superheater hydrogen fire, resulting in the boiler melting and totally destroyed. I doubt that ship ever sailed again! The ship also had a reputation of being haunted! and when something happened whilst I was onboard her, on my own. I am firmly convinced she was. Scared the living daylights out of me(EEK)
The Carnegie on the other hand wasn't too bad, but your reference to de-humidified cockroches awoke another memory. I could not get the humidity in the accomodation to stay within prescribed limits for more than a day? so I eventually got hold of all the keys for the ship to search the locked rooms for a leak to the sealing. When I opened the beer locker, I found the problem! Numerous cases of Harp Larger had been left onboard and a large number of cans had burst! What was more alarming was that all the cockroches onboard had migrated there. The place was heaving with hundreds of drunken cockroaches all wanting to fight!(Jester)

colin moore
17th September 2012, 20:05
i was j/e on the ranger from nagasaki to lay up in brunei, then did a stint on the gull until november 1980, and loved every minute of it, i was 4/e then, probably the oldest 4/e in the fleet at 31 then. have got photos somewhere of feeding the big lizards on the sunday island jolly with some of the labuan ex pats.

colin moore
17th September 2012, 20:12
you are right a young geordie lad drowned in 1974 his grave is in Labuan and is tended to by shipcare and a guy called marcel deleaga a french man from a company called 2MC
never did understan why his parenta did not want to take him home?????

the lad was on the shore boat, fell and hit his head and sunk like a stone. was recovered the day after under the jetty by divers. he had to be buried the next day, due to local temperatures and his parents were not allowed to take him home as he was allready buried.

sparks69
4th November 2012, 22:06
Does the name Matty Hepple (Lecky) ring any bells ? Good bloke.

John Bryson
7th November 2012, 14:07
Thanks John, your reply has awakened my "grey matter" somewhat from the dim and distant past. I can recall the incident with the launch now! so I was actually involved in laying the ship up not re-activating as I previously stated. The launch in question I seem to recall was not much better than a large dugout canoe, it hit the bottom of the gangway and virtually split in two! I think it was one of our launches that eventually ferried your crew ashore.
The GATX vessels you refer to were the Carnegie and the Casterbridge. Again both these ships were looked after by my team. The Casterbridge made the GB look good, she had been towed in as she had, had a serious boiler superheater hydrogen fire, resulting in the boiler melting and totally destroyed. I doubt that ship ever sailed again! The ship also had a reputation of being haunted! and when something happened whilst I was onboard her, on my own. I am firmly convinced she was. Scared the living daylights out of me(EEK)
The Carnegie on the other hand wasn't too bad, but your reference to de-humidified cockroches awoke another memory. I could not get the humidity in the accomodation to stay within prescribed limits for more than a day? so I eventually got hold of all the keys for the ship to search the locked rooms for a leak to the sealing. When I opened the beer locker, I found the problem! Numerous cases of Harp Larger had been left onboard and a large number of cans had burst! What was more alarming was that all the cockroches onboard had migrated there. The place was heaving with hundreds of drunken cockroaches all wanting to fight!(Jester)

Hi Steve,

I too remember the GATX vessels and I might be able to put your mind at rest concerning the haunting of the Casterbridge. My predecessor, a lovely welshman named Terry Thomas but known by one and all as the Fluid Druid, was convinced the ghost was responsible for the eerie moaning that could be heard on that vessel.
However when I was investigating the reason why I could never keep the humidity down in the engine room I think I discovered the answer to both mysteries. On the boiler platform there was a box like structure with a dogged down lid which looked like a sandbox. When I hammered the dogs loose and opened it up I was surprised to find it was actually a shute which was open to the sea. I never found out what this arrangement was used for, and even though it was above the waterline how any classification society could sanction it. Anyway as the lid was not completely air tight it solved the reason for the increasing humidity. The ghostly noise was then explained by the rise and fall of the water level in the shute acting like a giant organ pipe. Once I re-dogged the lid and applied the sealastic both problems appeared to be cured.

stevekelly10
7th November 2012, 18:35
Hi Steve,

I too remember the GATX vessels and I might be able to put your mind at rest concerning the haunting of the Casterbridge. My predecessor, a lovely welshman named Terry Thomas but known by one and all as the Fluid Druid, was convinced the ghost was responsible for the eerie moaning that could be heard on that vessel.
However when I was investigating the reason why I could never keep the humidity down in the engine room I think I discovered the answer to both mysteries. On the boiler platform there was a box like structure with a dogged down lid which looked like a sandbox. When I hammered the dogs loose and opened it up I was surprised to find it was actually a shute which was open to the sea. I never found out what this arrangement was used for, and even though it was above the waterline how any classification society could sanction it. Anyway as the lid was not completely air tight it solved the reason for the increasing humidity. The ghostly noise was then explained by the rise and fall of the water level in the shute acting like a giant organ pipe. Once I re-dogged the lid and applied the sealastic both problems appeared to be cured.

Hi John

Thanks for that explanation, unfortunately it doesn't explain what happened to me on the Casterbridge. I was onboard by myself, the launch had just dropped me off. I started the CAT generator on deck and if you remember, then you had to enter the ship, with a torch to go down the engineroom, to close the shore breaker on the switchboard to put the lights on! Anyway I was halfway down to the switchboard, when there was an almighty bang and loads of rust started falling down from the ventilation tunking! It was as if someone had hit the trunking with a wheelkey. I turned round, made my way out the accomodation, stopped the generator and called the launch to come back and pick me up, as I had to change my shorts :D