Southern Cross

R893891
30th January 2007, 08:53
I signed on the Southern Cross several days prior to departure on Friday 13th November 1970 (not a good omen).

The voyage was out to Oz via the Panama Canal, then 3 cruises out of Sydney and return to the UK in March 1971.

Being young and naive, I discounted tales that you didn't so much 'sign on' as 'weigh in' on the 'Suffering Cross'.

However the cracks began to appear on sailing day when most of the 'Belfast contingent' of the deck department were in various states of intoxication, thus causing extra work for the rest of us.

Things went from bad to worse during the Atlantic crossing, I was so relieved to plant my feet on terra firma upon arrival at Trinidad.

I stuck the trip out, though not sure how. During the trip there where 3 deaths, a crew member 'disapeared' one night, a passenger died of a heart attack, and there was one other death of which I dont know the circumstances.

I was attacked myself whilst sleeping, the attacker was unaware of the attack the next day due to being on various 'substances'.

During a visit to Suva (on one of the cruises), the catering staff walked off the ship. The band played on for sometime until the Ozzie passengers were no longer waving, the band eventually packed up and went home, as did the stevadores, I never did find out out why they walked off.

During 30 years service at sea I never witnessed anything like the level of violence and drunkeness on that ship, I still have the odd nightmare of this experience.

Having survived the 'ship from hell', I signed up for a correspondence course for 2nd Mates ticket.

Captain Wheatley was the Master on this voyage, a really nice man. What he did to deserve the Cross I really dont know, I hope things were better in his latter career.

When I saw pictures of the ship being scrapped, I had a glass of wine - quite an occasion as I am teetotal!

I'm sure someone somewhere must have a happier experience of the Suffering Cross, but it wasn't me!

john shaw
30th January 2007, 09:05
-----an interesting thread for me. If any one merchant ship was responsible for getting me away to sea it was this ship--- only because she was the only vessel to register deep in my psyche during a harbour pleasure trip of Southampton Water in late July/early Aug 1965 whilst I was an 11year old on holiday. So why, seven years later, did I end up in ore carriers/tramps/tankers?-- but on reflection after reading your entry, perhaps a wise choice after all. I continued to remember, and look out for, that ship ever afterwards-- you've indflicted a deep psychological injury on me now!!!!!

R893891
30th January 2007, 17:33
-- you've indflicted a deep psychological injury on me now!!!!!

My sincerest apologies John! I suppose we all had certain inspirations to set us off on our sea going careers, my inspiration was the film 'The Cruel Sea' (maybe it's me that needs help!).

However, my Father served with Union Castle, my Grandfather served most of his sea going career with the White Star Line and my great Grandfather was also a Mariner, so it was probably 'in the genes'.

My son incidentaly, has no interest in the sea at all (EEK)

John B.
31st January 2007, 08:22
I'm sorry to hear of such a bad experience while in SOUTHERN CROSS, I'm sure many old SX hands will be sharpening their pens in her defence! you cant blame the ship - its the Officers and crew which make a well run ship!!

Incidently I sailed with capt Wheatley in MEGANTIC , he was a popular master and ran a happy efficient ship.

rgds John B.

mcglash
31st January 2007, 09:31
An electrician came to work at a place where I was serving my time and he filled my head full of magic re his time on the Southern Cross. I could hardly wait to Join Shaw Savill,in the hope that I may sail on her, never did though because at my first meeting with the Engineer Super he remarked that I had Motor Man written all over me, funny I thought I had given my self a real good wash that mornig ! -)

dave beaumont
2nd February 2007, 09:01
R 893891 Southern Cross not only ship with crew troubles. My family came out on New Australia, yes S.S.L, in the fifties to Oz and crew were regarded by some as the scum of Southampton. Fights with passengers, fights ashore with police, crew drunk most ports!. My father had to have a police escort off the ship in Sydney as stewards said they were going to get him.( Didnt though.) Must dig out some pics. Then there was the Ocean Maniac, i mean Monarch in the early 70's...was it only SSL passie ships with crew trouble or did P&O or others have crew probs?

nobby s
23rd July 2007, 14:53
Hi R893891, I can relate to your feelings on the "Suffering Cross!" I joined her begining of '63. The trip could be described as 'interesting'. I was about to get married and thought I could make a few bob on a longer trip. Wrong !!! I wont elaborate but I was escorted down the gangplank at 06.00hrs docking morning by a M/A. I was smothered in blood none of which was mine. I paid off Board of Trade 3 days later with the grand sum of £36. I do promise you that being marched off was not my fault and my boss said he would give me a good ref. if I wanted to sign on again. And I got a V.G!!

waiwera
23rd July 2007, 18:41
I did 3 trips on her from 68 to 69. Yes we had the usual problems when you have a crew of around 450 - but at that time anyway she was quite a "happy" trip with many of the crew with many years "time served" on board in all ranks and ratings.

Of course at that time we were still on the strict round the world line voyages - but things may well have changed when she moved to cruising and you could no longer set your clock for the return to Southampton.

Captain Willie Newport was the master at that time. A real gentleman - although very short - needed a box to see over the bridge dodger - but he ran a tight and happy ship.

aleddy
24th July 2007, 02:32
The term 'Belfast Contingent' hurts a bit, though facing reality I have heard the term before so some truth must be attached to it.
There might have been a danger of me becoming part of it but fortunately something else caught my interest and I got out of the possibility shortly after getting out of my teens
I still have a healthy respect for my short period in the Merchant Navy and the many people I came in contact with and do not believe that any of the 'contingent' types would be interested enough to be looking in on or commenting on SN
Cheers
Ted

aleddy
31st August 2007, 05:17
Came into contact recently with a chap who had been an Engineer on Southern Cross many years ago, he was surprised she had lasted so long and was only scrapped in recent years as Ocean Breeze.
His name is John Mawer also known as Limmpet a nick name he picked up on BP Tankers.
John would like to know if anyone can supply him with the Name and Address of the Company which demolished Ocean Breeze/Southern Cross at Chittagong as he is interested in trying to obtain some pieces of memorabilia from her.
Possibly only a long shot or it might be like coal from Titanic.
Cheers
Ted

gadgee
31st August 2007, 15:15
Aleddy
This search may prove difficult because as I am sure you are aware shipbreaking in India/Bangladesh is a thoroughly seedy affair much reviled by environmentalists and human rights campaigners. Consequently I would think that the shipbreakers would be hard to communicate with, without the right contacts. The Shaw Savill Society might be able to help. Brandane is a SN member and has details of the NZ Shaw Savill Society. There is an SS Society in the UK. She was owned by Imperial Majesty Cruise Line of Florida in her final years -maybe they could help:-

http://www.imperialmajesty.com/index.htm

raybnz
31st August 2007, 21:06
I did 3 trips on her from 68 to 69. Yes we had the usual problems when you have a crew of around 450 - but at that time anyway she was quite a "happy" trip with many of the crew with many years "time served" on board in all ranks and ratings.

Of course at that time we were still on the strict round the world line voyages - but things may well have changed when she moved to cruising and you could no longer set your clock for the return to Southampton.

Captain Willie Newport was the master at that time. A real gentleman - although very short - needed a box to see over the bridge dodger - but he ran a tight and happy ship.

Captain Willie Newport was the captain on the Waipawa when I sailed on her. He must have have earned his command of the Southern Cross after this trip although if my memory is right he had commanded her for some time. I found him to be a real nice guy and yes he was a shortish fella.

John.H.Clark
31st August 2007, 21:44
Tales I heard 1959-62 included a claim that she once sailed from Oz with over 1000 female passengers under 25. I was told that with seven passenger decks , there was an unwritten rule about which deck deck officers and cadets socialised, so that they did not encounter each other in difficult situations. This is only gossip that I picked up on Athenic so may not be true. Very different situation there with only 70-80 passngers all middle aged or older. There were occasions when ladies got the worse for cheap gin and we always pointed out that Captaion Heywood would not allow cadets to visit passenger cabins. We were not allowed to drink either but kind stewards would top up our cokes with rum

aleddy
31st August 2007, 23:25
Paul W,
Thanks for that info, will pass it all on to John.
Soon as he mentioned it to me I was unable to see much of a climmer of light at the end of that particular tunnel.
Dave B,
I did some time on P&O's Iberia end of 63 and 64 and there was never any problems, perhaps the presence of the Goanesse greatly weakened the ranks of us troublesome Whites, come to think of it , until about that time Orient Line was all White and there didn't appear to be such troubles on those ships.
Cheers
Ted

Don Meehan
3rd September 2007, 11:06
Here (hopefully) is a photo of myself meeting Capt Willie Newport on Southern Cross in March 1970 en route Sydney-Brisbane.
Mention has been made of the good Captain's shortish stature. My height is 1.83m (about 6ft) as a comparison.
Others I remember from that cruise were Chief Electrician John Dover and a Purser Don Waddell. John Dover became quite a family friend and we used to see him occasionally on Icenic in later years.

Cheers, Don

gadgee
3rd September 2007, 15:17
I am pretty sure I sailed with John Dover on Icenic in 1972. Unfortunately I only kept a record of Deck Officers though.

RGascoyne
3rd September 2007, 19:21
During my time with Union-Castle, there were very few incidents amongst the crew, that ended up in the log, and I believe none involving passengers. I always thought that the Masters-at-Arms had an easy time of it on our ships, as the crews were pretty easy going, even in the Pig and Whistle. I did serve one crew Christmas dinner on Edinburgh Castle and a great and fun time was had by all, but no-one took any liberties or got drunk. Most times, I was in the P&W for cash advances, and those were orderly and no trouble. If stewards did get mad, I heard they might lose some of the silver overboard, but nothing physical.

holmsey
4th September 2007, 20:41
Greetings Paul
John Dover was indeed on your Icenic trip, he was quite a memorable chap, came from a family of bishops if I remember correctly, he was very well spoken and behaved like a perfect gentleman!! Was very lucky with the gee-gees during my time on the Icenic, with many senior officers benefitting by being in his syndicate.
Regards
Jim H

gadgee
4th September 2007, 21:19
Holmsey
Yes of course I remember him now, and can nearly picture him. Not too bad after 35 years!!

mcgrattan
5th September 2007, 10:19
John Dover was relieved of his duties on the Icenic on 3 August 1976. I was his replacement.

Tom McGrattan

holmsey
7th September 2007, 20:53
Greetings Tom
Quite a bland statement "relieved of his duties" please give us a little more info
Regards
Jim H

mcgrattan
8th September 2007, 17:43
Health / Medical reasons.

Tom McGrattan

GWB
9th March 2008, 08:51
(Thumb) I did 10 trips on the Cross and had some of the experiences mentioned, only once did we have any fighting that was when leaving Belfast after dry docking where all deck crew were signed on. If memory serves correct at Southampton half the stewards singed on were shirt lifters. Had a bit of trouble in Tahiti yep the guys got loaded in Quinns Bar and took on the locals. Had couple of deaths on previous voyages, and sailed with lot more women than guys one voyage. As to the engine room donkey men, greasers, and firemen returned voyage after voyage may have been due to Storeman Bill, as he ran a tight crew. never had to log to many of them if the lads did get a bit out of line Bill would cut their overtime after Chief Engineer okayed. She was a great ship and only scraped due to cost of upgrading to US invalid standards. she had no more crew problems than other ships, bear in mind she carried a lot of 10 pound millionaires who thought they were and treated crew as such.
GWB

Morrie Forte
9th March 2008, 10:46
Never a bad moment on the SX. Great food; Norfolk Turkey, Roast Eynsbury Duckling with Thousand Isles Dressiing and slabs of Danish blue after leaving the stokehold at 8 bells.
The Cinema Lounge was a great hang out for us engineers in the early 60's. Guiness and cider being a good starter before graduating to Hotspur Rum and orange juice.
A great ship giving me the fondest of memories.

Dulcibella
18th March 2008, 23:15
I knew Southern Cross in Melbourne, and had many friends who had travelled aboard her... all had good words to say about her. I got to know her better in UK when she was sold by SSL to Ulysses Line, whose office was in London, and renamed Calypso. I was in charge of all her bookings for three years and travelled aboard her a few times, latterly on her final voyage as Calypso when I, my wife and 6 month old baby daughter sailed on her last Baltic Cruise. I found her verycomfortable and a good sea boat. During the time we were on the cruise, in August 1979, there were severe storms in the North Sea and a couple of vessels went down as aresult. It was also the time that Lord Mountbatten was murdered.

Dulcibella

Jeff Taylor
20th March 2008, 14:14
To GWB, in addition to the impending SOLAS upgrades, the other significant reason given for her retirement/scrapping was that they were able to replace her with the more economical diesel ex-Olympia which also had bow thrusters despite being two years older than SX. SX required tugs to dock at Ft. Lauderdale.

sjkiwi63
1st September 2008, 16:47
are there any members here who sailed on the southern cross from southampton in 1962.....i'm desoerate for some information...thanks in anticipation.

Morrie Forte
8th September 2008, 04:58
What sort of info are you desperate for SJ? I sailed on SX around that time.

brandane
23rd September 2008, 22:44
The best webpage for information on Southern Cross (or any other ships) is http://www.maritimematters.com/oceanbreeze1.html ~ gives comprehensive cover of her life.

Jamie Shedden
Shaw Savill Society
New Zealand

John.H.Clark
30th September 2008, 22:55
have you read the book on her building, Spendid sisters I think ?
John

olddog96
8th December 2008, 03:51
/Hi Done 2 trips S/C.march 59 paid off in Liverpool august 59 then another 4 trips Feb 60 to Feb 61. 5 trips in forward dinning room as a winger ,couple of those trips as "locker man". the last trip as lounge stwd. about getting to the Female cabins one had to know where the master at arms were, mostly in the lounge pantry with a glass in their hand. After the first 2 trip was able to stay away from the $10 (pound) migrants so was able to make beer money.All in all was a good run and never much trouble on the ship few minor upset in some ports. I even met Marlon Brando in a beach side bar during Bastille week in Tahiti.
All good times but so long ago. Vern.

M.Brand making "mutiny on the Bounty"

waimea
8th December 2008, 10:10
Southern Cross! not a mention here of Dominion Monarch - Shaw Savill generally had a reputation for the poor behaviour in NZ of their crews - with Blue Star not far behind. Port Line on the other hand were generally well regarded - it might have something to do with company men and men off the pool. Time away from home was not really an excuse as the MANZ run proved.I might add that I experienced similar crews on the Kiwi and Aussie coasts. My experience of Belfast men was no different to any others - good and bad but mostly good. In 22 years at sea I saw a lot of violence-most of it in my 8 years in the RNZN - so work that one out.

Keith Adkins
2nd March 2011, 10:50
I was on the Cross from May 59 to August 60. I was 3rd R/O with Harry Matthews as Chief and Captain Edmeads. I was paid off in Balboa with appendicitis, an operation was offered by the ships surgeon but I wasn't too keen on how steady his hand would be so opted for the American Army Hospital in the Canal Zone. Came home dbs on the Ceramic.
I do remember paying off one trip with the princely sum of 3d and a travel warrant, my parents weren't to impressed with my financial affairs!
From her I did 14 months on a 1939 Shell tanker but then thats another story!

dick palmer
23rd October 2011, 04:50
Tales I heard 1959-62 included a claim that she once sailed from Oz with over 1000 female passengers under 25. I was told that with seven passenger decks , there was an unwritten rule about which deck deck officers and cadets socialised, so that they did not encounter each other in difficult situations. This is only gossip that I picked up on Athenic so may not be true. Very different situation there with only 70-80 passngers all middle aged or older. There were occasions when ladies got the worse for cheap gin and we always pointed out that Captaion Heywood would not allow cadets to visit passenger cabins. We were not allowed to drink either but kind stewards would top up our cokes with rum

John
I sailed on the rich old widow ships as an apprentice/4th/3rd/2nd - Atehnic & Gothic. I also sailed on the SX 1965 as 5th mate / senior apprentice. You had better believe about the girls under 25 going to visit the old country. I know, I was there, and I indulged !!!!!

Island Boatman
17th November 2011, 01:36
I sailed on the Southern Cross from Trinidad to Liverpool in 1960 - as a 7year old kid! It was me, 2 older brothers and aunt, and for 2 days we had a BALL. Then my brother got a spot on his forehead, the ship's doc came and said: chicken pox - quarantine! We spent the next 8 days locked away at the very back of the ship - for us 3 kids it was torture, and I'm sure our aunt didn't love it either! After three days the spot went away but they still wouldn't let us out!

R658336
26th February 2012, 07:56
Tales I heard 1959-62 included a claim that she once sailed from Oz with over 1000 female passengers under 25. I was told that with seven passenger decks , there was an unwritten rule about which deck deck officers and cadets socialised, so that they did not encounter each other in difficult situations. This is only gossip that I picked up on Athenic so may not be true. Very different situation there with only 70-80 passngers all middle aged or older. There were occasions when ladies got the worse for cheap gin and we always pointed out that Captaion Heywood would not allow cadets to visit passenger cabins. We were not allowed to drink either but kind stewards would top up our cokes with rum

Hi John, I note you mention the " Athenic " I was aboard her as AB 60/61,as I remember a happy ship.What were you aboard her . I hope you are well. John White

DURANGO
26th February 2012, 19:09
Hi John, I note you mention the " Athenic " I was aboard her as AB 60/61,as I remember a happy ship.What were you aboard her . I hope you are well. John White Theres a memory the old Athenic I joined her in Auckland with my younger brother for her last voyage from New Zealand we took her to the east coast of America up to Montreal then back to Taiwan to the breakers yard ,T bone steaks all the way sadly enough I was the last man to steer her to her final berth we left Kiwi in july 1969 if my memory serves me right , in fact I wrote a poem about her final voyage best regards Dave .

Reef Knot
26th February 2012, 19:50
John
I sailed on the rich old widow ships as an apprentice/4th/3rd/2nd - Atehnic & Gothic. I also sailed on the SX 1965 as 5th mate / senior apprentice. You had better believe about the girls under 25 going to visit the old country. I know, I was there, and I indulged !!!!!Talk about a contradiction. With a name like "Dick Palmer" what are we supposed to think? (EEK) (Thumb)

R658336
27th February 2012, 08:45
Theres a memory the old Athenic I joined her in Auckland with my younger brother for her last voyage from New Zealand we took her to the east coast of America up to Montreal then back to Taiwan to the breakers yard ,T bone steaks all the way sadly enough I was the last man to steer her to her final berth we left Kiwi in july 1969 if my memory serves me right , in fact I wrote a poem about her final voyage best regards Dave .

Thank you for taking the time to reply to me Dave.
Keep happy keep well.
John.

John.H.Clark
5th March 2012, 10:35
Hi John,
I was one of the three cadets. Were you the AB who used to lift himself off the deck with one arm then lift a bucket of water with a foot ? Impressed lady passengers ! I am sure you are not the AB who fell into the smokeroom while we were alongside in Panama. It was about midnight and he had blood pouring from his head because , he said, he fell out of his bunk. I got the drunken Irish doctor to sew him up. Captain Heywood would not allow crew lady visitors and one night on the Kiwi coast , the third mate made me go to the crew accomadation and ask all the party ladies to go ashore. The lads were kind enough to take their ladies without a complaint. Lots of memories of the ship, including picking up an AB who had fallen on a sugar boat. Or the night that the third mate was so drunk he passed out across the chart table while we off Aruba with ships everywhere,
great days
hope you keep well
John

FIREMANFRED02
9th December 2012, 06:36
Hi To All That Sailed On The Ss Southern Cross. I Joined The X On Voy 33 Signing On As 2nd Refridge 1-3-63 Until 20-5-63. Great Memories Having Met The Girl I Would Later Marry.certainly A Plus Eating In The Engineers Saloon. All The Left Overs Would Come Down On The Dumb Waiter. Trevor Davis

FIREMANFRED02
9th December 2012, 07:01
HI TO ALL THAT SAILED ON THE AMALRIC SIGNED ON AT NAPIER AS THE 2nd REFRIG ON THE 4-8-61 SIGNING OFF IN WELLINGTON ON THE 9-10-62 DAVE FINESTON WAS 1ST FRIG, IAN FRASER 1ST ELEC, GOD WAS C/E. WALLY THE 2ND ENG.
PETE MITCHELL THE 3RD ,I THINK MACCA WAS 4TH AND WAS IT STEVE EDGE AS THE 5TH BUT NOT ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN . CHEERS TREVOR DAVIS

barry john macauley
3rd June 2013, 20:04
I remember I had my interview for Shaw Swiv aboard the Cross in Southampton in 1966. The interviewer was Bill Lewis, one of the two assistant electrical supers at the time. The other was Bob Richardson.The Super super was Jock Hastie who struck fear into the heart of many a 'Leckie. Nevertheless all three were great guys,who it was my pleasure to know.
One story(probably apochryphal), has stuck with me over the years,concerning a new junior engineer joining the Cross. The Engineers accommodation on the ship was not air conditioned, but the cabins were supplied with a sort of scoop arrangement that was pushed out of the porthole to deflect any breeze available into the cabin while the ship was under way. Some sort of flange was affixed to the inboard end to prevent the item disappearing into the tide.
The young Engineer inquired as to the use of this piece of equipment, and was told, by one of the colleagues, that this was to go out of the port once the ship was at sea.
Later during the voyage the young man chanced upon the colleague and informed him that he was unable to get the item out of the port, but had instead thrown it over the side.
I hope this stays with you as it has with me for the past forty odd years.

Brian Brown
4th June 2013, 10:59
A very interesting thread including the reference to one of Shaw Savill Characters...namely John Dover.
My memory of John was his joining TSS Gothic in October 1962 Victory Dock. Allan McDiarmid Ch Eng. Donald McDonald 2nd Eng. John McFarlane 3rd Eng
I believe John had previously served on Northern Star (sea trials + 1st Voyage?) as Chief Electrician.
Regards to all who are able to recapture those far off days...50+ years ago
Brian (Joe) Brown 4th Eng on the above October 1962 trip of the good ship Gothic...

FIREMANFRED02
5th June 2013, 10:05
Hi Barry,
Yes The Dreaded Scoops, I Only Used Mine Once,ended Up With A Bunk Full Of Cig Butts. Me A Non Smoker

Ron Stringer
5th June 2013, 16:44
Hi Barry,
Yes The Dreaded Scoops, I Only Used Mine Once,ended Up With A Bunk Full Of Cig Butts. Me A Non Smoker

The trick was to angle it forward and down. That way you got a steady breeze (but avoided whatever was chucked overboard) and didn't get caught out if you ran into a shower/squall. Only ever sailed on two ships with air-con and found the scoops a God-send on the others.

On one ship without air-con I had a cabin with 'sash windows' that slid up and down like those that used to be common in railway carriages. No such things as scoops on there and it could be stifling in the West Indies in both Summer and Winter. The Radio Room was worse - it was inboard, with just a skylight and no portholes at all.

Wakefield-on-sea
5th January 2014, 22:42
I was an A/Steward on that trip of 1970 and had a great time. We were on strike in Suva as our overtime had been taken away without any reason. Captain Wheatley eventually gave in to our "demands" in time to catch the evening tide.

brandane
9th January 2014, 21:50
Hi there ~ which ship are you referring to when in Suva with Captain Wheatley. I sailed with him on Southern Cross and Arawa.

Cheers Jamie

G Eyre
4th March 2014, 09:49
A very interesting thread including the reference to one of Shaw Savill Characters...namely John Dover.
My memory of John was his joining TSS Gothic in October 1962 Victory Dock. Allan McDiarmid Ch Eng. Donald McDonald 2nd Eng. John McFarlane 3rd Eng
I believe John had previously served on Northern Star (sea trials + 1st Voyage?) as Chief Electrician.
Regards to all who are able to recapture those far off days...50+ years ago
Brian (Joe) Brown 4th Eng on the above October 1962 trip of the good ship Gothic...

With reference to John Dover I never sailed with him but met him in Auckland when he came over to the Alaric to borrow a spare armature for the dough mixer on the Gothic. I opened my door and found this figure in a spectral white boiler suit standing there he introduced himself a ''John Dover Commodore Chief Electrician" He was very well spoken and had a great manner, I said I did not know we had Commodore Chiefs in the Company and he explained by saying that if the Captain of the Gothic could call himself Commodore then it was good enough for him. I asked him to follow me and we could go and get the spare part from the store, he puffed himself up and said "laddie I have no intention of picking up the armature - that's what I brought HIM for" pulling a junior leccy into the cabin, we set off and everything else went off fine.

I did hear that later on had advanced his legend in SSA by impersonating a Herald reporter and with an engineer festooned in cameras bluffing his way onto the Canberra on her maiden voyage into Auckland where he was given a tour of the ship and had cocktails with the Commodore P&O afterwards sending a thank you telegram to P&O Head 0ffices in London. From what I was told he came within a hairs breadth of being fired but somehow survived. I cant vouch for the truth of this but maybe another reader can shed some light on the subject?

G Eyre
4th March 2014, 09:55
Does anyone remember a 3rd Fridge on the S/C by the name of Ted Rivens AKA Shadrack he was Australian and ex Canopic and would have sailed on her in the early 1960's